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Author Topic: Favorite songs about historical events
Adam T
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posted 07 August 2008 09:00 PM      Profile for Adam T     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't know if this topic has been done before. I didn't see it on the front page. If it has been done before, I'd appreciate a link .

Have to start with:
Eric Bogle's
1.Green Fields of France (original name 'No Man's Land')
2.And the Band Played Waltzing Mathilda

The Men They Couldn't Hang
3.The Ghosts of Cable Street

Gordon Lightfoot
4.Black Day In July
5.Canadian Railroad Trilogy
6.The Wreck of the Edmond Fitzgerald.


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Robespierre
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posted 08 August 2008 12:21 AM      Profile for Robespierre     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Patriot Game


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 08 August 2008 12:24 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Hip - "Wheat Kings" (David Milgaard)
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Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 08 August 2008 12:42 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Acadian Driftwood, The Band
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WendyL
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posted 08 August 2008 02:43 AM      Profile for WendyL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Connie Kaldor's Maria's Place/Batoche
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Caissa
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posted 08 August 2008 03:54 AM      Profile for Caissa     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sunday Bloody Sunday.
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jrose
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posted 08 August 2008 05:05 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What a wonderful thread.

In the Aeroplane Over the Sea is a concept album, based on Anne Frank's diary, though it doesn't actually translate into a song about a historical event.

Also:

Ohio by Neil Young

My absolute favourite song about a historical event is That was the President by Phil Ochs. I credit that song for introducing me to much of the music I listen to today. I was working on an assignment in early high school about JFK, so my Dad pulled out his old Phil Och's collection and introduced me to this song, which led to weeks upon weeks of listening to every Ochs' album my dad owned.


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Robespierre
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posted 08 August 2008 06:48 AM      Profile for Robespierre     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Phil Ochs, live 1968 - Joe Hill


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oldgoat
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posted 08 August 2008 07:03 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Handel's Messiah.
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remind
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posted 08 August 2008 07:16 AM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Hip "38 Years Old"

Rita McNeil's "Working Man"


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Scott Piatkowski
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posted 08 August 2008 07:40 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Kiri's Piano by James Keelaghan is a poignant memoir of the internment of Japanese-Canadians, told from the point of view of the person tagging their belongings for auction.


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Scott Piatkowski
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posted 08 August 2008 07:47 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lard Tunderin' Jeezus:
Acadian Driftwood, The Band

Definitely my favourite song by The Band, but also egregiously inaccurate from a historical perspective. The expulsion of Acadiens preceded "what went down on the Plains of Abraham". Indeed, the British learned from their experiment in ethnic cleansing and consciously decided to treat the French population of a conquered Quebec in a more benevolent manner.


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Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 08 August 2008 07:57 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good catch. I'd never thought about it in terms of historical accuracy.
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Blairza
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posted 08 August 2008 09:02 AM      Profile for Blairza     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Lonesome Death of Hattie Caroll,
Hurricane,
Who Killed Davey Moore By Bob Dylan

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Blairza
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posted 08 August 2008 09:14 AM      Profile for Blairza     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Chumbawamba's album English Rebel songs 1381-1914

This a capella Album was re-recorded in 2003.

Not all the songs are about specific events, but it is a gorgeous album and a treasure trove of English Protest songs going back to Wat Tyler. The Band also did a cassette album about the miners strike of 84-85 but alas it is out of print and I've not heard it.


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Robespierre
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posted 08 August 2008 09:28 AM      Profile for Robespierre     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Patty Hearst - Stereo Total


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Papal Bull
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posted 08 August 2008 09:31 AM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
War of 1812
From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 08 August 2008 09:35 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A few weeks ago I drove over a bridge in old Vancouver town...

quote:

Nineteen scarlett roses the chaplin spread around
In the waters of Berard Inlet in old Vancouver town

When the bridge came tumbling down
When the bridge came tumbling down
Nineteen men were drowned
In June of 1958
In old Vancouver town

There were seventy-nine men working
To build this brand new bridge
To span the second and narrows
And connect up with the ridge
Till a big wind hit the bridge
And the bridge came tumbling down
And nineteen men were drowned
The medical corp couldn't be too sure of the rest of the men they found

In among the twisted girders one man realized
How last night he'd been dreaming and saw before his eyes
The big wind on the rise
And the bridge came tumbling down
And nineteen steelmen drowned, and he saw the fright of the darkest night
In old Vancouver town

With frogmen in the water by the cutting torches glow
They fought to save the steelmen
From certain death below and pain we'll never know
When the bridge came tumbling down
And nineteen men were drowned, and sixty more that came ashore
So thankful they were found

It often makes you wonder
In strength who has the edge
The longest steel beam structure
That spans the highest ridge
For the men that built the bridge
For the bridge came tumbling down
And nineteen men were drowned
But the other men came back again
To lay the new beams down

Now if your ever crossing
This mighty bridge sublime
And nineteen scarlett roses pass before your mind
Remember and be kind
The bridge came tumbling down
Ansd nineteen men were drowned
So you could ride to the other side
Of old Vancouver town

So you could ride to the other side
Of old Vancouver town


[ 08 August 2008: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


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WendyL
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posted 08 August 2008 09:50 AM      Profile for WendyL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Just about all of Johnny Clegg & Savuka's stuff:
-Asimbonanga
-Scatterlings of Africa
-Third World Child
-Berlin Wall
-Missing
-Inevitable Consequence of Progress
and on and on

And Phranc has done some amazing things:
-The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll
-Caped Crusader (hahaha)
-Mary Hooley

And Claudia Schmidt
-Hip To Be Homeless


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WendyL
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posted 08 August 2008 09:51 AM      Profile for WendyL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sorry Blairza, you already mentioned The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll
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sgm
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posted 08 August 2008 10:10 AM      Profile for sgm     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Randy Newman's 'The Great Nations of Europe.'

quote:
The Great Nations of Europe
Had gathered on the shore
They'd conquered what was behind them
And now they wanted more
So they looked to the mighty ocean
And took to the western sea
The great nations of Europe in the sixteenth century

Hide your wives and daughters
Hide the groceries too
Great nations of Europe coming through



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WendyL
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posted 08 August 2008 10:21 AM      Profile for WendyL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A rousing tribute to Margaret Thatcher by Sinead O'Connor -- Black Boys On Mopeds.
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Paul Gross
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posted 08 August 2008 10:28 AM      Profile for Paul Gross   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Dylan's "with God on our side" (1964, presumably "inspired" by the song "The Patriot Game") and Och's "I ain't marching anymore" (1965) are similar litanies of American wars. Both songs predate awareness of the Vietnam war but the songs structure makes it easy to add verses about Vietnam, Iraq, etc.

http://bob-dylan.com/moderntimes/songs/withgod.html

quote:
Oh the history books tell it
They tell it so well
The cavalries charged
The Indians fell
The cavalries charged
The Indians died
Oh the country was young
With God on its side.
...
Oh the First World War, boys
It closed out its fate
The reason for fighting
I never got straight
But I learned to accept it
Accept it with pride
For you don't count the dead
When God's on your side.
...
I've learned to hate Russians
All through my whole life
If another war starts
It's them we must fight
To hate them and fear them
To run and to hide
And accept it all bravely
With God on my side.

But now we got weapons
Of the chemical dust
If fire them we're forced to
Then fire them we must
One push of the button
And a shot the world wide
And you never ask questions
When God's on your side.


I Ain't marching anymore

quote:

Oh I marched to the battle of New Orleans
At the end of the early British war
The young land started growing
The young blood started flowing
But I ain't marchin' anymore

For I've killed my share of Indians
In a thousand different fights
I was there at the Little Big Horn
I heard many men lying
I saw many more dying
But I ain't marchin' anymore
...
For I flew the final mission in the Japanese sky
Set off the mighty mushroom roar
When I saw the cities burning
I knew that I was learning
That I ain't marchin' anymore



[ 08 August 2008: Message edited by: Paul Gross ]


From: central Centretown in central Canada | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
unionist
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posted 08 August 2008 01:17 PM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I loved this since I first heard it. It was written by Peggy Seeger and Ewan McColl, made more famous by Peter, Paul, and Mary, and re-done by U2 (I couldn't find one single place on the internet where they actually got the lyrics spelled right in full, so here's one that's close):

quote:
In the town of Spring Hill, Nova Scotia,
Down in the heart of the Cumberland Mine,
There's blood on the coal and miners lie
In the roads that never saw sun or sky
Roads that never saw sun or sky.

Down at the coal face the miner's workin'
Rattle of the belt and the cutter's blade
Crumble of rock and the walls close round
Living and the dead men two miles down
Living and the dead men two miles down

Twelve men lay two miles from the pitshaft
Listen for the drillin' of a rescue team
Six hundred feet of coal and slag
Hope imprisoned in a three-foot seam
Hope imprisoned in a three-foot seam

Eight days passed and some were rescued
Leaving the dead to lie alone
All their lives they dug their graves
Two miles of earth for a markin' stone
Two miles of earth for a markin' stone

In the town of Spring Hill you don't sleep easy
Often the Earth will tremble and groan
When the Earth is restless, miners die
Bone and blood is the price of coal
Bone and blood is the price of coal.


More about Springhill here.

And if you search on YouTube you might find a live performance. You really need to hear this if you haven't already done so.


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triciamarie
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posted 08 August 2008 01:49 PM      Profile for triciamarie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Eisler on the go", Billy Bragg, words by Woody Guthrie -- can't believe that Mermaid Avenue record is 10 years old now... song is about Hanns Eisler's blacklisting and deportation during the cold war, and Woody's just not sure what to do if he gets called before the House Committee on Un-American Activities.

quote:
Eisler on the go, Eisler on the move
Brother is on the vinegar truck
and I don't know what I'll do

I don't know what I'll do,
I don't know what I'll do
Eisler's on the come and go
and I don't know what I'll do

Eisler on the farm, Eisler on the town
Sister in the tickly bush
and I don't know what I'll do

Eisler on the boat, Eisler on the ship
Daddy on the henhouse roof
and I don't know what I'll do

Eisler in the jailoe, Eisler back at home,
Rankin scratch his head and cry
and I don't know what I'll do

Eisler him write music, Eisler him teach school,
Truman him don't play so good
and I don't know what I'll do


(Sounds better when you hear it.)


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 08 August 2008 04:29 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

Tri Yann - Pelot d'Hennebont

quote:
Ma chère maman je vous écris
Que nous sommes entrés dans Paris
Que je sommes déjà caporal
Et serons bientôt général

A la bataille, je combattions
Les ennemis de la nation
Et tous ceux qui se présentions
A grand coups d'sabres les émondions

Le roi Louis m'a z'appelé
C'est "sans quartier" qu'il m'a nommé
Mais "sans quartier", c'est point mon nom
J'lui dit : "J'm'appelle Pelot d'Hennebont"

J'y aquiris un biau ruban
Et je n'sais quoi au goût d'argent
Il dit : "Boute ça sur ton habit
Et combats toujours l'ennemi"

Faut qu'ce soye quèqu'chose de précieux
Pour que les autres m'appellent "monsieur"
Et foutent lou main à lou chapiau
Quand ils veulent conter au Pelot

Ma mère si j'meurs en combattant
J'vous enverrais ce biau ruban
Et vous l'foutrez à votre fusiau
En souvenir du gars Pelot

Dites à mon père, à mon cousin
A mes amis que je vais bien
Je suis leur humble serviteur
Pelot qui vous embrasse le cœur



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Robespierre
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posted 08 August 2008 04:38 PM      Profile for Robespierre     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Damn hippies! No matter what the century, they're unwitting dupes for evil malcontents disguised as folk singers.

When will they ever learn? When will they ever learn?


From: Raccoons at my door! | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 08 August 2008 06:41 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
In 1649
To St. George’s Hill,
A ragged band they called the Diggers
Came to show the people’s will
They defied the landlords
They defied the laws
They were the dispossessed reclaiming what was theirs ...

The one and only Billy Bragg in what sounds like a studio version of Leon Rosselson's song.

Here's a Leon Rosselson version ...

... and here is Dick Gaughan with a fine version ...

quote:

We come in peace they said
To dig and sow
We come to work the lands in common
And to make the waste ground grow
This earth divided
We will make whole
So it will be
A common treasury for all

The sin of property
We do disdain
No man has any right to buy and sell
The earth for private gain
By theft and murder
They took the land
Now everywhere the walls
Spring up at their command

They make the laws
To chain us well
The clergy dazzle us with heaven
Or they damn us into hell
We will not worship
The God they serve
The God of greed who feed the rich
While poor folk starve

We work we eat together
We need no swords
We will not bow to the masters
Or pay rent to the lords
Still we are free
Though we are poor
You Diggers all stand up for glory
Stand up now

From the men of property
The orders came
They sent the hired men and troopers
To wipe out the Diggers’ claim
Tear down their cottages
Destroy their corn
They were dispersed
But still the vision lingers on

You poor take courage
You rich take care
This earth was made a common treasury
For everyone to share
All things in common
All people one
We come in peace
The orders came to cut them down


[ 08 August 2008: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 08 August 2008 07:10 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's a tune about that bloodthirsty git, Oliver Cromwell.
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Webgear
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posted 08 August 2008 07:21 PM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My favorite song about Napoleon Bonaparte


Boney was a Warrior


Boney was a warrior
Away, a-yah!
A warrior and a terrier
Jean Francois!

Boney fought the Russians
Away, a-yah!
The Russians and the Prussians.
Jean Francois!

Moscow was a-blazing
Away, a-yah!
And Boney was a-raging.
Jean Francois!

Boney went to Elba
Away, a-yah!
Boney he came back again.
Jean Francois!

Boney went to Waterloo
Away, a-yah!
There he got his overthrow.
Jean Francois!

Then they took him off again
Away, a-yah!
Aboard the Billy Ruffian.
Jean Francois!

He went to Saint Helena,
Away, a-yah!
There he was a prisoner,
Jean Francois!

Boney broke his heart and died
Away, a-yah!
Away in Saint Helena
Jean Francois!

And a good sailing tune for those pirate types


The Coast of High Barbary

There was a gallant English ship
A-sailing on the sea,
Blow high, blow low,
and so say we;
And her Captain he was searching
For a pirate enemy,
Cruising down along the coast
Of the High Barbaree.

"Look ahead, look astern,
Look a-weather and a-lee,"
Blow high, blow low,
and so say we;
"Aloft there at the masthead
Just see what you can see,"
Cruising down along the coast
Of the High Barbaree.

"There's nought upon the stern,
There's nought upon the lee,"
Blow high, blow low, and so say we;
"But there's a lofty ship to windward
And she's sailing fast and free,"
Cruising down along the coast
Of the High Barbaree.

"O hail her! O hail her!"
Our gallant Captain cried,
Blow high, blow low,
and so say we;
"Are you a man-o-war
Or a privateer?" said he,
Cruising down along the coast
Of the High Barbaree.

"O I am not a man-o-war
Nor privateer," said he;
Blow high, blow low,
and so say we;
"But I'm a salt-sea pirate
Whose a-looking for his fee,"
Cruising down along the coast
Of the High Barbaree.

O 'twas broadside to broadside
A long time lay we,
Blow high, blow low,
and so say we;
Until we shot her masts away
And blew them in the sea,
Cruising down along the coast
Of the High Barbaree.


From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 08 August 2008 07:45 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If you really are sittin' in Montgomery's Tavern, then maybe you could come up with something that honours Mackenzie's rebels. Surely there's at least one such song?

Edited to add: Mind you, I've always had a inexplicable fondness for the music around the fictional Lt. Sharpe ...

quote:
Old Wellington, he scratched his bum.
He says, "Boney lad, thee's had thee fun."
My riflemen will win the day
Over the hills and far away.

... which is a verse from the following ...

quote:

Here's forty shillings on the drum
For those who volunteer to come,
To 'list and fight the foe today
Over the Hills and far away

[Chorus]

O'er the hills and o'er the main
Through Flanders, Portugal and Spain
King George commands and we obey
Over the hills and far away


Sharpe's Eagle - just the last minute or so. Never mind the mushy scene that precedes the song.

[ 08 August 2008: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Webgear
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posted 08 August 2008 07:58 PM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have a poem/song from the era somewhere in my research notes on my family’s history in the Toronto area from that time period.

I should make an electronic copy and post it here in the near future.


From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 08 August 2008 08:00 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, I've only had a couple of drinks so far, but here goes:

[QUOTE] Away, away, with fyfe and drum,
Here we come, full of rum,
Looking for women to pat on the bum
In the North Atlantic Squadron.

The firefighters have lots of fire,
They never, never seem to tire
Of pulling their hose, and pulling their wire
In the North Atlantic Squadron.

...and &tc.


The North Atlantic Squadron

[ 10 August 2008: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 08 August 2008 08:09 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think you need a dog's nose to go with such a song. At least that's what they say over here.
From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Webgear
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posted 08 August 2008 08:31 PM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Yukon Drinking Contest

To Whitehorse in the Yukon, the year of Forty-Nine
Came a stranger from down-country, and it wasn’t Clementine,
Nor was it Rober Service, nor Dangerous Dan McGrew,
It was Robert Andrew Annis, famous maker of home-brew.

Now in Whitehorse things are rugged, tough and tumble is the game,
And when Annis hit the city, even Hell seemed nice and tame,
And the huskies took for cover, their tails between their legs,
While the Crees grabbed up their Klootches and took off for Winnipeg.

So Annis looked around him and beat upon his chest
Said he – By God, I’m Thirsty! Where in hell’s the Sgt’s Mess?
And he forked the nearest Grizzly, the happened to go by,
And lit out for Upper Whitehorse, with fire in his eye.

Well the Sgt’s Mess at Whitehorse ain’t no home for aged folks,
And there’s liquor there a-plenty if you’ve money in your poke,
And when Annis came a-roaring, astride that Grizzly bear,
By mistake we threw out Annis, and gave the bear a chair.

Now of course this kind of treatment makes Annis pretty riled
So we rectified our error and brought him back inside,
And we gave them both a bottle of our strongest Duggans Dew
And inside of fifteen minutes that blasted bear was stewed,

But not so brother Annis; with his face aglow with pride
He tossed down a gulp of Duggans and said he, “I’ll now defy,
A man within this blasted Mess, this den of iniquity!
To place his feet upon the bar, and take drink for drink with me.”

And there were some mighty drinkers, around the bar that night,
But their thirst was promptly scuttled, when they saw that bear get tight.
So they sat in scowling silence, and with their glasses toyed,
One man only rose among them, and his name was Scotty Boyd.

Said Boyd, “My dear friend Annis, your challenge I’ll accept;
And I’ll drink you ‘neath the table, ere the midnight sun has set.
You’ll regret your base presumption, to challenge such as me
For I’ve been drinking liquor since I was THURTEE THREE.”

And so they threw aside their coats, and toed up to the bar
And the Steward poured the liquor, and the first drink was straight OLD PAR
Then he poured another snifter of Hudsons Overproof,
And the groans of those two drinkers, tore the shingles off the roof.
And so they drank for hours, these two animated stills,
While the Midnight sun sank slowly, behind the distant hills,
And they were both reeling blindly, in an alcoholic haze,
And ‘twas plainly seen, the battle had entered its last phase.

At last in desperation, Scotty said unto the crowd,
“I may be slightly pickled, but my head is yet unbowed,
I’ll out drink this damned Beat Trainer, this Blotter Bladdered Souse;
Put them on the counter, Steward, one of each that’s in the house.”

In that last and final effort, as the sun began to set
Each man tried to do his damndest to win that drinking bet,
But alas for poor old Scotty, when the final glass was drunk
He collapsed upon a sofa, he was drunker than a skunk.

So they raised the hand of Annis, in the sign of Victory
As a drinker he’s unbeated, and his record still is free,
And if you’re e’er in Whitehorse, you will hear the story there
O when ROBERT ANDREW ANNIS, out drank SCOTTY and the bear.


From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
triciamarie
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12970

posted 09 August 2008 05:58 AM      Profile for triciamarie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:
Well, I've only had a couple of drinks so far, but here goes:


Those are some pretty obnoxious lyrics there al-Qa'bong. Any sober second thoughts about posting that shit on this board?


From: gwelf | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Ghislaine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 14957

posted 09 August 2008 06:11 AM      Profile for Ghislaine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:
The native girls are all misfits,
They have no teeth, they have no tits,
No wonder they give us the shits
In the North Atlantic Squadron.


Mods - this is sexist and racist.


From: L'Î-P-É | Registered: Feb 2008  |  IP: Logged
martin dufresne
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posted 09 August 2008 06:12 AM      Profile for martin dufresne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The current historical event is that we are about to have a world war and the men among us are already smelling blood.. and singing!
From: "Words Matter" (Mackinnon) | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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Babbler # 3807

posted 09 August 2008 09:26 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Mods - this is sexist and racist.

No kidding?

It's a 65-year old sailors' drinking song. Think of it as an historical document.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
TemporalHominid
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Babbler # 6535

posted 09 August 2008 09:34 AM      Profile for TemporalHominid   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Strange Fruit


From: Under a bridge, in Foot Muck | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
RevolutionPlease
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 14629

posted 09 August 2008 10:00 AM      Profile for RevolutionPlease     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Public Enemy - Son of a Bu$h

code:
  


From: Aurora | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged
aka Mycroft
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6640

posted 09 August 2008 11:57 AM      Profile for aka Mycroft     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ghosts of Cable Street by the Men They Couldn't Hang
code:


From: Toronto | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
triciamarie
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12970

posted 09 August 2008 01:24 PM      Profile for triciamarie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:
It's a 65-year old sailors' drinking song. Think of it as an historical document.

A 65-year old sailors' drinking song rife with vicious misogyny, racism and homophobia is your favourite historical song?

Really.


From: gwelf | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
remind
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Babbler # 6289

posted 09 August 2008 01:37 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by martin dufresne:
The current historical event is that we are about to have a world war and the men among us are already smelling blood.. and singing!
Interesting statement, and I am afraid given the recent posts here you are correct.

On both accounts!


From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Ken Burch
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8346

posted 09 August 2008 02:11 PM      Profile for Ken Burch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
James Connolly
(Patrick Galvin)

Where oh where is our James Connolly ?
Where oh where is that gallant man ?
He is gone to organise the Union
That working men they may yet be free.

Where oh where is the Citizen Army ?
Where oh where is that gallant band ?
They've gone to join the great rebellion
That working men they might yet be free.

Oh who then who will lead the van ?
Oh who then who will lead the van ?
Who but our James Connolly
The hero of the working man.

Who will carry high the burning flag ?
Who will carry high the burning flag ?
Who but our James Connolly
Could carry high the burning flag.

They carried him up to the jail
They carried him up to the jail
And they shot him down on a bright May morning
And quickly laid him in his grave.

Who mourns the death of this great man ?
Who mourns the death of this great man ?
Oh bury me down in yon green garden
With union men on every side.

So they buried him down in yon green garden
With union men on every side
They swore they would form a mighty union
That James Connolly's name might be filled with pride.

Where oh where is our James Connolly ?
Where oh where is that gallant man ?
He is gone to organise the Union
That working men they may yet be free.


From: A seedy truckstop on the Information Superhighway | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Webgear
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Babbler # 9443

posted 09 August 2008 04:55 PM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Us and Them
By Pink Flyod


Us, and them
And after all were only ordinary men.
Me, and you.
God only knows its noz what we would choose to do.
Forward he cried from the rear
And the front rank died.
And the general sat and the lines on the map
Moved from side to side.
Black and blue
And who knows which is which and who is who.
Up and down.
But in the end its only round and round.
Havent you heard its a battle of words
The poster bearer cried.
Listen son, said the man with the gun
Theres room for you inside.

I mean, theyre not gunna kill ya, so if you give em a quick short,
Sharp, shock, they wont do it again. dig it? I mean he get off
Lightly, cos I wouldve given him a thrashing - I only hit him once!
It was only a difference of opinion, but really...i mean good manners
Dont cost nothing do they, eh?

Down and out
It cant be helped but theres a lot of it about.
With, without.
And wholl deny its what the fightings all about?
Out of the way, its a busy day
Ive got things on my mind.
For the want of the price of tea and a slice
The old man died.


From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 09 August 2008 05:19 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
A 65-year old sailors' drinking song rife with vicious misogyny, racism and homophobia is your favourite historical song?

Really.


No, not really; but while you're carefully reading the thread title, why don't you also pull the twig out of your butt?


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 09 August 2008 05:49 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Well, I've only had a couple of drinks so far, but here goes:

Jesus H. Murphy al-Qa'bong, that song is ONLY sung by people who have had a few drinks, and was originaly compiled by people who had had a few drinks. My older brother in the Air Force taught it to me when I was twelve.

It ain't babble material, man. We're for the most part not 65 year old sailors.

(also, you missed a couple of verses)


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
jester
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11798

posted 09 August 2008 06:43 PM      Profile for jester        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
(also, you missed a couple of verses)

With oft quoted words of Alexander Pope lending guidance, it is with some trepadation that I venture to add to this discussion.

While this ditty,in its many variations has some historical context, the context is of an era when juvenile disregard for any perspective other than King and Country ran rampant.

It is reminiscent of an era where not only indiginous peoples and 'colonials' were discriminated against but also the progeny of colonial administrators, factotums and remittance men who were not 'engish born', meaning sending the pregnant wife back to Blighty to give birth.

This colonial mindset predates the ditty itself but the unwitting acceptance of these colonial values,or lack of values, by those who enthusiastically contribute to its continued rendition speaks to the lack of comprehension of the hurt these types of dittys inflict on the subject of the verses.

I suppose it is similar to nursury rhymes that today do not transmit the nasty intent of the rhymes as composed. Stupid sheeple still shout out these sorts of dittys as part of a process to furthur a group identity without any concept of the group they entreat.


From: Against stupidity, the Gods themselves contend in vain | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 09 August 2008 06:44 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Some guys at the Legion told me there were pages of similar verses to that song, among others, compiled somewhere.

How's this one?


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Robespierre
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 15340

posted 09 August 2008 06:47 PM      Profile for Robespierre     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
American Witch is a song about the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, written and performed by Ron Zombie. We here at Babble could have probably helped out Ron with some additional historically interesting lyrics, however, I like the song because Ron Zombie is very popular and reaches a large audience who usually are bombarded by the music industry with apolitical crap. At least this song refers to a criminal act by government against innocent persons in early North American history. It has the potential to spark the desire for further inquiry into real politics.

American Witch

Body of a monkey and the feet of a cock,
Dragged from her home on the killing rock,
Black dog dying on the weather vain,
The Devil's in a cat and the baby's brain,

[Chorus]
The End - The End of The American,
The End - The End of The American,
The End - The End of The American Witch,

Alone on the hill and ready to die,
Cancer of darkness - blacken eye,
The mark of the wolf and the sign of the calf,
Angels bleed down above the raft,

We all pray for 20 innocents,
We all bow down 20 innocents,
We all hang high - 20 innocents,
We all accused - 20 innocents,

[Chorus]

Do you want to know where their dreams come from?
Some showed the faith and some showed none.

We all pray for 20 innocents,
We all bow down 20 innocents,
We all hang high - 20 innocents,
We all accused - 20 innocents,

[Chorus]

Do you want to know where their dreams come from?
Some showed the faith and some showed none.

The End - The End of The American Witch
--

Martha Carrier, A Puritan Feminist? Is a short essay that explains general events of the Salem Witch Trails, and some specific details about an accused woman who refused to confess under duress.

quote:
In refusing to submit to the wishes of the unanimously male judges, reverends and politicians who gave the hysteria legitimacy, Martha did something women in Puritan America rarely dared; stand up to male authority figures wielding not only physical power, but spiritual authority. The harsh sentence of death handed down to witches refusing to confess reflected the threat to the status quo evident in Martha’s act of protest. It could be argued, then, that Martha Carrier was not only an early feminist , but a martyr defending her rights and honor against false accusation and tyranny.

From: Raccoons at my door! | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged
Krago
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3064

posted 09 August 2008 09:21 PM      Profile for Krago     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If you're looking for a 65-year-old "historical document" that is babble-worthy, ya gotta go with this old chestnut:

object width="425" height="344">

We're Gonna Hang Out Our Washing on the Siegfried Line

Not only does it extol the virtues of defeating fascism, it's about men doing laundry!


P.S. Rob Zombie is "very popular"? Who knew?

[ 09 August 2008: Message edited by: Krago ]


From: The Royal City | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Robespierre
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Babbler # 15340

posted 09 August 2008 11:41 PM      Profile for Robespierre     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Krago:
If you're looking for a 65-year-old "historical document" that is babble-worthy, ya gotta go with this old chestnut:

We're Gonna Hang Out Our Washing on the Siegfried Line

Not only does it extol the virtues of defeating fascism, it's about men doing laundry!

P.S. Rob Zombie is "very popular"? Who knew?


It's a great song. And, I love all of the YouTube videos of turntables, ahaha. The camcorder person in this one is very professional, only shakes a little.

I have a pair of earbud-style headphones that look like standard Apple iPod issue, but they are not. They are effective as earplugs, however. When I'm on a city bus and someone starts yaking in a loud voice on their mobil phone, I have put the earphones on and started singing a song eventhough I don't connect it to a MP3 player---I just sing. Loud. Works really well to annoy the mobile phone abuser.

Well, that song you posted would be excellent for me. I must memorize it.


From: Raccoons at my door! | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged
triciamarie
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12970

posted 10 August 2008 05:25 AM      Profile for triciamarie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:
while you're carefully reading the thread title, why don't you also pull the twig out of your butt?

Right. Thanks for your concern there al-Qa'bong.

Speaking of assholes... can we assume that you do like the song, or you wouldn't have posted it?


From: gwelf | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 10 August 2008 07:57 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Upon closer look at the posts this morning,
al-Qa'bong your response to triciamarie was inappropriate, and I think I'll lose some of the more egregious verses out of that song.

The song was put together in the early 40's by teenagars who were away from home, told to act like men with no guidance as to what that was, and were cold lonely and terrified. To that extent it's an interesting historic artifact.

Trouble is, not much has changed.


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 10 August 2008 07:57 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
removing double post

[ 10 August 2008: Message edited by: oldgoat ]


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 10 August 2008 08:19 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The song was put together in the early 40's by teenagars who were away from home, told to act like men with no guidance as to what that was, and were cold lonely and terrified. To that extent it's an interesting historic artifact.

Thanks for posting that, springchicken.

Before logging on today I was pondering the socio-anthropological reasons for the creation of such a song ("King and Country" didn't come to mind, but fear of death, hatred of officers, seeing the same faces day after day, extremely limited encounters with women, and not much recreation other than rum, playing cards and having dry socks did) and was happy to see that someone else thought about this,

How about I remove the lyrics and replace them with a link?


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 10 August 2008 08:28 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Say, waitaminnut!

This sounds like an an hominem attack!

quote:
Speaking of assholes...

From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 10 August 2008 08:56 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anyway, back to the music.

During the war, the German Ministry of Propaganda recorded US/English pop tunes with altered lyrics in a goofy attempt to undermine Allied morale.

Here's one example:

I Double Dare You, by Charlie and his Orchestra

More musical Nazi propaganda at this page

[Edited to add: even though I posted Nazi propaganda, I am not now, nor have I ever been, a member of the Nazi Party]

[ 10 August 2008: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 10 August 2008 07:17 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A great song about the terrible event that killed the 1960s - Ohio:


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 11 August 2008 08:25 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That "Zadok the Priest," that Handel wrote for the coronation of King George II ain't bad neither:


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 11 August 2008 08:41 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Krago:
If you're looking for a 65-year-old "historical document" that is babble-worthy, ya gotta go with this old chestnut:


We're Gonna Hang Out Our Washing on the Siegfried Line

Not only does it extol the virtues of defeating fascism, it's about men doing laundry!


P.S. Rob Zombie is "very popular"? Who knew?


Nice call!

Here's another:

George Formby's Imagine Me on the Maginot Line.

[ 11 August 2008: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8273

posted 11 August 2008 08:50 AM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My favourite anti-war song.
From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 11 August 2008 08:58 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"The Draft Dodger Rag" by Phil Ochs

Oh, I'm just a typical American boy
From a typical American town.
I believe in God and Senator Dodd
An' in keepin' old Castro down.
And when it came my time to serve
I knew better dead than red,
But when I got to my old draft board,
Buddy, this is what I said:

Sarge, I'm only eighteen,
I got a ruptured spleen
And I always carry a purse.
I got eyes like a bat,
My feet are flat,
My asthma's getting worse.
Yes, think of my career,
My sweetheart dear,
My poor old invalid aunt.
Besides, I ain't no fool,
I'm a-goin' to school,
And I'm a-workin' in a defense plant.

I got a dislocated disc
And a racked-up back.
I'm allergic to flowers and bugs.
And when the bombshell hits,
I get epileptic fits,
And I'm addicted to a thousand drugs.
I got the weakness woes,
I can't touch my toes,
I can hardly reach my knees,
And if the enemy came close to me
Why, I'd probably start to sneeze.

Yes, I'm only eighteen,
I got a ruptured spleen
And I always carry a purse.
I got eyes like a bat,
My feet are flat,
My asthma's getting worse.
Yes, think of my career,
My sweetheart dear,
My poor old invalid aunt.
Besides, I ain't no fool,
I'm a-goin' to school,
And I'm a-workin' in a defense plant.

I hate Chou En Lai,
And I hope he dies,
But one thing you gotta see:
That someone's gotta go over there
And that someone isn't me.
So I wish you well,
Sarge, give 'em Hell,
Kill me a thousand or so.
And if you ever get a war
Without blood and gore
I'll be the first to go.

Yes, I'm only eighteen,
I got a ruptured spleen
And I always carry a purse.
I got eyes like a bat,
My feet are flat,
My asthma's getting worse.
Yes, think of my career,
My sweetheart dear,
My poor old invalid aunt.
Besides, I ain't no fool,
I'm a-goin' to school,
And I'm a-workin' in a defense plant.


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 11 August 2008 09:01 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
After a fair bit of digging, I came up with this interesting and somewhat related thread from way back in ancient times. Enjoy!
From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
TemporalHominid
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6535

posted 11 August 2008 09:25 AM      Profile for TemporalHominid   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:

There's a cold wind blowin' through the old east side
it cuts with the devil's curse
they're turning our people into the streets, while
the landlords line their purse
with the greenback dollar of the tourist trade
there's a fortune to be had
make way for the out-of-towners, for
the tenants it's just too bad
this appears to be their attitude.
kick 'em until they're down
they're only welfare cases and
pensioners and they're easily pushed around

we've invited the world to come and stay
and celebrate the fair
I wonder if the world will understand
the homeless walkin' there.

I'm alright jack, and how 'bout you?
I'm gonna catch this wave that's rollin' through
and turn a trick or two
I'm alright jack, no flies on me!
I'm within my rights, my conscience is clear
I am the profiteer

the sign says closed for renovation
this is a con we all see through
it spreads like a poison through the town,
monkey see and monkey do
turn your slum into a mine, squeeze 'em
hard for every dime
the people will paint your criminals, but
you can't see the crime

- chorus -

they're all bastards with no morals,
overcome by a pitiful greed
for years they've taken rent from
the tenants, now they bite the hand that feeds
they've easily turned a blind eye to
all pain and despair
and I pray when they rush is over that
their gold mines all stand bare

I'm alright jack and how about you?
gonna catch me a wave that's
rollin' through and turn a trick or two
I'm alright jack, no flies on me!!
I'm within my rights, my conscience clear
I am the profiteer



-Spirit of the West's the Profiteer

about Vancouver's Expo 86 and the displacement of the homeless and working poor.

Sounds familiar somehow?


From: Under a bridge, in Foot Muck | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 11 August 2008 09:30 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That is a great thread, oldgoat. I had been thinking of adding D-Day Dodger (oops, it mentions "dames" though) to this thread, but see that skdadl mentioned it already.

Nice to see grasshopper, flotsom, Arch Stanton and alQ all together there, too.

I like the irony in that Phil Ochs defence plant worker/draft dodger tune.

The last two posts reminded me of this, Jacques Dutronc's L'Opportuniste:

I can't say what historical event it might refer to, though.

[ 11 August 2008: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 11 August 2008 10:02 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, what ever happened to that Arch Stanton dude? He knew his music. I recall a particularly well phrased admonition of his to young punks who think they know something about Rock 'n Roll


quote:
If you've never thrown a stubby at a road sign while hanging out the ass-end of a half-ton, with yer drunken fate in the hands of the gods of gophers and the other blessed road-meat, with the deathwish knell of Foghataprilwinethesweet calling you to the other side...well then, ya've got nothin' ta tell me!

He did have a certain command of the Queen's English.


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
WendyL
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posted 11 August 2008 10:03 AM      Profile for WendyL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Meant with much fondness and a lot of missing, this thread is beginning to make me think of my father. Thanks.
From: PEI Canada | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged
kropotkin1951
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Babbler # 2732

posted 11 August 2008 10:22 AM      Profile for kropotkin1951   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Gordon Carter is an emerging folk/country artist with a working man's perspective on his Cumberland BC history. His Ginger Goodwin song is one of the best.

If you listen closely to this version you can here me singing during the chorus. It was recorded at Miner's Memorial in Cumberland this June.

The Day They Shot Ginger Down

Gordon's Website


From: North of Manifest Destiny | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
jrose
babble intern
Babbler # 13401

posted 11 August 2008 04:05 PM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw Country Joe McDonald perform this live over the weekend.


From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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Babbler # 8273

posted 11 August 2008 05:26 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anti-Iraq War Songs

Anti-war song thread


From: One millihelen: The amount of beauty required to launch one ship. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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Babbler # 3807

posted 11 August 2008 05:49 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by oldgoat:
Yeah, what ever happened to that Arch Stanton dude?


Pfft, probably sold out to The Man. Really, April Wine and The Sweet?

Anyway, I don't know how historical Ronnie Raygun's trip to a Nazi cemetery was, but The Ramones made it into something beautiful:

On the other hand, the Sex Pistols left Belsen ugly:

I see from the other Toutube clips that the Pistols reprised "Belsen" in 2008. Funny that, I scrawled the following on a desk in a lecture hall back in 1991:

"'Bagdhad was a blast,' I heard the pilots say
As they flew over rubble where the dead wogs lay.
'Life is fun, and I wish you were here,'
Said CNN to us on the air.
Oh dear.

Be someone, kill someone
Be a Bush, kill someone
Be a man, kill a kid
Be a Bush, kill a Bush"

Later, someone else wrote beside this that it was "deeply weird."

[ 11 August 2008: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 11 August 2008 06:07 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
al-Q, your mailbox is full.
From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 11 August 2008 06:54 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, I never throw anything away.
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Robespierre
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Babbler # 15340

posted 11 August 2008 10:58 PM      Profile for Robespierre     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jrose:
I saw Country Joe McDonald perform this live over the weekend.
Such a good video.

From: Raccoons at my door! | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged
Robespierre
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 15340

posted 11 August 2008 11:18 PM      Profile for Robespierre     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Belsen Was a Gas video---look at that dance movement Johhny is doing when he starts singing. Ahahah. That's beautiful, man.
From: Raccoons at my door! | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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Babbler # 3807

posted 13 August 2008 07:41 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't believe this hasn't been posted yet...

Stalin Wasn't Stallin'

quote:
Stalin wasn't stallin'
When he to1d the beast of Berlin
That they'd never rest contented
Til they had driven him from the land
So he called the Yanks and English
And proceeded to extinguish
The Fuhrer and his vermin
This is how it all began

Now the Devil he was reading
In the good book one day
How the lord created Adam
To walk the righteous way
And it made the Devil jealous
He turned green up to his horns
And he swore by things unholy
That he'd make one of his own

So he packed two suitcases
Full of grief and misery
And he caught the midnight special
Going down to Germany
Then he mixed his lies and hatred
With fire and brimstone
Then the devil sat upon it
That's how Adolf was born

Now Adolf got the notion
That he was the master race
And he swore he'd bring new order
And put mankind in it's place!
So he set his scheme in motion
And he was winning everywhere
Until he up and got the notion
For to kick that Russian bear

Yes he kicked that noble Russian
But it wasn't very long
Before Adolf got suspicious
The he had done something wrong
Cause that bear grabbed the Fuhrer
And gave him an awful fright
Seventeen months he scrapped the Fuhrer
Tooth and claw, day and night

Then that bear smacked the Fuhrer
With a mighty armored paw
And Adolf broke all records
Running backward towards Krakow
Then Goebbels sent a message
To the people everywhere
That if they couldn't hit the Fuhrer
Go down hit that Russian bear



From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
unionist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11323

posted 13 August 2008 08:43 PM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I suppose I should post a union song. Please find the music if you can.

THE ALMANAC SINGERS, 1942: BESS HAWES, PETE SEEGER, MILLARD LAMPELL, WOODY GUTHRIE, ARTHUR STERN, SIS CUNNINGHAM (left to right)

quote:
I was hanging round the defense town one day,
When I thought I overheard a soldier say,
"Every tank in my camp
Has that U.A.W. stamp
And I'm U.A.W. too, I'm proud to say."

CHORUS:
It's that U.A.W.-C.I.O.
Makes that army roll and go,
Turnin' out the jeeps and tanks, the airplanes every day.
It's that U.A.W.-C.I.O.
Makes that army roll and go --
Puts wheels on the U.S.A.

I was there when the union came to town,
I was there when old Henry Ford went down,
I was standing by gate four
When I heard the people roar:
"They ain't gonna kick the auto-workers around."

I was there on that cold December day
When we heard about Pearl Harbor far away;
I was down in Cadillac Square
When the union rallied there
To put those plans for pleasure cars away.

There'll be a union label in Berlin
When the union boys in uniform march in;
And rolling in the ranks
There'll be U.A.W. tanks
-- Roll Hitler out and roll the union in!



From: Vote QS! | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
RosaL
rabble-rouser
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posted 13 August 2008 08:44 PM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by unionist:
I suppose I should post a union song. Please find the music if you can.


I have the CD

[ 13 August 2008: Message edited by: RosaL ]


From: the underclass | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 13 August 2008 09:00 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Which CD? Info please, so I can put this on my wish list!
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
unionist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11323

posted 13 August 2008 09:18 PM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, it's a 10-CD box set. You'll find it on Disc 4, Track 24.

"Only" $215 USD, including book.

Start saving.


From: Vote QS! | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 14 August 2008 09:15 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good grief, that's way too much dough for me. Mebbe I should email the guy and ask, "Brother, can you spare a boxed set?"

There's some great material there for Mayday radio programs. Right now pretty well all I play are a version of "l'Internationale" that I found at the library and Florence Reese singing "Which Side Are You On?"

Coal Mining Women


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
RosaL
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 13921

posted 14 August 2008 10:13 AM      Profile for RosaL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by unionist:
Well, it's a 10-CD box set. You'll find it on Disc 4, Track 24.

"Only" $215 USD, including book.

Start saving.


I got it for much less than that! I'll try to remember where it was - it was on sale, too.


From: the underclass | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged
unionist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11323

posted 14 August 2008 07:02 PM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by RosaL:

I got it for much less than that! I'll try to remember where it was - it was on sale, too.


Well, I have the whole 10 CD set, and I got it for free years ago, at a place called Usenet.


From: Vote QS! | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Blairza
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Babbler # 15227

posted 14 August 2008 10:46 PM      Profile for Blairza     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
While we're on the good ol' american folk lefties

Earl Robinson wrote the music for
"I dreamed I saw Joe Hill"
the lyrics were a poem by Alfred Hayes

and "Black and White"

Black and White was written to commemorate Brown V.Board of Education, and became a hit in 71 for Three Dog Night. The Lyrics were by David Arkin, father of actor Alan Arkin.

Oh and lets not forget
Plane wreck at Los Gatos
By Woody Guthrie


From: Sonoma, California | Registered: May 2008  |  IP: Logged
Ken Burch
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Babbler # 8346

posted 15 August 2008 12:44 PM      Profile for Ken Burch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There was also this by Utah Phillips:

Enola Gay
(Utah Phillips)

Look out, look out from your schoolroom window!
Look up, young children, from your play!
Wave your hand at the shining airplane,
Such a beautiful sight is Enola Gay.

High above the clouds in the sunlit silence,
So peaceful here, I'd like to stay.
There's many a pilot who'd swap his pension
For a chance to fly Enola Gay.

What is that sound high above my city?
I rush outside and search the sky.
Now we are running to find the shelters,
Hearing sirens start to cry.

What will I say when my children ask me,
Where was I flying up on that day?
With trembling voice I gave the order
To the bombardier of Enola Gay.

Look out, look out from your schoolroom window;
Look up, young children, from your play.
Your bright young eyes will turn to ashes
In the blinding light of Enola Gay.

I turn to see the fireball rising.
"My God, My God," all I can say.
I hear a voice within me crying,
"My mother's name was Enola Gay."

Look out, look out from your schoolroom window;
Look up, young children, from your play.
Oh, when you see the warplanes flying,
Each one is named Enola Gay.


From: A seedy truckstop on the Information Superhighway | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Robespierre
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 15340

posted 15 August 2008 03:24 PM      Profile for Robespierre     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This one's not old. It's good, though.

The Consumer Goods - Hockey Night in Afghanada


From: Raccoons at my door! | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged
jrose
babble intern
Babbler # 13401

posted 16 August 2008 07:24 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't stop listening to this song after belting it out at the concert this week. It's from an upcoming documentary about an American soldier who is paralyzed and has become an anti-war protester while slipping in and out of comas and other near-fatal injury-related health crises.


From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Doug
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 44

posted 17 August 2008 11:19 PM      Profile for Doug   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Three Dead Trolls in a Baggie - War of 1812


From: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 27 August 2008 08:10 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Tri Yann again:

Ye Jacobites


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Bookish Agrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7538

posted 27 August 2008 08:30 AM      Profile for Bookish Agrarian   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Tanglefoot -Vimy

[IMG][/IMG]


From: Home of this year's IPM | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
bagkitty
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 15443

posted 27 August 2008 01:20 PM      Profile for bagkitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Clash : Washington Bullets
From: Calgary | Registered: Aug 2008  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5594

posted 27 August 2008 04:15 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not a fan of hip-hop as I'm in my early 40's now. But "Good Vibrations" by Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch was probably one of the first high energy workout tunes I ever heard. It certainly got me motivated at times and was one of my faves. Historically important to me personally, and yet not that important.

Come on come on
Feel it feel it
Feel the vibration


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged

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