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Author Topic: Musical name-dropping
obscurantist
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Babbler # 8238

posted 15 August 2005 01:51 AM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Warning: this thread is sheer trivia, and if any serious theme emerges, I'll be as surprised as anyone else.

I'd like to talk about the topic of what I call "musical name-dropping". Occasionally in a song, a musician will refer to another musician or band. Not all that remarkable. What I'm trying to figure out is, when does this sound cool, and when does it just sound kind of lame?

I have a theory. Musical name-dropping works best when the musician making the reference is more famous, or at least better, than the musician being referred to.

So, for example, when the Who referred to Bob Dylan and the Beatles in their song "The Seeker" in the late '60s, it was not nearly as cool as when they referred to T.Rex in "You Better You Bet" in 1979. It's somehow neater to think of a thirtysomething Pete or Roj getting smashed while listening to Marc Bolan than it is to think of them as callow young men asking Lennon or Zimmerman for the secret of musical success or what have you. On the other hand, the Who are cool even when they're not.

Don Henley in his O.J.-trial-inspired "The Garden of Allah" sings of 1994-5 being "a lousy year for rock and roll ... a dark dark night of the Collective Soul." I'll assume he's referring to the bland band that had several hits around that time. This is a tricky one. Henley was and is more famous than the band he sings about here, and I'd say cooler too, but mainly because I dislike Collective Soul so much.

Then there's INXS, in whose mid-'90s song "Elegantly Wasted" the backing vocal on the chorus sounds suspisciously like "I'm better than Oasis." Well, that's just objectively true.

Of course, regardless of relative notoriety or coolness, wit counts for something in musical name-dropping, e.g. Sloan's sly slam of Consolidated in "Coax Me." (Strange that three of the songs I can think of here all come from around the same time, with the Simpson trial and Kurt Cobain's suicide as a backdrop. Maybe it says more about me than about the songs.)

What are some other (higher or lower profile) examples of musical name-dropping? And do they work or not, and why? What do they say about the musician making the reference and the musician being referred to, on their own, in relation to one another, or in the musical / historical context in which they wrote?

(That last sentence started to sound less trivial than this thread is intended to be. But I like to sound ultra-serious about silly things.)

[ 15 August 2005: Message edited by: obscurantist ]


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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Babbler # 1299

posted 15 August 2005 02:26 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's three.

The obvious one is "American Pie", by Don McLean, which drops references to everyone from Buddy Holly and the Beatles to Marty Robbins, Elvis Presley and the Rolling Stones.

[edited because christ that song is long.]

In "God, Part 2", U2 sings

quote:
Don't believe in the 60's
The golden age of pop
You glorify the past
When the future dries up
Heard a singer on the radio late last night
He says he's gonna kick at the darkness
'til it bleeds daylight
I...I believe in love

The lyrics included with Rattle and Hum feature an asterix beside the lyric in question, and name Bruce Cockburn as the singer that they heard.

My other example is "A Simple Desultory Philippic (or How I Was Robert McNamara'd Into Submission)", which is essentially one extended name drop

quote:
(Or How I Was Robert McNamara'd into Submission)

I been Norman Mailered, Maxwell Taylored.
I been John O'Hara'd, McNamara'd.
I been Rolling Stoned and Beatled till I'm blind.
I been Ayn Randed, nearly branded
A communist, 'cause I'm left-handed.
That's the hand I use, well, never mind!

I been Phil Spectored, resurrected.
I been Lou Adlered, Barry Sadlered.
Well, I paid all the dues I want to pay.
And I learned the truth from Lenny Bruce,
And all my wealth won't buy me health,
So I smoke a pint of tea a day.

I knew a man, his brain was so small,
He couldn't think of nothing at all.
He's not the same as you and me.
He doesn't dig poetry. He's so unhip that
When you say Dylan, he thinks you're talking about Dylan Thomas,
Whoever he was.
The man ain't got no culture,
But it's alright, ma,
Everybody must get stoned.

I been Mick Jaggered, silver daggered.
Andy Warhol, won't you please come home?
I been mothered, fathered, aunt and uncled,
Been Roy Haleed and Art Garfunkeled.
I just discovered somebody's tapped my phone.

(folk rock)


[ 20 August 2005: Message edited by: audra trower williams ]


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
maestro
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posted 15 August 2005 03:21 AM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Course nowadays there isn't a song that doesn't refer to some DJ or other, or rap artist, or hip hop artist, so those don't really count.

The only time I could sanction a songwriter mentioning another songwriter would be if songwriter A was referencing specifically some action songwriter B had done or said. Even then, I think it's cheap.

I'll let American Pie of the hook because it was really a song about the death of Buddy Holly, and his music. Buddy Holly was iconic, so that gets a pass. However, only one pass. Anyone else mentions him, too bad, it's already been done.

U2, the most overrated band in the world, should be dispatched to rock 'n roll hell for mentioning Bruce Cockburn.

I mean, when songwriters start writing about other songwriters, it's a bit like journalists who write about other journalists. Talk about onanism. Enough! you got nothing else to write about, stop writing until you do.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
The Hegemo
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posted 15 August 2005 10:19 AM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Pavement, "Range Life"

quote:

After the glow, the scene, the stage,
The sad talk becomes slow but there's one thing I'll never forget:
Hey, you gotta pay your dues before you pay the rent
Over the turnstiles and out in the traffic
There's ways of livin' its the way I'm livin' right or wrong
Its all that I can do and I wouldn't wanna let you be

I wanna range life
If I could settle down
If I could settle down
Than I would settle down

I wanna range life
If I could settle down
If I could settle down
than I would settle down

Run from the pigs, the fuzz, the cops, the heat
Pass me your gloves
This crime, it is never complete
Until you snort it up or shoot it down
You're never gonna feel free
Out on my skateboard the night is just humming
And the gumsmacks are the pulse I'll follow
If my walkman fades
Well I got absolutely no one
No one but myself to blame
Don't worry, we're in no hurry
Schools out
What did you expect?

I wanna range life
If I could settle down
If I could settle down
Than I would settle down

I wanna range life
If I could settle down
If I could setle down
Than I would settle down

Out on tour with Smashing Pumpkins
Nature kids
I-- they don't have no function I dont understand a word they say
And I could really give a fuck
Stone Temple Pilots they're elegant bachelors
They're foxy to me, are they foxy to you?
I will agree they deserve absolutely nothin', nothin' more than me
Dreamin' dream dream dream dream...

...So Alive



From: The Persistent Vegetative States of America | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
leftist-rightie and rightist-leftie
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posted 15 August 2005 12:15 PM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Two songs that both Papal Bull and I have referred to on multiple occasions.

quote:
We Hate All Music And Especially Rap
We Don't Like Michael Jackson
We Hate Depeche Mode
We Don't Care For Madonna Or Kylie Minogue
Our Records Have Stickers With A Warning From Tipper
'coz They're No Good For Kids
If We'd Get Her We'd Strip Her

Sucks, KMFDM

quote:
war on ambassadors of pretense
war on mtv and cnn
mcdonald's, walt disney, and bethlehem
on christina, britney, and eminem

WWIII, KMFDM


quote:
Originally posted by obscurantist:
I have a theory. Musical name-dropping works best when the musician making the reference is more famous, or at least better, than the musician being referred to.

Definately.

From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
DandyLion
recent-rabble-rouser
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posted 15 August 2005 02:46 PM      Profile for DandyLion     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
New here so a thousand pardons if I screw this up.

Anyway, the first T. Rex reference i can think of was Bowie's "All the Young Dudes"

"Man I need a TV when I've got T. Rex"

The song also includes:

"And my brother's back at home with his Beatles and his Stones"

The Beatles also scored a reference in London's Calling:

"Phony Beatlemania has bitten the dust"

For self-reference there's always Bo Diddley.


From: Toronto | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
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posted 15 August 2005 03:13 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Scott - I was aware of American Pie, of course, but your posting the entire song reminded me that Don Maclean doesn't actually name any of the artists he refers to. Oh, wait, except for the Byrds and Lennon, although when he does mention those names, it's to make a play on words ("birds flew off with a fallout shelter / eight miles high..."; "Lennon read a book on Marx"). He refers more to songs and albums.

And I hadn't realized U2 quoted Bruce Cockburn. This might qualify as an example of a famous musician referring to someone less famous, and therefore a cool example of musical name-dropping, except that (1) they don't actually name Cockburn in the song itself, and (2) they really only mention him in order to repeat a line of his that's more poetic than anything they've written or will ever write (and I LIKE some of U2's lyrics).

Maestro, I'd agree with your harsh assessment of U2 on this one, but perhaps for different reasons. On the face of it, U2 do what Don Maclean does, incorporating lyrics without specifically naming their writer, but Maclean's song is such an obvious homage / slam of the artists in question that he can get away with it. In "God Part II", a tribute to Lennon, U2 riff on Lennon's lyrics among others, but come on, how many listeners are going to get the LENNON allusions, let alone the Cockburn ones? It smacks of plausibly deniable "passing off" to me.

Hegemo - I love "Range Life", and as with "Coax Me", I'd make an exception to my theory on the basis that Pavement nail it with their wry observations about the Pumpkins and STP, and it's such obvious over-the-top tongue-in-cheek "name-dropping" - "hey man, we did Lollapalooza with Billy and Scott, and guess what, they're no better than you or me, man!"

Thought of another one - Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama." This one's complicated for me. They were replying to Neil Young's musically beautiful but lyrically half-baked tunes (well, that's most of Neil Young's songs for you) "Alabama" and "Southern Man". Still, they remind me of some Babble posters who attack left-wing / feminist / other progressive views that could possibly stand to be criticized, only it would be nice if the critics were more eloquent, more incisive, and had less of a chip on their shoulders.

By the way, has anyone else noticed that Warren Zevon's "Werewolves of London" is almost identical to "Sweet Home Alabama" musically, only with very different lyrics? I once tried to play off of this by writing a parody called "Werewolves of Alabama", where the werewolves were rabidly intolerant U.S. southerners.


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
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posted 15 August 2005 03:22 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hi DandyLion. Those are some good examples, particularly "phony Beatlemania." Would that be an ironic self-reference by the Clash?

The topic of self-reference would make for an interesting tangent to this discussion - when is it cool, when is it lame? Again, as Maestro pointed out, you'd have to disqualify a few entire genres like rap and hip-hop, where such references are ubiquitous.


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Weltschmerz
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posted 15 August 2005 04:10 PM      Profile for Weltschmerz     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mojo Nixon and Skid Roper - Debbie Gibson is Pregnant with my Two-Headed Love Child:

Debbie Gibson is pregnant with my two headed love child
It's a Bigfoot baby all covered in fur now
Stark craving naked in a fornication nation

We were secretly married out in Las Vegas
In a little-bitty chapel, Joan Collins made us
Root'n Toot'n, and high faloot'n

Rick Astley is a panty wiss
That's my butt, his face
His teenage attitude is as rich as a terro
And they all go hysteria
Hair brain, cock-a-mamie, knuckle headed idga incahoot

No truth to the rumor about Spuds and Debbie
Ohh, they went to the motel just to watch a little T.V.
Hey, the dog, he must die

T-T-T-Tiffany is wrestling in Jello, by the slamming Debbie G
They covered head to toe
Heart, ohh my heart ohh

Debbie Gibson is pregnant with my two headed love child
It's a Bigfoot baby all covered in fur now
Stark craving naked in the fornication nation

It's stark craving naked in a fornication nation
Stark craving naked in the fornication nation

Not so much name-dropping as out and out silliness


From: Trana | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Left Turn
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8662

posted 15 August 2005 04:55 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Pennyroyal Tea" by Nirvana has a good reference to Leoanrd Cohen in the second verse:


quote:
I'm on my time with everyone,
I have very bad posture

Sittin' drink pennyroyal tea
Kill the life that's inside of me
Sittin' drink pennyroyal tea
I'm anemic royalty

Give me Leonard Cohen afterworld
So I can sigh eternally

I'm so tired I can't sleep
I'm a liar and a thief
Sittin' drink pennyroyal tea
I'm anemic royalty

I'm on warm milk, laxatives
Cherry flavoured antacids

Sittin' drink pennyroyal tea
Kill the life that inside of me
Sittin' drink pennyroyal tea
I'm anemic royalty


[ 15 August 2005: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


From: Burnaby, BC | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
Krago
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3064

posted 15 August 2005 05:03 PM      Profile for Krago     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And don't forget "We Didn't Start the Fire" by Billy Joel.

On second thought...


From: The Royal City | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
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Babbler # 8238

posted 15 August 2005 05:20 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I forgot about "It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)", which I tried to transcribe from the tape back in high school when I didn't know who half the people were:

quote:
Leonard Bernstein, Leonid Brezhnev, Lenny Bruce and Lester Bangs.

Not really rock musicians, although arguably three of them deserve honorary status for "West Side Story", jazz-like stand-up routines, and... oh yeah, I forgot that when Brezhnev wasn't writing those scabrously brilliant music reviews, he did play in a band.


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 15 August 2005 05:39 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Not really rock musicians, although arguably three of them deserve honorary status for "West Side Story", jazz-like stand-up routines, and... oh yeah, I forgot that when Brezhnev wasn't writing those scabrously brilliant music reviews, he did play in a band.

When I was at U of T, my college's weekly pub (as it was called) was called Reznikoff's. It always had good music, but especially, good posters. My favourite was from 1983 or so, not long after cruise-missile testing had begun in Canada. It was done in that rough, cut-and-paste punk-zine style, and featured Leonid Brezhnev with a Mohawk, safety pin in his ear, etc.

The caption: "Cruise on down to Brezhnikoff's."


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Stephen Gordon
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4600

posted 15 August 2005 05:58 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
H'ray! Someone mentioned Reznikoff's, arguably *the* coolest place to be in early-80's Toronto!

How about The Cowboy Junkies' Sun comes up, it's Tuesday Morning:

quote:
... and anyways I'd rather listen to Coltrane than go through all that shit again

From: . | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
maestro
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7842

posted 15 August 2005 06:09 PM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
By the way, has anyone else noticed that Warren Zevon's "Werewolves of London" is almost identical to "Sweet Home Alabama" musically, only with very different lyrics?

I once tried to play off of this by writing a parody called "Werewolves of Alabama", where the werewolves were rabidly intolerant U.S. southerners.


Hey DandyLion, good post, and welcome to babble.

The chord structure that Warren Zevon and Lynyrd Skynyrd used is pretty common.

How about a version of Werewolves of Alabama where the werewolves were rabidly intolerant of rednecks.

I am a fan of Neil Young, at the same time I understand he's a bit of a character who has had his ups and downs (musically and otherwise).

However, I'll hand him this. It was an interview with him that started me on my limited songwriting career. I had always aspired to write, but nothing ever came of it.

Then I read an interview in one of the guitar player magazines where the interviewer asked him how many songs he had on the go at any given time.

His reply was 'only one...otherwise nothing ever gets finished.'

I recognized that at least a part of my problem was I would get ideas, but they would get dropped as I got other ideas. If you want to finish a song, you have to finish it, then move on.

In a sense it doesn't matter if the finished song is any good or not. If the idea is good, it will come around again, and you may take a slightly different approach.

What's most important is to *finish* the damn song.

So if I ever achieve any kind of success (extremely doubtful, of course), Neil will have played a role.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Stephen Gordon
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4600

posted 15 August 2005 08:46 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Bruce Springsteen, Thunder Road:

quote:
Like a vision she dances across the porch
As the radio plays
Roy Orbison singing 'For the Lonely'
Hey that's me and I want you only

Stevie Wonder, Sir Duke:

quote:
For there's Basie, Miller, Satchmo
And the king of all Sir Duke
And with a voice like Ella's ringing out
There's no way the band can lose

Steely Dan, Hey 19:

quote:
Hey Nineteen,
That's 'Retha Franklin,
She don't remember,
The Queen of Soul

Joni Mitchell, A Case of You:

quote:
On the back of a cartoon coaster
In the blue TV screen light
I drew a map of Canada
Oh Canada
And I sketched your face on it twice

[ 15 August 2005: Message edited by: Stephen Gordon ]


From: . | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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Babbler # 6477

posted 15 August 2005 09:02 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
maestro, at a folk fest I heard Arlo Guthrie say that writing songs was like fishing them out from a stream; and that he said to Bob Dylan "Bob, why don't you throw the little ones back?"
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
koan brothers
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3242

posted 15 August 2005 09:02 PM      Profile for koan brothers     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Song To Woody

Bob Dylan

Im out here a thousand miles from my home

Walkin a road other men have gone down

Im seein your world of people and things

Hear paupers and peasants and princes and kings.

Hey, hey, woody guthrie, I wrote you a song

bout a funny old world thats a-comin along

Seems sick and its hungry, its tired and its torn

It looks like its a-dyin and its hardly been born.

Hey, woody guthrie, but I know that you know

All the things Im a-sayin, and many times more

Im a-singin every song, but I cant sing enough

Cause theres not many men done the things that you done.

Heres to cisco and sonny and leadbelly, too

And to all the good people that traveled with you

Heres to the hearts and the hands of the men

That come with the dust and are gone with the wind

Im a-leavin tomorrow, but I could leave today

Somewhere down the road someday

The very last thing that Id want to do

Is to say Id been hittin some hard travelin too.


From: desolation row | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
MartinArendt
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posted 15 August 2005 10:26 PM      Profile for MartinArendt     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't necessarily agree with just dismissing all rap because it's so self-referential. I think that's one of the coolest things about the genre. That being said...

"Hot Topic" by Le Tigre references just about every feminist icon around, and they change the names in concert all the time.

"Sweet Soul Music" by Arthur Conley references all the soul greats.

Also, when Stevie Ray Vaughn tragically died in a plane crash, they wrote a song about him called "Six Strings Down", which also referenced a lot of old blues singers who had passed away, and it was quite a lovely song.


From: Toronto | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
maestro
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posted 16 August 2005 04:03 AM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I don't necessarily agree with just dismissing all rap because it's so self-referential.

That wasn't quite what I meant.

I just didn't think it could be considered in this context because it is all self referenced...it's part of the genre.

At the same time, my personal opinion is that it is utterly juvenile and lazy to write that way.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
catje
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posted 16 August 2005 05:19 AM      Profile for catje     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I instantly thought of bob dylan's "and nobody could sing the blues like blind willie mctell"

which somehow got me onto Dan Bern's

Talkin Woody Bob Bruce and Dan Blues

Well, when Woody Guthrie was sick and dying
Bob Dylan visited him as he was lying
In a hospital bed. Bob sang him songs
Woody smiled and said "I'm glad you come
You belong here ---
Go forth and be the voice of your generation"

Well, above Beverly Hills one night real late
I snuck past a security gate
Parked by a Mercedes Benz
Climbed up a barbed wire fence and over
Couple of scratches, but I'd made it
To the home of Bruce Springsteen

Well, I found the Boss asleep in bed
Pillows piled up round his head
I turned on the light, took off my coat
Stuck a theromometer down his throat
Said, "Don't talk.
You look pale, Boss ---
Not at all well."

I said, "You look bad" and I asked him could he
Think of us as Bob and Woody
I said, "You just rest your pretty head
As I sing to you in your hospital bed."
He said "What the hell you talking about?
I ain't sick ---
This ain't a hospital ---
And how'd you get past the security gate?

I said "I wrote you a song called 'Song To Bruce'
With a tune I stole from one of yours"
To his platinum records next I pointed
Said "I just want to be annointed"
Springsteen, I wrote you a song
'Bout a funny ol' world that's a coming along
Seems sick and it's tired it's hard and it's torn
It looks like it's dying and it's hardly been born
He started really looking sick
And I stopped singing

Then Patty his wife came in I said, "Jeez,
I'm sorry about your husband's incurable disease
I'm here to help any way I can
You know, Woody and Bob, Bruce and Dan"
She said "Honey, what am I hearing?"
He said "Baby, you know I'm in the prime of life"
I said "Down to two million in sales last time out?
Read the signs, Patty."

He said "Some people think this record's my best"
I said "Shhhhh, you need your rest"
He said "There's a madman on the loose"
I said "Woody and Bob, Dan and Bruce"

He sprang out of his bed and said,
"All right, I've heard enough of this stuff"
He grabbed my throat and dragged me hard
Down the hall and through the yard
Suprising strength for a dying man

Well, he threw me out the way I come
Barbed wire scraped my face and thumbs
I've been thinking ever since
Bob and Woody
Dan and the artist formerly known as Prince
Dan and Madonna
Bob and Woody ---
Dan and Bob
So long, Bel Air
Howdy, Malibu
______________________________________

Chris Chandler has a somewhat more heartfelt tribute to the same pair on his new album. I can't find the lyrics, but you can hear it here-

Talking Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan Blues


From: lotusland | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
sub lite
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8918

posted 16 August 2005 09:10 PM      Profile for sub lite   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thought of this one last night as I was falling asleep and had to force myself not to get up and log on to post.

Barenaked Ladies
"Brian Wilson"
Lying in bed just like Brian Wilson did
Well I'm lying in bed just like Brian Wilson did.

"Be My Yoko Ono"
I know that when I say this,
I may be stepping on pins and needles;
But I don't like all these people
slagging her for breaking up the Beatles.
(Don't blame it on Yokey)
if I was John and you were Yoko,
I would gladly give up musical genius,
just to have you as my very own, personal Venus.

"New Kid on the Block"
I'm a new kid on the Block,
'though I may not be Johann Sebastian Bach.
So we may not write the songs we sing,
but look at Elvis, he sold his soul and
you crowned him King.

"Deck the Stills"
Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young, Crosby
Stills, Nash, and Young, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and
Young, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young
Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young, Crosby, Stills, Nash
And Young, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young
Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young
Crosby, Stills
Nash, and Young, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and
Young, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young, Crosby

I hope that fits the criteria. Sort of. (And can you tell I'm a BNL fan? )


From: Australia via the Canadian Wet Coast | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
DandyLion
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10150

posted 17 August 2005 01:22 PM      Profile for DandyLion     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
More Beatles references.

There was a Johnny Rivers song from the 60s caleld Summer rain with a chorus that refers to everyone playing Sgt peper's lonely hearts Club Band.

Also, "I Dig Rock & Roll Music" by Peter, Paul & Mary has the line "And when the beatles tell you"

This song also references Donovan and the Mamas and the Papas.

The Ms & Ps of course have Creeque Alley with references to Roger McGuinn (The Byrds) and John Sebastian and Zal Yanowsky (Lovin' Spoonful).

The Animals song "Monterey" describes the concert with references to Hendrix, The Who, The Byrds, Jefferson Airplane, Ravi Shankar, Hugh Masekela, The Grateful Dead, and Brian Jones (the Stones, not sure if he had been kicked out
by then).

Also, I fully agree with the overrated comments re U2. They're a good band but not in the league of some of the dominant groups of their day (Beatles, Stones, Zeppelin, Floyd, the Police, the Clash).


From: Toronto | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
pogge
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2440

posted 17 August 2005 01:31 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Smoke on the Water

quote:
We all came out to Montreux
On the Lake Geneva shoreline
To make records with a mobile
We didn't have much time
Frank Zappa and the Mothers
Were at the best place around
But some stupid with a flare gun
Burned the place to the ground
Smoke on the water, fire in the sky

[ 17 August 2005: Message edited by: pogge ]


From: Why is this a required field? | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 17 August 2005 02:14 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One of my favourites is from the Plastic Ono Band Album:

I don't believe in magic
I don't believe in I-ching
I don't believe in Bible
I don't believe in tarot
I don't believe in Hitler
I don't believe in Jesus
I don't believe in Kennedy
I don't believe in Buddha
I don't believe in Mantra
I don't believe in Gita
I don't believe in Yoga
I don't believe in kings
I don't believe in Elvis
I don't believe in Zimmerman
I don't believe in Beatles

I just believe in me

One of the most breathtaking resolutions in rock music, which Lennon promptly deflates right away with

Yoko and me


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
gopi
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6163

posted 17 August 2005 05:27 PM      Profile for gopi     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Dead Milkmen could fill a small chapter in a book on this topic:

quote:
Sha-Na-Na were the kings of Woodstock
You know it's true deep in your heart
Greasy guys in gold lame
If only Hendrix had been so smart
Pete Townshend wouldn't be so deaf
If he followed Sha-Na-Na's advice
And played fifties do-wop songs that
Even your mom would think are nice

Sha-Na-Na were the kings of the sixties
Deep in your heart you know it's true
All those kids at Berkeley dressed like Bowser
They didn't like the Stones or the Who
Sha-Na-Na didn't need flower power
They didn't drive a yellow submarine
Yet they were the guys who called the shots
Sha-Na-Na really made the scene


quote:
Oh, baby, look at you
Don't you look like Siouxsie Sioux
How long'd it take to get that way
What a terrible waste of energy
You wear black clothes say you're poetic
The sad truth is you're just pathetic

quote:
Well we're gonna drag Bruce Springsteen
By his axe through our streets
By the time we're done The Boss
Will look like a side of beef
We've got plans for other wankers
Who might come through our town
Y'know we're going to rid the world
Of those Top-40 clowns

quote:
How many hippies can this monster eat?
It ate Stills and Nash before they could shout
And then it chewed on David Crosby
But it spit him out

All the punks are gonna scream yippee
'Cause it's the thing that only eats hippies


quote:
Hey Jack, what's happenin'?
Oh, I don't know.
Well, rumor around town says you think you might be heading down to the shore.
Uh, yeah, I think I'm goin' down to the shore.
Whatcha gonna do down there?
Uh, I don't know, play some video games, buy some Def Leppard t-shirts.
Hey, don't forget to get your Motley Crue t-shirt, y'know, all proceeds go to get their lead singer out of jail.
Uh huh.
Hey, you gonna check out the Sand Bar while you're there?
Uh, what's the Sand Bar?
Oh, it's this place that lets sixteen year-old kids drink.
Oh, cool.
Y'know who's gonna be there?
Uh, who?
My favorite cover band, Crystal Shit.
Oh.
Yeah, they do a Doors show, you'd be really
impressed, in fact, it goes a little like this:

Love me two times baby
Love me twice today
Love me two times girl
Cause I got AIDS
Love me two times baby, once for tomorrow, once cause I got AIDS

Wow, pretty good Jim Morrison impersonation there.
I hope those guys have a good sense of humor and don't take us to court.


The song "Air Crash Museum" should probably be shown in all its tasteless glory:

quote:
"Air Crash Museum"

Went out to feed the cattle
And to my surprise
My lawn was full of bodies
Just a gatherin' up the flies
A big ol' jet liner
Had dropped from out of the sky
Well I was so darn happy that
I couldn't believe my eyes

We're gonna stuff 'em
Put 'em on display
'tween Patsy Cline and Buddy Holly

Loadin' up my tractor
Gonna take the bodies inside
Betty Lou will bring the sawdust
And I've got the formaldehyde
I'm callin' up my neighbours
Tell 'em all to drop by
A body stuffin' party
And we'll bake some kidney pie

We're gonna stuff 'em
Put 'em on display
'tween Patsy Cline and Buddy Holly

We'll have our own air crash museum
People lined for miles just to see 'em

Jim Croce's in the corner
The Big Bopper's by the stairs
Ricky Nelson's in the kitchen
But nobody cares


[ 18 August 2005: Message edited by: gopi ]


From: transient | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Black Dog
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2776

posted 17 August 2005 05:43 PM      Profile for Black Dog   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For name-dropping, nothing tops LCD Soundsystem's "Losing My Edge"

quote:
Yeah, I'm losing my edge.
I'm losing my edge.
The kids are coming up from behind.
I'm losing my edge.
I'm losing my edge to the kids from France and from London.
But I was there.

I was there in 1968.
I was there at the first Can show in Cologne.
I'm losing my edge.
I'm losing my edge to the kids whose footsteps I hear when they get on the decks.
I'm losing my edge to the Internet seekers who can tell me every member of every good group from 1962 to 1978.
I'm losing my edge.

To all the kids in Tokyo and Berlin.
I'm losing my edge to the art-school Brooklynites in little jackets and borrowed nostalgia for the unremembered eighties.

But I'm losing my edge.
I'm losing my edge, but I was there.
I was there.
But I was there.

I'm losing my edge.
I'm losing my edge.
I can hear the footsteps every night on the decks.
But I was there.
I was there in 1974 at the first Suicide practices in a loft in New York City.
I was working on the organ sounds with much patience.
I was there when Captain Beefheart started up his first band.
I told him, "Don't do it that way. You'll never make a dime."
I was there.
I was the first guy playing Daft Punk to the rock kids.
I played it at CBGB's.
Everybody thought I was crazy.
We all know.
I was there.
I was there.
I've never been wrong.

I used to work in the record store.
I had everything before anyone.
I was there in the Paradise Garage DJ booth with Larry Levan.
I was there in Jamaica during the great sound clashes.
I woke up naked on the beach in Ibiza in 1988.

But I'm losing my edge to better-looking people with better ideas and more talent.
And they're actually really, really nice.

I'm losing my edge.

I heard you have a compilation of every good song ever done by anybody. Every great song by the Beach Boys. All the underground hits. All the Modern Lovers tracks. I heard you have a vinyl of every Niagra record on German import. I heard that you have a white label of every seminal Detroit techno hit - 1985, '86, '87. I heard that you have a CD compilation of every good '60s cut and another box set from the '70s.

I hear you're buying a synthesizer and an arpeggiator and are throwing your computer out the window because you want to make something real. You want to make a Yaz record.

I hear that you and your band have sold your guitars and bought turntables.
I hear that you and your band have sold your turntables and bought guitars.

I hear everybody that you know is more relevant than everybody that I know.

But have you seen my records? This Heat, Pere Ubu, Outsiders, Nation of Ulysses, Mars, The Trojans, The Black Dice, Todd Terry, the Germs, Section 25, Althea and Donna, Sexual Harrassment, a-ha, Pere Ubu, Dorothy Ashby, PIL, the Fania All-Stars, the Bar-Kays, the Human League, the Normal, Lou Reed, Scott Walker, Monks, Niagra,

Joy Division, Lower 48, the Association, Sun Ra,
Scientists, Royal Trux, 10cc,

Eric B. and Rakim, Index, Basic Channel, Soulsonic Force ("just hit me"!), Juan Atkins, David Axelrod, Electric Prunes, Gil! Scott! Heron!, the Slits, Faust, Mantronix, Pharaoh Sanders and the Fire Engines, the Swans, the Soft Cell, the Sonics, the Sonics, the Sonics, the Sonics.

You don't know what you really want.



From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 19 August 2005 02:24 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
JUMPIN’ AT THE RECORD SHOP

Slim Gaillard


May I hear your new releases
I’m in the market for some brand new pieces
Let me read your record list
There may be something I don’t want to miss

Duke Ellington, Count Basie and The Dorseys
Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, they’re the voices
King Cole and Johnny Mercer, just won’t stop
Jumpin’ at the record shop

Artie Shaw, Coleman Hawkins and Harry James
Lena Horne, Dinah Shore, a few of the names
Carmen Miranda, Xavier Cugat
Jumpin’ at the record shop

Jack Benny and Bob Hope tell the jokes
Bob Wills and Spade Cooley play the folks
Sammy Kaye, Gene Krupa and Johnny Long
Slim Gaillard, the guy who wrote this song
Pied Piper, Calloway, Anita O’Day
Kate Smith, Perry Como, just won’t wait
Eddie Cantor, Frances Langford
Jimmie Lunceford, too
Harry James, Henry Busse
Betty Hutton, Kay Kyser, all have fame
Don’t feel slighted if we missed your name
Al Jolson, Martin Block, just won’t stop
Jumpin’ at the record shop

Pied Piper, Calloway, Anita O’Day
Kate Smith and Perry Como just won’t wait
Eddie Cantor, Frances Langford
Jimmie Lunceford, too
Henry Busse, Guy Lombardo
Know just what to do
Betty Hutton, Kay Kyser, all have fame
Don’t feel slighted if we missed your name
Al Jolson, Martin Block, just won’t stop
Jumpin’ at the record shop

We only had three minutes
And we’re not to blame
Because we jumped in that record shop


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
West Coast Lefty
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3697

posted 19 August 2005 02:38 AM      Profile for West Coast Lefty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't believe nobody has mentioned Weezer in this thread - the best Happy Days inspired video of all time

Weezer, Buddy Holly

quote:

Ooh-we-ooh, I look just like Buddy Holly
Oh-oh, and you're Mary Tyler Moore
I don't care what they say about us anyway
I don't care about that

Cheap Trick, Surrender

quote:
When I woke up
Mom and Dad were rolling on the couch
Rolling numbers, rock and rolling
Got my Kiss records out

Mojo Nixon, Elvis is Everywhere

quote:
Elvis is everywhere, Elvis is everything
Elvis is everywhere, Elvis is still the King
I'm just trying to make you see
That the big E is in you and me!

From: Victoria, B.C. | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 20 August 2005 12:03 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Back to basics...

quote:
So, for example, when the Who referred to Bob Dylan and the Beatles in their song "The Seeker" in the late '60s, it was not nearly as cool as when they referred to T.Rex in "You Better You Bet" in 1979. It's somehow neater to think of a thirtysomething Pete or Roj getting smashed while listening to Marc Bolan than it is to think of them as callow young men asking Lennon or Zimmerman for the secret of musical success or what have you.

I dunno, I found "The Seeker" kind of slyly funny, and "You Better You Bet" merely nostalgic (possibly because I didn't like it). When Daltry sings about asking Dylan, the Beatles, and Timothy Leary ("but he couldn't help me either"), I take him to be sending up the 1960s vogue for gurus, or anyway Leaders. Remember, "The Seeker" actually came out in 1970, by which time this vogue had had some truly disastrous consequences, with worse still to come (Jonestown, etc.).


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8238

posted 20 August 2005 02:45 AM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I stand enlightened - didn't realize "The Seeker" was that recent. And your interpretation of it is the best I've heard. All right, it's the only interpretation I've heard, but it makes sense.

I don't actually like "You Better You Bet" that much myself. Face Dances was the first Who album I heard, several years ago, before I knew that much about the band aside from their biggest hits. Didn't really like it then, although the friend I borrowed it from thinks it's a good album. I've asked to borrow it from him again, but he says I have not yet reached a state of mind where I can fully appreciate the quality of this record, and I defer to his wisdom on matters Who-esque.

By the way, did you know that Petra Haden (one of Charlie Haden's daughters) has just come out with an a capella version of the entire Who Sell Out album? Another friend mentioned it to me last month, and I just heard a bit of it over the phone today.

quote:
Originally posted by 'lance:
I found "The Seeker" kind of slyly funny, and "You Better You Bet" merely nostalgic (possibly because I didn't like it). When Daltry sings about asking Dylan, the Beatles, and Timothy Leary..., I take him to be sending up the 1960s vogue for ... Leaders. Remember, "The Seeker" actually came out in 1970, by which time this vogue had had some truly disastrous consequences....

From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Vansterdam Kid
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5474

posted 20 August 2005 03:02 AM      Profile for Vansterdam Kid   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oops wrong thread, carry on.

[ 20 August 2005: Message edited by: Vansterdam Kid ]


From: bleh.... | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 20 August 2005 03:06 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I haven't found any lyrics on the 'Net, but Jelly Roll Morton's I thought I heard Buddy Bolden Say should qualify.

Glenn Miller's Jukebox Saturday Night does as well:


Moppin‘ up sodapop rickeys
To our heart’s delight
Dancin‘ to swingeroo quickies
Jukebox saturday night

Goodman and Kyser and Miller
Help to make things bright
Mixin‘ hot licks with vanilla
Jukebox Saturday night

They put nothin‘ past us
Me and honey lamb
Making one Coke last us
Till it’s time to scram

Money we really don’t need bad,
We make out alright
Lettin‘ the other guy feed that
Jukebox Saturday night

After sippin‘ a soda we got a scheme
Somebody else plays the record machine
It’s so easy to say pet names
When you listen to the trumpet of Harry James...
Miller's trumpet player (of the three listed as playing on the track, Billy May seems the most likely candidate) plays a few lines of James' theme, "Ciribiribin" here

We love to hear that tenor croon
Whenever the Ink Spots sing a tune...

This bit is a parody of "If I didn't Care" by the Ink Spots:
"If I didn’t know why the roses grow
Then I wouldn’t know why the roses grow...
(Spoken) Now listen, honey child,
If I didn’t know all them little things I’m supposed to know
Then I sure would be a SAD man
If I didn’t know..."

Money we really don’t need it,
We make out alright
Lettin‘ the other guy feed that
Jukebox Saturday night!

[ 22 August 2005: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
audra trower williams
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2

posted 20 August 2005 07:29 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
OH LORD. Can you kids just link to lyrics instead of reprinting them all?
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 21 August 2005 03:14 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Not if we want to add our own comments.

How about bands named after songs? Stiff Little Fingers were named after a Vibrators' song, and Discharge got their name from a line in the Sex Pistols' Bodies.

The Rolling Stones owe a lot to Muddy Waters too.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8238

posted 21 August 2005 03:47 AM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think Audra meant that we don't need to quote entire songs. We could just quote particular portions of them, and maybe link to the rest, although I realize some of the songs above are non-stop name-dropping sessions.

Bands named after songs. Right now, I can think of Radiohead, the Be Good Tanyas, and Five Guys Named Moe. After I turn my computer off in about two minutes, I'll think of ten or fifteen more. No, wait, that'll happen about a minute after my head hits the pillow....

quote:
Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:
Not if we want to add our own comments.

How about bands named after songs?



From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 21 August 2005 07:25 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I suppose "Life is a Rock but the Radio Rolled Me" has already been mentioned...and its poor cousin, "We Didn't Start the Fire" (although that's more event dropping rather than musical name dropping). As well as a not-so-well-known Neil Diamond imitation of Life is a Rock called "Crunchy Granola Suite".
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 21 August 2005 09:16 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
S'funny.

I was trying to come up with my own personal deffinition as to why name dropping in one song is okay, while in another it's annoying, and I just can't. On one pole you have the Joel piece of shite and on the other you have fun or iconic name dropping that's probably important. But where exactly does it cross the line? I dunno.

I think this probably starts for artists sometime after the third album, when they've gotten all the songs from their own experience out, and they have to start drawing from how bad Los Angeles or Hollywood is, dropping names from older bands, and songs on substance abuse and addiction.

[ 21 August 2005: Message edited by: Tommy_Paine ]


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1299

posted 23 August 2005 12:13 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey Audra, thanks for calling me "a kid"

The fantastic John Wesley Harding (himself a musical name drop) had a great song called Phil Ochs, Bob Dylan, Steve Goodman, David Blue and Me.

Josh Joplin has a song dedicated to Phil Ochs which also refers to a certain mediocre band by name.

quote:
our surveys say, this is what they want today.
our surveys say all they want is Sugar Ray
Phil you can't be killed (3x)
50 fans can't be wrong (3x)
or can they, can they....can they, can they?

In another song, Happy at Last, Joplin acknowledges what is apparent to all: that he sings like Michael Stipe.

[ 23 August 2005: Message edited by: Scott Piatkowski ]


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 23 August 2005 12:37 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I clicked on Scott's link hoping to see some cool Janis Joplin stuff. Who the hell is _Josh_ Joplin?

- Boom Boom, longtime Janis Joplin fan


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1299

posted 23 August 2005 12:46 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's a new century, Boom Boom

Josh Joplin is an amazing lyricist, a superb musician and a fantastic vocalist (you'll swear he really is Michael Stipe at times, but there's an energy and spirit that's been lacking from recent REM releases) and just happens to have a brand new CD out tomorrow (Jaywalker, his fifth).

[ 23 August 2005: Message edited by: Scott Piatkowski ]


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
alisea
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4222

posted 23 August 2005 12:48 AM      Profile for alisea     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I join Boom Boom in confessing my bewilderment. Nice web site, and the MP3s sound good, though.
From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 23 August 2005 01:05 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
How about Frank Zappa on Hollywood and the Lizard King?

quote:
...The Tinsel Town aficionados
Come to see and not to hear
But then again this system works
As perfect as a dream
For all of those record company pricks
Who come to skim the cream
From the cesspools of excitement
Where Jim Morrison once stood...


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1299

posted 12 September 2005 02:15 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Scott Piatkowski:
The fantastic John Wesley Harding (himself a musical name drop) had a great song called Phil Ochs, Bob Dylan, Steve Goodman, David Blue and Me...

I'm not sure why I didn't remember to also mention Wes' song Bastard Son, which refers not only to Bob Dylan and Joan Baez, but also to Leonard Cohen, Bruce Springsteen, James Taylor, Suzanne Vega, etc, etc.

quote:
Bob Dylan is my father, Joan Baez is my mother
And I'm their bastard son
Though my roots show through I'm just 22
I don't belong to anyone
When The Band was disbanded, I was disowned
I got a number you can ring me on but I ain't got no phone
Got a forwarding address, baby I ain't got no home
I got no direction home
That's the style of a bastard child
This is the song of a bastard son

Uncle Lenny used to make me laugh
Took away my nightmares, tore my daydreams in half
Showed them to me reflected upside-down
In the mirror that Suzanne Vega found
Lenny's still doing his tricks today
Only goes to show that growing up might pay

Bruce and James were family friends
Took my mind to Carolina through the New Jersey bends
Gave me a harmonica when I was three
Nailed a banjo to my knees
Now Bruce is a foreman and James is a slave
Bruce gave in and James just gave up

My family didn't grow up too well with technology
And I think this is why they disowned me
But now I wanna get back into the fold
I don't wanna be a black sheep, I don't wanna grow old
Here's to Warren, Neil, T-Bone, Andy, Lou, Townes, Elliott
Tom, Steve, Elizabeth, Elvia, Dave
You're singing something good and it's gotta be saved
I think so!

I've only just started playing guitar and already they say
I'm a has-been
Say my songs are too long, words are too strong, shoes
aren't clean
See the synthesizer's broken, the 12 inch does not exist
It's gonna take a blessed life to get on to the hitlist
I'm gonna need a blessed life to get on to the hitlist
But I'm singing for the men, for the women and the kids
Who grew up like me with seven basic instincts hid

Bob Dylan is my father, Joan Baez is my mother
And I'm their bastard son.



From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
byzantine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10235

posted 12 September 2005 03:21 AM      Profile for byzantine        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking of Joplin:

I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel
You were talkin' so brave and so sweet.
Giving me head on the unmade bed
While the limosines waited in the street.
--Leonard Cohen


From: saskatchewan | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
byzantine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10235

posted 12 September 2005 03:26 AM      Profile for byzantine        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One more:

So come back Emma Goldman
Rise up old Joe Hill
The barricades are goin' up
But they cannot break our will
Come back to us Malcolm X
And Martin Luther King
We'll be marchin' into Selma
As the bells of freedom ring

Come back Woody Guthrie
Come back to us now
Tear your eyes from paradise
And rise again somehow
If you run into Jesus
Maybe He can help us out
Come back Woody Guthrie to us now
--Steve Earle


From: saskatchewan | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
chester the prairie shark
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6993

posted 12 September 2005 11:31 AM      Profile for chester the prairie shark     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
akkk! i discovered on the drive to the lake saturday night that my copy of el'corozon is damaged! it gets through the first "christmas time in washington" but then i have to skip all the way to track 6, shit. I love "new york city"...steve earle and the supersuckers, oh yea.
From: Saskatoon | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
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posted 12 September 2005 01:58 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by byzantine:
Speaking of Joplin:

And speaking of songs that allude rather than actually mention specific names, there's Carly Simon's "You're So Vain", possibly unique in that she's gone to great lengths NOT to reveal who the song is about, as that would sort of defeat the purpose of

quote:
I bet you think this song is about you

Well, Dick Ebersol knows. But he ain't telling....


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 25 September 2005 03:48 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's a few more name drops that don't mention the artist by name:

Tom Hooper from Grapes of Wrath says that "What Was Going Through My Head" was written after injesting a controlled substance at a Pink Floyd concert.

"Solsbury Hill" was written by Peter Gabriel after he attended a Bruce Springsteen concert and was moved to leave Genesis ("... which connection I should cut...").

"Killing Me Softly (With His Song)" was a tribute to Don McLean ("... I felt he found my letters and read each one out loud..."). Lori Lieberman wrote the original lyrics after hearing him play, then songwriters Norman Gimbel and Charles Fox modified them and put them to music. It was a hit for both Roberta Flack and The Fugees.

One that mentions an album title but not the artist is "Nebraska" by The Cash Brothers.


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
chubbybear
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posted 25 September 2005 04:00 AM      Profile for chubbybear        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Scott Piatkowski:
One that mentions an album title but not the artist is "Nebraska" by The Cash Brothers.
Ooh - from the Raceway CD - love that CD - never heard a lot about it.

From: nowhere | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
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posted 25 September 2005 04:19 AM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Another (rather mean, I must say) reference to an album title:

Every great band should be shot
Before they make their Combat Rock

- Too Much Joy

Hey, I didn't think that album was that bad. I mean, it's no London Calling, but neither is it a Cut the Crap. ** shudder **


From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Slumberjack
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posted 25 September 2005 04:35 AM      Profile for Slumberjack     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
All music should be considered in the context of the era in which it came forward. U2's heyday came and went with their breakout album "War." They started out as punk band wannabes. They went on to put out lucrative mainstream junk for 20 years. Speaking of lucrative junk, I like the sound of Green Day, but what's with these american idiot guys trying to sound like the Clash, complete with fake Limey accents. Anyways, if Roger Daltry says Green Day are the real deal, I suppose they're worth a listen, which I recently did. Hard to believe they haven't been Dixie Chicked in the USA, especially in light of some of their interesting lyrics.
From: An Intensive De-Indoctrination, But I'm Fine Now | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 25 September 2005 05:18 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Hey, I didn't think that album was that bad. I mean, it's no London Calling, but neither is it a Cut the Crap. ** shudder **

Other than "Know Your Rights" it was pretty bad.

What the heck was all that "oi, look, there's Lauren Bacall" stuff about?

And yeah, "Cut the Crap" was unlistenable.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
kingblake
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posted 25 September 2005 12:32 PM      Profile for kingblake     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Cut the Crap should hardly count, since Mick Jones was gone by then. But yeah, I think Combat Rock was severely over-rated (though I do have a soft spot for Casbah). Know Your Rights is a great tune, but there's a much better version of it on the relatively recently released Clash live album, From Here to Eternity.

Did anyone ever hear the London Calling 25th anniversary re-release? I didn't, but I'm still curious.


From: In Regina, the land of Exotica | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
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posted 25 September 2005 07:25 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
All music should be considered in the context of the era in which it came forward. U2's heyday came and went with their breakout album "War." They started out as punk band wannabes. They went on to put out lucrative mainstream junk for 20 years.

I'm not disagreeing with you, but this discussion would make more sense in the "Rock Snobs" thread.


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
DandyLion
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posted 26 September 2005 01:59 PM      Profile for DandyLion     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"The fantastic John Wesley Harding (himself a musical name drop) had a great song called Phil Ochs, Bob Dylan, Steve Goodman, David Blue and Me."

Didn't Phil Ochs have a song "Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and Me"?


From: Toronto | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 26 September 2005 02:14 PM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by DandyLion:
Didn't Phil Ochs have a song "Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and Me"?

Um, don't think so ( ), but Joe Jackson wrote a great song about "Shakespeare and Bach and The Man Who Wrote Danny Boy"


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
DandyLion
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posted 27 September 2005 01:39 PM      Profile for DandyLion     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Phil Ochs Bach, Beethoven, Mozart & Me Lyrics

Em F Em F
Every morning at the dawn dust is in the air.
Em F G Am
Karen rises early, runs brushes through her hair.
Em F Em F
Then she buys the paper, I lay on my back,
Em F G A
Then she feeds the monkey, then she feeds the cat.

Chorus:
G
I'll talk, I'll talk they live by the sea
D G
Surrounded by a cemetery.
Bm A
If you get tired come up for some tea
Em Bm D Em
With Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, and me.


From: Toronto | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 27 September 2005 02:24 PM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
T Rex paying homage to Bob Dylan in "Telegram Sam"(I still prefer the later, kick-ass Bauhaus version):

quote:
Bobby's alright Bobby's alright
He's a natural born poet
He's just outa sight

From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
favoritething
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Babbler # 6971

posted 29 September 2005 11:16 AM      Profile for favoritething     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Two Westerbergs I can think of off the top of my head are the obvious "Alex Chilton" and "Something to Du" (reference to Husker Du, but of course you already knew that)

Local band Jimmy George returned the favour in one of its songs (things i did wrong?)..."Guess it's just like Westerberg says..."

Didn't see any mention of the Mojo tune "Don Henley must die"


From: Ontario | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged

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