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Author Topic: What I saw in the museum
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 30 January 2005 04:27 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Went to Glenbow Museum on Friday to catch some exhibits that were about to close. One was of Evan Penny's work; he makes faces and heads out of silicone or something, and they are very striking. They are completely realistic, down to the nose pores and little bristles sticking out of the neck, but the head may be huge or a weird shape. It's going to Halifax next, then to Vancouver. If you do go to see it; get down and look from below at the long face called "Stretch" and he seems to be sweating. [The museum guy said he learned that from kids looking at it.]

The big exhibit was Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession; all sorts of sculptures of various sizes from the Gates of Hell, the Burghers of Calais, the Kiss, and Balzac. It was impressive; and I liked the atmosphere, a lot of art students sitting or standing around making sketches, and they were pretty good too. There were many visitors; some would look at a statue from the front and move on; I prefer to walk around and check out their back sides.

I was a little startled by all the phallic stuff around Balzac, not being aware of that aspect of the final statue of him; font of creativity and all that, but you'd think he had done his writing with it or something. I liked best the nude fat Balzac; as opposed to some muscle-bound torso that spends all day pushing weights [or pulling his weenie].

There was a small copy of the Thinker, but I would rather see the big one; generally the bigger copies looked better to me. There was a large photo from above of Rodin's funeral and it looked like he was buried at the feet of the Thinker; or at least the funeral was held there.

So what's on at other museums?


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 31 January 2005 07:35 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i fell in love with rodin at the hermitage in st petersburg. the main museum of his works in paris has a great garden as well.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Gary Arseneau
recent-rabble-rouser
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posted 08 February 2005 11:03 PM      Profile for Gary Arseneau     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Part 1 of 2

October 15, 2004

Mike Robinson
President and CEO
Glenbow Museum
130 9th Avenue S.E.
Calgary, Alberta Canada T2G OP3
(403) 268-4100
(403) 265-9769 FAX
[email protected]

Dear Mr. Robinson:

I have enclosed, for you and your colleagues’ review, a copy of my October 15, 2004 “FRAUD” Press Release that details the the serious misrepresentation in the Glenbow Museum’s upcoming Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession, Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundtion exhibit.

Any additional questions, comments or requests for additional documentation, please write, email or call.

I look forward to your reply.

Sincerely,

Gary Arseneau
artist, printmaker of original lithographs, gallery owner and author
Ribault’s Gallery of Fine Art
319 Centre Street
Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
(904) 321-0021
[email protected]


(No photographs or graphs are displayed in this version of this Press Release Footnotes are not elevated and are enclosed with {})

PRESS RELEASE
October 15, 2004
from: Gary Arseneau
Ribault’s Gallery of Fine Art
319 Centre Street Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034
(904) 321-0021 [email protected]


*
“August Rodin,
The Kiss, c. 1881-82, date of cast unknown
Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation”
www.glenbow.org/media/rodin_img.htm

Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession,
Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation
FRAUD
and the Glenbow Museum’s attempt to cover it up.


In the upcoming October 30, 2004 to January 30, 2005 Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession, Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation exhibit at the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, Canada, fifty-four of the sixty-three so-called “authentic and original” Auguste Rodin sculptures are non-disclosed fakes.

WHY ARE THEY FAKE?
This Press Release will document that these fifty-four non-disclosed fakes: 1) are not from Auguste Rodin’s original plasters, 2) have counterfeit signatures, 3) have editions that are not limited to twelve, 4) are owned by the Cantors who have been allowed by the Musee Rodin to pick the color of at least one of the bronzes they promote as a “Rodin” and 5) are posthumously reproduced by a corrupt Musee Rodin who posthumously completes Auguste Rodin’s unfinished work in violation of his 1916 Will. In otherwords, this exhibit is a fraud.

WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF “FRAUD?”
On page 670 of the Seventh Edition of Black’s Law Dictionary, “fraud” is defined as: “A knowing misrepresentation of the truth or concealment of a material fact to induce another to act to his or her detriment.”

CANTOR FOUNDATION’S “MISSION STATEMENT”
The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s “Mission Statement,” on their www.cantorfoundation.org/About/about3.html website, in part, states that they are: “a private operating foundation established in 1978 to promote and encourage recognition and appreciation of excellence in the arts- {and the} main thrust of the Cantor Foundation's support focuses on the art of Auguste Rodin -.”

GLENBOW MUSEUM
On the Glenbow Museum’s www.glenbow.org/index.html website, in part, it states: “Glenbow is western Canada’s largest museum- {and} Glenbow Archives is a major research centre for historians-.”

Unfortunately, with regard to this Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession, Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation exhibit, the Glenbow Museum and the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation are not acting respectfully like a “museum” much less “focus{ing} on the art of Auguste Rodin.”

Here is one example from this exhibit:

THE KISS?
On the Glenbow Museum’s website, The Kiss, in this exhibit, is listed with the date “c.1881-82, date of cast unknown.” In a prior Cantor Foundation exhibition checklist{1} , for the same The Kiss, it is listed as “Original plaster version executed in 1886; this bronze cast at a later date - Foundry: Alexis Rudier.”

Unfortunately, the Alexis Rudier foundry was in business from 1902 to 1952{2} some sixteen to twenty years after both prior listed dates of “c. 1881-82” and “1886.” But it doesn’t end there. The Leblanc-Barbedienne foundry owned the contract for reproducing The Kiss, in bronze, till 1919{3}.

Therefore, the earliest the Alexis Rudier foundry could have legally reproduced The Kiss, in bronze, would have been in 1919 some two years or more after Auguste Rodin’s death in 1917. That is almost thirty-three to thirty-seven odd years after the overtly misleading “c.1881-82, date of cast unknown” and “1886” dates respectively listed for The Kiss by both the Glenbow Museum and the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation.

The Kiss is just one of fifty-four fakes in this exhibit. Here is the true chronology:

TRUE CHRONOLOGY OF THE COLLECTION
(numbering and dates below are directly from a Cantor Foundation checklist unless enclosed with {} )

FOUNDRY REFERENCES
The Alexis Rudier foundry was in business from 1902 to 1952. The Godard Foundry began working with the Musee Rodin “since 1969”. The Georges Rudier foundry opened in 1952. The Susse Foundry worked with the Musee Rodin between “1964 and 1978.” The Coubertin Foundry opened in 1963 and began working with the Musee Rodin “since 1973.” (Source: former Musee Rodin curator Monique Laurent, pages 285-293, 1981 Rodin Rediscovered.)


1881 to 1910
8) METAMORPHOSIS OF OVID c. 1886
52) WALKING MAN 1900-10

1902 to 1952
5) FUGITIVE LOVE 1881, {1902 to 1952}
33) CALL TO ARMS (THE SPIRIT OF WAR)1879, {1902 to 1952}
46) AGE OF BRONZE (REDUCTION)1876, reduction c. 1903-04, date of cast unknown
42) ROMEO AND JULIETTE 1902, cast before Rodin’s death in 1917
19) PIERRE DE WIESSANT, (REDUCTION)1884-95 {1902-1952}
3) THE THINKER (REDUCTION) 1880, reduction made before Rodin’s death in 1917,
this bronze cast at a later date
39) GUSTAV MAHLER 1909, Cast at a later date {Alexis Rudier foundry}

1917
(Auguste Rodin dies.)

1919 or later
15) THE KISS, 1886, cast at a later date by Alexis Rudier, {Barbidienne Foundry till 1919}
47) CRYING LION, 1881, Date of Cast Unknown {“Issued by Musee Rodin, Paris”}


1950’s
41) THE BENEDICTIONS, 1955
57) THE CATHEDRAL, 1955
6) HEAD OF SORROW, 1956
4) EVE (REDUCTION), cast at a later date {Georges Rudier - after 1957}
14) PAOLO AND FRANCESCA , 1889 {Georges Rudier -after 1957 )
24) MONUMENTAL HEAD OF JEAN D’AIRE , date of cast unknown {Georges Rudier - after 1957}
48) DANCE MOVEMENT ‘D’, date of cast unknown {after 1957}
54) FLYING FIGURE (G.. M.), date of cast unknown {Georges Rudier - after 1957}
61) RIGHT HAND, FINGERS CLOSE TOGETHER,SLIGHTLY BENT , date of cast unknown
{Georges Rudier - after 1957}

1960’s
49) SAINT JOHN THE BAPTIST PREACHING (REDUCTION) , 1962
28) STUDY FOR BALZAC ‘B’, 1963
34) TRAGIC HEAD , 1963
43) PAS DE DEUX ‘B’, 1965
53) FEMALE TORSO (THE MARTYR), 1966
58) LARGE CLENCHED LEFT HAND, 1966
19) MONUMENTAL HEAD OF PIERRE DE WIESSANT , date of cast unknown {Godard - after 1969}
25) BUST OF YOUNG BALZAC, date of cast unknown {Godard - after 1969}
35) GENERAL LYNCH, MAQUETTE OF, 1886 {Godard - after 1969}
38) MASK OF HANAKO TYPE ‘D’, date of cast unknown {Godard - after 1969}
60) LARGE LEFT HAND OF A PIANIST, 1969

1970’s
59) HAND, LEFT, LARGE CLENCHED WITH FIGURE , 1970
23) JEAN D’AIRE, SECOND MAQUETTE, 1971
26) BALZAC, NAKED WITH FOLDED ARMS (“C”) , 1972
45) ILLUSION’S RECEIVED BY THE EARTH (THE FALLEN ANGEL), n.d {Coubertin - after 1973}
22) JEAN D’AIRE, NUDE (REDUCTION) , 1974
27) BALZAC ‘F’ ATHLETE, 1974
1) ADAM WITH PILLAR , 1978
2) EVE WITH PILLAR, 1978
32) MASK OF THE MAN WITH THE BROKEN NOSE , 1978
10) FALLING MAN, 1979
56) THE PRAYER, 1979

1980’s
30) MONUMENTAL HEAD OF BALZAC, 1980
31) BUST OF JEAN BAPTISTE RODIN, 1981
12) THE THREE SHADES, 1981
44) IDYLL OF IXELLES, 1981
29) BALZAC IN DOMINICAN ROBE, 1981
18) JEAN DE FIENNES, VETU (G.M.) , 1983
37) MAQUETTE FOR THE MONUMENT TO WHISTLER, 1983
71) SORROW, 1983
9) THE CREATOR (BAS RELIEF), 1984
11) SMALL TORSO OF THE FALLING MAN , 1984
36) CLAUDE LORRAIN (P.M.), 1985
55) NARCISSE , 1985
51) MONUMENTAL TORSO OF THE WALKING MAN , 1986
17) BURGHERS OF CALAIS, 1ST MAQUETTE, date of cast unknown {Godard - 1987}
13) TOILETTE OF VENUS AND ANDROMEDE , 1987
70) TEN STEP LOST WAX CASTING PROCESS OF SORROW, 1987
8) CARYATID WITH STONE (G.M.), 1988
40) MONUMENTAL HEAD OF SAINT JOHN THE BAPTIST, 1988

1990’s
16) GATES OF HELL, 3RD MAQUETTE , 1991
50) WHISTLER’S MUSE, 1991
21) FINAL HEAD OF EUSTACHE DE ST. PIERRE, 1995


“Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession, Sculptures from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation at Glenbow Museum features such partial figures as The Cathedral (1908), Flying Figure (c.1890-91), and Large Left hand of a Pianist (1885) - Monumental Head of Balzac (Enlargement, 1897).”

Glenbow Museum’s
September 8, 2004 “A Season of Sculpture at Glenbow Museum” Press Release


WHAT IS “CONNOISSEUR?”
A “connoisseur” is defined, by the “American Heritage Dictionary,” as: “A person with expert knowledge or training, especially in the fine arts.”

IS THE GLENBOW MUSEUM A CONNOISSEUR?
The Cathedral, listed with a “1908” date by the Glenbow Museum, was actually reproduced in 1955 (Cantor Foundation exhibition checklist) some 38 years after Auguste Rodin’s death and some 47 years after the listed “1908” date

The Flying Figure, listed as “c. 1890-91” date by the Glenbow Museum, was actually reproduced by the Georges Rudier foundry which went into business in 1952 some thirty-five years after Auguste Rodin death. Furthermore, the Musee Rodin by French decree in 1957 began officially limiting editions to twelve. The Flying Figure is listed, in the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation exhibition checklist, as “Cast: 12.”

Large Left hand of a Pianist, listed with a “1885” date by the Glenbow Museum, was actually reproduced by Georges Rudier foundry in 1969, some fifty-two years after Auguste Rodin’s death and some eighty-four years after the listed date of “1885.” Additionally, it is listed with the edition number: “9/12.”


*
Monumental Head of Balzac
1897, Musée Rodin cast 9/12 in 1980
Bronze
20 ¼  x  20 7/8 x 16 3/8 in.
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation
www.cantorfoundation.org/Rodin/Gallery/rvg45.html


Monumental Head of Balzac, listed with a “Enlargement, 1897” date by the Glenbow Museum, was actually reproduced by Georges Rudier foundry in 1980, some sixty-three years after Auguste Rodin’s death and some eighty-three years after the listed date of “1897.” Additionally, it is listed with the edition number: “9/12.”


“The bronze sculptures in Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession, which range from small studies, reductions, enlargements and monumental works, span the length of Rodin’s career.”

Glenbow Museum’s
September 8, 2004 “A Season of Sculpture at Glenbow Museum” Press Release


Unfortunately, despite the Glenbow Museum pronouncement in their September 8, 2004 Press Release, fifty-four of the so-called “bronze sculptures” do not “span the length of Rodin’s career.” That career ended upon his death on November 17, 1917. Fifty-three of the fifty four non-disclosed fakes, in this exhibit, span from 1955 to 1995 or some 38 to 78 years after Auguste Rodin’s death.

Once again, by definition, rule of law and laws of nature, dead men don’t create sculptures.


“All works in this exhibition are original, either cast in bronze during Rodin’s lifetime, or cast posthumously according to sculptor’s explicit wishes and instructions to the French government.”

Glenbow Museum’s
September 8, 2004 “A Season of Sculpture” Press Release


NONSENSICAL AND FACTUALLY INACCURATE
A cast by definition is a reproduction. A reproduction is a copy of an original. An original is created by an artist. Anything posthumously reproduced would, at best, be a reproduction.

Therefore, Glenbow Museum’s nonsensical remarks, in their Press Release, does not change the fact that dead men can’t “posthumously” create “originals.”

Furthermore, the Glenbow Museum, has distorted, with or without intent to defraud, Auguste Rodin’s Will ie. “sculptor’s explicit wishes and instructions to the French government.”

WHAT WERE RODIN’S “EXPLICIT WISHES AND INSTRUCTIONS?”
Auguste Rodin’s “explicit wishes and instructions” are documented on page 285 in the National Gallery of Art’s published 1981 Rodin Rediscovered exhibition catalogue by the former Musee Rodin curator Monique Laurent. In her “Rodin and his Founders” essay, the former Musee Rodin curator documents some of the details of Auguste Rodin’s Will and his donation to the State of France.

AUGUSTE RODIN’S WILL
Former Musee Rodin curator Monique Laurent writes: “Let us indicate right away on this subject that he never fixed a precise limit to the number made. The only indication on this point occurs in the text of the donation of 1 April 1916, according to which “notwithstanding the transfer of artistic ownership authorized to the State of M. Rodin, the latter expressly reserves for himself the enjoyment, during his life, of the reproduction rights of those objects given by him, being well understood that the said right of reproduction will remain strictly personal to the donor who is forbidden to cede it for whatever reason to any third party. He will have, in consequence, the right to reproduce and to edit his works and to make impressions or mold for the usage which suits him. In the event that M. Rodin, exercising the right that he has thus reserved, contracts with an art editor for the reproduction in bronze of one or several works included in the present donation, the contract of publication cannot be made for a period of more than five years and the number of reproductions of each work shall not exceed ten.” (underline mine)

Once again, this Will clearly gave the Musee Rodin the “right of reproduction of those objects given by him” after his death in 1917.

Does the Musee Rodin reproduced from “those objects given by him {ie. Auguste Rodin}?”

1) NOT FROM THE ORIGINAL PLASTERS
On the Musee Rodin’s www.musee-rodin.fr/welcome.htm website, the current Musee Rodin curator Antoinette Romain writes: “Consequently, whenever it is decided to release a new "subject", a copy is first made from the old mould which can be sent without risk to the foundry where it undergoes the necessary preparations for casting. It is coated with an unmoulding agent, usually in a dark colour, and cut, before being cast again. This practice not only ensures absolute fidelity to the original but also preserves the old plasters which are obviously more valuable since they were made during the lifetime of Rodin.” (underline mine)

So, the Musee Rodin admits that the posthumous bronzes that they reproduced are not from “those objects given by him.” What are the legal requirements under French law, if any, for disclosure of “reproductions?”

1981 FRENCH DECREE
The Musee Rodin is located in Paris, France. The March 3, 1981 French decree no. 81.255, Article 9{4}, in part, states: Article 9--All facsimiles, casts of casts, copies, or other reproductions of an original work of art as set out in Article 71 of Appendix III of the General Code of Taxes, executed after the date of effectiveness of the present decree, must carry in a visible and indelible manner the notation ‘Reproduction’.” (underline mine)

The question is: In this upcoming Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession exhibit at the Glenbow Museum, are any of these 54 posthumously reproduced second-generation removed fakes marked at least, by the Musee Rodin, “in visible and indelible manner {with} the notation ‘Reproduction?’”


*
1925{5}

*
1967{6}

*
1968{7}

*
1979{8}

*
1986{9}

*
1995{10}


2) COUNTERFEIT “A RODIN” SIGNATURES
The above so-called “inscribed -- A Rodin” signatures were posthumously applied between 1925 and 1995 by the Musee Rodin or by the foundries with the Musee Rodin’s approval. The application of counterfeit “A Rodin” signatures onto posthumously reproduced bronzes is confirmed in the Musee Rodin’s and Tasende Gallery’s 1999 Sculptures from the Musee Rodin, Paris{11} catalogue.

TASENDE GALLERY
On page 47 of this catalogue, it is written: “All work cast under commission by the Musee Rodin includes the following mandatory inscriptions: - Rodin’s signature.” (underline mine)

WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF “SIGNATURE?”
Here are two independently documented definitions of the term “signature.” On the J. Paul Getty Trust’’s “www.getty.edu” website, under their Getty Vocabulary Program the term “signature” is defined as: “Persons' names written in their own hand.” Also, on page 1387 in the Seventh Edition of Black’s Law Dictionary, the term “signature” is defined as: “A person’s name or mark written by that person or at the person’s direction.” (underline mine)

How would the public ever know that Auguste Rodin did not sign “in {his} own hand” these so-called “Rodin signature{s},” much less that they were applied to posthumously reproduced second-generation fakes?


* * * * * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * * * *

“Auguste Rodin, The Thinker, 1880 enlarged in 1903-04, bronze,
Georges Rudier Foundry, no. 10/12, 79 x 51 1/4 x 55 1/4 inches,
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation and Stanford University Museum of Art”
Description given and the photographs reproduced are from the
RODIN, Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Collection brochure


3) EDITIONS NOT LIMITED TO TWELVE
On page 121 in the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s published 1976 Sculpture of Auguste Rodin{12} catalogue by John Tancock, there are nineteen 79” high Thinkers in bronze listed. One of those nineteen 79” high Thinkers is listed as: “Beverly Hills, Cantor, Fitzgerald Art Foundation. Cast no. 10/12.” How can there be nineteen 79” high Thinkers listed in the 1976 Sculpture of Auguste Rodin catalogue if one of them is described as being number 10 in a so-called edition of twelve?

Furthermore, this edition hanky-panky is further confirmed on the 1999 Norton Simon Museum of Art’s www.nortonsimon.org website. On the website, it states: “In 1902 , an enlarged seventy-nine inch version was cast, and since then at least twenty-one additional bronzes have been created from the original mold. The Norton Simon’s statue is from a 1969 edition of twelve authorized by the Musee Rodin.” (underline mine)

Now compare those documented facts, that some of the so-called editions of “Rodins” are not limited to twelve, to the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s website.

IRIS AND B. GERALD CANTOR FOUNDATION
On the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s 2004 www.cantorfoundation.org/ Rodin/Bronze/rbrz.html website, it states: “In 1956 French law limited production to twelve casts of each model. A system of numbering was established by French legislation in 1968 whereby the first eight of the twelve casts, numbered 1/8-8/8, have been available for the public to purchase; the last four, numbered I/IV-IV/IV, have been reserved for cultural institutions. This law was reestablished and strictly imposed in 1981{13}.” (underline mine)

What French law?

1978 FRENCH DECREE
One of the French decrees that mandates the Musee Rodin to limited editions of their posthumously reproduced “Rodins” is: Article 1 of a joint decree by the Ministries of Culture and Finance, issued on 5 September 1978, which regulates the internal administration of the Musee Rodin{14}.” In part, it states: -The reproduction of works of Rodin and the editions sold by the Musee Rodin consist of; -Original editions in bronze. These are executed from models in terra cotta or in plaster realized by Rodin and under the direct control of the museum, acting as the holder of the artist’s rights of authorship; the casting from each one of these models cannot in any case exceed twelve examples.” (underline mine)

CANTOR FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP?
The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation claims on their www. cantorfoundation.org website that “the Foundation places great emphasis on Rodin scholarship” and yet for the last twenty-eight years, since creation of the foundation in 1976, they didn’t know that the Musee Rodin’s promotion of “editions of twelve” was, in some cases, a lie?

Now compare these facts to the current Glenbow Museum’s statements made in their September 23, 2004 “The Curious Fixation of the Rodin Chaser” Press Release.


“Today, the number of posthumous casts taken from any given plaster is limited to twelve by French law. It is interesting to note, however, that the concept of the “limited edition has only been in effect for about the past 50 years.”

Glenbow Museum’s
September 23, 2004 “The Curious Fixation of the Rodin Chaser” Press Release


GLENBOW MUSEUM’S SCHOLARSHIP?
The Glenbow Museum in their September 23, 2004 “The Curious Fixation of the Rodin Chaser” Press Release states: “the concept of the “limited edition” has only been in effect for about the past 50 years.”

Unfortunately, the Glenbow Museum’s “concept of the ‘limited edition.’” as it applies to the Musee Rodin and their posthumous reproduction in bronze of Auguste Rodin’s work, seems to have been wishful thinking for the “past 50 years.”


*

Fall 1998 Sculpture Review “Casting of the Monument”


4) CANTOR FOUNDATION PICKS THE COLOR
The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation has picked the color ie. patina of at least one of their posthumously reproduced bronze fakes, The Monument to Victor Hugo, they promote in their exhibits as an “Auguste Rodin Sculpture.”


“As all Musee Rodin casts - must be assessed for quality on an individual basis. This is done by a Rodin expert who evaluates the bronze used in the cast, determines its fidelity to the modelling of the plaster model, and considers the technical finishing and the patina (colour).”

Glenbow Museum’s
September 23, 2004 “The Curious Fixation of the Rodin Chaser” Press Release


CANTOR FOUNDATION APPROVED THE COLOR TO BE ACHIEVED
This huge conflict of interest, by the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, is confirmed in the article “Casting of the Monument” by the Coubertin founders Frederic Colombier and Jean Dubos that was published in the Fall 1998 Sculpture Review{15} magazine. The article details the casting in bronze of the so-called Auguste Rodin’s Monument to Victor Hugo plaster. On page 34, the founders wrote: “The last stage is patination. It is the most delicate and essential as it brings out the full richness of the metal. After presentation of samples, the Musee Rodin and the Cantor Foundation approve the color to be achieved.”


From: Fernandina Beach, Florida | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Gary Arseneau
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8173

posted 08 February 2005 11:05 PM      Profile for Gary Arseneau     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Part 2 of 2

RUTH BUTLER HELPED PICKED THE COLOR
This picking of the color ie. patina of this bronze is additionally confirmed in the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s 1998 Rodin’s Monument to Victor Hugo{16} exhibition catalogue’s “Forward.” On page 10 of the “Forward” for this book, the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s Executive Director Rachael Blackburn states: “Ruth Butler, professor emerita at the University of Massachusetts in Boston, who wrote the introduction to this catalogue, offered her insightful guidance and worked closely with Mrs. Cantor, the Musee Rodin, and the foundry to determine the delicate nuances of the monument’s patina.” (underline mine)

In a September 21, 1999 telephone conversation with this author, Ruth Butler was asked: “Whether there was any historical research that would document what Auguste Rodin might have selected as the patina for the reproduction bronze?” Ruth Butler replied: “That basically, it was up to the foundry.” When asked whether the foundry asked for her approval of the patina, Ruth Butler replied: “Well.”

How can the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation claim to support “Rodin scholarship,” if they pick the color ie. patina of the bronzes they in turn misleading promote as “original Rodins?”


*
“1897 Monument to Victor Hugo plaster”
(page 113, 1981 Rodin Rediscovered catalogue)


*

“1964 Monument to Victor Hugo bronze”
(page 108, 1998 Rodin’s Monument to Victor Hugo)



5) POSTHUMOUSLY COMPLETED PLASTERS
The posthumously reproduced Auguste Rodin “sculptures” authorized by the Musee Rodin have, in at least one case such as The Monument to Victor Hugo bronze{s}, been reproduced from a posthumously completed{17} plaster, altered and reconstructed in the late 1950’s.

This posthumous practice of completing unfinished work by Auguste Rodin by the Musee Rodin is, in part, confirmed on the Musee Rodin’s current 2003 musee-rodin.fr website. Musee Rodin curator Antoinette Le Normaid-Romain writes: “Museum aware of their value {Rodin’s plasters} also took great care of them even completing them as time went by.” (underline mine)


*
“Hand of Rodin Holding Torso
1917, Musee Rodin cast in 1968
Bronze
6 1/8 x 8 ¾  x  4 1/8 in.
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Collection”
www.cantorfoundation.org/Rodin/Gallery/rvg65.html


IS THE “HAND OF RODIN HOLDING TORSO” AUTHENTIC?
On the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation www.cantorfoundation.org/ Rodin/Gallery/rvg65.html website, it states: “Hand of Rodin Holding Torso consists of a life cast taken directly from Rodin's hand by one of his assistants and a fragment known as Small Torso A, originally created for The Gates of Hell. While this composition was not likely assembled by Rodin, it is comparable to works such as The Hand of God that portray hands as symbols of creative power.”

On page 637, in the 1976 Sculpture of Auguste Rodin by John Tancock, the author writes: “Three weeks before Rodin’s death, Paul Cruet, who was largely responsible at that time for making Rodin’s molds, took this cast of his right hand. Into it was inserted a cast of a small torso by Rodin, Small Torso A, one of the innumerable small fragments possibly connected with The Gates of Hell (no. 1). The torso has since been cast separately. This composite work, made from a life cast and an original work, which pays homage to Rodin the sculptor.” This plaster was “not signed or inscribed.” (underline mine)

Notice the “A Rodin” signature on the wrist of the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s “Hand of Rodin holding Torso” bronze. Who signed this posthumous bronze reproduction since Auguste Rodin never signed the plaster? Remember, dead men don’t sign anything.

Early in Auguste Rodin’s career, his “Age of Bronze” sculpture was criticized by some critics as being cast from life despite his denials.

So in the last weeks of his life, Paul Cruet takes advantage of a stroke-ridden invalid Auguste Rodin and has his hand reproduced/cast in plaster and subsequently combined with one of his original plaster sculptures. Now eighty-five years later it has been cast in bronze, inscribed with the counterfeit “A Rodin” signature and promoted by the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation as a “sculpture” by Auguste Rodin.

The same unethical practice of casting from life Auguste Rodin fought so hard to deny about his art, is now attributed directly to him with a counterfeit “A Rodin” signature applied to create the illusion he approved the entire process when he obviously did not because he was dead at the time.


“Notably, all the bronzes in the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Collection and Foundation were personally vetted by the world’s leading expert on Rodin, the late Dr. Albert Elsen (d.1995) of Stanford University.”

Glenbow Museum’s
September 8, 2004 “A Season of Sculpture” Press Release


THE ALTERATION AND CORRUPTION OF RODIN’S LEGACY
The last few years before Auguste Rodin’s death, his control and oversight of his plasters was subverted by those entrusted by the State of France to protect it. A prime example of this subversion is the first Musee Rodin director Leonce Benedite.

FIRST MUSEE RODIN DIRECTOR LEONCE BENEDITE
In Albert Elsen’s 1985 Gates of Hell by Auguste Rodin{18} book, on page 148, the author states: “As events after Rodin’s death were to prove, Benedite did overstep his authority on certain occasions. In the matter of the final assembly of the doorway, Judith Cladel, who was dismissed by Benedite as a curator at the Musee Rodin, wrote during the years 1933-36 that workmen told her in 1917 that Benedite edited their efforts on at least one occasion in a way they felt Rodin would not have approved: “Some of Rodin’s scandalized assistants who cast his plasters made it known to me that, charged with the reassembly of The Gates of Hell, they received orders to place certain figures in different arrangement than that which the artist wanted, because “that would be better.” (underline mine)

“Rodin, like most of his contemporaries, did not generally supervise this process but entrusted his work to employees who used certain reputable foundries.”

Glenbow Museum’s
September 8, 2004 “A Season of Sculpture” Press Release


FOUNDER CASTING WITHOUT AUTHORIZATION
One of those “occasions,” that Albert Elsen refers to, is described in his Footnote 17 on page 253 of his book. The author writes: “In 1921, during the course of a trial on charges brought by the State against a founder who was casting Rodin’s work without authorization, it was shown that Benedite had authorized the enlargement of Rodin’s La Defense after the artist’s death.” (underline mine)

HENRI LEBOSSE, SCULPTEUR REPRODUCTEUR HABITUEL
On page 253, in Albert Elsen’s “Rodin’s “Perfect Collaborator,” Henri Lebosse” essay in the National Gallery of Art’s 1981 Rodin Rediscovered exhibition catalogue, the Stanford Professor and Rodin scholar writes: “From the mid-1890’s until his death, Rodin entrusted most if not all of his important enlargements and reductions to this dedicated and today unknown technician who referred to himself as Rodin’s “sculpteur reproducteur habituel.” Lebosse wrote the master on January 24, 1903. “I would like to be your perfect collaborator.”

1920 SCANDAL INVOLVING FAKE WORKS
Unfortunately, on page 256 of this essay, Albert Elsen documents that Henri Lebosse became one of Auguste Rodin’s biggest betrayers. After August Rodin’s death in 1917, the Musee Rodin Director Benedite directed Henri Lebosse to increase the original scale of the sculpture “The Defense” four times. Albert Elsen writes: “Tragically for Rodin’s “perfect collaborator,” the Verdun enlargement became part of a 1920 scandal involving fake works, marble carvers who continued to turn out sculpture signed with Rodin’s name, and unauthorized bronze casts by the Barbedienne foundry.” (underline mine)

RODIN CHALLENGES FOUNDER FOR COUNTERFEITING
On page 289, in the 1981 Rodin Rediscovered exhibition catalogue, former Musee Rodin curator Monique Laurent further explains the circumstances behind the 1919 scandal and trial when she writes: “As for Philippe Montagutelli, founder, 54, avenue du maine in Paris, who worked in 1912 and 1913 on Clemenceau, France and Carrie-Belleuse, among others, but in September 1913, Rodin challenged him and filed a complaint for counterfeiting. This first affair would be followed in 1918-1919 by a famous trial for fakes and counterfeits in which the sculptor Archilles Fidi, of Italian origin, was also implicated.”

The Musee Rodin’s inauspicious beginnings before and after Auguste Rodin’s death in 1917 has not changed much in eighty-seven years as documented by the current Musee Rodin’s deceptive application of counterfeit “A Rodin” signatures on second-generation removed bronze fakes in editions not always limited to twelve.


“All posthumous casts derived from moulds and plasters in Rodin’s studio under the aegis of the Musee Rodin fulfill Rodin’s express wishes. These posthumous casts are universally considered as authentic and original by scholars, art experts, museums and collectors around the world.”

Glenbow Museum’s
September 23, 2004 “The Curious Fixation of the Rodin Chaser” Press Release


POSTHUMOUS CASTS ARE ORIGINAL?
Glenbow Museum’s statement that posthumous casts are “original” is an obvious huge “non-sequitur.”

WHAT IS A NON-SEQUITUR?
On page 1080 of the Seventh Edition of Black’s Law Dictionary, “non-sequitur” is defined as: “An inference or conclusion that does not logically follow from the premises.”

Only living artists can create “originals.” By definition, rule of law and laws of nature, anything posthumously reproduced would be, at best, a reproduction. Quality aside, these posthumous “Rodins,” in this exhibit at best, are no different than the reproductions of Rodin’s work offered for sale in museum gift shops.

Where did these museums come up with this nonsensical idea that posthumous reproductions could ever be considered “originals?”

5 SEPTEMBER 1978 FRENCH DECREE
Possibly, this abuse of the term “original” may have been misconstrued from a French decree “Article 1 of a joint decree by the Ministries of Culture and Finance, issued on 5 September 1978,” which regulates the internal administration of the Musee Rodin{19}.” In part, it states: -The reproduction of works of Rodin and the editions sold by the Musee Rodin consist of; -Original editions in bronze. These are executed from models in terra cotta or in plaster realized by Rodin.” (underline mine)

In this 1978 French decree, the term “original” is used as an adjective to describe and separate the Musee Rodin’s posthumous “editions” of reproductions in bronze of Rodin’s work from others who legally may posthumously reproduce in bronze any of Rodin’s work that is in the public domain.

CANTOR FOUNDATION SAYS AUTHORIZED CASTS ARE ORIGINAL
Certainly, this serious misconception is perpetuated self-servingly by the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation on page 36 of their RODIN 101: Docent Manual. In part, it states: All authorized casts made by any foundry are considered ‘originals.’” (underline mine)

So why does the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation defy independently documented definitions, rule of law and laws of nature to promote posthumously reproduced second-generation removed fakes as “originals?”


*
www.cantorfoundation.org

10) Rodin, Auguste
Gates of Hell, 3rd Maquette
1880, Musee Rodin cast 1/8 in 1991
Bronze
Cast: 1/8 Foundry: Godard
Patina: X
Dimensions: 43 5/8 x 29 1/16 x 11 3/4 in.
CC ID# 1511
Iris and B. Gerald Collection
Insurance $250,000


*
www.stanford.edu

25) Rodin, Auguste
Kiss, the
c. 1881-82,
Bronze
Cast: X Foundry: Barbedienne
Patina: brown with gold highlights
Dimensions: 10 x 6 1/4 x 5 7/8 in.
CC ID# 1711
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual
Arts at Stanford University, gift of Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation
Insurance $50,000

(Source: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s exhibition and insurance checklists)

RODIN 101: DOCENT MANUAL
This can be answered on page 36 in the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s RODIN 101: Docent Manual, under “Frequently Asked Questions.” The question that is written is: “Is there more ‘value’ ascribed to works made by one foundry than by another?” (undeline mine)

The answer, given by the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, is: “In terms of monetary ‘value’ and interest to a collector or institution, there is often a higher ‘value’ put on works produced during Rodin’s lifetime. All authorized casts made by any foundry are considered ‘originals.’ However, casts that were made before Rodin’s death in 1917 are often appraised for higher amounts and fetch larger sums at auction.” (underline mine)

Let’s test the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s economic theory on the monetary value of “lifetime casts” versus so-called posthumous “originals’ using their own insurance list for two of their so-called “Rodins” in this exhibit.

POSTHUMOUS REPRODUCTION VALUED $200,000 MORE?
The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation insurance and checklist for this Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession exhibit lists a 43” high Gates of Hell, 3rd Maquette, with a given insured value of $250,000, that was cast ie. reproduced in bronze in 1991, some seventy-four years after Auguste Rodin’s death in 1917.

On the otherhand, the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation lists a potential ten inch high lifetime cast, The Kiss, with an insured value of $50,000 that was possibly cast ie. reproduced in bronze by the Gustave Leblanc-Barbedienne foundry before Auguste Rodin’s death in 1917.

So which one would a connoisseur of the arts choose? Would they purchase a small potential lifetime bronze cast, titled The Kiss, for $50,000 that was possibly approved by Auguste Rodin before his death? Or would they rather pay $200,000 more, or $250,000 for an extra large fake, titled the Gates of Hell, 3rd Maquette, with a counterfeit A Rodin signature applied that was posthumously reproduced thirteen years ago in 1991, some seventy-four years after Auguste Rodin’s death?

The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s practice of misrepresenting posthumously reproduced second-generation removed fakes as “originals” may be nonsensical, unethical and fraught with serious questions of law but it sure seems profitable.

HOW IS IT PROFITABLE?
These museums and cultural institutions, that accept these so-called “Rodins” for exhibit from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, generate potential revenue by: 1) charging admission, 2) receiving city, state and federal grants, 3) accepting corporate sponsorship money to defray exhibit costs and 4) selling related items in their museum gift shops.

ADMISSION FEE
To view this upcoming Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession exhibit, the Glenbow Museum is charging a $12 per adult admission fee.

What’s in it for the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation? Aside from generating revenue by renting their “Rodins” to museums and cultural institutions, the real benefit for the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation comes when these so-called “Rodins” are exhibited in museum venues and are given the rubber-stamped air of authenticity that a museum inherently bestows. The result being potentially higher appraised value for their so-called “Rodins” with the possible future windfall being: 1) large tax-write offs for donations and/or 2) outright sales.


DEFINITIONS ARE THE KEY
Finally, to clearly define this deception in this Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession, Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, lets document the definitions of key terms.

WHAT IS AN "ORIGINAL?"
In the J. Paul Getty Trust’s www.getty.edu website that “supports limited research and cataloging efforts,” under their Getty Vocabulary Program the term “original” is defined as: “Use to distinguish from reproductions or other types of copies.” In Ralph Mayer’s Dictionary of Art Terms and Techniques, “original” is defined as: “An artist’s independent creation. 2. a work of art considered as a PROTOTYPE, as that from which copies and reproductions have been made.”

WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF "CAST?"
In Ralph Mayer’s A Dictionary of Art Terms & Techniques, on page 66, the term “cast” is defined as: “To reproduce an object such as a piece of sculpture, by means of a MOLD.”

So an "original" would be a "work of art" by the artist and a "cast" would be reproduced from a "sculpture.”

WHAT IS A “SCULPTURE?”
In Ralph Mayer’s A Dictionary of Art Terms & Techniques, on page 372, the term “sculpture” is defined as: “The creation of three dimensional forms by carving, modeling or assembly. In carving, the sculptor removes unwanted material.... In modeling on the other hand, the sculptor creates a form by building it up...”

WHAT IS A “SCULPTOR?”
This is answered in the J. Paul Getty Trust’s www.getty.edu website. Under their Getty Vocabulary Program the term “sculptor” is defined as: “Artists who specialize in creating images and forms that are carried out primarily in three dimensions, generally in the media of stone, wood, or metal.”

Since Auguste Rodin died in 1917 and at least 54 of these objects were "cast" after his death, 53 of them between 1955 and 1995, they could not be "sculptures" by the "sculptor" Auguste Rodin because he was still dead.

Hence, dead people don't make sculpture.

WHAT IS A “REPRODUCTION?”
In Ralph Mayer’s A Dictionary of Art Terms & Techniques the term “reproduction” is defined as: “A general term for any copy, likeness, or counterpart of an original work of art or of a photograph, done in the same medium as the original or in another, and done by someone other than the creator of the original.”

Since Auguste Rodin died in 1917 and at least 54 of these objects were "cast" after his death, they would have to be reproduced by "someone other than the creator of the original." Therefore, at best, they would be "reproductions."

Are these fifty-four objects reproduced after Auguste Rodin’s death at least reproductions? Unfortunately, not.

Once again, the Musee Rodin admits on their www.musee-rodin.fr{21} website that they do not send Auguste Rodin’s original plasters but posthumously reproduced plaster reproductions to the foundry for casting in bronze. A reproduction is a copy of an original work of art done by someone other than the artist. Therefore, any bronzes reproduced from these plaster reproductions would not be reproductions of an original work of art as required by the definition of “reproduction” but copies of copies.

In other words, by avoiding sending the hypothetical original plasters to the foundry, they have willingly given up the authentic original surface details made by the working fingers of Rodin himself or that Rodin approved through his collaboration with his “sculpteur reproducteur habituel{22}” Henri Lebosse. Each time the surface of one of these subjects is approximated by the necessary crude handling of the materials used in the reproduction processes, there is visible change. The resulting pieces may be interesting to look at, but it is an absurdity to pretend they are just the way Rodin would have wanted and intended for them to appear.

WHAT IS A “FAKE?”
Once again, on page 617 of the Seventh Edition of Black’s Law Dictionary, the term “fake” is defined as: “Something that is not what it purports to be.”

If you had “bronze reproductions” reproduced from “plaster reproductions” posthumously reproduced from Auguste Rodin’s original plasters and then misrepresented as “sculpture”, would you have a "fake" or “something that is not what it purports to be?” The answer is: “Yes.”

Now that you the reader have these independent definitions of key terms to guide you, the enclosed documentation will clearly show that the Musee Rodin and business partners have been deceptively cashing in over the last 87 years at the expense of the public and Auguste Rodin’s legacy.

CONCLUSION
What needs to be accomplished is the full and honest disclosure of “reproductions” as “reproductions” by all museums, auction houses and art dealers. If the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, Glenbow Museum and all participating museums, in this Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession, Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation exhibit, will give full and honest disclosure for all “reproductions” as: “Reproductions posthumously reproduced with reproduced signatures applied”, it would allow museum patrons to give informed consent if they chose to pay admission to see these “reproductions” in this exhibit.

But if these “objects” are not “reproductions” or copies of the artist’s original artwork but second generation or more removed “fakes” ie. “something that is not what it purports to be” then serious consequences of law may come into play for those who chose to misrepresent these “objects” for profit.

The reputations and legacy of living and past artists, present and future museum art patrons and the art-buying public deserve the re-establishment of the obvious; that the living presence and participation of the artist to once again be required, as it always should have been, to create the piece of art attributable to the artist if indeed it is attributed to them, much less purported to have been signed by them.

Footnotes:

1) Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation’s “Dayton Art Institute, Working Checklist, May 7, 1998”

2) page 290 in former Musee Rodin curator Monique Laurent’s RODIN AND HIS FOUNDERS essay published in the National Gallery of Art’s 1981 Rodin Rediscovered exhibition catalogue.

3) page 289 in former Musee Rodin curator Monique Laurent’s RODIN AND HIS FOUNDERS essay published in the National Gallery of Art’s 1981 Rodin Rediscovered exhibition catalogue. The author writes: “Leblanc-Barbedienne thus owned exclusive rights to the working of reductions for the Eternal Spring and of The Kiss except for the original size which the sculptor reserved for himself, but with the obligation to reserve the casting for the same firm.”

4) page 281, in Jean Chatelain’s “13. An Original in Sculpture” essay published in the National

5) (Detail page 54, 1998 Rodin’s Monument to Victor Hugo) “Jules Dalou” - “inscribed---A Rodin” - in 1925 - “Alexis Rudier Foundry”

6) (Detail page 99, 1998 Rodin’s Monument to Victor Hugo) “Iris” - “inscribed---A Rodin” - in 1967 - “Georges Rudier Foundry”

7) (Detail page 84,1998 Rodin’s Monument to Victor Hugo Rodin) “Balzac” - “inscribed---A Rodin” - in 1968 - “Susse Foundry”

8) (Detail page 91, 1987, The Cantor Gift to The Brooklyn Museum) “Damned Women” - “inscribed---A Rodin” - in 1979 “Coubertin Foundry”

9) (Detail 1999 RODIN, Tasende Gallery Catalogue) “Ariane” - “inscribed---A Rodin” - in 1986 “Godard Foundry”

10) (Detail 1999 RODIN, Tasende Gallery Catalogue) “The Martyr” - “inscribed---A Rodin” - in 1995 “Godard Foundry”

11) Catalogue organized and edited by Mary Beth Hynes and Betina Tasende - Historical excerpts for sculptures provided by Musee Rodin and translated by Intex Translations ISBN 9655319-5-3

12) Copyright © 1976 by the Philadelphia Museum of Art ISBN 0-8923-157-2

13) www.cantorfoundation.org

14) page 281 in Jean Chatelain’s “13. An Original in Sculpture” essay published in the National Gallery of Art’s 1981 Rodin Rediscovered catalogue ISBN 0-89468-001-3 (pbk.) AACR2

15) Sculpture Review Fall 1998 Vol XLVII No.2 ISSN 0747-5284 Editorial Telephone # (212) 529-1763

16) © 1998 Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation ISBN 1 85894 071 0 (exhibition paperback)
Gallery of Art’s 1981 Rodin Rediscovered catalogue ISBN 0-89468-001-3 (pbk.) AACR2

17) In a July 1999 E-mail to the former Cummer Museum curator Dr. Robert Torchia from Rodin Scholar, Professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts and member of the board of directors Musee Rodin Ruth Butler, she wrote: “The plaster mold used for the bronze VICTOR HUGO MONUMENT that belongs to the Cantor Foundation, as well as the cast made in 1997 for the Musee Rodin, is the same one that was used for a monument seen in the Salon of 1897. It was repaired sometime in the late 1950’s in anticipation of the casting that was inaugurated in Paris in 1964.” (underline mine)

18) © 1985 by Albert Elsen Published with the assistance of the Cantor Fitzgerald Foundation

19) page 281 in Jean Chatelain’s “13. An Original in Sculpture” essay published in the National Gallery of Art’s 1981 Rodin Rediscovered catalogue ISBN 0-89468-001-3 (pbk.) AACR2

20) Musee Rodin curator Antoinette Le Normaid-Romain’s statement on the 2004 Musee Rodin’s www.musee-rodin.fr website. (To find this statement, access the website then: a) Chose “Collections,” b) Chose “Meudon” and c) Scoll done to the above photograph titled: “Assemblage of two figures of Eve and the Crouching Woman.” The statement is in the subsequent paragraph.)

21) On page 249 in Albert Elsen’s “10. Rodin’s ‘Perfect Collaborator,’ Henri Lebosse” essay published in the National Gallery of Art’s 1981 Rodin Rediscovered catalogue ISBN 0-89468-001-3 (pbk.) AACR2

Bio:
Gary Arseneau is an artist, painter, printmaker of original lithographs, gallery owner in Fernandina Beach, Florida and author of the self-published books “The Monument to Victor Hugo DECEPTION, The marketing and profit of “inauthentic” and “counterfeit” Degas Bronzes, Casting Doubt and The Gates of Hell, Are these really Rodins?

The many misperceptions about original lithography voiced by some of his gallery visitors have led Gary to become a tireless researcher into the operation of the national and international marketplace for original (and not so original) printmaking and, of course, sculpture.


From: Fernandina Beach, Florida | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
catje
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posted 08 February 2005 11:39 PM      Profile for catje     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
hmm. not unlike the degas bronzes which were at the AGO so recently.

interesting debate on it summarized here.

not to mention a more general discussion here

I always liked PF Hoving's remark that no fake ever lasts a generation after it was made. Our concepts of previous times are so subjective.

i'd love to add my own current exhibit reviews to this thread, but the sad fact is that i haven't been to a major museum since my contract ended at the RBCM, and all the Maltwood has up right now is the Art Education faculty show. Nice stuff but neither historic nor earthshattering.

[ 08 February 2005: Message edited by: catje ]


From: lotusland | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
catje
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posted 09 February 2005 04:37 AM      Profile for catje     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
actually i did catch Massive Change at the Vancouver Art Gallery. It struck me as essentially a science exhibit with a political thesis, which somehow makes it perfect for an art gallery. Overly optimistic, to my view, but certainly interesting.

I think it's going to TO next. The ROM? The AGO?


From: lotusland | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 24 February 2005 09:34 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In the interest of fairness, here is the Glenbow's media page with a link to its Press Release: The Curious Fixation of the "Rodin Chaser"
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
catje
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posted 25 February 2005 04:34 AM      Profile for catje     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Since 1999, the “Rodin Chaser” has dogged this acclaimed exhibition in different centres across the
United States. By now, the pattern is familiar. Shortly before the scheduled opening of the exhibition,
local media are bombarded with lengthy and inflammatory e-mails from Florida artist and gallery
owner Gary Arseneau that denounce the sculptures in the Magnificent Obsession show as fakes. Driven
by an obsession of his own, Mr. Arseneau is a self-proclaimed crusader on a mission to expose
supposed art fraud. He is the self-published author of several books on art and deception and has
been a vocal critic of many different exhibitions over the years. Mr. Arseneau tracks the itinerary of
A Magnificent Obsession as it travels from place to place and Glenbow Museum is the next venue.

Hmmm. One wonders.


From: lotusland | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 25 February 2005 12:11 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've been to the ROM, sort of. I was spending a week in Toronto doing research, but had lost a contact lens before arriving. I am very near-sighted, and my glasses were comparatively weak, so when looking at things in display cases, I had to put my nose right up against the glass to see anything. Still, it's an interesting place; though I came away with the feeling that mummies should be buried and not displayed.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 25 February 2005 12:24 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Aha! So that was you! Those smudges on the glass!

The ROM is kind of depressin', isn't it? I don't know that the Libeskind crystals are going to save it, either. Very odd collection.

The Gardiner across the street is much more cheerful, if a bit flighty. Ceramics, you know. Girl stuff.

Rodin is powerful, but I would like to see a Maillol before I shuffle off. I've never seen a Maillol except in pictures. They just look so wonderfully swollen to me. I would like to touch one.


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skdadl
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posted 25 February 2005 12:26 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

[ 25 February 2005: Message edited by: skdadl ]


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
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posted 25 February 2005 12:33 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Nice; I love these artists who portray chubby as sexy. I definitely found with the Rodin exhibit that the big ones were more impressive than the little copies.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 25 February 2005 01:04 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think this one is so beautiful. If you image-google Tumbling Woman, you will find several versions of her, by the artist Eric Fischl.


They remind me of Maillol. And other things, of course.

[ 25 February 2005: Message edited by: skdadl ]


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