babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » right brain babble   » culture   » Digital Libraries

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: Digital Libraries
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 14 December 2004 02:57 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Globe & Mail story about Google planning to make an online reading room by scanning and indexing material from four universities and the NY public library.
quote:
...The Michigan and Stanford libraries are the only two so far to agree to submit all their material to Google's scanners.

The New York library is allowing Google to include a small portion of its books no longer covered by copyright while Harvard is confining its participation to 40,000 volumes so it can gauge how well the process works. Oxford wants Google to scan all its books originally published before 1901...


I think this is a great idea. Scanning the books means you are looking at pictures of the actual books; and they have been OCR'd and indexed which means you can search for specific words or names. (OCRing is apretty good way for the computer to read words, but it occasionally misinterprets words and numbers; unless someone has gone through and checked which is unlikely when they are dealing with thousands of books.)

There are other collections of digitized material online:

Our future our past
Has Alberta local histories, newspapers, folklore, art, air photos, etc.

Our roots
Has Canadian local histories, including some Alberta ones not at the previous site.

canadiana.ca
Used to be called the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions and has been reproducing old books, pamphlets, etc., on microfiche cards for years.

Anyone have other good digital library websites?

[ 14 December 2004: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 15 December 2004 12:20 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
More in Globe about digital ibraries:
quote:
...Library and Archives Canada, which combines the former National Library of Canada and National Archives of Canada, has been especially active, scanning millions of pages of documents a year. It has now put all of the publications, including pamphlets and books, printed in Canada in the 18th and 19th century on-line for the public to access, said Ian Wilson, librarian and archivist of Canada.

"We're building this systematically and we're looking right now at the feasibility of other print material for the 20th century," he said. But even if the archive digitizes several million pages a year over 10 years, it will still have only less than half of 1 per cent of the national archives on-line, Wilson added...



From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 15 December 2004 12:43 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is SUCH fantastic news, no? Imagine having the whole of Stanford or Oxford or Princeton or the NYCL online eventually. Yippee. I can't get over this. It is one of the few things that make me wish I were younger.

I didn't know about our national archives. Bad me. That is also wonderful.

All navigation tips from those already practised will be appreciated.

But isn't it great?!?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 15 December 2004 12:44 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
PS: Didn't we hear last year that MIT was planning to put all its profs' courses online? Has anyone followed that story?
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7136

posted 15 December 2004 01:05 PM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My optimistic side is thrilled that this stuff can be accessed online. Research is getting so much easier to do every day.

But my inner pessimist can't help worrying that stuff like this won't remain free after a certain period of time. There's something about the Internet that boggles my mind. Yes, I know I pay a monthly rate that allows me to navigate and do all kinds of stuff for work and play, but I'm always afraid that the weight of it all will make it come crashing down someday.

Well, I've put the pessimistic worrywart back into her closet and can continue being happy at having access to so much information and interaction.


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 15 December 2004 01:11 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I worry too, brebis noire.

We have to get all the different kinds of geeks and nerds and wonks united on this front. Some are facing more immediate attacks on their free use of the Web than others. But it is such a wonderful thing. We have to fight to keep it free.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
miles
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7209

posted 15 December 2004 01:13 PM      Profile for miles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I worry a bit more about the copyright issues. We have seen music downloading basically stopped due to copyright. So I as well fear that I will need to pay some crazy amount for the right to read the research and other data.

I know that they will not post it out of the good of their hearts but I wonder if a compromise can be found to keep it free.


From: vaughan | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
scribblet
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4706

posted 15 December 2004 01:22 PM      Profile for scribblet        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have been using the Toronto Reference Libary to research articles and journals, its great, find the one you want and email it to yourself. However, I just heard (forget where) that there is talk about charging $5.00 per article emailed. Now that would really put a cramp in a college students research wouldn't it? Imagine how many articles a student would need for various essays, not a fair tax I think.
From: Canada | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 15 December 2004 01:29 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
About books still in copyright: Google seem to be saying that they will only make excerpts of these books freely available, and then I presume they will somehow link people to the publisher or a bookseller for the full volume. (Sounds like a lot of checking and linking, no?)

Still, there are VAST reserves in all libraries that are no longer in copyright.

Och, if Diderot had known that we could do this, the man would be bouncing and rolling all over Paris, beside himself with glee. If there is one ancient I would love to bring forward to our times, it would be Denis. Mind you, there are lots of things about Now that wouldn't make him happy, but I'd show him the good stuff first.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 888

posted 15 December 2004 01:33 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
skdadl: You're talking about MIT OpenCourseWare:

http://ocw.mit.edu/index.html


From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 15 December 2004 01:52 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
On the sites for local history I cited above, you can read the page of the book, and I think you can print it out, but you cannot cut and paste text from the page.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 15 December 2004 02:00 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thank you, Mandos. That site has its limitations, but if one is determined, one can find good guidelines, anyway, to independent learning.

I just ran through as much as I could find on one course, the only course they seem to have on the Enlightenment, which they treat as a history course. Undergrad course. The basic text is an anthology of excerpts, but there is a modest list of other texts, and more interesting references in the calendar.

It's a help. It does leave one with the feeling that one has to be there, though, doesn't it.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chris Borst
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 731

posted 15 December 2004 05:47 PM      Profile for Chris Borst     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There is a large number of e-text archives available, as well as self-archives, working paper (e.g., IDEAS) and preprint (e.g., E-Prints) archives. The most important digital libraries are Project Gutenberg (the best!) and Bartleby. Perseus is the essential source for Greek and Latin classics, while I'm very fond of McMaster's Archive for the History of Economic Thought. Also check out the Internet Library of Early Journals and the sources available through the Digital Library of Early Scholarly Journals, especially the awesome Gallica collection from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. U of T also has a small digital library, primarily classics of English literature and various Canadiana.
From: Taken off to the Great White North | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 15 December 2004 05:50 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
memo to audra: Please archive this thread in Best of Babble when it gets full up.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
No Yards
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4169

posted 15 December 2004 07:26 PM      Profile for No Yards   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For the techies out there we have Free Tech Books.
From: Defending traditional marriage since June 28, 2005 | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
unmaladroit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7325

posted 17 December 2004 03:54 PM      Profile for unmaladroit        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
a couple of good sites that i like:

complete online books: The Mondo Politico Library
The Full Text of Some of the World's Most Important Political Books, Online and Free

and online interviews: The Paris Review - The DNA of Literature - complete pdf interviews with some of the world's best authors, from the '50's to present.


From: suspicionville, bc | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 888

posted 17 December 2004 04:09 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For many of the philosophy and reading courses, there's very little in the way of online notes in MIT OCW. Disappointingly this appears to be true for the cognitive science stuff. I was hoping that the course on sociobiology and gender would have some notes, but it doesn't.

For the more experimental math/science/engineering courses, there are extensive notes. If you want to learn technology, OCW is pretty good.


From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 888

posted 17 December 2004 04:11 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I should also note that most universities publish similar stuff online, but just not in such a systematic way. Most of my courses, at least, are online and have been so for six years. I'm in computer science, and other departments are alas slow to catch up, but by and large almost everything but reading courses/discussion seminars in some of the humanities is online these days at almost every university.

The only thing they need to do, as I said, is get their act together and publish it in a single system like OCW.


From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 17 December 2004 04:21 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Paris Review interviews! Thank you, notmaladroitatall.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chris Borst
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 731

posted 17 December 2004 04:40 PM      Profile for Chris Borst     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I should also recommend the Marxists Internet Archive, Anarchy Archives, Anarchist Library, Documents from the Women's Liberation Movement, The Sixties Project, The Library at nothingness.org, and the Learning Resources page at the Swaraj Foundation. There is also some worthwhile material at the Historical Text Archive.
From: Taken off to the Great White North | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
pebbles
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6400

posted 17 December 2004 05:42 PM      Profile for pebbles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
www.pgdp.net

Not an on-line library, but an on-line library builder-upper.


From: Canada | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7050

posted 17 December 2004 07:51 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
An online library of early horror literature:

Lovecraft page


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 19 December 2004 06:31 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Wow, what a wealth of suggestions added while I was in bed with a heartrending cough and a disgusting snuffle! This is great and the thread certainly deserves to be well preserved. I feel like a mad scientist with a whole room full of brains to pick; though Chris Borst's seems to be the juiciest so far.

I will add to the mix the British Library which includes various treasures on line such as pages of the Lindisfarne Gospels, and much more; and it led me to the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography which lists hundreds of articles about electronic publishing, but also has a resources list which lists more sites for digital libraries, books, images, etc.

There are all sorts of archives and museums which probably have sites, but I'll keep it down to two: Archives Canada which is connected to the provincial and territorial archives as well as the National Archives and Library; and the Glenbow Museum and Archives in Calgary; to check out their photos, maps, scanned documents, etc., on line use the Library & Archives search menu.

Keep up the good brainstorm!


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 14 January 2005 07:18 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm bumping this because it's a darn good thread and there is a cool new reference here for any history buffs interested in history blogs, as well as links for science and philosophy blogs.Intro to History Carnival
quote:
Welcome to the History Carnival
This page exists to introduce and co-ordinate the History Carnival, a showcase of weblog posts about history (and historiography and history teaching). It's modelled on Tangled Bank (for science blogs), the Philosophers' Carnival (for, well you guessed it, philosophy blogs) and Carnivalesque (on the 'early modern' period in history).

The goal of these carnivals is to provide a regular showcase of the best blogs - well-known and not so well-known - in their fields. If you follow the links above you can get a feel of how they work, but essentially a carnival consists of a list, with editorial comments, of a varied range of blog posts (typically numbering between 8 and 12 entries) recently published. Frequencies vary depending on the topic - the initial hope is that there is enough history blogging out there, and enough willing volunteers for hosting, to sustain roughly fortnightly issues.



From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 15 January 2005 01:04 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
bump
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
kingblake
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3453

posted 15 January 2005 01:10 AM      Profile for kingblake     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
bump right back atcha!
From: In Regina, the land of Exotica | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
catje
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7841

posted 15 January 2005 05:44 AM      Profile for catje     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
the great disappointment of google scholar (www.scholar.google.com) is that so many of the results require subscription. To get around this, you have two options:
1. click the 'library search' option, plug in your postal code and pray
2. actually do the search in your local library, where that library search will automatically hookup with any databases the library subscribes to (vancouver public has thousands) or can get through interlibrary loan

From: lotusland | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 17 January 2005 07:09 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
bump ba dump
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 28 February 2005 03:29 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Another cool reference: Library of Congress. Just for an example, the Maps Collection includes Panoramic Maps and Railroad Maps which have some historic maps of parts of Canada, that you can zoom in on at various levels; eg., a panoramic map of Halifax in 1869, I think.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 28 February 2005 03:37 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, you found it! You found it! I've been looking for this thread, but couldn't find it.

audra should be the one to post this link, actually; I got it from her originally, but she may have forgotten to transfer it here:

Working Class Movement Library

quote:
The Working Class Movement Library (WCML) is a collection of English language books, periodicals, pamphlets, archives and artefacts, concerned with the activities, expression and enquiries of the labour movement, its allies and its enemies, since the late 1700s.

And I think that lagatta has some related links to add.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 28 February 2005 04:52 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Great! The more the merrier.

Something else I found; Australian War Memorial has a link to "Captured in Colour" which links to colour photos of WWI. You have to search around a little; but they are good photos.

[ 28 February 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 04 March 2005 12:36 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yee-haw! Here's a really big library gone digital: New York Public Library Has galleries and lots of maps it appears.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 13 March 2005 06:21 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's one about films of workingclass northern Britain about 1900-1913:
Mitchell and Kenyon Collection. Among other things, this page links to a gallery of stills from some films, and to an excellent Guardian article about the films and the social context for them. Guardian Link
quote:
...The images, then, have a freshness and clarity, but that (to the film historian or otherwise) is only part of their appeal. What they show is a world now lost to us: the busy world of northern Britain in its manufacturing, mining heyday; the world that, among other things, created and sustained this newspaper as the Manchester Guardian. Not until the 1930s and the British documentary movement did film-makers pay it so much attention again, this time as a subject for moral concern because it had then begun its slow collapse.

In Mitchell and Kenyon's films you can see it as an independent civilisation, glorying in its new recreations and enjoyments such as electric trams, professional sport, street parades and pageants, and seaside holidays... ...northern soccer matches... ...piers at Blackpool and Morecambe... ...You see many factory chimneys, smoking.

Most of all, you see people. Very few of them, no matter how poor, are bareheaded: the men wear flat caps, bowlers, straw boaters, trilbies, toppers, the women shawls or floral hats. Waistcoats are everywhere, as are moustaches and mufflers, pipes and cigarettes. Tobacco smoke drifts close to the camera, coal smoke further off. Nobody is fat. Many have bad teeth; people have a way of smiling which manages not to reveal them. Perhaps this technique has been forgotten; a particular male stance afforded by the waistcoast - the thumbs in its pockets - has also disappeared...


Edited to fix Mitchell and Kenyon link.

[ 04 November 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 18 March 2005 03:48 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's a Link to the other thread about Aboriginal maps. Also has lots of good links.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 18 April 2005 03:47 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
APIS page with links to online collections of papyri. Includes a link to Oxyrhynchus online; papyri from there are being discussed in this rabble thread.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 24 April 2005 04:41 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Not for the squeamish, but really cool:
Historical Anatomies
with images from a wide variety of anatomies, including some animal pictures, one by Albrecht Durer, who I've actually heard of and who drew some chubby women. Also note that at the bottome of the page is a link to yet more Historical Anatomies.

[ 24 April 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 25 April 2005 12:52 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This site has the first page of many rare old science books, and ends with a daquerrotype of Darwin and son: at University College London. Contents include
quote:
* Part One: Incunabula - Early printed books
* Part Two: Astronomy and Physics
* Part Three: Earth Sciences and volcanoes
* Part Four: Natural History, Zoology and Botany
* Part Five: Medicine
* Part Six: Anthropology and Genetics

It explains incunabula:

quote:
...Books printed before 1501 are called Incunabula, which comes from the Latin for swaddling clothes, meaning any art or craft in its infancy.

UCL Library has 180 incunabula, in 160 volumes, covering a range of subjects, including history, theology, medicine, witchcraft, and literature as well as science...



From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 29 April 2005 01:46 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Another beautiful interactive site: The Unicorn Tapestries. Alright, it's a museum, not a library, but there is much information, including closeups and details of the flowers and animals in the tapestry.

The history bloggers of Cliopatria at hnn.us keep coming up with these wonderful websites, especially Ralph Luker.

[Speaking of museums, this thread has some good ones.]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 13 May 2005 01:08 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
France in America bilingual site produced by US Library of Congress and France's Library.

Also Library of Congress Global page uber-directory o\to Library of Congress digital resources including international collaborations.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 20 May 2005 01:44 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here is a thoughtful piece about researching books on the Internet, including using Google Print and covers a lot of issues, also noting our forebears' use of indexes, compilations etc. Caleb McDaniel

Also he linked to a couple of digital libraries that look promising:

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection

Making of America

[ 20 May 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 22 May 2005 07:53 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
hnn's Cliopatria blog, Friday, May 20, 2005
MIRIAM ELIZABETH BURSTEIN: Nineteenth-Century Historical Fiction on the Web; includes Databases and bibliographies, and links to individual authors from Grace Aguilar to Charlotte Mary Yonge. Lots of good links here. You have to scroll down to May 20 blog entries.

[ 22 May 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 24 May 2005 08:28 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Concerns re the Google book plan at the start of this thread: BBC article.
quote:
...Google's $200m (£110m) plans were announced in December. It aims to put 15 million volumes online from four top US libraries - the libraries of Stanford, Michigan and Harvard universities, and of the New York Public Library - by 2015.

It will also scan in out-of-copyright books from the UK's Oxford University...

...But from the start Google's recent plan met opposition. The letter to Google from the Association of American University Presses, which represents 125 non-profit-making academic publishers, is just the latest in a series of criticisms.

The Association wants clarification on 16 questions and claims the book-scanning scheme "appears to involve systematic infringement of copyright on a massive scale." ...

...Supporters of the Google project say copyright is protected because many of the works being initially scanned in are old texts not by living authors.

Google said in a statement on Monday that it offers protection to copyright holders. For newer books still in copyright, users will only see a list of contents and a few sentences of text.

Only older, out-of-copyright books from Oxford University and from the New York Public Library will be scanned into the Google system...



Also note:
quote:
France and several other European countries recently got European Union backing for a rival book-scanning project for works not in English.

From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 15 June 2005 08:00 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
More cool sites:

Exploratoria has descriptions of diaries and some letters over the centuries up to the present; and links to the online text. Many travel diaries.

Authorama posts public domain books in XHTML instead of ASCII.

The Little Professor has a huge and womderful list of links on the left side of the page; including links to many collections of documents online; such as Proceedings of the Old Bailey, and all sorts.

[ 15 June 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 17 June 2005 03:33 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Internet Archive Kind of a hodge-podge, but a big one; worth spending time wandering around, including links re digital libraries.

[ 25 June 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 25 June 2005 01:24 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Periodicals and Pamphlets of the French Revolution of 1848.
quote:
...From royalist to socialist, every political opinion was represented and challenged in these papers. The spontaneity, variety, and abundance of these papers makes them an outstanding source for uncovering the cultural, political, social, and other aspects of the French revolution of 1848...

From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 18 July 2005 12:27 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Index to first person accounts, oral histories, etc. This one is expected to grow. Includes at some Canadian stuff.
quote:
In the First Person is a landmark index to English language personal narratives, including letters, diaries, memoirs, autobiographies, and oral histories. Working with archives, repositories, publishers, and individuals we've indexed first person narratives from hundreds of published volumes—those that are publicly available on the Web and those that are held by repositories and archives around the world. Our intent is to make it possible to find and explore the voices of more than 300,000 individuals...

And this Alexander Street Press also has databases of sound, etc., including music, fiction, etc. But it looks like you have to pay to get at them [or get your library to buy them]

[ 18 July 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 21 July 2005 01:12 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
News of a big internet photography datase: Photomuse to be ready in 2006.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 15 August 2005 07:51 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Links for several collections of ancient writing. Greek, Egyptian, Romano British.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 09 September 2005 01:05 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'll repeat here a post from another thread; this has links to various digital libraries of medeival manuscripts, etc.

The Electronic Beowulf Project. This is a little old, a paper from a 1995 conference [at U of Calgary I guess?] called The Electric Scriptorium.

Their list of web resources is likewise old, but at least some of the links lead to interesting places.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 01 October 2005 04:23 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Clearinghouse for links to collections of documents on the "long 18th century" which apparently means roughly the years from 1660 to 1830. Mrs. Spectator's Coffeehouse by an English prof at U of NB.

Includes links to this site about Women Writers of Early Canada. I find you click one of her links to get a description of the site, then click on it to get to the actual site.

Another good link posted by Ralph Luker at Cliopatria.

[ 01 October 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 04 November 2005 08:58 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Google Print site, the announcement of which started this thread. For copyright books they are showing snippets only.

Here's a history professor gloating about what he has found so far, on that site.

Here's one cool site from a Google information page: Digital Library of India.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 20 December 2005 02:55 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Harvard has an Open Collections project; it is putting extensive collections of documtnes online organised around certain themes. The first one is about Women Working in the US:
quote:
Women Working, 1800 - 1930 focuses on the women's role in the United States economy and provides access to digitized historical, manuscript, and image resources selected from Harvard University's library and museum collections. The collection features approximately 500,000 digitized pages and images including:

* 7,500 pages of manuscripts
* 3,500 books and pamphlets
* 1,200 photographs



The next collection is about immiigration to the US.

From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 30 December 2005 03:00 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Canadian libraries will digitise books.
quote:
A major effort to digitize millions of books and other documents at libraries is beginning across Canada.

Canadian research libraries have formed a digitization alliance called Alouette Canada to get their books online.

The process involves scanning the millions of books available in Canadian libraries so they can be read by internet users. Parts of the virtual library should be available beginning next year — and it'll be free to use....


Edit; can't find Alouette Canada on the web, except a company that sells games or something; but Canadian Association of Research Libraries has some background.

[ 30 December 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Yst
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9749

posted 30 December 2005 03:15 PM      Profile for Yst     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What delights me the most at present is the proliferation of OCRed e-texts across peer to peer networks.

Now, mind you, the trading of e-texts on the web is not a new thing. It's been going on on Usenet for a decade. But the fact that it has made a very successful jump to the peer to peer networks delights me.

Particularly, one practice that has sprung up, I think is terrific: e-texts which have been OCRed will inevitably contain some scanning errors. Users will therefore sometimes be invited, in a header to the e-text, to correct any errors they notice in the e-text, and once they have made any necessary corrections, increase the version number of the e-text by one for redistribution. Collaborative information sharing. It pleases me.

Mind you, those who would like to be paid for work involving the distribution of texts may not find this as delightful, but those who wish to benefit from the free exchange of knowledge will.


From: State of Genderfuck | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 30 December 2005 03:25 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here is a good listing of digital collections with brief descriptions of what is at each site. Sites from Canada, UK, USA, Netherlands, India...

Yst, what are "peer to peer networks"? Are you talking about sites like Project Gutenberg with e-texts of old published books, or something else?


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Makwa
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10724

posted 30 December 2005 03:34 PM      Profile for Makwa   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Yst:
Now, mind you, the trading of e-texts on the web is not a new thing. It's been going on on Usenet for a decade. But the fact that it has made a very successful jump to the peer to peer networks delights me.
Personally, I despise P2P - but UseNet constantly for MP3s - can you recommend any newsgroups for e-texts - my daughter loves to download novels on her text mp3 player - reads and listens on the TTC.

From: Here at the glass - all the usual problems, the habitual farce | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Yst
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9749

posted 30 December 2005 03:41 PM      Profile for Yst     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Contrarian:

Yst, what are "peer to peer networks"? Are you talking about sites like Project Gutenberg with e-texts of old published books, or something else?

Any of a number of networks on the web accessed by users to exchange files directly (i.e., peer to peer), some of which require central servers and some of which do not. Commercial clients for these networks have often been supported by adware, malware and spyware, and so any commercial applications providing access to peer to peer networks are generally best avoided. Among presently popular peer to peer networks are the Edonkey network, on which the most popular client application is Emule, FastTrack used by various apps, and Gnutella.

For similar purposes, Bittorrent has recently become popular, but it is not a network per se, being rather a protocol for the exchange of data for a specific file.


From: State of Genderfuck | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Yst
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9749

posted 30 December 2005 04:03 PM      Profile for Yst     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Makwa:
Personally, I despise P2P - but UseNet constantly for MP3s - can you recommend any newsgroups for e-texts - my daughter loves to download novels on her text mp3 player - reads and listens on the TTC.

Despising P2P doesn't really make any sense. Despising two people exchanging data? I mean, there are lousy P2P networks or servers, but that's no more a reason to dismiss every P2P network in existence than the existence of lousy websites is a reason to dismiss the web as a whole.

Personally, I find getting e-texts off of the ED2K network through Emule to be the most efficient method at present. Bittorrent sites can be useful for popular etexts or large etext archives. And DC++ can be alright for DC file exchange, but Emule is far better for etexts.

Usenet has ceased to be any sort of hub for e-text exchange for the simple reason that it's dreadfully inefficient as a medium for etext sharing by comparison to web-based e-text databases and peer to peer networks. First, etexts went to the web, now they've gone to P2P. As far as I know, usenet etext sharing is pretty much dead. Even if it were anything like it was when I last used it for etext exchange years ago, then, accessing a usenet etext group through a typical ISP, you've got several texts, probably none of which you're interested in, which you can get access on any given day. It's rather hard to explain the usefulness of the medium at this point for the purpose. Anything anyone posted in the past is gone, unless you ask that it be reposted and someone obliges.

A whole lot of e-texts can be accessed right off the web. Books by George Orwell? All there at Orwell.ru. Similar sites exist for most authors who are out of copyright in some part of the world, and for many others who are simply deceased and/or don't have aggressive lawyers. Google's a vastly better etext resource than Usenet could ever have hoped to be.

The most exhaustive etext resource, where you can find practically anything through a single search interface, though, is Emule, as I say. Certainly a larger selection of texts than Project Gutenberg, at any rate.


From: State of Genderfuck | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 30 December 2005 04:08 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Gotcha, thanks. I already spend far too much time reading stuff on the computer and it gets to my eyes eventually; and I can soak in the tub with a paperback. Then again, I have too many bookshelves and more books than they can hold anyway...
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Makwa
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10724

posted 30 December 2005 04:21 PM      Profile for Makwa   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Yst:
Despising P2P doesn't really make any sense. Despising two people exchanging data? I mean, there are lousy P2P networks or servers, but that's no more a reason to dismiss every P2P network in existence than the existence of lousy websites is a reason to dismiss the web as a whole.
Um, I said nothing of the kind. I hate P2P because I don't like having open ports, OK? And I have been exchanging data since gopherspace on Unix mainframes, thankyaverrymuch. Sure, Usenet (and BBS's afore that back in my day) are inefficient, but they are anonymous and secure. Is it so hard to set up a good newsreader and reassemble a coupla UUencoded scripts? Geesh. Just askin a simple question, don't have to get all up in my face and all.

From: Here at the glass - all the usual problems, the habitual farce | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 31 December 2005 02:07 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's some nice sites lagatta came up with:

World History Sources is a website for teachers of world history and this particular page has links to websites containing primary documents, photos, maps, journals, films, etc.

For example: scottish broadsides such as the story of Burke and Hare;

And here's one that might interest some people: anti-imperialism in the US, 1898-1935

Also, The History Cooperative has Resources links to the papers of Booker T. Washington, and to several map collections.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 08 January 2006 08:30 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here is a gorgeous blog I found through the HNN blog Cliopatria (they gave it an award for best new blog). On BibliOdyssey, "PK" posts images of illustrations from books and some discussion and many links to Digital libraries of images, etc. The current post is from an 1809 book about garden architecture. Magnificent.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 09 January 2006 02:48 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
bumped for people who like to look at illustrations
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 20 January 2006 03:21 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
David Rumsey Map Collection. Under creative commons licence so stuff can be used for non-commercial purposes. I haven't tried the site because I will have to change my pop-up settings or download something, but it looks good. Here's a historian showing off what he's been able to do using maps from the collection [which includes 18th and 19th century North and South American maps and world maps. And here's another historian showing off.

The map collection is one of a group on this Visual Collections website, (apparently made by David Rumsey?) with links to collections of "images of art, history and culture". Looks like a good resource.

[ 20 January 2006: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8238

posted 17 March 2007 07:34 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"There is no such thing as 'everything is on the Internet.' When you say that to a librarian, they're too polite to say so, but their first thought is: 'I'm dealing with an idiot.'"

The BC legislative library, where I went a couple of times to do research, is closed for a seismic upgrade, and it might not open again:

quote:
The 29 staff in the 90-year-old building at the back of the legislature were told this week to prepare for a move. Half of them will be laid off, although they've been told work will be found elsewhere in the public service. Whether they will ever move back is still up in the air.

Much of the library's holdings will be headed for a warehouse.

What happens after the historic building has been seismically upgraded still hasn't been decided, Speaker Bill Barisoff said. A management committee that includes himself and members of the Liberal and NDP caucuses will make the final decision, he said.

But suspicion ran rampant yesterday that the politicians are planning a takeover of the marbled space for their own office use.

Barisoff confirmed that options under discussion include creating a reception area for official functions and more room for MLAs and staff.

The steady increase in the number of politicians who inhabit the buildings has made space allocation a perennial concern.

The number of MLAs has increased to 79 from 65 over the last 20 years. An electoral boundaries commission reviewing B.C. constituencies could increase that by another six.

Barisoff said the material stored in the warehouse will still be easily retrievable. A core collection of essential materials will be moved to another government building on Superior Street, just behind the legislature.

The law that established the library stipulates that it "must be kept conveniently near the legislative chamber."

Barisoff said future use of the library building has to be decided and approved by a legislative management committee that includes MLAs from the Liberal and New Democrat caucuses.

"There will still be a library," he said. "The only thing different will be the location of the books."

The marble foyer features a 15 metre-high vaulted ceiling, under which resides the history of government going back to the Crown Colony of Vancouver Island. The library was founded in 1863 and includes millions of documents, microfilmed newspapers going back 100 years and a reading room. It primarily serves the needs of MLAs and their staff. The public is allowed in at specified times when the house isn't sitting.

Former head librarian Joan Barton, who ran it for more than 30 years, said successive legislatures have ignored the space problems in the building.

"It was the optics. They were worried about building grand new offices for politicians."

"Now they're in crisis mode, and the premier's office is driving this agenda."

Premier Gordon Campbell and senior staff spent some time touring the library several weeks ago.

One of the arguments advanced is that much of the reference material is now available online, but Barton scorned that explanation.

"There is no such thing as 'everything is on the Internet.' When you say that to a librarian, they're too polite to say so, but their first thought is: 'I'm dealing with an idiot.'" ...



From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca