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Author Topic: Speaking of Cover Tunes...
Arch Stanton
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posted 18 October 2002 04:31 AM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
No deadbeat junkies, Stiff Little Fingers did a fine Ulsterized adaptation of Marley's "Johnny Was."

The New York Dolls did a credible version of Sonny Boy Williamson's "Don't Start Me Talkin'," and The Pistols' "Stepping Stone" somehow had more edge to it than the Monkees' rendition.

I heard a recording of some metalheads (Metallica maybe?) doing Discharge's "Free Speech for the Dumb" and wondered why they had bothered.


From: Borrioboola-Gha | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Arch Stanton
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posted 30 October 2002 01:26 AM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And Anne Murray's psychedelic version of "Daydream Believer"....
From: Borrioboola-Gha | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Trespasser
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posted 06 November 2002 07:06 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Forgive me for thread-drifting here a bit, but I have to get something off my shoulders.

Did anyone see Madonna's video for the latest Bond movie soundtrack? "I'll Die Another Day"? What the fuck was that about?

The plot is: she's been caught by an evil prison warden that wears a military uniform and looks "Far-Eastern" (is he Chinese, perhaps?); several of his underlings who look equally evil and all wear the same type of uniform are helping him tie her up in an electric chair. She's struggling, laughing at their faces, spitting at them, stuff like that. The Big Cheese is yelling at her as the finally tie her in that chair. Then they all go to the Button room and an underling with monstruous metallic teeth lets the power on.

(And then they discover that she disappeared from the electric chair and so forth.)

I mean, honestly. I've seen more politically astute, less stereotyping, less off-base, and less insulting-to-the-intelligence videos from New Kids on the Block.


From: maritimes | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Black Dog
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posted 06 November 2002 07:22 PM      Profile for Black Dog   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Madonna's a joke, and a bad one at that. She should be trussed to a Titan V and launched into orbit, along with the folks who continue to trot out those horribly purile Bond movies.
From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 06 November 2002 08:07 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's Anthony Lane of The New Yorker on the Bond franchise:

quote:
All right, pay attention, 007. Here are some things that are great about James Bond movies: the suits, the drinks, the stunts, the cars, the hubcaps of the cars, the men, the women, the posters, the weather, the music, the sex, the life. Here are some things that are not so great about James Bond movies: James Bond movies. Have you ever tried to watch "A View to a Kill," a work so bereft of ideas that it chooses to employ Grace Jones as a special effect? Now is the moment to reflect on this curious discrepancy—between the completed films and the stuff they contain, between the millions of brain cells that will die as you sit in front of "Moonraker" for two hours and the pleasure of hearing Q say to M, "I think he's attempting reŽntry, sir," while Roger Moore makes interlunar love to Lois Chiles, adrift in what he, of all people, must recognize as zero gravity.

From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trespasser
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posted 06 November 2002 08:34 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I had a few good laughs reading that essay. And this is so true:

quote:
The only genre that clings to such unsatisfying structures with anything like the same conservatism is the porno flick; as the performers heave and bellow their way toward the climactic blowout, you sense the absolute drainage not just of humor but ó and this is really bad news ó of genuine arousal, and so it is with Bond.

From: maritimes | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 06 November 2002 08:48 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, Lane can sometimes be glib, and Bond movies are not exactly, shall we say, a moving target, for all their frantic action. But he manages to capture just why most of the movies are so unsatisfying, even just as mindless fun.
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rebecca West
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posted 06 November 2002 09:06 PM      Profile for Rebecca West     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I mean, honestly. I've seen more politically astute, less stereotyping, less off-base, and less insulting-to-the-intelligence videos from New Kids on the Block.
It's, like, Madonna. She's making fun of a genre. Like her Music video parodies trashy rap videos and their equally trashy rappers and gyrating bimbo-bots. Her forte is exploiting brainless pop culture with a precious sneer for the things and people she despises (a seemingly endless list, that would be).

From: London , Ontario - homogeneous maximus | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 06 November 2002 09:24 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wonder at Maddona's Cher-like dependancy on electronic manipulation of her voice in that song.

I've always written off Maddona as more sizzle than steak when it comes to her selling faux S&M in her video's, and looked with amusement on the way she sells sex with the music, and ignored her artistic offerings as so much fluff, but I've always admired the quality of her voice. Why, I wonder, would she screw with that?


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trespasser
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posted 06 November 2002 10:30 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
OK. I'd never say that "Die Another Day" is making fun of the genre or of the Hollywoodian depiction of bad guys. That part in which she fences with her evil counterpart is well designed and seemed quite earnest. Yet the part with the pseudo-Chinese (or Korean? What's the movie's main Bad Guy anyway?) is unbelievably bad politics and bad visual art. I really thought of her as politically more astute. (Not that she's anywhere near radicalness of a Sinead O'Connor, who is probably as radical as mainstream can get.)

And I must admit, I thought most of her videos were well done. That's why this one was such a disappointment. I even like the rhythm of this song too.

By the way: here's the video. Let me see it once again, though.

Added later: Alright, there is some ironic distance (the sabre once ends up in a painting of Pierce Brosnan, haha!), but if only the torturers were white, the whole video would be so much better... Hell, nobody could tell for sure if it weren't happening in a Texan jailhouse or someplace foreign.

[ November 07, 2002: Message edited by: Trespasser ]


From: maritimes | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Arch Stanton
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posted 07 November 2002 09:51 PM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw a bit of that Madonna/James Bond video. Afterwards I kept thinking that Sarah Vaughn or Helen Forrest would never have acted in such a way.
From: Borrioboola-Gha | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Briguy
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posted 08 November 2002 10:20 AM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Yet the part with the pseudo-Chinese (or Korean?

I think that's the same guy who played the heavy way back in Goldfinger. The hat-throwing decapitator guy. He's just meant to be a semi-clever cameo.


From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 08 November 2002 10:40 AM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That would be Oddjob.

I haven't seen the video, but I'm pretty certain the chap you mention with the metallic teeth would be "Jaws", ala Moonraker and the like.

And I would like to remind everyone that we are trying to find some sort of depth/meaning/point/taste/politicalcorrectness, whathaveyou, in not only a Madonna video (I agree with Rebecca's assessment, personally) but a Madonna video for a song she did for a BOND flick.

PLEASE


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trespasser
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posted 08 November 2002 12:57 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've noticed you are using an archaic distinction between High and Low culture, Trinitty (not that I've seen that much discussion of the former in your posts, mind you). Pop culture is a field as important as its power over everyday lives of millions of people around the globe -- it sometimes contains subversive politics and real art, and sometimes teaches us to think uncritically and enjoy kitsch.

Knowing how to distinguish one from the other is quite important, no?


From: maritimes | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 08 November 2002 01:25 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Tres,

"and sometimes teaches us to think uncritically and enjoy kitsch."

Perhaps that is what you are supposed to do with music videos made for James Bond movies.
I wouldn't recommend thinking a whole lot.

My point is, if you are going to be troubled by trashiness, you're only going to become enraged by subjecting yourself to musicvideos made for Bond flicks.

Sure, some musicvideos can be insightful, interesting, moving, profound, whatever, but, I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for those attributes to surface in videos made for movies like Die Another Day.

I like James Bond shows because I watched them as a child and they provide a warm fuzzy. BUT, I have to turn off my political views, my critical thinking and my social conscience, OR, I'd go crazy watching them.

That was my point.

And as far this goes:

quote:
I've noticed you are using an archaic distinction between High and Low culture, Trinitty (not that I've seen that much discussion of the former in your posts, mind you).

What was the purpose of this jab?


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trespasser
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posted 08 November 2002 01:54 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You hate film, don't consider it art. You hate television, and never watch any of it. Now I learn you hate pop music too. And all these areas of human activity have both immense democratic potential *and* can be dangerously indoctrinating -- and you don't think it's important to discuss how to create and use more of the first and criticize with some precision (not just dismiss) the second.

I expected you would come up with some sort of Adorno-esque critique of the Lowest Denominator Culture and a defence of elitist cultural creations (traditional Word theatre -- 'cause, I'd be with you in that one; literary canon; classical music; pre-20C visual art). You didn't. And it's a pity. I'd love to read that stuff, it's always a good discussion.


From: maritimes | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 08 November 2002 02:03 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
You hate film, don't consider it art. You hate television, and never watch any of it. Now I learn you hate pop music too. And all these areas of human activity have both immense democratic potential *and* can be dangerously indoctrinating -- and you don't think it's important to discuss how to create and use more of the first and criticize with some precision (not just dismiss) the second.

Where is the heck are you getting this?

I'm not even going to go through it, but be assured, I enjoy all three.

I feel like I'm taking crazy pills.


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trespasser
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posted 08 November 2002 02:23 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh! So I was wrong! That's great!

Well, you must admit your sometimes said things that came close to my paraphrases above.


From: maritimes | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 08 November 2002 02:31 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, I have been distainful of SOME attributes of all of these media... especially tv.

But, I do enjoy all three, and was originally going to yell at you for slagging New Kids on the Block, true, shining, artists.


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged

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