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Author Topic: "Wendy, sweetheart...darling...LIGHT of my LIFE!"
Michelle
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posted 28 July 2006 08:21 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Shining is on A&E tonight. I've seen it quite a few times, and it still totally freaks me out. I was just writing to a friend about it, telling him that although it doesn't have all that much gore in it, it's way scarier than all the gorefests out there. It's one of those older movies that doesn't lose its impact, even though it's somewhat dated.

The thread title is the line that freaks me out most in the movie, even more than the more popular, "Here's Johnny!"

So, what are your favorite horror movies, and horror movie lines? BTW, I don't like horror movies as a rule. They upset me too much. (The labyrinth scene is happening now, where he's chasing his kid through the labyrinth. Even though I know what's going to happen, it still freaks me out! )

[ 28 July 2006: Message edited by: Michelle ]


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mayakovsky
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posted 28 July 2006 09:15 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I am also not a horror fan but there are two:

'Jaws' and its on CBC tonight! It was a sensation in its time, I read the book as a kid and it was an 'adult' book (different context). I think that the descriptions in the book are actually more vivid for me than the movie but it represents a certain 70s time and place for me. My parents saw it at the drive in BC when it came out, I was not allowed to go, and my mother had her feet up on the seat by the end. I would also say 'The Exorcist' which I first watched alone mid-winter while everyone was away. I could have watched Saturday Night Live but noooo! It's just the wind!


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voice of the damned
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posted 29 July 2006 03:54 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The thread title is the line that freaks me out most in the movie, even more than the more popular, "Here's Johnny!"


The scene that freaks me out most is the ones with the girls chopped up in the hallway.

I agree, Here's Johnny is somewhat over-rated, and has by now probably lost whatever power it had to scare people. I think these days it's mostly just considered emblemetic of how over-the-top Jack Nicholson's performaces got for awhile there.


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voice of the damned
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posted 29 July 2006 04:03 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
would also say 'The Exorcist' which I first watched alone mid-winter while everyone was away.

Maybe there's something wrong with me, but I've never found The Exorcist all the frightening, at least not the parts that everyone talks about as being so terrifying. The scene with the crucifix is certainly revolting, but it doesn't send chills down my spine the way good horror should. Perhaps because I had heard so many descriptions of the films prior to watching it, the impact was muted. I'd imagine it would be pretty terrifying if you were watching the film in 1973, and no one had told you what to expect.

I really like the film, though. Lots of cool imagery, especially near the beginning.


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Michelle
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posted 29 July 2006 06:17 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by voice of the damned:
I agree, Here's Johnny is somewhat over-rated, and has by now probably lost whatever power it had to scare people. I think these days it's mostly just considered emblemetic of how over-the-top Jack Nicholson's performaces got for awhile there.

Do you really think he was over-the-top in that movie? I think he was excellent.

Last night I found a really great review of The Shining online while doing a google search to make sure the woman's name was "Wendy".

This really hit home for me, because it explains why the movie keeps scaring me every time, even though I know what's going to happen. And I think Jack Nicholson's insane raving in the movie really contributes to that.

quote:
Most horror films aren't very suspenseful on second viewing; you know where all the surprises are. But in refusing to rely on any of the cinematic shock effects currently in vogue, Kubrick has made a film that gets more frightening every time you see it. This, combined with the fact that he twisted King's sardonic tale of possession into a comment on American television, makes The Shining a perfect home video horror show.

Take the scene where Wendy Torrence (Shelley Duvall) is crouching in the corner of the bathroom as an ax comes crashing through the door. Any filmmaker on earth could have guaranteed a scream from the audience with that scene by using the old Ultimate Scare Tactic: Build the suspense until Wendy finds sanctuary in the bathroom; have her relax a moment till both she and the audience feel safe; then suddenly, without warning, have an ax come crashing through the door. Surprise! Everybody jumps. Big deal.

But Kubrick is not after any cheap rush of adrenaline. In his version, we see Jack Torrence outside with the ax. He takes a mighty swing. Cut to the inside of the bathroom where the ax comes crashing through the door. Wendy screams, but the audience doesn't because they knew it was coming.

In this same way, Kubrick deliberately undermines all the most frightening moments in the book. He's still trying to scare you, but not the way it's usually done. Jack Torrence is trying to kill his wife with an ax. Isn't that frightening enough? Isn't violence terrifying all by itself? Kubrick feels no need to cheat you by not showing what's on the other side of the door.



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voice of the damned
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posted 29 July 2006 07:28 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Do you really think he was over-the-top in that movie? I think he was excellent.


Well, I think a case could be made that his maniacal antics in that particular film were in keeping with the character's persona. But next time you watch it, pay attention to Nicholson's facial expressions in this scene...

I'm thinking specifically of the part where he delivers the line about Danny hearing about the Donner Party on television. To my eyes, his cynical countenance seems slightly overdone.

Mind you...

The narrative is, I think, supposed to be understood as mostly from Danny's partly subjective POV, so it could be argued that Nicholson captures the way children interpret parental anger.


The parody trailer headlined Another Comedic Trailer For The Shining contains a shot from the scene I was referring to. Also, note Nicholson's expression in the bar scene toward the end.

http://tinyurl.com/ovzoc


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voice of the damned
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posted 29 July 2006 07:36 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Take the scene where Wendy Torrence (Shelley Duvall) is crouching in the corner of the bathroom as an ax comes crashing through the door. Any filmmaker on earth could have guaranteed a scream from the audience with that scene by using the old Ultimate Scare Tactic: Build the suspense until Wendy finds sanctuary in the bathroom; have her relax a moment till both she and the audience feel safe; then suddenly, without warning, have an ax come crashing through the door. Surprise! Everybody jumps. Big deal.

But Kubrick is not after any cheap rush of adrenaline. In his version, we see Jack Torrence outside with the ax. He takes a mighty swing. Cut to the inside of the bathroom where the ax comes crashing through the door. Wendy screams, but the audience doesn't because they knew it was coming.


I think this encapsulates Kubrick's approach to the whole film. He never really allows suspense to build through fear of the unknown. As soon as Mr. Torrance assures the hotel manager that he's not going to chop up his wife and kids like Mr. Grady did, we know that that is exactly what is going to happen. It's an interesting approach.

quote:
This, combined with the fact that he twisted King's sardonic tale of possession into a comment on American television, makes The Shining a perfect home video horror show.

I'm glad someone else picked up on the television motif, which is present throughout the film. I think my personal favorite scene is where Wendy and Danny watch the Road Runner cartoon together. The music co-ordinates with the action really well.


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Boom Boom
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posted 29 July 2006 08:03 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

The shower scene in Psycho frightened me the first couple of times I saw it. I just don't like knives, in general.

ETA: five fingers and a thumb? Huh?

[ 29 July 2006: Message edited by: Boom Boom ]


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Boom Boom
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posted 29 July 2006 08:09 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And, in "Silence Of The Lambs", there's that line of Hannibal Lecter's, "I ate his liver with a nice Chianti".
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voice of the damned
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posted 29 July 2006 08:15 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The shower scene in Psycho frightened me the first couple of times I saw it. I just don't like knives, in general.

ETA: five fingers and a thumb? Huh?


If I'm not mistaken, that image you posted is from the Gus Van Sant re-make.

Actually, I am someone who thought that the re-make wasn't too bad. I know a lot of other people trashed it.


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voice of the damned
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posted 29 July 2006 08:19 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
And, in "Silence Of The Lambs", there's that line of Hannibal Lecter's, "I ate his liver with a nice Chianti".

The creepiest movie in that series was Red Dragon. Something about seeing the footage of the family when we know that they will later be murdered. Also, there is a scene where Ed Norton sits down and suddenly has a flash of the dolls that were in the room when the family was killed.

Silence Of The Lambs was quite good, but I wasn't creeped out in a visceral, feel-it-in-your-skin sort of a way. The scenes in Buffalo Bill's torture chamber came close, I suppose.


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Boom Boom
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posted 29 July 2006 10:18 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by voice of the damned:
If I'm not mistaken, that image you posted is from the Gus Van Sant re-make.

Thanks. I was googling for an image of Psycho, and that's the first one that popped up. I didn't know there was a re-make, so I guess that weird poster threw me a bit. I loved the original - with Anthony Perkins - I've seen it maybe ten times so far. Psycho II was much weaker, I thought - only seen it once, that was enough for me. No one can do Hitchcock like Hitchcock.

BTW, MPIX has 48 hours of Hitchcock this weekend, including Psycho.


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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 29 July 2006 01:52 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think the part about The Shining that was the coolest is when the caretaker was having a little chat with Danny, and they both realized (at the same time the audience did too) that they had the "shine" -- Danny had an imaginery friend that was ever present with him, even before the trip letting him know that there was something 'spooky' or not right with their new home. And the part where he wrote "MURDER" backwards, and he had been scared silent for days until finally he is shouting the famous "Red Rum"! Red Rum!! Then the screams; sort of a climactic turning point.

And of course the imagery of the twins, first filmed far away as Danny viewed them (they were there, but no one else could see because they didn't have the 'shine'...then closer; then closer; then the terrible scene of what ended up happening to him. Eeeek! Scary.

Then there was the scene with; what was the room number? Nicholson in a stupor is drawn to that room by the suggestion of an apparition advising him to check it out; also the bathroom scene with the woman in the tub,then getting out, heading for Jack and turning into quite something else...eek! And great camera work panning back and forth in the men's room where the former 'caretaker' (also slain, dead and haunting him) was letting him know that his family was "getting the better of him." And posing the question about what is he going to do about it? And the impression is that these apparitions began more than haunting; he actually turns into the part of every other caretaker that had the Overlook before.

The only time I felt 'safe' or sat back for a brief time, upon my first viewing of the film; was when Wendy had locked herself into the large food pantry; Danny had managed to get away from him; and she was for the moment; safe. Didn't last, though!

Kubrick was one of my favorite directors; especially with .Clockwork Orange -- but in this movie he truely showed with the fabulous setting and the ballroom and bar where Jack would go to find some consolation; (and a drink)-- suddenly the room comes alive with this wonderful 20's or 30's type of music (?) and the Art Deco atmosphere was brilliantly portrayed, like a glamorous Hollywood atmosphere from the era of Garbo or someone like that. Maybe older? Quite a lot of ghosts appeared and dissappeared just as quickly. It was almost like the viewer could see that he was slowly going mad; especially with his demands to be left alone with his work; and the first time that the movie goer got a glimpse of just how hard he had been working. And when Wendy saw it...and the music escalating...then enters Jack.

"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy."

Also; another line made fameous by that movie as well as "here's Johnny" was when he was talking to Wendy through the kitchen door regarding the snow plow; "Wendy -- you're not going anywhere! "go; check it out!"

Saying that over and over was more than menacing. I think it's safe to say that it should be a hall of famer for bone chilling, scary movies.

Exorcist was scary for me; because of the subject matter. And that little girl was very convincing as being possessed; I found it pretty creepy.

"The Omen", the first movie was good. The sequels, though were predictable and played out, IMO.

I could think of others, but right now I'm thinking that my posts are too long.

[ 29 July 2006: Message edited by: erroneousrebelrouser ]


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pookie
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posted 29 July 2006 08:43 PM      Profile for pookie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by voice of the damned:

The creepiest movie in that series was Red Dragon.


I highly recommend Michael Mann's version of this movie: Manhunter. I found it extremely disturbing. Joan Allen plays the blind woman and Brian Cox is absolutely brilliant as Lecter. I don't remember the name of the actor who plays Ralph Fiennes' character, but he scared the crap out of me.


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voice of the damned
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posted 29 July 2006 09:02 PM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I highly recommend Michael Mann's version of this movie: Manhunter.

Thanks for the recommendation!

quote:
And of course the imagery of the twins, first filmed far away as Danny viewed them (they were there, but no one else could see because they didn't have the 'shine'...then closer; then closer; then the terrible scene of what ended up happening to him. Eeeek! Scary.


That imagery is widely believed to have been a quote from this Diane Arbus photograph...


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Polly Brandybuck
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posted 29 July 2006 09:02 PM      Profile for Polly Brandybuck     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I watched "the Hills Have Eyes" last week with my son. We were truly creeped out, and revolted, for the first 45 minutes or so. Then it seemed that the movie - I don't know, jumped the shark? - cuz at that point we started talking and making totally crude and inappropriate jokes and kept up the chatter until the credits rolled.

After that my son says to me, "goodnight Mom. I am just going to have to watch about twenty minutes of cartoons before I go to bed, okay?" Ya, me too.

It was one of those, you could see the potential in the storyline I guess, but the director obviously got carried away with blood and guts and pickaxes in the forehead.


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Fidel
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posted 29 July 2006 09:47 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Shining is an all time greatest. Shelly Duval played the part of the helpless wife so well. And the wintery scenes around the hotel were awesome. I'd jump at the chance to look after a big place like that, and to, shall we say, fullfil contractual obligations to my employers. bwbwbwbwah scary!

"The Thing" gave me the creeps when I first saw it. It's not the creepiest scene in the movie, but the last frames of the burning arctic outpost and then "the dog" trotting off was absolutely chilling.

VoiceOver narration- "Who knows what has come from the galaxy? Who knows what lurks in the sky? Beyond God. Watch those around you. For who knows what today, tonight, or tomorrow will bring."


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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 29 July 2006 11:25 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That imagery is widely believed to have been a quote from this Diane Arbus photograph...

OMG; I'm not the sharpest tool in the box, (obviously!) but please tell me; was that photograph just inspiration for him, is that what you meant? I don't understand what you mean by a "quote" unless it was supposed to be a joke. That picture of twins was creepy too; so if it was a joke or if it wasn't; please just pat me on the back and tell me "it's allright, Err. We understand. You're learning." LOL

BTW I absolutely love these recommendations for scary movies, or horror, whatever. Horror movies are my favorites; along with exceptional meaningful films like "Shindler's List", "The Pianist", "The English Patient", "The Godfather I, II, and III; (I'm also a huge fan of films about wiseguys and organized crime; or any kind of heist films like "Ocean's Eleven" or one done really well like "Blood and Wine" with some great actors as well, some of my favorites. But still I love a great horror movie. I think that Bram Stoker's "Dracula" was pretty cool. And that vampire movie that had Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise in it. It was one of Ann Rice's novel's made into a movie. The name? See. I hate to Google search just to give the right information. Gives the impression of early alzheimers coming on. Heheh.

[ 29 July 2006: Message edited by: erroneousrebelrouser ]


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Left Turn
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posted 30 July 2006 04:38 AM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have an affinity for classic black and white horror films: Dracula; Frankenstein ;The Mummy;The Wolf Man

I also quite liked The Blair Witch Project

[ 30 July 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


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voice of the damned
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posted 30 July 2006 05:23 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
That imagery is widely believed to have been a quote from this Diane Arbus photograph...
OMG; I'm not the sharpest tool in the box, (obviously!) but please tell me; was that photograph just inspiration for him, is that what you meant? I don't understand what you mean by a "quote" unless it was supposed to be a joke. That picture of twins was creepy too; so if it was a joke or if it wasn't; please just pat me on the back and tell me "it's allright, Err. We understand. You're learning." LOL


Yes, I meant that the scene is a reference to the photograph. The word "quote" is sometimes used to describe one work of art referencing another, ie. The baby carriage scene in The Untouchables quotes Battleship Potemkin.

Mind you, now that I think about it, I'm not sure if it's proper to use the word that way when you're talking about influences between different mediums(in this case from photograph to film). I didn't want to say that Kubrick copied the photograph, because that would sound like I'm accusing him of plagarism. I guess I probably just should have said that it references the photograph.


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voice of the damned
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posted 30 July 2006 05:31 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Since this is a left-leaning message board, I should include this link to an analysis of The Shining which postulates a metaphor for the destruction of North America's First Nations.

http://tinyurl.com/ogwne


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Boom Boom
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posted 30 July 2006 07:13 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by voice of the damned:
Since this is a left-leaning message board, I should include this link to an analysis of The Shining which postulates a metaphor for the destruction of North America's First Nations.

Wow - I'll have to see it again; it's been a while.


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voice of the damned
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posted 30 July 2006 08:16 AM      Profile for voice of the damned     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
quote:
Originally posted by voice of the damned:
Since this is a left-leaning message board, I should include this link to an analysis of The Shining which postulates a metaphor for the destruction of North America's First Nations.


Wow - I'll have to see it again; it's been a while.


Yeah, it's an interesting analysis. For the record, though, not everyone is convinced by it. I read an interview where Kubrick's daughter was asked about it, and she said that her father wasn't doing any specific research into First Nations topics during his preparation for the film. Apparently, Kubrick tended to do a lot of research on topics that he was referencing in his films.


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Sineed
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posted 30 July 2006 08:43 AM      Profile for Sineed     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking of movies made out of books by Stephen King, how about "Carrie?" I've seen it several times, and the hand coming out of the ground at the end still freaks me out.
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Boom Boom
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posted 30 July 2006 11:59 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Cujo. Can't ever watch that again.
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Michelle
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posted 30 July 2006 01:02 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Another movie I saw on television a couple of months ago or so is The Exorcism of Emily Rose (I think that's the name). Freaky, freaky, freaky. I think we mentioned it on another thread, and I'd said something about the scene where she is lying on the floor, twisted and catatonic with eyes wide open, pupils completely dilated, staring at her friend who had just woken up from a dead sleep to see her like that. I shrieked and must've jumped about 10 feet.
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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 31 July 2006 06:02 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Last week while Andy was home with me; we did quite a lot of searching on our 'on demand' movie selections; and over and over I saw that movie available "The Exorcism of Emily Rose" -- and I had remembered another thread in which folks here were describing how it had scared them really bad (also!) so I refrained from watching that not wanting for him to have any extra unwanted nightmares (or myself!) What I was wondering about, and maybe it was mentioned here somewhere, was an old movie called "Audrey Rose" where a little girl had received the spirit of another girl with another name; the daughter of the actor Anthony Hopkins who played her father who was stalking the family...claiming that their daughter was going to receive the spirit of his deceased little girl; that was kind of scary too, but I watched that one to see if there was any resemblance or if it had anything to do with the newer one that you guys are talking about...? (See -- I said that I love spooky movies but after what I've read here I'm afraid to watch this one!)

And Voice O.T.D...thank you for explaining that to me! And BTW what a great link. Quite fascinating -- I had no idea that Kubrick had all of those references within that movie surrounding a hidden meaning...and that all makes it seem even better to me. And as well makes me want to watch it again. Thanks! It couldn't be truer, and I love it when a director has the sensabilities to make films like that have much more meaning than just being a "horror flick." And the reference to the white man killing off the Indians as genocide; the mentioning of the dialogue in references made by the manager of the Overlook and by the chef..now that I think of the times that I have viewed the movie. Interesting analogy.

"All the best people." !

It's curious too...that King didn't have these things in his book but that Kubrick added them, as a chef adds his own particular spice. I love it...and I loved the way that you showed the other photograph; no I don't think that using the world "quote" would be construed as plaguerism, but it makes one mindful of how these things can be looked upon. Thank you for taking the time to 'splain it to me.

[ 31 July 2006: Message edited by: erroneousrebelrouser ]


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Erik Redburn
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posted 31 July 2006 10:47 PM      Profile for Erik Redburn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I unfortunately read the Shining before I saw the movie, so it kinda ruined it for me. Too high expectations always do. Been trying to think of what other movie was scariest for me. Dawn of the Dead, Haunting of Hill-House, Apocalyse Now, hhmm, then it hit me -Fellini's Casanova. Oh, the Horror, the horror...
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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 31 July 2006 11:56 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was trying to remember the name of a really scary King movie that I saw for the first time this past winter; it was called Dreamcatcher ...It really was a chiller; and I couldn't take my eyes off of it from beginning to end. Also; I did a search just to see how many King movies have actually been made; and I was stunned! Check out this link; and click on his movie index in the upper left column, if you click it all of his movies are listed. I clicked on to watch the trailer because Dreamcatchers was so good; it made me want a copy...I also clicked on the trailer to The Mangler... because I remembered notorious Robert Englund and his performance in this chiller; I was shocked to see there was actually a Mangler II and Mangler III! But more shocked to see just how many sequels have been made by King movies. He should go down in the 'sequel' hall of fame. The link (easy enough found, but entertaining!) web page

"The only thing worse than the devil within...is the devil without!" --Robert Englund...The Mangler


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pookie
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posted 01 August 2006 08:20 AM      Profile for pookie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by erroneousrebelrouser:
Last week while Andy was home with me; we did quite a lot of searching on our 'on demand' movie selections; and over and over I saw that movie available "The Exorcism of Emily Rose" -- and I had remembered another thread in which folks here were describing how it had scared them really bad (also!) so I refrained from watching that not wanting for him to have any extra unwanted nightmares (or myself!) What I was wondering about, and maybe it was mentioned here somewhere, was an old movie called "Audrey Rose"
[ 31 July 2006: Message edited by: erroneousrebelrouser ]

OMG I loved "Audrey Rose"! It probably would look a bit dated now, but it was great. It's also a pretty good novel - I read it when I was 12 years old.


From: there's no "there" there | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 01 August 2006 11:20 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I read that book too, when I was a teenager. It was pretty creepy all right! In fact, when I saw the "Emily Rose" movie, I thought at first that it was the movie version of Audrey Rose.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Makwa
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posted 01 August 2006 12:14 PM      Profile for Makwa   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've seen thousands of horror films (donno - is it somthing about me? heeeee hee he, uh) but the only one that made it hard for me to sleep (yeah, literally) was "Henry - A Portrait of a Serial Killer." It was just too low key, to believable. Eeeeks.

Ed: Re. The Shining - see what happens whenever Jack talks to a ghost - (hint: there's always a mirror). Bwa hahahaha - erk.

[ 01 August 2006: Message edited by: Makwa ]


From: Here at the glass - all the usual problems, the habitual farce | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Makwa
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posted 01 August 2006 12:17 PM      Profile for Makwa   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
oh when will I ever learn how to use the dag edit button?

[ 01 August 2006: Message edited by: Makwa ]


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angrymonkey
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posted 01 August 2006 11:06 PM      Profile for angrymonkey     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I recommend A tale of two sisters(korean) and the eye (hong kong). Not quite as good are dark water(not the u.s. one - haven't seen that one) and maybe phone.
Kwaidan was decent.
I've been going to my local asian cinema place for my horror fix lately.

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Catchfire
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posted 08 August 2006 09:15 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Man I just saw The Shining again last night. What an incredible movie. The sound effects are masterful.

As for the First Nation massacre allegory, I'd call that interpretation highly cursory and rather weak. I would say there is a point that the First Nations are absent from the movie, there's not much else to go on.

For my money, the movie is about class, America's consumerist culture as it relates to the the 19th century leisure class, the fallacy of manhood in a patriarchal system, a brilliant comment on writing and authorhood, and a masterful hybridization of several genres in a fantastic rewriting of the horror film.

And Jack Nicholson is awesome in every movie he's ever been in. Except Witches of Eastwick.


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bigcitygal
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posted 08 August 2006 10:26 AM      Profile for bigcitygal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Catchfire:

And Jack Nicholson is awesome in every movie he's ever been in. Except Witches of Eastwick.

Yeah? Even Terms of Endearment?

P.S. I *loved* him in A Few Good Men! What a collosal bastard he was!


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500_Apples
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posted 08 August 2006 02:47 PM      Profile for 500_Apples   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought Aliens was scary, but then again I was like thirteen. And when we were teenagers (my friends and I), Candyman was considered the scariest movie.
From: Montreal, Quebec | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
Jacob Two-Two
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posted 09 August 2006 12:21 AM      Profile for Jacob Two-Two     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Me and my sister always talk about how scary Nightmare on Elm Street was when we first saw it. Freaked. The living. Shit. Out of me.

Nowadays stuff like that never scares me, but more realistic crazy-killer movies do (which is precisely why The Shining is such a classic, 'cause it's both). One of the scariest movies I've seen in my adult life is The Vanishing (European version). It seems very low-key, but it leaves you with such an intense feeling of dis-ease that follows you around for days.


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chester the prairie shark
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posted 09 August 2006 12:53 PM      Profile for chester the prairie shark     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i don't do horror movies but i saw the original Omen and that truly (but not literally ) scared the shit out of me! the babboons, the dogs, the decapitation by window.....we need a "gives me the willies" smilie.
From: Saskatoon | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
West Coast Lefty
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posted 12 August 2006 10:46 PM      Profile for West Coast Lefty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For classic horror of the slasher film variety, it's hard to beat the original "Halloween" with Jamie Lee Curtis. John Carpenter knows how to build suspense as opposed to just piling on the gore, and the music is pretty scary too.

There's also an old Roman Polanski movie called "Repulsion" with Catherine Deneuve which is quite creepy, if not scary in the usual sense.

And yes, "The Shining" is one of my all-time creepiest films. The scene with the two young girls in the hallway with the rivers of blood flowing by them still gives me the creeps just thinking about it..


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Green Bastard
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posted 13 August 2006 05:11 PM      Profile for Green Bastard     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Poltergeist was very scary the first time I saw it. I was the same age as the kid in the movie..bedroom looked like his with all the Star Wars crap, and man oh man that clown!

Speaking of clowns lol, I'm re-reading It by Stephen King. Probably the only book to scare the bejesus out of me, at least when I first read it. One of his best. Shame the movie wasn't all that great.

[ 13 August 2006: Message edited by: Green Bastard ]


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Bobolink
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posted 13 August 2006 07:29 PM      Profile for Bobolink   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think that my favourite horror film is The Wicker Man with its relentless undercurrent of impending doom. But it is also mixed with the absurd. This exchange is between Edward Woodward (Sgt. Howie) and Christopher Lee (Lord Summerisle).


Sergeant Howie: Your lordship seems strangely... unconcerned.
Lord Summerisle: I am confident your suspicions are wrong, Sergeant. We do not commit murder here. We are a deeply religious people.
Sergeant Howie: Religious? With ruined churches, no ministers, no priests... and children dancing naked!
Lord Summerisle: They do love their divinity lessons.
Sergeant Howie: But they are... a-are naked!
Lord Summerisle: Well, naturally. It's much too dangerous to jump through fire with their clothes on.

Another excellent film is Robert Wise' The Haunting. Wise uses his skill and your own imagination to thorougly frighten you. No gore, no special effects worth mentioning, just fear, a terrific cast, and excellent acting.

Julie Harris as Eleanor Lance:

Eleanor Lance: God! God! Who's hand was I holding?

[ 13 August 2006: Message edited by: Bobolink ]

[ 13 August 2006: Message edited by: Bobolink ]


From: Stirling, ON | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 13 August 2006 09:02 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
[Past guests at the Overlook Hotel]
Stuart Ullman: Four presidents, movie stars...
Wendy Torrance: Royalty?
Stuart Ullman: All the best people.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 13 August 2006 09:43 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Poor little Newt. Has anyone seen her ?.


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
buffycat
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posted 17 August 2006 07:50 PM      Profile for buffycat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hello all, I'm new here, but was just looking through everything and found this thread.

I agree the Shining was a good movie, though like another poster here I read the book first - very scary!!

A few months back I was talking with my collegue at work and he told me of a movie which scared him silly. Of course I teased him and laughed away.

My son and I rented it that weekend.

We literally hid under the blanket: Whitenoise.

Very very scary film.


From: Hellmouth | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
arborman
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posted 21 August 2006 12:53 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I remain convinced that the best scary movie, bar none, on the 'edge of your seat oh god' scale has to be The Changeling.

Very few special effects, almost no gore. But there were some scenes in there that are making my arm hairs stand up as I type this.

1. The seance.
2. The ball and the wheelchair on the stairs.
3. 'My....father'...

Gah. Now I'm all freaked out again. A classic scary movie, done almost perfectly. Filmed in Vancouver too, I think in the eighties.


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Catchfire
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posted 21 August 2006 01:22 PM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
From Frederic Jameson "The Shining" Social Text 4, 1981 pp. 114-125.

quote:
Beauty and boredom: this is then the immediate sense of the monotonous and intolerable opening sequence of The Shining, and of the great aerial tracking shot across a quintessentially breathtaking and picture-postcard "unspoiled" American natural landscape; as well as of the great hotel, whose old-time turn-of-the-century splendor is undermined by the more meretricious conception of "luxury" entertained by consumer society, and in particular by the manager's modem office space and the inevitable plastic coffee he has his secretary serve. . .these depthless people, whether on their way to the moon, or coming to the end of another season in the great hotel at the end of the world, are standardized and without interest, their rhythmic smiles as habituated as the recurrence of a radio-announcer's drawn breath. If Kubrick amuses himself by organizing a counterpoint between this meaningless and obligatory facial benevolence and the ghastly, indeed quite unspeakable story the manager is finally obliged to disclose, it is a quite impersonal amusement which ultimately benefits no one. Meanwhile, great swathes of Brahms pump all the fresh air out of The Shining's images and enforce the now familiar sense of cultural asphyxiation.

quote:
That generation, finally, is the 20s and it is by the 20s that the hero is haunted and possessed. The 20s were the last moment in which a genuine American leisure class led an aggressive and ostentatious public existence, in which an American ruling class projected a class-conscious and unapologetic image of itself and enjoyed its privileges without guilt, openly and armed with its emblems of top-hat and champagne glass, on the social stage in full view of the other classes. The nostalgia of The Shining, the longing for collectivity, takes the peculiar form of an obsession with the last period in which class consciousness is out in the open: even the motif of the manservant or valet expresses the desire for a vanished social hierarchy, which can no longer be gratified in the spurious multinational atmosphere in which Jack Nicholson is hired for a mere odd job by faceless organization men. This is clearly a "return of the repressed" with a vengeance: a Utopian impulse which scarcely lends itself to the usual complacent and edifying celebration, which finds its expression in the very snobbery and class consciousness we naively supposed it to threaten. The lesson of The Shining, then, its depth analysis and "working out" of the class fantasies of contemporary American society, is peculiarly disturbing for Left and Right alike. Its generic framework-the ghost storyimplacably demystifies the nostalgia film as such, the pastiche, and reveals the latter's concrete social content: the glossy simulacrum of this or that past is here unmasked as possession, as the ideological project to return to the hard certainties of a more visible and rigid class structure, and this is a critical perspective which includes but transcends the more immediate appeal of even those occult films with which The Shining might momentarily have been confused. For the former seemed to revive and stage a Manichaeistic world in which good and evil exist, in which the devil is an active force, in which, with the right kind of attention and the right guides, one could finally sort all this out and determine what was on the side of the Lord and what was not.

Edited for formatting.

[ 21 August 2006: Message edited by: Catchfire ]


From: On the heather | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
arborman
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posted 21 August 2006 07:21 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Aye caramba. I just found it scary, but to each their own.


Manichean indeed. Mutter grumble.


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 21 August 2006 08:21 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My dad refuses to watch The Changeling. Never has seen it and swears he never will. He can't stand horror movies. Gives him nightmares.

The Shining is the only movie I can't finish. I stop half way through. Bothers me too much. And I can watch ANYTHING...

But the Shining.


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged

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