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Author Topic: Who's dead now? creeps on inexorably
skdadl
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posted 16 June 2005 11:09 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Last thread was getting too long.

I was sorry to read, in this a.m.'s Grope and Flail, of the deaths of two cultural giants, Norman Levine and Carlo Giulini.

Levine (b. 1923) was one of the greatest of modern short-story writers in English. Although he left Canada as a young adult to live in Britain, he remained engaged for the rest of his life in a cranky dialogue with the Canada that "made him" (his phrase). He is often called "a writer's writer," for the formal purity of his narration. Except for Mavis Gallant, I believe he has no peer in English Canadian writing.

Giulini (b. 1914) was one of the great conductors of the last century, renowned, as the G&M obit says, for his "rigorous and spiritual interpretations of classical music." Many North Americans became familiar with him during his tenure as director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic. I have only ever seen televised performances that he led, but he was simply beautiful to watch, his whole elegant body inspirated by the music he was conducting.

Two great lives.


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Albireo
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posted 20 June 2005 10:44 PM      Profile for Albireo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Alas, the Roman Catholic with the best name has passed on:


Philippines’ Cardinal Sin dies

quote:
Cardinal Jaime Sin, a driving force behind two Philippine “People Power” revolts, died in hospital on Tuesday morning, church officials said. He was 76 years old and the officials said he died from an infection relating to a longstanding kidney ailment.

“Jaime Cardinal Sin, archbishop emeritus, died early this morning,” Sin’s spokeswoman, Peachy Yamsuan, told reporters.

The main Roman Catholic radio station played hymns to mourn Sin, who retired as archbishop of Manila in 2003, and said a wake would be held at Manila cathedral.

“The nation lost a spiritual leader,” said Senator Aquilino Pimentel. “He was irreplaceable.”


[ 20 June 2005: Message edited by: Albireo ]


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 21 June 2005 06:12 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
james weinstein, the founder of the san fran bookstore, "modern times," and the founder and longtime publisher/editor of "in these times"

quote:
The scion to a Manhattan real-estate fortune, Weinstein had determined early on to pour his wealth into projects that helped other people. In an interview shortly before his death, he recalled a recurrent argument he had during the 1950s with fellow leftist Lorraine Hansberry, the future author of Raisin in the Sun. Like Weinstein, Hansberry had come from a wealthy family, but the two friends disagreed on what to do with their fortunes. "Her position was, 'It's dirty money, I don't want to touch it," he recalled. "And mine was, 'Money doesn't get dirty: It's what you use it for that gets it dirty. If you have the money and you're using it for the right things, use it!'"

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Hephaestion
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posted 22 June 2005 08:37 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Microchip Pioneer Jack Kilby Dies at 81

quote:
DALLAS - Nobel laureate Jack Kilby, whose 1958 invention of the integrated circuit ushered in the electronics age and made possible the microprocessor, has died after a battle with cancer.

[...]

Before the integrated circuit, electronic devices relied on bulky and fragile circuitry, including glass vacuum tubes. Afterward, electronics could become increasingly more complex, reliable and efficient: powering everything from the iPod to the Internet.

During his first year at Texas Instruments, using borrowed equipment, Kilby built the first integrated circuit into a single piece of semiconducting material half the size of a paper clip. Four years later in 1962, Texas Instruments won its first major integrated circuit contract, for the Minuteman missile.

Kilby later co-invented the hand-held electronic calculator.


[ 22 June 2005: Message edited by: Hephaestion ]


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 23 June 2005 07:51 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
charles keeling, the first man accurately to measure the rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

quote:
The machine he set up in 1958 at the Mauna Loa Observatory, on top of a Hawaiian volcano, has given climate scientists a continuous record of rising carbon dioxide levels and confirmed that human activities are rapidly changing the atmosphere.

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Hephaestion
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posted 23 June 2005 05:24 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
William Fenton, author and scholar of the Iroquois culture, dies at 96
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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 24 June 2005 12:22 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
charlie saikley, beach volleyball legend:

quote:
An employee of the Manhattan Beach Parks and Recreation Department for more than 40 years, Saikley was hailed as the "Godfather of Beach Volleyball" and ran the prestigious Manhattan Beach Open for decades.

Richard Gill, Manhattan Beach's director of parks and recreation: "Down on the beach, Charlie was the man. Whether it was about a foul or about a ball that was in or out, his word was the final word."

Saikley was a man of creative ideas, the most popular of them being the Manhattan Beach Six-Man, where participants enjoy playing six-on-six beach volleyball in theme costumes. There was the Buggy Brigade program he devised for new moms who would stomp down The Strand with their buggies. And then he came up with Aqualetics, a combination of semi-supervised body boarding, body surfing and surfing.



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Crippled_Newsie
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posted 26 June 2005 06:05 AM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
LA Times:
quote:
Shana Alexander, who broke ground as the first woman staff writer and columnist at Life magazine and gained pop-culture status on television in the 1970s as the liberal voice on the "Point/Counterpoint" segment on CBS' "60 Minutes," died Thursday. She was 79.

Alexander died of cancer....



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skdadl
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posted 26 June 2005 08:18 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
And what a great broad Alexander was. The SNL parodies were hilarious ("Jane, you ignorant slut"), but they were a real tribute as well, especially to Alexander, who was taking risks in those days that few women had taken so publicly before, and she obviously paid something of a personal price.

I hadn't known of that elite and complicated background before, and I am especially sorry to hear about her daughter.

She was tremendously elegant both in person and in her writing -- I read her biography of Jean Harris, insightful not only in feminist terms but maybe even more so in terms of class. In some ways, I suppose she was as much an inheritor of a now-lost American tradition of tough elite women -- think Katherine Hepburn -- as she was a modern feminist. Her career and what she says of it remind me a bit of Canada's Doris Anderson:

quote:
"I don't give a rap about '60 Minutes,' " she said. "Before I ever heard about '60 Minutes,' I had been a writer, a columnist for Life magazine and for Newsweek — that was about as high as you could get in column writing. I care about my writing. I'm not a quack-quack TV journalist."

Tough talk, well said. She earned the right to say it, too.

[ 26 June 2005: Message edited by: skdadl ]


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 27 June 2005 05:39 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
paul winchell: "he was bouncy, trouncy, flouncy, and pouncy, but the wonderful thing about winchell was that he was the only one"

[ 27 June 2005: Message edited by: Willowdale Wizard ]


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Hephaestion
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posted 27 June 2005 05:45 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Tigger has left the building. We are poorer for it.
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solarpower
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posted 28 June 2005 09:04 AM      Profile for solarpower   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Piglet and Tigger on the same day? :-o

John Fiedler, voice of Piglet, dies at 80
--------------------


June 27, 2005, 3:32 AM CDT

NEW YORK (AP) _John Fiedler, a stage actor who won fame as the voice of Piglet in Walt Disney's Winnie-the-Pooh films, died Saturday, The New York Times reported in Monday editions. He was 80.

Fiedler served in the Navy during World War II before beginning a stage career in New York. He performed in supporting roles alongside Sidney Poitier on Broadway, John Wayne in Hollywood and Bob Newhart on television.

But he was best known for the squeaky voice of the ever-worrying Piglet that he landed when someone noticed his naturally high-pitched voice.

"Walt Disney heard it on a program and said, 'That's Piglet,"' his brother James Fiedler told The Times.

In addition to his brother, Fiedler is survived by a sister, Mary Dean, The Times reported. The newspaper did not report the cause or location of his death.


Copyright (c) 2005, The Associated Press


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Anchoress
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posted 28 June 2005 09:06 AM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by solarpower:
Piglet and Tigger on the same day?

Was it a murder-suicide?


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skdadl
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posted 28 June 2005 09:14 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I think they were a day apart, actually. It's touching, though.
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skdadl
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posted 29 June 2005 10:07 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Shelby Foote has died (born 1916).

Everyone who watched Ken Burns's ground-breaking PBS series on the American Civil War (1990) will remember Shelby Foote, the soft-spoken historian/storyteller from Mississippi, one of the mesmerizing presences in that mesmerizing film.

Although he had been a successful novelist and historian for decades, Burns's series brought Foote instant fame, which he seems to have disliked and spoke about in amusingly acid terms. There's a good obit in the sports section of this a.m.'s G&M that speaks interestingly of his close friendships with the writer Walker Percy, eg, and his fellow Mississippian William Faulkner.

A gentleman scholar of a kind unusual in any culture he was, charming and witty but sharp-eyed and sometimes sharp-tongued.

[ 29 June 2005: Message edited by: skdadl ]


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skdadl
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posted 29 June 2005 10:13 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This morning's G&M also has a fine Lives Lived portrait of Rose Richardson Yanofsky (born 1938), who died in March.

Kingston-area babblers especially will know about Rose and her husband Zal Yanofsky (earlier of Lovin' Spoonful fame), who created Chez Piggy and then other local restaurants/bread stores of character and lively spirit. He died suddenly and unexpectedly a couple of years ago; she struggled with cancer over the last year.


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 30 June 2005 07:15 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
chet helms, founder and manager of big brother and the holding company (see above for login)

quote:
He helped stage free concerts and Human Be-ins at Golden Gate Park, which became the backdrop for the Summer of Love in San Francisco in 1967. He was the first producer of psychedelic light-show concerts at the Fillmore and the Avalon Ballroom and was instrumental in helping to develop bands delivering the San Francisco sound.

"Without Chet, there would be no Grateful Dead, no Big Brother and the Holding Company, no Jefferson Airplane, no Country Joe and the Fish, no Quicksilver Messenger Service," said Barry Melton, the lead guitarist for Country Joe and the Fish. "He wasn't just a promoter; he was a supporter of music and art. He supported people emotionally, psychologically and psychically. He made the scene what it was."



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Anchoress
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posted 01 July 2005 08:21 PM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Luther Vandross He was only 54.
From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Arezes
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posted 01 July 2005 11:35 PM      Profile for Arezes     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
He was fat most of his life.
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aldo
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posted 01 July 2005 11:49 PM      Profile for aldo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
He was fat most of his life.

plain speak,, how refreshing,,


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audra trower williams
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posted 02 July 2005 12:14 AM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Uh, he was a diabetic with hypertension. Do we have to be such jerks?
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 02 July 2005 12:18 AM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by audra trower williams:
Uh, he was a diabetic with hypertension. Do we have to be such jerks?

I see you haven't met Arezes yet. He's a gay-bashing hate-monger.

Edited because you met and banned Arezes immediately after I posted that!

[ 02 July 2005: Message edited by: RealityBites ]


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Hephaestion
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posted 02 July 2005 12:40 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
That damn Santa Claus! He's so FAT!!! What right does he have to still be breathing?! Big tub of LARD!!!
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aldo
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posted 02 July 2005 10:57 PM      Profile for aldo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
ya and that rich Walton guy, trying to enjoy life with a bit of adventure, he deserved to crash and die,,
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Hephaestion
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posted 03 July 2005 12:02 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
That wasn't it... it was because he was a scumbag exploiter of poor people. Cry me a fukkin' river...
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Hephaestion
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posted 04 July 2005 10:10 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Gaylord Nelson, U.S. environmental politician, Earth Day founder, dead at 89

quote:
(Milwaukee) Gaylord Nelson, a folksy Democratic senator from Wisconsin who helped start the modern environmental movement with the creation of Earth Day 35 years ago, died Sunday. He was 89. Nelson died of cardiovascular failure at his home in the Washington suburb Kensington, Md., said Bill Christofferson, his biographer and family spokesman.

A conservationist years before it was fashionable, Nelson was recognized as one of the world's foremost environmental leaders.

The former governor and senator started Earth Day in 1970, when an estimated 20 million people participated. April 22 is still celebrated today by planting trees, cleaning up trash and lobbying for a clean environment.



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jeff house
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posted 04 July 2005 12:30 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Gaylord Nelson was also one of the earliest people opposed to the Vietnam war.

Here he is, speaking against the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, the bogus resolution which allowed President Johnson to expand the war exponentially, based on a lie claiming American ships were attacked "without provication".

This was August, 1964, when American dead in Vietnam were under 100. Eventually they were 55,000.

quote:
My concern is that we in Congress could give the impression to the public that we are prepared at this time to change our mission and substantially expand our commitment. If that is what the sense of Congress is, I am opposed to the resolution. I therefore ask the distinguished Senator from Arkansas if he would consent to accept an amendment [that explicitly says Congress wants no extension of the present military conflict and no U.S. direct military involvement].

Of course, the answer to that was "no."

http://vietnam.vassar.edu/doc9.html


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josh
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posted 04 July 2005 09:42 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
He may have been opposed to the resolution, but only two senators actually voted against it, Morse and Gruening.
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Bobolink
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posted 05 July 2005 12:16 AM      Profile for Bobolink   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Hank Stram has died.
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Hephaestion
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posted 06 July 2005 06:58 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Retired vice-admiral James Stockdale, a former prisoner of war and Ross Perot's running mate in 1992, has died, the navy announced Tuesday. He was 81.
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josh
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posted 06 July 2005 02:41 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Former FBI Director L. Patrick Gray, Deep Throat's (Mark Felt's) boss, and ultimately a hapless figure, who was left "slowly twisting in the wind."

http://tinyurl.com/7gggl


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skdadl
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posted 06 July 2005 02:48 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Gray became one of those "Where are they now?" figures, didn't he.

Not much glory in becoming some Great Man's functionary, and yet new waves of bright young persons prepared to do that keep coming on. When will they ever learn?


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Hephaestion
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posted 18 July 2005 09:10 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Former British PM, Edward Heath

quote:
LONDON (AP) - Sir Edward Heath, the prime minister who led Britain into what is now the
European Union but lost the Conservative party leadership to Margaret Thatcher, died Sunday. He was 89. Heath, who governed the country from 1970-1974, died at his home in the southern cathedral city of Salisbury.

A carpenter's son who broke the tradition of blue bloods leading the Conservative party, he was a born politician whose major achievement was to negotiate Britain's 1973 entry into the European Community. The entry into what became the European Union overturned years of resistance domestically and by France, which had vetoed Britain's entry in 1967.

In 1992, he became Sir Edward, a member of the country's most prestigious order of chivalry, the knights of the Garter.



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Hephaestion
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posted 19 July 2005 09:15 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Vietnam-era 'murkan general, Westmoreland

quote:
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Retired Gen. William Westmoreland, who commanded U.S. forces during the Vietnam War from 1964 to 1968 and advocated a strong military buildup at a time when American casualties were mounting, has died.

Westmoreland died Monday of natural causes at Bishop Gadsden retirement home, where he had lived with his wife, said his son, James Ripley Westmoreland. He was 91.

"I have no apologies, no regrets. I gave my very best efforts," Westmoreland told The Associated Press in 1985. "I've been hung in effigy. I've been spat upon. You just have to let those things bounce off."



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skdadl
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posted 19 July 2005 10:05 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Very tempted to note that the good die young.

Good heavens. Edward Heath. I noticed Westmoreland in the paper this a.m. but not Heath. He was a bit of a silly man, actually, but once Mrs Thatcher took over, one came to appreciate Heath's ineffectuality.


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RP.
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posted 19 July 2005 10:09 AM      Profile for RP.     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Heath was once interview on Ali G. Good interview, actually, Ali did not take the piss too bad at H's expense. Not to say there was no teasing,

quote:
Did you shag Mag Thatcha?

From: I seem to be having tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 20 July 2005 12:53 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post
He's dead, Jim. Scotty gets beamed up.

LOS ANGELES - James Doohan, the burly chief engineer of the Starship Enterprise in the original Star Trek TV series and motion pictures who responded to the command “Beam me up, Scotty,” died early Wednesday. He was 85.
Doohan died at 5:30 a.m. at his Redmond, Wash., home with his wife of 28 years, Wende, at his side, Los Angeles agent and longtime friend Steve Stevens said. The cause of death was pneumonia and Alzheimer’s disease, he said.


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The Hegemo
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posted 20 July 2005 12:53 PM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Star Trek's Scotty has died
From: The Persistent Vegetative States of America | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 20 July 2005 01:04 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
X( damn!!!!!

*grumble, grumble* You guys beat me... I wanted to get that Doohan one in.

I put first dibs in on Shatner, then.


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N.Beltov
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posted 20 July 2005 01:45 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Wow. I had no idea. "Scotty" was a veteran of Juno Beach in Normandy, France in June of 1944 and fought for Canada. He took a few hits ... including one to the chest ... but his life was spared by his metal cigarette case.

How poetic, that. It could have been a communications device.


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 20 July 2005 02:34 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
if you watch the old episodes, you never see his right hand do the "energize", push the lever up the transporter panel, etc.

startrek.com

quote:
And then in 1974 he found his one true thing that made his personal life complete, finally. While doing a play in San Francisco, he was met by two young ladies who came backstage to get autographs. Julie brought Wende to the play as a gift, because Wende was a big fan of Scotty's. Jimmy couldn't keep his eyes off Wende. He invited her to come see the play again, and they went on a date. On their second date, he proposed. A few months later, she accepted. (By the way, Jimmy's best man was William Campbell, known to fans as "Koloth" and "Trelane.")

bbc news

quote:
Star Trek's impact became apparent when he was awarded an honorary doctorate in Engineering from the Milwaukee School of Engineering, after half the students there said that Scotty had inspired them to take up the subject.

[ 20 July 2005: Message edited by: Willowdale Wizard ]


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 20 July 2005 02:36 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Och, beamed up. Here's tae Scottie.

Pneumonia and Alzheimer's -- well, that's the way it goes.

I am struck, though, to read that his Alzheimer's was diagnosed less than a year ago. That is most unusual.


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Jimmy Brogan
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posted 20 July 2005 02:53 PM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
His Katra lives on.

Rest In Peace Jimmy.


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 20 July 2005 03:14 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
Och, beamed up. Here's tae Scottie.

Pneumonia and Alzheimer's -- well, that's the way it goes.

I am struck, though, to read that his Alzheimer's was diagnosed less than a year ago. That is most unusual.


Inaccurate reporting, but it was still recent. On July 6 last year they made the announcement in May or June 2004:

quote:
SEATTLE -- James M. Doohan, the actor who played Scotty on the '60s Star Trek TV series, has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, his agent confirmed yesterday. Doohan, 84, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's "within the last couple months,'' agent Steven Stevens said. He said Doohan is in the beginning stages of the disease

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Papal Bull
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posted 20 July 2005 04:02 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
...Beam him up God.
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Contrarian
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posted 22 July 2005 02:20 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I heard on the radio that Long John Baldry had died. He was at the Calgary Folk Fest years ago; a good musician.
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Boom Boom
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posted 22 July 2005 02:38 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Long John Baldry performed in Ottawa several times in the 1970's; once with John Mayall's Bluesbreakers. I loved the guy, great music.
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N.Beltov
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posted 22 July 2005 02:57 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
C'mon you lazy louts. Give us a link.

Blues Legend Long John Baldry passes away.

Here is Baldry's Home Page: John Baldry, (1941-2005)

I remember Baldry from the late 70's on Vancouver Island. He was always popular on the West Coast and finally moved there. Before rock 'n roll there was "Boogie-Woogie" music and Baldry was playing it. He was mentor to Rod the Mod and helped along a young Reg Dwight (Elton John) among many others.


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Crippled_Newsie
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posted 24 July 2005 06:28 AM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Gerry Thomas, the US salesman who brought the concept of the TV dinner to the world, has died of cancer aged 83
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Reality. Bites.
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posted 24 July 2005 11:18 AM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Tape_342:
Gerry Thomas, the US salesman who brought the concept of the TV dinner to the world[/URL]

He will be cremated at 350 degrees for 40 minutes in an aluminum casket. Parts of the remains will be burnt, while others will be ice-cold, but mourners will be too busy watching Milton Berle to notice.


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gopi
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posted 24 July 2005 01:41 PM      Profile for gopi     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Star Trek's Scotty has died

He was so great. Remember that episode where the ship was damaged and he had to fix it or they would be destroyed?


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 24 July 2005 02:15 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Oh yeah, those were my favourites.
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Reality. Bites.
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posted 24 July 2005 08:32 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by gopi:

He was so great. Remember that episode where the ship was damaged and he had to fix it or they would be destroyed?


Wasn't that the episode where Kirk made out with an alien with big hair?


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Stephen Gordon
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posted 24 July 2005 08:35 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post
No, that was the one where Spock said that the Enterprise was facing 'a pure energy field.'
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Reality. Bites.
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posted 24 July 2005 09:59 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post
Right, the one where Bones said "I'm a doctor, not an electrician," isn't it?
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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 24 July 2005 10:17 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Was it the one with crap, wobbly sets and alien planets with an odd fetish for sixties-earth interior design?
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Stephen Gordon
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posted 24 July 2005 10:31 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post
That's the one! The one where the new guy from security gets beamed down with the regular characters, is told to 'go behind that rock over there' and - get this! - dies mysteriously!!!

[ 24 July 2005: Message edited by: Stephen Gordon ]


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beluga2
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posted 24 July 2005 10:37 PM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Or maybe the one where the cameraman breathes on the lens whenever one of Kirk's "babes" appears?
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Hephaestion
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posted 26 July 2005 10:33 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Rod Hall, literary agent of "The Full Monty" and "Billy Elliott" fame


quote:
The literary agent credited with the success of the hit British films The Full Monty and Billy Elliot was murdered by a boyfriend who wanted his money a London court has been told.

Rod Hall, 53, was stabbed to death after being chained and manacled during what the prosecutor said was a an S&M sex game punctuated by greed.

Hall had become a wealthy man representing some of Britain's most acclaimed young writers. After his relationship with a long time partner dissolved Hall went through a series of short term affairs. 

One boyfriend, Usman Durrani, 22, is on trial accused of killing Hall in a premeditated attack.

Prosecutor Aftab Jafferjee told the court that when Hall realized Durrani was only interested in him for his money he tried to dump the much younger man.

From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 05 August 2005 10:02 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
clancy eccles

quote:
In 1967 Eccles formed the Clandisc label, initially as a vehicle for self-productions; it was based in a tailoring shop he had opened in downtown Kingston. The following year, in collaboration with the eccentric vocalist Lee "Scratch" Perry, Eccles was instrumental in breaking the new reggae form, which many say he actually named, by adapting the term "streggae" (connoting a woman of loose morals) to describe the new dance-based music that was taking the island by storm.

Long a committed political activist, devoted to social equality, Eccles became involved in the People's National Party (PNP) election campaign of 1971. He appeared on musical bandwagons with the Wailers in support of the PNP leader Michael Manley. Eccles also released a single, "Power to the People", featuring excerpts from Manley's public speeches set to reggae.



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
raccunk
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posted 05 August 2005 04:34 PM      Profile for raccunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by beluga2:
Or maybe the one where the cameraman breathes on the lens whenever one of Kirk's "babes" appears?

They got that soft glowing effect by putting vaseline on the lens. Of course, today there are ways of doing it with a computer. Just thought you guys might be interested!

Rest in Peace Scotty.*sniff*


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Albireo
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posted 06 August 2005 11:21 PM      Profile for Albireo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Ibrahim Ferrer, lead singer of Cuba's magnificent Buena Vista Social Club.
quote:
Known for his trademark cap and graying mustache, Ferrer was a wiry, animated figure who clearly enjoyed performing Cuba's traditional “son” music of the 1940s and 1950s for new generations of fans.

Among a group of older Cuban performers recruited by U.S. musician Ry Cooder, Ferrer performed on the “Buena Vista Social Club album” that won a Grammy in 1999, and was among those appearing in the film of the same name.
...

Originally from Cuba's eastern city of Santiago, Ferrer was born on Feb. 20, 1927, during a dance at a social club after his mother unexpectedly went into labor.

Ferrer was still a boy when he began singing professional with Santiago groups in 1941. By the late 1950s, he was a well-known singer performing regularly with the late, great bandleader Pacho Alonso.

He also made guest appearances with other legendary names, including Benny More and Orquesta de Chepin.

Alonso's group moved to Havana in 1959, and Ferrer came along, remaining with the group for more than two decades. By the early 1980s, Ferrer had left the musical scene, but came out of retirement to perform with the Buena Vista group.



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al-Qa'bong
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posted 10 August 2005 02:06 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Gene Mauch, the Expos' first Manager, has died of cancer at the age of 79.
web page

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deBeauxOs
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posted 11 August 2005 01:34 AM      Profile for deBeauxOs     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Canadian visual artist Carl Beam, who was recognized earlier this year with a Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts, has died at the age of 62.

The Ojibwa artist died July 30 after a lengthy illness, according to a statement from friends released Monday. (from CBC site, link below)

CBC article

Carl Beam

[ 11 August 2005: Message edited by: deBeauxOs ]


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Sharon
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posted 11 August 2005 09:57 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I intended to do this earlier but the day got away from me. Barbara Bel Geddes -- Miss Ellie Ewing, Maggie the Cat, and so many others.
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obscurantist
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posted 15 August 2005 06:42 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
David Lange, Labour prime minister of New Zealand, 1984-89

quote:
In 1985, to the anger of then-US President Ronald Reagan and other leaders, he banned nuclear-powered vessels from New Zealand's waters and nuclear arms from its territory.

The ban is still in force, to the disquiet of Washington.

...

An economic reformer, Mr Lange was forced from office in 1989 in a row within his own party over some of his controversial changes, which were aimed at modernising New Zealand's economy.


David Lange's legacy

quote:
Lange's opposition to French nuclear testing at Mururoa Atoll in the Pacific - New Zealand's "back yard" - was vocal and insistent.

It grew even more strident after France bombed a Greenpeace ship, the Rainbow Warrior, in Auckland harbour.

...

Just months before, the prime minister, a forceful public speaker, had travelled to the Oxford University Union debate in Britain to argue that nuclear weapons were illegal.

"Those who build nuclear weapons, and those who devise nuclear strategies, do more than provide for their own defence. They have it in their hands to determine the fate of us all," he told the debate.

Lange and Labour's commitment to the anti-nuclear cause - in the age of 'mutually assured destruction' - was instrumental in creating New Zealand's environmentalist identity, former Labour prime minister Mike Moore told the BBC.

"This was a deep emotional issue to New Zealanders," he said. "He was of a generation born out of the anti-war movement."

...

Lange's reformist Labour government was also "New Labour when Tony Blair was still at school", Mr Moore said.

Led by the free-market thinking of finance minister Roger Douglas - quickly dubbed 'Rogernomics' by headline writers - Lange's government was responsible for the biggest economic reforms in New Zealand's history.

The reforms, which included selling off state-owned assets, alienated the party from many of its traditional working class voters. Farmers were also upset at an end to agricultural subsidies.

But the reforms have been seen as a blueprint for the centrist policies of Blair's New Labour administration.



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belva
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posted 16 August 2005 01:44 PM      Profile for belva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This is certainly not current news but caught me by surprise--guess I'm feeling my age just a bit--I noticed in today's New York Times that it was on this date that Elvis Presley died in 1977!

I was not a fan of his but the passge of time caught me very unaware!


From: bliss | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
catje
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posted 16 August 2005 08:29 PM      Profile for catje     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by deBeauxOs:
Canadian visual artist Carl Beam, who was recognized earlier this year with a Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts, has died at the age of 62.

The Ojibwa artist died July 30 after a lengthy illness, according to a statement from friends released Monday. (from CBC site, link below)

CBC article

Carl Beam

[ 11 August 2005: Message edited by: deBeauxOs ]


At 62! Far too young for a force of nature like that. Here's to Carl, a brilliant artist, and a rebel who actually got the establishment to listen.


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The Hegemo
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posted 19 August 2005 11:17 AM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
RIP Mo Mowlam

Mo Mowlam, the former Northern Ireland secretary and one of the most popular Labour politicians of recent times, died today, aged 55.

[ 19 August 2005: Message edited by: The Hegemo ]


From: The Persistent Vegetative States of America | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 19 August 2005 11:26 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Och, I'm sorry to hear that, although we heard a week ago, at the time of Robin Cook's funeral, that she had just moved to a hospice.
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Suzette
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posted 19 August 2005 11:30 AM      Profile for Suzette     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by belva:
This is certainly not current news but caught me by surprise--guess I'm feeling my age just a bit--I noticed in today's New York Times that it was on this date that Elvis Presley died in 1977!


I remember coming home as an eight-year-old that day and finding my mother crying. Worried, I asked her what was wrong, and she told me that Elvis had died. I laughed, so she gave me a smack on the bum and sent me to my room.

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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 19 August 2005 12:38 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
some people's personal memories of mowlem:

quote:
Mo Mowlam stepped in to help Simon Gray stack boxes in time for a fundraising dinner:

"I was a volunteer for Stonewall and helped out at a fundraising and awareness event.

We were running a little late, and I was still unpacking boxes of literature for the display, when I realised that people were arriving. I started moving the boxes out of the way, when I noticed someone helping me - it was Mo Mowlam.

I recognised her immediately, and knew she hadn't been well. I wasn't expecting any guest to help me out, least of all a politician.

I told her it was ok, and that I could do it, but she ignored me and said carried on helping.

Here was a remarkable woman who had survived a brain tumour, been an advocate for peace in Ireland and was a member of the Cabinet, mucking in. I couldn't help but wonder if any of her colleagues would have done the same."


[ 19 August 2005: Message edited by: Willowdale Wizard ]


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 22 August 2005 12:26 AM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I just heard about David Lange's death. In many ways a brilliant man who led a courageous campaign for a Nuclear Free South Pacific and did many good things for enviromental causes, such as setting up New Zealand's Department of Conservation, Lange's legacy is greatly tarnished by the Thatcherite reforms implemented by his Finance Minister Roger Douglas. Regardless of this, I think we can say that this was a good man who fought the good fight, and acheived great good. His downfall was his inability to keep Douglas and his acolytes in check, which cost him his political career.
For those who enjoy such things, his Oxford Union debate against Jerry Falwell was extraordinary political theatre.

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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 22 August 2005 11:13 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
bob moog, pioneer of the analog synthesiser


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skdadl
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posted 22 August 2005 03:26 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Did anyone here study Shakespeare at U of T with Sheldon Zitner? I never took his course, but it was famous in my day, before my day, and after my day, so I figure there may be a few former students about.

I just learned, from today's G&M Lives Lived, that he died in April, at the age of 85, I believe.


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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 22 August 2005 08:27 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Willowdale Wizard:
bob moog, pioneer of the analog synthesiser


Aw, shit. Moog was one of the greats.


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alisea
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posted 22 August 2005 09:46 PM      Profile for alisea     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Yes, skadl, I took Zitner's 2nd year Shakespeare course in, oh, 1975. Brilliant and acerbic man, and the first B I ever got on an essay -- what a shock THAT was to my cocky little brain :-)
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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 23 August 2005 11:33 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
a bbc radio interview with howard jones and keith emmerson (of emmerson, lake and palmer) on the moog legacy.
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skdadl
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posted 23 August 2005 11:40 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by alisea:
Yes, skadl, I took Zitner's 2nd year Shakespeare course in, oh, 1975. Brilliant and acerbic man, and the first B I ever got on an essay -- what a shock THAT was to my cocky little brain :-)

Oh, alisea, I know that experience. Professor Meagher (at St Mike's) once gave me a B on an essay, my first in about six years of U-school, and I spent a month in bed weeping. I think we all need at least one of those experiences.

Professor M was wrong, of course.

I'm pretty sure that 'lance also did Zitner's course -- 'lance: are you there?

Did you know that Zitner began to write and publish his own poetry as/after he retired? His third collection is about to come out, I gather.

What a strange but sometimes glorious department that was.


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deBeauxOs
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posted 25 August 2005 01:40 AM      Profile for deBeauxOs     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Actor Brock Peters Dies

Actor Brock Peters, best known for his role as Tom Robinson, a black man falsely accused of rape in the classic film "To Kill a Mockingbird", died Tuesday in Los Angeles of pancreatic cancer; he was 78. According to reports, he had been diagnosed with the disease in January and had been receiving chemotherapy treatments, and the actor passed away at his home surrounded by family.

An actor with a distinctive, authoritarian baritone who worked extensively in films, television and on the stage, Peters made his film debut in the lush melodrama "Carmen Jones", an re-imagining of Bizet's Carmen starring Dorothy Dandridge, and appeared five years later in another musical adaptation, "Porgy and Bess". In 1962, Peters took the role of Tom Robinson in "To Kill a Mockingbird", and during filming was befriended by star Gregory Peck; in fact, Peters read the eulogy at Peck's funeral in 2003. His magnetic and heartbreaking performance in Mockingbird led to roles in "The L-Shaped Room" and "The Pawnbroker", and though he rarely achieved leading man status, Peters worked steadily throughout the 60s, 70s, and 80s in both movies and TV, and received a Tony nomination in 1973 for Lost in the Stars. He appeared in thrillers "Soylent Green" and "Two-Minute Warning", miniseries "Roots: The Next Generation", and innumerable guest spots on television series ranging from Gunsmoke to The Bionic Woman.

To a later generation of fans, Peters was known for two different Star Trek roles, playing Admiral Cartwright in "The Voyage Home" and "The Undiscovered Country" as well as a recurring role on Deep Space Nine as Joseph Sisko, the father of star Avery Brooks' character. In 1991, Peters received a lifetime achievement award from the Screen Actors Guild. Peters is survived by his longtime companion Marilyn Darby and a daughter from his first marriage.

[ 25 August 2005: Message edited by: deBeauxOs ]


From: missing in action | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 25 August 2005 09:35 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
*salute*
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oldgoat
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posted 25 August 2005 09:44 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I was delighted when I got my first B.
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skdadl
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posted 25 August 2005 10:02 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Slacker.

Did you get it from Sheldon, oldgoat?


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belva
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posted 25 August 2005 11:43 AM      Profile for belva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by deBeauxOs:
Actor Brock Peters Dies

Actor Brock Peters, best known for his role as Tom Robinson, a black man falsely accused of rape in the classic film "To Kill a Mockingbird", died Tuesday in Los Angeles of pancreatic cancer; he was 78.


To a later generation of fans, Peters was known for two different Star Trek roles, playing Admiral Cartwright in "The Voyage Home" and "The Undiscovered Country" as well as a recurring role on Deep Space Nine as Joseph Sisko, the father of star Avery Brooks' character.


[ 25 August 2005: Message edited by: deBeauxOs ]


A great man gone!

[ 25 August 2005: Message edited by: belva ]


From: bliss | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 25 August 2005 01:47 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hunter S. Thompson's ashes have gone up in fireworks.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
belva
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posted 26 August 2005 11:02 AM      Profile for belva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hon. Clarence C. Newcomer, of Stone Harbor, New Jersey, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a federal district court judge for more than 33 years, died Aug. 22 at age 82 at his home in Stone Harbor, New Jersey. The cause of death was melanoma.

Judge Newcomer was born in Mount Joy, Pennsylvania on January 18, 1923, the son of the late Clarence S. and Clara Charles Newcomer.

He was graduated from Franklin and Marshall College in 1944 and actively served in the United States Naval Reserve as an executive officer of an amphibious landing craft in the Pacific Theater from 1943-46. After his honorable discharge with the rank of Lieutenant Junior Grade, he was graduated from Dickinson School of Law, in 1948.

On October 2, 1948, Judge Newcomer married Jane Moyer Martin of Lancaster. In 1950, Judge Newcomer entered into private practice in Lancaster, his home for more than 50 years, and served several positions in that county. From 1950-57, he was a solo practitioner, and later became partner in the law firm of Rohrer, Honaman, Newcomer & Musser. During that time, he also served as a Pennsylvania Special Deputy Attorney General from 1953-54. Committed to public service, Judge Newcomer served as a Lancaster Assistant District Attorney from 1960-64, as a First Assistant District Attorney from 1964-68, and as the Lancaster County District Attorney from 1968-72, when he was also a partner with the law firm of Newcomer, Roda & Morgan.

On November 13, 1971, he was appointed by the President to serve as a federal judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania . During his three decades on the federal bench, he was known among his colleagues as open-minded, principled, and impartial. All who entered his court were treated with dignity and respect; he gave litigants their "fair day in court". He assumed senior judge status in 1988, but maintained a full case load.

During his three decade career on the federal bench, Judge Newcomer presided over several mob and public corruption cases, and in 1994 invalidated a state senate election he found to be overwhelmingly tainted by fraud. The Almanac of the Federal Judiciary cited several other noteworthy cases, including a 1993 ruling that a law firm s refusal to promote a female associate to partner violated the Civil Rights Act and a 1997 ruling that states cannot discriminate against new residents by paying them lower welfare benefits than longtime residents. In April, Judge Newcomer presided over a civil trial in which a jury awarded residents displaced by the MOVE bombing a $12.83 million verdict against the City of Philadelphia.
________________________________________________

A man of honor & fairness, a credit to the judiciary!

I had the pleasure of being in his courtroom several times. Many of us in the liberal bar shall miss him.


From: bliss | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
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posted 27 August 2005 12:37 PM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Gerry Fitt, first leader of the SDLP from 1970 - 79.

Pat Rabbitte, leader of the Irish Labour Party, says:

quote:
Gerry Fitt was one of the most important figures of the last 50 years in Irish political life.

In the 1960s, he put Labour politics on the map in Northern Ireland, through his activism at grassroots level and subsequent election to Belfast City Council, Stormont, and Westminster.

He was always a strong and passionate advocate of civil rights at a time when unionists failed to recognise or respond to these calls. He also demonstrated great personal courage in the face of worsening sectarianism.

Gerry Fitt's larger-than-life personality and his forthright, often blunt, approach won him enemies and friends alike.

Yet despite political differences with colleagues and opponents he remained committed to the politics of persuasion and to a peaceful, non-violent solution to the violence in the north.


MP in the UK Parliament for West Belfast for 17 years, he was first elected as a "Republican Labour" candidate in 1966, re-elected in 1970.

In August 1970 he became the first leader of a coalition of civil rights and nationalist leaders who created the Social Democratic and Labour Party. In 1974 he became deputy chief executive of the short-lived Power-Sharing Executive. Reelected in February 1974 (the only pro-Sunningdale agreement MP elected) and again in October.

On October 11, 1974 he stated: "In Northern Ireland it is very difficult to be a socialist without being labelled a Unionist socialist or an anti-partionist socialist, but I am a socialist..."

He became a target for republican sympathisers in 1976 when they attacked his home.

In 1979 he was re-elected despite his outspoken criticism of the IRA; the Republican candidate got only 6.9%. (That was the year the IRA assassinated Lord Mountbatten, and the MP for South Belfast, and others.)

Then the new Tory Secretary of State Humphrey Atkins proposed a round-table conference to consider an internal solution without an 'Irish Dimension.' Following an SDLP Executive meeting in Dugannon the Party refused to participate; two days later Gerry Fitt resigned as Party Leader, replaced by John Hume, and he left the party altogether. In 1981 he opposed the hunger strikes in the Maze prison in Belfast.

In 1983 his seat in Westminster was targeted by Sinn Féin as well as by the SDLP:
Gerry Adams (Sinn Féin) 16,379 (36.9%)
Joe Hendron (SDLP) 10,934 (24.6%)
Gerry Fitt MP (Independent Socialist) 10,326 (23.3%)

The following month he was made a UK life peer as "Baron Fitt, of Bell's Hill in the County of Down."


From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 27 August 2005 01:03 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Penny Petrone (Serafina Petrone), 1949-2005.

All students of Canadian literature and Canadian aboriginal culture will know of Penny Petrone's ground-breaking works:

quote:
Her research on the Canadian Poet, Isabella Valancy Crawford resulted in two books The Selected Short Stories of Isabella Valancy Crawford and The Fairy Tales of Isabella Valancy Crawford. They were the first books to make Crawford's prose works publicly accessible.

Dr. Petrone also pioneered the critical study of aboriginal literature in Canada with her landmark books First People, First Voices, and Northern Voices. Her Native Literature in Canada was the first book-length history of the literature of Canada's First Peoples. For this ground-breaking research, Dr. Petrone was made an honorary Indian Chief by the Gull Bay Ojibwa and gained international recognition.

After her retirement from Lakehead University, Dr. Petrone's scholarly focus shifted to the study of her Italian heritage. Anxious to promote Italian culture, in January 1995, she was instrumental in forming 'I Literati', a local reading group which focused on Italy's cultural heritage in the fields of literature, art, music, history and film as well as on the Italian immigrant experience in North America. She also wrote two memoirs, Breaking the Mould and Embracing Serafina. Her book Breaking the Mould was translated into Italian and launched at the University of Rome, La Sapienza in July, 2005.


She would only have been 56, and is said to have died "unexpectedly."

I never met her, but this is a serious loss to Canadian scholarship.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4140

posted 27 August 2005 01:36 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I cannot remember if I mentioned already that Manitoba First Nation poet Marvin Francis passed away earlier this year. skdadl's previous entry has reminded me that I should post this.

Marvin Francis

Marvin was a fine Open Mike poet and the inventor, near as I can determine, of the cigarette poem.

The cigarette poem (or cigarette poetry) is a poem that fits on the back of a pack of cigarettes. Sometimes, that is all you have to write on.

Marvin had a wry sense of humour and an unswerving progressive orientation that found reflection in his choice of subject matter and in his humility and approachability. He would have been an outstanding babbler if we had been lucky enough to find him here.


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 27 August 2005 01:46 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
The cigarette poem (or cigarette poetry) is a poem that fits on the back of a pack of cigarettes. Sometimes, that is all you have to write on.

Sometimes, that is all you have, indeed.

Thank you, N. Beltov.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3276

posted 27 August 2005 01:54 PM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Gerry Fitt stated: "In Northern Ireland it is very difficult to be a socialist without being labelled a Unionist socialist or an anti-partionist socialist, but I am a socialist..."

P.S. from the BBC:

quote:
From an archetypal Belfast Catholic working-class background, Gerry Fitt joined the Merchant Navy in 1941, serving on Atlantic and Russian convoys.

He said later that on the ships he discovered poverty was not confined to Belfast, and learned a tolerance he had not found in the Catholic ghettos of his childhood.

When his convoy had been surrounded by German submarines, with missiles flying back and forth, he wondered how young men in both vessels could try to kill each other when they had not even met.

"Since then I have been totally against war," he once told the BBC.

Gerry Fitt returned to Northern Ireland a committed socialist, and was soon on Belfast City Council as a member of the Irish Labour Party.



From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
belva
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8098

posted 29 August 2005 11:45 AM      Profile for belva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Quote:
________________________________________________
The Rev. Katrina Swanson, one of the first women to be ordained as an Episcopal priest, died Saturday at her home in Manset village. She was 70.

The Rev. George Swanson, her husband and also an Episcopal priest, said she died of colon cancer.


The fourth generation of her family to enter the ministry, Swanson was one of the "Philadelphia 11," a group of women ordained in an irregular and controversial ceremony in that city on July 29, 1974.


The Radcliffe graduate was ordained by her father, the late Rt. Rev. Edward Welles II, who had advocated ordination of women in a book published in England in 1928.


Swanson's awareness of the role of women in the church blossomed during the year she and her husband spent in an exchange pastorate in Botswana during the 1960s.


In the villages, she saw that capable women, barred from any leadership roles, had to hire men to read morning and evening prayers in the mud and thatch schoolrooms that became church on Sunday.


Swanson's status as a priest became official after the Episcopal Church approved the ordination of women in 1976. Two years later, she became a rector of St. John's Parish in Union City, N.J., where she instituted bilingual Spanish and English services and established an after-school program for children.


Until then, Swanson's path was not simple. When she returned home to Kansas City, Mo., after the Philadelphia ordination, her husband, who was rector of an inner city parish there, had to fire her as his unpaid assistant priest to keep his job.


Subsequently, Katrina Swanson was hired for a dollar a year as assistant priest at the Church of the Liberation in St. Louis.


In 1975 Swanson signed a three months suspension from her deacon's ministry under the threat of an ecclesiastical trial. She was the only one of the Philadelphia 11 and the ordaining bishops to receive ecclesiastical punishment.


Swanson retired to Manset in 1996. During her 16-month illness, friends made a cedar bench in her name on the grounds of St. Saviour's Church in Bar Harbor. At the dedication this year, the Rt. Rev. Chilton Knudsen, the first woman Episcopal bishop of Maine, thanked Swanson "for being a pioneer. Without you, I wouldn't be here."


Swanson is survived by her husband; children Olof, William and Helene; and her brother, Peter Welles.


A requiem Eucharist will be held on a date to be announced.
_________________________________________________

"Costly in God's sight is the death of a saint"
---The Book of Psalms 116:15

Rest in peace. Your ministry is not forgotten.


From: bliss | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 31 August 2005 09:45 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
ted "double duty" radcliffe:

quote:
Radcliffe, who has died aged 103, was not the best batting catcher in the Negro Leagues, nor by any means the best pitcher. But his ability to do both well, coupled with presence as an entertainer second only to Paige himself, made him a key figure in black baseball.

1932 was Radcliffe's finest season; he batted 325 (registering one hit in every three at-bats) and won 19 games as a pitcher. Playing for the American Giants, he was named most valuable player of the Negro American League in 1943.

His greatest skill was his defensive ability as a catcher. His ability to whip throws from behind home plate to catch base-stealing runners at second base was legendary; across his chest-protector he had written "thou shalt not steal".

In 2003, he debuted in the Major Leagues, throwing out a ceremonial first pitch before a St Louis Cardinals game. Aged 101, Double Duty stepped out of his wheel chair, double-pumped his arms and delivered the pitch to 92 year old Buck O'Neil. The fully integrated crowd roared its appreciation.



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
deBeauxOs
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10099

posted 02 September 2005 02:31 AM      Profile for deBeauxOs     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
On August 31, Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper, from the Netherlands, died peacefully in her sleep aged 115 at a home for the elderly in Amsterdam. She was born on 29 June 1890 and had held the record for the oldest woman in the world since May 2004.

Henny, as she was known to her friends and family, was a life-long Ajax football fan. She attributed her longevity to a diet of pickled herring and urged all those who wanted to emulate her achievement to "keep breathing".

Mrs van Andel-Schipper, whose husband, Dick, died in 1959, was described as "very clear mentally" by the home's director, Johan Beijering. "She said 'It's been nice, but the man upstairs says it's time to go'," he said.


From: missing in action | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
kingblake
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3453

posted 02 September 2005 06:31 PM      Profile for kingblake     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Bluesman R.L. Burnside Dies at 78
quote:
NEW YORK - R.L. Burnside, one of the last, great Mississippi bluesmen, whose raw, country blues was discovered late in his life, has died. He was 78.

Burnside died Thursday morning at the St. Francis Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. His health had been declining for some time, said Matthew Johnson, owner of Burnside's record label, Fat Possum.


Maybe now he can sit down

From: In Regina, the land of Exotica | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7136

posted 04 September 2005 10:05 AM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Did anyone take English lit courses at Concordia University during the 1980s? I just found out that Prof. Harry Hill, who was also a well-known Montreal actor, died at the age of 64 on August 18th. He was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1940.

I only met him once when I was a kid, he was a friend of my brother's, but I remember him as a really funny, truly kind and eccentric man.
I was really sad to hear this, and will try to provide a link - there was an article in the Montreal Gazette, for which I don't even have the date.


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 06 September 2005 10:27 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Gilligan dead
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 07 September 2005 11:09 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Skipper: "I'm not overweight, I just have big bones."
Gilligan: "Yeah, and they're covered with big meat."

From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 16 September 2005 05:33 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
After all, the wool from the black sheep is just as warm.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
deBeauxOs
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10099

posted 16 September 2005 11:10 AM      Profile for deBeauxOs     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
posted by Willowdale Wizard:
After all, the wool from the black sheep is just as warm.
Yep, that was posted here. The title of that thread is Bless me now with your fierce tears ...

Director Robert Wise dead at 91


From: missing in action | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 18 September 2005 02:27 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
first, the last five "who's dead" obituary threads hav been in "culture" not "body and soul".

second, there's no way i would have known that thread had anything to do with the series of "who's dead" threads from its title.

[ 18 September 2005: Message edited by: Willowdale Wizard ]


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
deBeauxOs
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10099

posted 18 September 2005 03:07 PM      Profile for deBeauxOs     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
posted by Willowdale Wizard: first, the last five "who's dead" obituary threads hav been in "culture" not "body and soul".
So sorry, I joined in August so I don't have your seniority in this matter.
quote:
second, there's no way i would have known that thread had anything to do with the series of "who's dead" threads from its title.
True enough, so I added DEAD to the thread topic title.

From: missing in action | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
The Hegemo
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5176

posted 19 September 2005 09:37 PM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Sandra Feldman, ex-President of the American Federation of Teachers
From: The Persistent Vegetative States of America | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
kingblake
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3453

posted 20 September 2005 12:29 PM      Profile for kingblake     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Simon Wiesenthal dead at 96

And

Richard Holden died. He made one of the oddest political jumps I can think of, when he crossed the floor of the National Assembly, leaving the Equality Party and joining the Parti Quebecois. His Westmount constituents were not happy

From: In Regina, the land of Exotica | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
belva
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8098

posted 22 September 2005 06:18 PM      Profile for belva     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
an email from Eleanor SmeaL:

Quote:
_________________________________________________
Dear Feminist News Readers,

I am writing with the sad news that Molly Yard, an indefatigable advocate for
women’s rights, passed away last night in her sleep in Pittsburgh at the age of 93.
Molly had suffered a major stroke in 1991, but kept working until the late 1990s at
the Feminist Majority. Throughout her long life, Molly worked for women’s rights,
civil rights, workers’ rights, and social justice.

Molly served as the political director and a leader of the campaign to pass the
Equal Rights Amendment for the National Organization for Women in the late 1970s and
1980s, and was the president of NOW from 1987 until 1992. Yard led the March for
Women’s Lives to keep abortion and birth control safe and legal in 1989. She was
also active in Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) and the Democratic Party,
leading George McGovern’s presidential campaign in Pennsylvania in 1972. One of her
first jobs out of college was special assistant to Eleanor Roosevelt.

She was a brilliant strategist and a tireless organizer for campaigns for social
justice who could always rally the troops. She was a leader in winning equal
representation for women within the Democratic Party on all levels. She worked for
countless women’s candidacies and made sure that NOW and the Feminist Majority kept
equal representation for women and the winning of elected office for women high on
the agenda of the women’s movement.

Her energy, commitment, and dedication were unmatched, and she would never get
discouraged. She saw the women’s rights struggle as a process, and she was there for
the long haul. She instilled her spirit for the fight for women’s rights in three
generations of women.

Among Molly’s many contributions to the women’s movement was helping to popularize
the gender gap in voting and public opinion. She helped convince her brother-in-law,
Lou Harris, the dean of pollsters in the early 1980s, to separate out his polls by
gender, which at the time was not the norm. Harris’ polls on Reagan broken out by
gender made it clear that the gender gap was real and has had a lasting impact on
politics.

Molly recognized the importance of Title IX, the landmark 1972 legislation
prohibiting sex discrimination in federally funded educational programs. As NOW’s
political director from 1985 to 1987, and then as president of NOW, she helped lead
the victorious fight to restore Title IX after the devastating 1984 Supreme Court
decision in the Grove City case. Molly was so dedicated to equal educational and
sports opportunities for women and girls, that even after her stroke and her
presidency of NOW, she led the Feminist Majority’s Task Force on Title IX to ensure
it would never be gutted again. Time after time in the 1990s, she helped beat back
attempts to weaken Title IX.

Molly worked for women’s rights long after she suffered her stroke. She organized
one of the largest delegations for the Feminist Expo in 1996, and gave her last
major speech at Feminist Expo 2000, inspiring seasoned feminist activists and young
feminist leaders alike.

Molly was nothing if not a dedicated fundraiser for the causes to which she
dedicated her life. I remember speaking at an event during the Equal Rights
Amendment campaign, asking attendees to consider making a contribution to defray the
costs of the campaign. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw Molly barreling toward me.
She took the mike from my hand and said that my ask was too soft. She asked everyone
in that room to dig into their pockets a little deeper, and no one could say no to
Molly.

Molly’s life touched so many of our lives. I invite you to share your remembrances
of or tributes to Molly on my new blog, The Smeal Report
(http://www.msmagazineblogs.com/smealreport/).

There will be a Washington, DC celebration of Molly Yard’s life in the coming weeks.
The Feminist Majority, the National Organization for Women, Americans for Democratic
Action, and the countless progressive groups with which Molly worked will
participate. If you are in the area, I hope you will be able to join us. Please
check back at www.feminist.org for the details.

For Equality,

Eleanor Smeal
President
Feminist Majority
_________________________________________________

I had the pleasure of meeting her several times. She was a grand human being! I am in her debt & will miss her!


From: bliss | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 26 September 2005 09:30 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
chima ubani, a leader of the pro-democracy movement in nigeria and a former AI prisoner of conscience.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 30 September 2005 08:29 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
one person that i wanted to add, but it was behind the star's subscription wall, was dr douglas salmon, who was described as "the first black surgeon in canada. he was an accomplished pianist, scholar, athlete and sculptor as well." he was the husband of former metro councillor bev salmon.

apolonio de carvalho:

quote:
Apolonio de Carvalho, a Brazilian leftist whose extraordinary life encompassed the international brigades in the Spanish civil war, the French resistance, the guerrilla struggle against Brazil's military dictatorship and the founding of the Partido dos Trabalhadores (PT), has died in Rio de Janeiro, aged 93.

From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 01 October 2005 11:29 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
patrick caulfield, british painter and printmaker.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 22 July 2006 08:58 AM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
One of my all time favorite supporting actors, Jack Warden.

quote:

He was the scruffy outlaw in "The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing" (1973), the cab-driving father in "The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz" (1974), the hard-nosed city editor in "All the President's Men" (1976) and Paul Newman's friend and conscience in "The Verdict" (1982).

He played a rich husband in "Shampoo" opposite Beatty and Julie Christie, and in "Heaven Can Wait" he played a coach for the Los Angeles Rams.

. . . .


"Brian's Song," the television movie that garnered him an Emmy, was story of the bond that developed between Chicago Bears teammates Gale Sayers and Brian Piccolo after Piccolo learned he was dying.

When he played the suicidal judge in " And Justice for All" (1979), Warden reportedly asked the makeup artist to sharpen the angle of his eyebrows so he would appear more deranged.

The New York Times called Warden a "fine farceur" as twin salesmen in "Used Cars" (1980) and said he played Ryan O'Neal's father "hilariously" in "So Fine" (1981).

After he portrayed a U.S. president influenced by an unlikely political insider played by Peter Sellers in the black comedy "Being There" (1979), Warden recalled how President Jimmy Carter told him, over lunch at the White House, how much he liked the performance.


http://tinyurl.com/nkdxt


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 21 November 2006 09:12 AM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Robert Altman

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061121/ap_on_en_mo/obit_altman


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4090

posted 21 November 2006 10:08 AM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
One of my all-time favourite directors -- who directed one of my all-time favourite movies: Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean Jimmy Dean. You just beat me to the obituary, josh.
From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
Moderator
Babbler # 1130

posted 21 November 2006 01:27 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
There seems to be some duplication of obit threads, so we'll close this one for length as Mr. Altman has a thread of his own.
From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged

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