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Author Topic: Movie that was better than the book
clersal
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posted 03 December 2006 04:58 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought the movie, 'Silence of the Lambs'was better than the book.
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sandpiper
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posted 03 December 2006 05:13 PM      Profile for sandpiper     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Stanley Kubrick's 'The Shining' over Stephen King's.
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Cueball
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posted 03 December 2006 05:31 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Lenin's What Is to be Done over the Russian revolution.

[ 03 December 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


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Fidel
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posted 03 December 2006 05:50 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hollywood's fictional Wall Street (1987) was much better than a 50 percent loss on the Dow at the end of Stiglitz' non-fiction book, The Roaring 90's
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Ken Burch
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posted 03 December 2006 07:44 PM      Profile for Ken Burch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Cueball:
Lenin's What Is to be Done over the Russian revolution.

[ 03 December 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


But what about "REDS" as compared to "Ten Days That Shook The World"?

(...Which I've read repeatedly, without finding any appearances by McCabe or Annie Hall during the October Revolution...)


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Cueball
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posted 03 December 2006 10:43 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought the book was better.
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Stargazer
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posted 04 December 2006 03:50 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A Clockwork Orange was better than the book.

One Flew Over the Cookoos Nest - about the same.


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Michelle
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posted 04 December 2006 04:10 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Pretty much any Biblical movie over the Bible.
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Stargazer
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posted 04 December 2006 04:11 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's true!
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Catchfire
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posted 04 December 2006 07:20 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Passion of the Christ was NOT better than the Gospel of Matthew.

Definitely agreed on Shining, Clockwork Orange and Cuckoo's Nest. Pretty much any Kubrick movie based on a book is better.


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Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 04 December 2006 07:26 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Blade Runner was the only movie based on a Phillip K. Dick story that was superior to the original.
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Cueball
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posted 04 December 2006 08:01 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There are a number of films were based on Dick stories, some explicitly, some not. Total Recall staring the Governator, and most recently A Scanner Darkly. There is another one too, which I can't recall right now.

I also agree that Blade Runner is possibly one of the best translations of a book into film, though you there are a number of editorial decision which make the movie less rich thematically, they are also in my view good editorial decisions, one that help the film translate well as visual art.

[ 04 December 2006: Message edited by: Cueball ]


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Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 04 December 2006 08:15 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Never saw A Scanner Darkly, but Minority Report was mediocre, and Total Recall was simply awful.
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Stargazer
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posted 04 December 2006 08:54 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I forgot, Running Man was almost as good as the book.
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arborman
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posted 04 December 2006 12:11 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lard Tunderin' Jeezus:
Blade Runner was the only movie based on a Phillip K. Dick story that was superior to the original.

Here is my card sir. I trust you will select a second to arrange a time and place. I leave the choice of weapons to you.

The movie was good as a stand-alone concept, but the book was pure unalloyed genius. And the divergent endings have me thinking that the moviemakers simply didn't 'get' the book. The very idea that the movie was 'better'. Pshaw! I say, Pshaw!

ETA: A PKD book that would probably not make the transition to movie very well is 'The Man in the High Castle'. They'd get the alternate history thing OK, but I don't think the US movie industry would be able to portray the inverted colonialism and internalized subjugation that PKD highlighted so well. No doubt it'd turn into a silly action movie.

[ 04 December 2006: Message edited by: arborman ]


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obscurantist
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posted 04 December 2006 12:31 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's not a matter of Blade Runner being better or worse than Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. It's just completely different.

I haven't made my mind up about whether the movie is a great one -- I last saw it on a thirteen-inch TV screen almost ten years ago -- but I do recall that it's a visually stunning film where very little happens or is said. That's not meant as a criticism. The emptiness of the film mirrors the emptiness of the main character, an (apparent) human being who has less of a soul than the replicants he's assigned to destroy.

By contrast, the book is a example of Dick doing what he normally does, having his characters bounce their thoughts off of each other in something akin to one of Woody Allen's chat-fest scripts. And he does it better than in most of his other novels.

It's also interesting, if not necessarily relevant, that all the other movie adaptations of Dick stories so far have been of short stories or novellas. Blade Runner is the only one based on a full-length novel. (Or it was until recently -- I just remembered about A Scanner Darkly. And what story was Running Man based on? I thought it was adapted from a Steven King novella, although the story is certainly very Dickian.)


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Jacob Two-Two
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posted 04 December 2006 01:09 PM      Profile for Jacob Two-Two     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Um, the Running Man? That godawful piece of crap? The Stephen King story is mediocre but miles better than the movie. Or are you talking about something else?

Speaking of Stephen King, Shawshank Redemption is better than the story it's based on.

Jaws was a book first, and apparently not a very good one.

Princess Bride. Tough call, but I'll give it to the movie by a nose.

American Psycho. By all accounts a dumb, ponderous novel, but I quite enjoyed the movie.


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arborman
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posted 04 December 2006 03:45 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by obscurantist:
It's not a matter of Blade Runner being better or worse than Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. It's just completely different.

That I'll accept. They are entirely different explorations of a similar theme.

And the book was earthshaking (for me) in its exploration of what it means to be human, while the movie was nifty in its exploration of post-whatever grittiness. Very different, and the book takes it by a mile, IMO.

Running Man was a bad Stephen King novella made into a dreadful movie. Really dreadful. Embarrassing.


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Fidel
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posted 04 December 2006 08:45 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Ken Burch:

But what about "REDS" as compared to "Ten Days That Shook The World"?


I only saw the movie. I thought it was excellent. I liked Beatty in most of his movie roles and remember him best in Bonnie and Clyde with Daye Funaway. Splendor in the Grass with Natalie Wood is an all-time fave as well.

I do remember the bit when Reed was giving a speech off the back of the train infront of the large crowd. Reed was pretty angry with their Russian translator who took liberties with his speech so as to incite chants of jihad against the west among what appeared to be a sea of Muslims. There were no awesome ice house scenes as per Dr Zhivago though, but I enjoyed it.

Apparently there were some authentic Russians? brought in for various scenes, and Beatty gave them a pep talk about demanding some decent wages during the shoot. So the Russian actors did just that and wobbled for more pay. The movie's labour costs were bumped up a bit due to Beatty's pro-worker maneuvering "behind the scenes." "REDS" gets five stars from moi.

[ 04 December 2006: Message edited by: Fidel ]


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Boom Boom
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posted 14 December 2006 07:22 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I dunno if there was a book called Munich but I just saw it on the telly. I have no idea how accurate it is to the real life events. TMN is showing it all month.
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jrose
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posted 18 December 2006 09:46 PM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
To Kill A Mockingbird, equally wonderful as a book and a film. Gregory Peck was more mesmerizing than I ever could have imagined Atticus as, while I was reading the book in Grade 9 English.
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Left Turn
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posted 18 December 2006 09:54 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The movie of The Wizard of Oz was definitely better than the book.
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quelar
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posted 19 December 2006 08:22 AM      Profile for quelar     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I completely agree that Blade Runner v Do Androids are different takes on the same idea, but really Blade Runner is a great movie.

A couple of others to consider, Apocalypse Now vs. Heart of Darkness. I love the book, but the movie does it wonderfully and with a lot more to the surrounding political culture (not redux though).

Lord of the Rings? I find the books annoyingly long at parts, the Movies even at the three plus hour extended versions move along well.

Fight Club as a movie had some great parts that were well viewed in movie form.


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jrose
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posted 19 December 2006 10:09 PM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's been years since I've read/watched them, but I loved One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest both in print, and on film.
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clersal
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posted 27 December 2006 12:00 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I follow 'A Touch of Frost' on TVO and the Knowledge channel and decided to read one of R.D. Wingfield's books.
Pleasantly surprised. Much like to series except that the series is sanitized although not as much as Dalziel and Pascoe.
I found that Reginald Hill's books much better than the series.

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Stargazer
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posted 27 December 2006 12:13 PM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Virgin Suicides.
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Boom Boom
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posted 27 December 2006 05:28 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've never read the book by Truman Capote, but I love the film version of "Breakfast at Tiffany's" which I'm watching right now (seen it a few times already). I'm a big fan of both Audrey and Kate Hepburn.
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Cueball
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posted 27 December 2006 06:38 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Last Temptation of Jesus Christ."
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Boom Boom
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posted 27 December 2006 07:07 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Cueball:
"Last Temptation of Jesus Christ."

It's actually called "The Last Temptation of Christ" by Nikos Kazantzakis, and the book is infinitely better than the movie. I have several of Kazantzakis' writings and have read "Last Temptation" three or four times. His novel "Zorba The Greek" is also better than the movie.


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Cueball
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posted 27 December 2006 07:31 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I actually meant the movie was better than the original book, upon which the latter one was based.
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'lance
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posted 27 December 2006 08:01 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Six Days of the Condor was -- as I remember it -- a pretty conventional, not very interesting spy thriller.

The movie, Three Days of the Condor, was something else, and still holds up. Not quite in the same league as The Conversation, but captures the early-mid 70s US sense of paranoia very well, without being too obvious about it. Helped by a great cast -- Redford is a good choice, as are Faye Dunaway, Max von Sydow, and John Housman.


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Cueball
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posted 27 December 2006 08:04 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, that's a blast from the past.

"Titus" with Anthony Hopkins was better than the play "Titus Andronicus."


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Bobolink
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posted 27 December 2006 08:25 PM      Profile for Bobolink   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" avoided Jules Verne's interminable lists of sea creatures although the book was very ambitious for its time.
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clersal
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posted 27 December 2006 08:26 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:

It's actually called "The Last Temptation of Christ" by Nikos Kazantzakis, and the book is infinitely better than the movie.



Agreed. The book was excellent.

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