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Author Topic: Test how 'English' you are...
clockwork
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Babbler # 690

posted 12 June 2003 12:51 PM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mongrel Nation
From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 12 June 2003 02:06 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I didn't know about strawberries or neckties, and I just made a lucky guess about April Fool's.

If the English think that these are essence of Englishness, though, I'm a bit surprised. I mean, some are; some aren't; but some are now so widespread as customs that no outsider would think of them as peculiarly English, yes/no?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 690

posted 12 June 2003 02:26 PM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, it's just a plug for some show on their lDiscovery Channel. I think the show is trying to claim that the customs of England are all imported (I found it curious that the modern ketchup goes back to Nova Scotia). The examples might not be all that English, or maybe some mythic version of what a typical English person does, but any red blooded Canadian would spot the nefarious forces of political correctness at work here.

Oh, and by extension, does this mean every good American will now boycott April Fools Day?


From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Secret Agent Style
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2077

posted 12 June 2003 02:31 PM      Profile for Secret Agent Style        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking of political correctness and ideas fit for April Fools:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2981038.stm


From: classified | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 690

posted 12 June 2003 02:42 PM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Bah,

quote:
Many of the supporters in Newfoundland who wanted to join with Canada promoted the union of the two countries as a British Union, suggesting the strong British heritage of both. In fact, Canada was trying to shed some of its British symbols in favour of more 'Canadian' ones that would better reflect the diverse nature of the country and its heritage. It would also demonstrate to the world and to Canadians, Canada's independence. The federal government passed the Canadian Citizenship Act in 1947, and Canada made the Supreme Court of Canada the final judicial body of appeal for Canadians in 1949 when it eliminated appeals to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in London, England. In 1952, Vincent Massey became the first native-born governor general, and another of the vestiges of the British imperialism was removed when the words 'Dominion of Canada' had fallen out of fashion and was replaced simply with 'Canada' or the 'Government of Canada.' One of the most contentious new symbols was the national flag of Canada.

Flag debate

I'm happy we don't have the red ensign. I'm sure if people had the lingo so many years ago, they'd call our flag and excercise in marketing and PC.


From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 12 June 2003 02:46 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A judicious use of deductive reasoning in the manner of Mssrs. Hooker and Hume will allow the individual to make a correct approximation every time.

I nevertheless neglected to apply sufficient thought to the "Croat-Cravat" connexion. I felt mildy smug, however, to find that my foreknowledge of the holy Teutonic Yggdrasil, the quaint Gallic custom of "poisson d'avril," not to mention the European taste for making saints of Anatolians (St. Nicholas being another of some prominence) enabled me to quite well on this amusing little test.

Quite well indeed.

"Publican, a round of sack for everyone!"


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
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posted 12 June 2003 02:49 PM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
By George, cheerio, good fellow!
From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 12 June 2003 02:49 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oops: this was in reply to Andy:

I'm so glad they added on the responses they got -- too funny. At least the last guy seems to have got the joke. But I can just hear a few Colonel Blimps huffing and puffing that morning over their soft-boiled eggs. Hee.

There was briefly, in the late 80s, an over-glossy magazine called Toronto inserted once a month in the Grope and Flail. In April 1987 (I have reasons for remembering the year), they published a double-page spread that really had me going for an hour or so, the one time that I can remember falling for an April Fool's joke.

I wish I could remember some of the squibs they did, very normal-looking short news-clips about city politics and happenings -- one after another was so outrageous. I would read one and become furious and think "I can't believe this!" I think I repeated that line for at least an hour before it sunk in that ... y'know.

[ 12 June 2003: Message edited by: skdadl ]


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
rabble-rouser
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posted 12 June 2003 02:57 PM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hmmm... I suppose I should say opps.
From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Secret Agent Style
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2077

posted 12 June 2003 03:05 PM      Profile for Secret Agent Style        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I'm happy we don't have the red ensign. I'm sure if people had the lingo so many years ago, they'd call our flag and excercise in marketing and PC.


There are, in fact, some Canadians on the far right fringe who use the red ensign to represent the Canada before Trudeau, multicultaralism and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. But this is a totally different issue than adding black lines to the Union Jack, for the following reasons:

1)The colours on the Union Jack don't represent skin tone, so adding black in order to make it more "multicultural" is nonsensical, especially since blacks aren't the only ethnic minority in Britain.

2)Altering the Union Jack won't do a single thing to reduce racism; it will only make a few liberal twits feel better about themselves.

2) Changing the Canadian flag to the maple leaf meant that we would have our own unique symbol that wasn't just a copy of another country's flag.

3) From a design perspective, the red ensign looks like a dog's breakfast, and looks pretty much the same as the Ontario flag. Our current flag is a lot more bold. The Union Jack looks even more bold; it's one of the most powerful looking symbols in the world. Adding or subtracting colours will just muck it up.

[ 12 June 2003: Message edited by: Andy Social ]


From: classified | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 12 June 2003 03:26 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Pip pip talley-ho! al-Q.

Andy: You wouldn't be eating a soft-boiled egg at the moment, would you?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
clockwork
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 690

posted 12 June 2003 03:28 PM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hmm, I got confused for a minute.
It doesn't appear that the black is actually supposed to represent black people, but supposed to represent a multiracial society. The black, I would guess, was picked because of the chant. If the chant was "There is no brown in the Union Jack, clown," maybe he'd pick brown as the colour, or maybe he'd still pick black.

While I'd think I prefer the original, I'm not going to begrudge the guy from trying. If it got popular, I'm sure their Parliament would pass an official flag act. And, of course it wouldn't stamp out racism, but as a representative colour, it's just there for awareness.


From: Pokaroo! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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