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Author Topic: Who's dead now? unfortunately cont'd
skdadl
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posted 04 October 2004 11:03 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Janet Leigh has died. I can't quite believe that.
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skdadl
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posted 04 October 2004 11:06 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
John Cerutti, former Blue Jays pitcher and broadcaster, was found dead in his hotel room yesterday. The CBC says natural causes. He was only in his forties, I think. This is just coming through on the radio; no weblink yet.
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skdadl
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posted 04 October 2004 11:13 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Damn shame. He was a good guy, and a good pitcher.
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Mr. Magoo
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posted 04 October 2004 11:23 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Did Richard Avedon get mentioned on the last thread?
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skdadl
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posted 04 October 2004 11:25 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes. With pictures, too, but that's a good link.

On related turf, the fashion designer Geoffrey Beene has died as well. He was no Yves St Laurent, but he had an interesting eye for structure, the drama of strong lines.


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Reality. Bites.
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posted 04 October 2004 12:22 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
Janet Leigh has died. I can't quite believe that.

I couldn't help thinking when I read it "Good thing Tony Perkins is already dead or he'd be the prime suspect."


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Anchoress
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posted 04 October 2004 12:28 PM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
Janet Leigh has died. I can't quite believe that.

Gee, she was really young. Here's her info on IMDB.


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Reality. Bites.
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posted 05 October 2004 11:32 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rodney Dangerfield.

http://www.canoe.ca/JamMovies/oct5_obit-ap.html

Poor guy really did get no respect.

quote:
In 1995, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences rejected Dangerfield's application for membership. A letter from Roddy McDowall of the actors branch explained that the comedian had failed to execute "enough of the kinds of roles that allow a performer to demonstrate the mastery of his craft."

The ultimate rejection, and Dangerfield played it to the hilt. He had established his own Web site ("I went out and bought an Apple Computer; it had a worm in it"), and his fans used it to express their indignation. The public reaction prompted the academy to reverse itself and offer membership. Dangerfield declined.



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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 06 October 2004 10:25 AM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I liked him. He was, on the surface, one of those old school nightclub comics, almost a Borscht Belt comic, but he had some real depth to his comedy. He'll be missed.
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paxamillion
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posted 06 October 2004 10:36 AM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rodney. What a class guy -- deserving of respect!
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sgm
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posted 09 October 2004 02:53 PM      Profile for sgm     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Jacques Derrida has died.

Star story.


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skdadl
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posted 09 October 2004 02:56 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
No.

Oh, no.

He was a wonderful man. I'll come back later. I am so sorry.


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skdadl
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posted 09 October 2004 03:07 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Philosophe dont l'oeuvre et la vie ont honore la France et la pensee humaine"

(inscription in the Pantheon to Henri Bergson)


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skdadl
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posted 09 October 2004 03:42 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here is the first, pretty raw, Reuters obit for Derrida.

It goes without saying that I disagree with almost everything interpretative that that obit says.


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sgm
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posted 09 October 2004 05:24 PM      Profile for sgm     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's an amusing anecdote from the BBC obit:

quote:

He was so influential that last year a film was made about his life - a biographical documentary.

At one point, wandering through Derrida's library, one of the filmmakers asks him: "Have you read all the books in here?"

"No," he replies impishly, "only four of them. But I read those very, very carefully".


Beeb link.


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skdadl
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posted 09 October 2004 05:35 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks, sgm. That rings true.
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jeff house
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posted 09 October 2004 06:13 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think Derrida was a huge disaster. He wrote compellingly, but there was little identifiable content to his writings, other than the idea that
any sentence could have infinite meanings.

This may be lovely literary doctrine, but it is political suicide.

For example: take a sentence like: "Saddam Hussein has weapons of mass destruction."

People who distinguish reality and fiction know that that was an American lie used to justify an illegal war.

But those who follow Derrida's methodology are left with wise musings about the "migration of meaning" and the "historicity of terminology".

I blame Derrida and his followers for making the university politically irrelevant in the last third of the twentieth century.


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Tommy_Paine
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posted 09 October 2004 08:14 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If I could understand Derrida, I'd likely agree with you.

Compelling reading? You need to buy some trashy novels once and a while, Jeff.


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Skye
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posted 11 October 2004 02:43 AM      Profile for Skye     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
According to CNN, Christohper Reeves has just died. He was 52.
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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 11 October 2004 03:52 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i had just listened to him (sept 25) on a bbc world service half-hour interview programme. he was talking about his recent turn for the worse (bouts with septecemia and doubting he would walk again), as well as american politics (condemning bush for being anti-stem cell research on religious grounds).
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Macabee
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posted 11 October 2004 09:12 AM      Profile for Macabee     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here is the sad story Christopher Reeves
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Cueball
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posted 11 October 2004 10:34 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I think Derrida was a huge disaster. He wrote compellingly, but there was little identifiable content to his writings, other than the idea that any sentence could have infinite meanings.

Not really the place for this, but this is really not a very good interpretation of Derrida. Derrida suggests that meaning in context dependent. That is the main point.

Therefore:

quote:
For example: take a sentence like: "Saddam Hussein has weapons of mass destruction."

Will be succesfully interpetted as by people in context that it "was an American lie used to justify an illegal war."

On the other hand, if someone did not know who Hussein was then the sentence would have no meaning, or an alternate meaning based on what that person thought a "Saddam Hussein" might be.

If someone whispers the sentence: "I love you," in your ear, it has a whole different meaning than if someone acting a part in a play says: "I love you," from the stage.

Ther sentence is the same, the meaning is contextual.

So'n'ways... back to the dead...


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Mandos
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posted 11 October 2004 10:45 AM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
flowers for derrida

Jacques Derrida died yesterday. We threw a Deathday Party to undermine the hegemonic life/death binary but for some reason everybody was still kinda sad.

"I don't get it," says me. "How could Derrida die? He was a social construct."
"True," says Giblets. "Nothin is outside the text, includin Derrida."
"Then he couldn't die," says me. "After all if he did he would be reinforcin the hegemonic Dead Derrida/Live Derrida binary."
"We must deconstruct Derrida's death!" says Giblets. "Beginning by inverting the priveleged duality! Derrida is alive!"
"He's stuffin his face with cake right now over there!" says me.
"Mmmfff," says Derrida. "Waffff uppppf fellaf."
"Derrida stop eatin all our cake!" says Giblets. "That cost good money!" Man that Derrida's always been a greedy bastard.


http://fafblog.blogspot.com/2004_10_10_fafblog_archive.html#109742151752168880


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Cueball
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posted 11 October 2004 07:41 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
People get in a snit about Derrida. I don't get it! He is a clown. His critics are like people who go to performance of Hamlet not realizing that Marcel Marceau is playing the lead.
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Loony Bin
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posted 11 October 2004 09:32 PM      Profile for Loony Bin   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I got a 9 (out of 9 - crazy UofA stanine system...) on a paper in my lit. crit. class in undergrad for basically saying that I didn't understand Derrida, but what I did understand legitimized my confusion and made it its own understanding...

It's an interpretation I've stuck with for lots of things, actually.

I'm ashamed to say, though, that I had assumed he was dead long before now...Silly me. I'm sorry I didn't even know I was sharing time with him (in a general sense, of course...).


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Mandos
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posted 11 October 2004 09:41 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Personally, I think things should be marked out of pi.
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candle
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posted 12 October 2004 04:07 AM      Profile for candle     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Bruce Palmer - Buffalo Springfield bassist at 58

Reporting of this was somewhat delayed - Palmer died on Oct 1 in Belleville but the first reporting of it I can find is in the Toronto Star on Oct 9. Palmer and Neil Young were in the Mynah Birds with the late Rick James before heading out to California in search of Stephen Stills who they couldn't find until they ended up in the same traffic jam as Stills and Richie Furay.


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Contrarian
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posted 13 October 2004 03:45 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Guardian has interesting articles about Derrida today; Link

Under "Deconstructing Jacques" I liked the last three comments especially, including

quote:
AS Byatt, novelist
Derrida examines how we construct meaning, the provisional way in which our constructions depend upon other constructions. He was an exciting person to read but had a bad effect on British critical writing. He wrote with immense ad hoc wit and had no interest in creating a system, but his followers did create a system and sought to deconstruct everything.

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Coyote
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posted 13 October 2004 03:50 PM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Derrida reminds me of Said; what he said wasn't all that remarkable or even really post-modern, but his followers went nuts with the psycho-babble.
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skdadl
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posted 13 October 2004 03:54 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Could anyone here point me to specific passages in those works of Derrida's that you have read that have distressed you? I would be glad to help.

[ 13 October 2004: Message edited by: skdadl ]


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skdadl
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posted 13 October 2004 04:19 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
On second thought, scratch that. It was sarcastic, and meant to be, of course.

But this is a mug's game, trying to reply to the no-nothings and the scoffers on this and another thread, instead of writing out what I would say myself.

Tomorrow sometime, if I can, I will start a thread about Derrida in context, and say my piece. Yesterday another babbler who, like me, is no disciple but was deeply affected by Derrida's work, a babbler now far away on another continent, sent me the loveliest, saddest message about our gains and our losses.

This is an obits thread, and I guess we're free to ridicule the newly dead if we like, but I would ask you to remember that there will be a number of people reading this thread who actually knew the man and cared about him, and who are still in mourning. In Toronto, there must be scores. I am one.

He lived a great if very difficult life, and he deserves his own version of Keats's defiant self-estimation, written also from a position of disgrace in the public eye.

But feel free to mock on. Footnotes might make you more credible.


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Contrarian
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posted 13 October 2004 04:21 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Haven't read a word, except quotations in recent news. I found Cueball's explanation helpful; that the meaning is in the context. Context is something that historians are supposed to always consider; a fact is distorted if you do not understand the context; also archaeologists - you don't just grab a bone and wave it around; you look at the soil it's in for other objects, etc.

So was it all those darn English majors that took his ideas and spun them until they made everyone dizzy?

Will look forward to your Derrida thread skdadl.

[ 13 October 2004: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


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skdadl
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posted 13 October 2004 04:26 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The first thing I read in Derrida (and recognized as a "truth") was his rejection of the very idea of disciples. The second was his rejection of anything that might become jargon.

And so now the world knows him through his jargon-spouting disciples.

Ptui. It is to spit.

I don't know who disappoints me more, the disciples or the feeble-minded cowards who take them for him.


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Hugh
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posted 13 October 2004 04:50 PM      Profile for Hugh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
skdadl--

I'd definitely like to hear about Derrida from someone sympathetic to his project. I'd also be interested if you have a suggestion for a first piece of Derrida to read. (I am a Derrida virgin .)


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skdadl
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posted 13 October 2004 05:20 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hugh, I will try to say more and better when I write about the historical context tomorrow or the next day.

Derrida is definitely not entry-level reading, not in the history of philosophy and not in the history of linguistics or poetics either. I can well believe that a lot of fresh-minted PhDs freaked out legions of frosh in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s by laying deconstructivist (-ite? ) jargon on them before the poor chicks had ever read the basic texts of the classical education that Derrida himself certainly had behind him. Those fresh-minted PhDs? Not so much education, unfortunately. The ones I knew had never read anything earlier than C19, which is a major handicap in thinking about any problem in the humanities, IMNSHO.

However. People of good will, with some preparation, some overview of Western thought since the Renaissance, might find it helpful to start by reading Gayatri Spivak's introduction to her translation of Derrida's Grammatology (1968). She is intense but clear, over about eighty pages, if I recall rightly, and she will summarize for you Derrida's philosophical engagement with three predecessors: de Saussure, Levi-Strauss, and Heidegger.

(The Grammatology, btw, is eventually headed to a reading of Rousseau's essay on the origin of languages, and to me it is that reading that makes the book. I have never quite understood, though, how anyone who hadn't already read Rousseau could follow the reading. It is a monument in Rousseau studies, but again, it is not entry-level reading.)

(Ok: let me revise that: The Grammatology is a work of art, and the whole book makes the book. It is constructed in three parts, and it is a work of genius, and you only know that when you get to the end. It isn't that hard, actually; it is just very big, and very slow.)

Spivak (sp?) has never herself been a blind disciple, and she is immensely sensitive to Derrida's split commitment to predecessors who influenced him but whose disciples he never was, whose great critic he was, even as he acknowledged their influence.

1968 was Derrida's annus mirabilis, and there are several other works from that year worth reading -- again, though, not entry-level texts. His famous appearance at Johns Hopkins that year is available -- I'll find the reference -- the paper he gave, and then the discussion that followed, with a number of august presences, including Lucien Goldmann of sainted memory.

At the end of their exchange, Derrida famously said to Goldmann: "I believe in the value of everything that is being done. I even believe in the value of what you are doing." (sorry: quoting from memory.)

There are easier ways to understand Derrida's work, though. Even if you don't read him -- and I don't actually see why everyone should, frankly -- there are easier and better ways to understand why he was important to some of us.

What I write about Derrida in context will address those easier ways.

And as a last thought: he really was a lovely man. He faced a terribly difficult political situation in Paris, which not many North Americans know about. He risked a lot by going to Czechoslovakia when he did, and was shaken by that experience in jail, even if it was only overnight.

He was funny and a bit disoriented in North America, I think. But he never stopped working; he never stopped creating; Hegel and Hume would have recognized him, and I think that early on, he knew that about himself.

And he deserved to know that, I believe.


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Cueball
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posted 13 October 2004 05:25 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
"I believe in the value of everything that is being done. I even believe in the value of what you are doing."

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skdadl
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posted 13 October 2004 05:32 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
*shake hands*

Well, we all do our best, eh?

Lucien Goldmann was a great, a very great critic. I couldn't honour him more.

But that was a historic skewer. It woke a lot of us up.


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Rand McNally
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posted 13 October 2004 08:17 PM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It was Goldmann’s work on Heidegger and Lukacs that gave me my first clear picture on what I wanted examine as a grad student. Excellent critic, he was able to breakdown extremely difficult language in to its' basic principles. I think I might just reread some of his work this weekend, dust some of the cobwebs out of my head.
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jeff house
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posted 13 October 2004 10:22 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
And so now the world knows him through his jargon-spouting disciples

And what did Derrida teach about the intention of the author of a text, as opposed to those who read him?


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Cueball
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posted 13 October 2004 11:26 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That neither his nor his 'disciples' intentions have any relationship whatsoever to your interpretation of Derrida's text.

[ 14 October 2004: Message edited by: Cueball ]


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skdadl
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posted 14 October 2004 11:49 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
On the subject of intentionality: From the 1920s on, anglo-American literary criticism, the so-called New Criticism -- and modernism generally, in all the arts -- has considered over-reliance on the "intention" of the author to be one of a series of sentimental attitudes to aesthetic form.

The classic statement of the New Critics' or formalist critique of intentionality is William Wimsatt and Monroe Beardsley, "The Intentional Fallacy," in The Verbal Icon (1954). (Actually, I think the essay may have appeared earlier in a journal.)

With the general shake-up of rigid formalist categories that began among post-formalist critics in the late sixties, the extreme prohibition of any discussion of intentionality was loosened up considerably by critics like Derrida and Edward Said, who clearly consider historical and biographical questions to be potentially useful variables in discussing any text, although their usefulness will vary, of course.


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 16 October 2004 11:59 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Pierre Salinger
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sgm
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posted 17 October 2004 03:31 AM      Profile for sgm     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Re: Derrida

I watched an interesting video this weekend of scenes from a talk by Derrida sponsored by Amnesty Interational. (He was asked to speak at the Sheldonian library about what the "deconstruction of the subject" might mean for universal human rights.)

My knowledge and understanding of his writings is extremely limited, but I was impressed by his statement that deconstruction is, first of all, a genealogical tracing of the history of terms (like "subject," or "philosophy,") through the different ways in which they have been used, legitimized, etc. At the same time, he suggested, there proceeds an analysis of the hidden assumptions behind these uses, legitimations, etc.

When asked to respond to the accusation that deconstruction undermines rationality, for instance, he pointed out as part of his answer that reason itself has a history, and that, for example, 18th century rationality is not 20th century rationality.

He also had some very interesting things to say about philosophy and nationalism, about the way in which philosophical discourse casts itself as something outside the national politics of a given historical situation, while at the same time betraying that historical situatedness. (This reminded me of some passages I read not too long ago in Jean Vanier's 2001 book on Aristotle, where he speaks of the "shortcomings of Aristotelian ethics." According to Vanier, Aristotle understands the proper "subject"--if I can import that term here--of the desire for virtue to be free, male, and Greek. Women, children, slaves and foreigners are not Aristotle's true concern: insofar as that's true his philosophy remains very much bound to his time, place, and socio-politico-economic position.)

A couple of other phrases that leapt out at me: He spoke of deconstruction as an "ethics of affirmation," (while admitting to suspicion about the term "ethics"), and said it proceeded with a "constant reference to a 'yes'." When he talked about democracy, he seemed to me to say that both it and deconstruction (a word not without its own problems, he admitted), are about openness to the other, to the "alterity" of the other.

I'm not sure I understood everything I heard him say, just as I know I didn't understand everything I heard him say when I was lucky enough to hear him give a talk at Grant Hall in Kingston some years ago on "The History of the Lie." There, as on the video, he seemed to be a person--in my opinion--of humility, humanity, patience and humour. In Kingston, he engaged in a good-natured way with a philosophy grad student who stood up at the microphone to say he was writing a thesis aimed at proving Derrida a relativist. At the Amnesty talk on the video, Derrida remarked as he began speaking that he had just found out before he spoke that there would be no questions from the floor of the Sheldonian--a threat to human rights, he acknowledged with a grin.


From: I have welcomed the dawn from the fields of Saskatchewan | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 17 October 2004 04:34 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
"The History of the Lie."

What more need be said the guy was a genious, he did a seminar on "the history of the lie." Who would have thunk it?


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 17 October 2004 07:36 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That is a super report, sgm: thank you very much.

The video of the Sheldonian lecture: is that generally available (in libraries, eg?), or was it a private taping?


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skdadl
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posted 17 October 2004 07:39 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Re Salinger: Gee, how did everyone get to be so old?

There's more of a story to his later years in Paris, no? Didn't he become a major conspiracy theorist? I assume we'll hear more of that when the longer obits appear.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Crippled_Newsie
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posted 17 October 2004 09:36 AM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
Re Salinger: Gee, how did everyone get to be so old?

There's more of a story to his later years in Paris, no? Didn't he become a major conspiracy theorist? I assume we'll hear more of that when the longer obits appear.


He did get a lot of press in 1997 for the theory that a Navy missile was responible for the crash of TWA's Flight 800.


From: It's all about the thumpa thumpa. | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
pogge
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posted 18 October 2004 01:11 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Doug Bennett

quote:
Doug Bennett, the lead singer of the Canadian indie band Doug and the Slugs, died Saturday following an undisclosed lengthy illness. He was 52.

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sgm
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posted 18 October 2004 01:35 PM      Profile for sgm     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:

The video of the Sheldonian lecture: is that generally available (in libraries, eg?), or was it a private taping?

Link.

This 1992 film was produced by Films for the Humanities and Social Sciences. I borrowed it from a university department's film library. That's the sort of place you'd have to look, I imagine, if you didn't want to pay the $129.00 US (ouch!) to order it from FHSS.


From: I have welcomed the dawn from the fields of Saskatchewan | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 18 October 2004 01:56 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks, sgm.

I've found tapes like that even in public libraries before. There was -- well, I guess there still is -- a tape of the great Oxford Union debate on the subject of feminism, ca late 1970s, between William F. Buckley Jr and Germaine Greer, plus their seconds and other helpers, easily available through the Toronto PL system.

I used to show it to my community college students just before we did our assigned formal debate section. At the end they would always say to me, "But Ms Dadl! They didn't follow the rules that you taught us!"

Heh. Heh. Burrow quietly, eh?


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Hugh
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posted 18 October 2004 10:36 PM      Profile for Hugh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Edited because I was trying to post something Mandos already posted.

[ 18 October 2004: Message edited by: Hugh ]


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remind
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posted 18 October 2004 11:57 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is very sad and I found myself unexpectedly quite teary over it. I loved going to his performances, the Slugs were a great dance band and funny to boot!!!

Here's to ya Doug, playing Day by Day" in memory, rock on!!!!


quote:
Originally posted by pogge:
Doug Bennett



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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 23 October 2004 10:47 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
the first wearer of a medic-alert bracelet, linda maurer

(login: babblers8, password: audrarules)

quote:
It was after Maurer had an allergic reaction to a tetanus antitoxin scratch test that her father, a doctor, suggested that she carry a written warning about her allergy. She did, attaching it to a bracelet.

Her parents later designed a silver identification bracelet, which bore not only a listing of her allergies but also the emblem of the medical profession - two serpents wrapped around a staff - and the words "Medic Alert."

Spurred by her experience, Ms. Maurer's parents started the Medic Alert Foundation in 1956 to provide emergency access to the medical records of people with potentially life-threatening ailments.

Her original identification bracelet is now at the Smithsonian Institution.



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Stagefffright
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posted 26 October 2004 01:44 AM      Profile for Stagefffright     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is a shame that Derrida died - he was my favourite theorist and I loved how he deconstructed things.
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fuslim
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posted 26 October 2004 03:04 AM      Profile for fuslim     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Dying is nothing to be ashamed of, we all do it.
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skdadl
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posted 26 October 2004 09:23 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Robert Merrill, the great American baritone, has died at age 85.

Many babblers will know his performance, with the great tenor Jussi Bjoerling, of the duet from Pearl Fishers. You don't need to know anything about classical music at all to find that performance heart-stopping, almost unbelievably passionate and disciplined at the same time.

I think I shall play the old vinyl now.


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runner
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posted 26 October 2004 10:16 AM      Profile for runner     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
John Peel BBC Radio DJ dead of a heart attack aged 65.

BBC website

Thanks John for all the years of humour and wit but most of all for offering an alternative to the mainstream pulp that your BBC Radio colleagues played. For sure you will be listening to the Undertones belt out teenage kicks whilst watching Liverpool win the league, rest well mate


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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 26 October 2004 10:23 AM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Fuck. Best DJ ever. Absolutely zero contest. Fuck.
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 26 October 2004 10:28 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
he was 65, and his show went out at 11pm, so naturally, his show had the highest proportion of bbc radio one's listeners under the age of 15.

i'm a bit shocked by his death. he seemed ageless.


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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 26 October 2004 10:29 AM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One of my Uni lecturers was his biographer.

The Peel Sessions - the greatest radio sessions ever


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aRoused
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posted 26 October 2004 11:44 AM      Profile for aRoused     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
They played 'Teenage Kicks' right after they read the news, apparently.

I'm stunned, I just found out three minutes ago.


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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 26 October 2004 11:58 AM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's hyperbole to say a man is irreplaceable, but if anyone is, he is.
This is a real shock.

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Budd Campbell
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posted 26 October 2004 12:41 PM      Profile for Budd Campbell        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by remind:
This is very sad and I found myself unexpectedly quite teary over it. I loved going to his performances, the Slugs were a great dance band and funny to boot!!!


Sad indeed, a tragic loss.

My wife and I went to yesterday's memorial, held appropriately at the Commodore Ballroom. There must have been three or four hundred there, including many people from the Vancouver music scene. It was hosted by the CBC's Steve Burgiss and Simon Kendall, one of the original Slugs.

Doug and the Slugs, in complete opposition to nearly all pop music bands, were there to make the audience and their needs central to the evening's entertainment. They were musicians and entertainers to be enjoyed and actually listened to, not sex symbols to be idolized in some idiotic frenzy.

There is, I hate to say it, something of a darker side to this sad development. Doug had apparently been ill for some time, and had broken up with his wife Nancy about two years ago. He was living at a hotel on Kingsway, having moved out of the family home that, in yesterday's eulogies, had apparently been a focal point for hundreds of happy occasions for family and fellow musicians over the years.

We had seen him at a local bar several months ago, and it was really very apparent that he was not in the best of health at all. He needed to be helped onto the stage. What it was all about, why he wasn't able to turn it around, I don't know. But the loss is real, and tragic. The guy was a real genius, no doubt about that.


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Baldfresh
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posted 26 October 2004 01:28 PM      Profile for Baldfresh   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

There are genres of music that probably wouldn't even exist without him.


From: to here knows when | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
runner
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posted 26 October 2004 02:26 PM      Profile for runner     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For all those that knew John Peel

"The Monday evening show the weekend after the Hillsborough tragedy was a piece of broadcasting I'll never forget.

He said nothing at the start of his show. He just played a record. A long slow record. It was Aretha Franklin's heart breaking gospel version of You'll Never Walk Alone.

I looked through the glass from my adjacent studio and John was just weeping. Silently. So were all of us - his listeners. Nothing more needed to be said."

This set me off, I will really miss this man


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skdadl
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posted 01 November 2004 02:17 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Forgive me for repeating m'self, but:

quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
Robert Merrill, the great American baritone, has died at age 85.

Many babblers will know his performance, with the great tenor Jussi Bjoerling, of the duet from Pearl Fishers. You don't need to know anything about classical music at all to find that performance heart-stopping, almost unbelievably passionate and disciplined at the same time.

I think I shall play the old vinyl now.


Hinterland has declared this to be Babble Fun Week, so it occurred to me to put this old vinyl on again. I am no opera buff, but I am sitting here stunned by the beauty of those two voices and those performances. I can't imagine any listener who would not be carried away by them. Has there ever been a more perfect recording?


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fuslim
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posted 01 November 2004 06:47 PM      Profile for fuslim     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Has there ever been a more perfect recording?

No


From: Vancouver BC | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 01 November 2004 07:06 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Salutations, fuslim.

It made me think of how beautiful men's voices are. In spite of everything, men's voices really are lovely.


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Gentlebreeze
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posted 02 November 2004 02:45 PM      Profile for Gentlebreeze     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Filmmaker, and columnist, Theo van Gogh

http://www.cbc.ca/story/arts/national/2004/11/02/Arts/filmvangogh041102.html

[ 02 November 2004: Message edited by: Gentlebreeze ]


From: Thornhill | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 03 November 2004 06:07 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
It made me think of how beautiful men's voices are. In spite of everything, men's voices really are lovely

Thanks for the kick in the groin, kiddo.

You might be interested to know that there's an Alessandro Moreschi CD available out there.

He ain't no Mackie Messer


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
runner
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posted 09 November 2004 09:14 AM      Profile for runner     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Liverpool loses another son. Emlyn Hughes gone at 57

Here


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Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 09 November 2004 02:42 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Emlyn 'A Question of Sport' Hughes? Wow. He wasn't old at all.
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
bittersweet
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posted 12 November 2004 03:13 AM      Profile for bittersweet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Iris Chang
quote:
...the prominent Chinese American author and journalist who fueled an international protest movement against Japan with her incendiary best-selling book, The Rape of Nanking, was found dead from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, authorities said Wednesday.

From: land of the midnight lotus | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Gentlebreeze
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posted 12 November 2004 09:29 AM      Profile for Gentlebreeze     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That is very sad. "The Rape of Nanking" was a very shocking, if somewhat flawed, work. A fantastic read, that I highly recommend. Pity.
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Snuckles
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posted 13 November 2004 11:55 PM      Profile for Snuckles   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Old Dirty Bastard dies at recording studio
From: Hell | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
kingblake
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posted 13 November 2004 11:57 PM      Profile for kingblake     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
RIP ODB.
From: In Regina, the land of Exotica | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 14 November 2004 12:47 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ivan Head, 1930-2004. Professor of law, wise man of North-South studies, founding director of the Liu Centre/Institute for the Study of Global Issues at UBC; special assistant to Pierre Trudeau for ten years, advising on foreign affairs; President of the IDRC (International Development Research Centre) 1978--1991.

Multi-talented, civilized human being, and a child of Calgary. Of course.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
faith
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posted 14 November 2004 02:11 PM      Profile for faith     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I had to search my memory for the reason the name Ivan Head grabbed my attention. I spent some time in Calgary and worked with a tiny elegant woman named 'Birdie' when I was between college and high school, her son was Ivan Head. She was so proud of him.
From: vancouver | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 14 November 2004 02:18 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good heavens, faith. That's a wonderful memory, and I'll bet she was proud. I met him once. He was ... noble.

Canada used to be famous for producing diplomats / international activists like him -- and I guess we still do -- Stephen Lewis, eg. But we used to have many, it seems to me, and many of them were prairie boys who became almost disconcertingly cultivated.


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Contrarian
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posted 14 November 2004 02:59 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Kenneth Taylor, the ambassador to Iran who helped six Americans get out in 1980, lived next to my grandparents in Calgary when he was a teenager. Taylor receiving medal from Reagan. [Edit; he's not dead, he's another prairie diplomat]

[ 14 November 2004: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 14 November 2004 03:31 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Calgary: We grow 'em up noble ... or else!
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Contrarian
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posted 14 November 2004 06:44 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ellen Fairclough died on Saturday at 99.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Klingon
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posted 14 November 2004 07:21 PM      Profile for Klingon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Heghlu'meH QaQ jajvam ODB, Ivan, Ellen
From: Kronos, but in BC Observing Political Tretchery | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 15 November 2004 07:15 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Apparently Ellen once remarked that if a male MP said something foolish, it would be forgotten the next day, but if a woman did, it would be repeated endlessly, right across the country. The more things change, eh?
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 15 November 2004 09:53 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
the man who shrunk greenland, (login: babblers8, pwd: audrarules) arthur robinson, has died.

[ 15 November 2004: Message edited by: Willowdale Wizard ]


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
salaam
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posted 15 November 2004 11:31 AM      Profile for salaam     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
John Peel introduced me to music. I just found out.

[ 15 November 2004: Message edited by: salaam ]


From: exile | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
gopi
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posted 16 November 2004 02:52 PM      Profile for gopi     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Has someone already mentioned Laura Branigan?
news
Laura may be gone, but Gloria will live on forever on Adult Oriented Radio. For better or worse.

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miles
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posted 16 November 2004 03:59 PM      Profile for miles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
John Morgan from CBC's Royal Canadian Air Farce died Monday at age 74.


Goodbye Mike from Canmore


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runner
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posted 16 November 2004 04:10 PM      Profile for runner     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
CBC Air Farce website does not carry any news of John's passing, thought they would.
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skdadl
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posted 16 November 2004 04:10 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ah -- Mike from Canmore.

And wasn't he Jock MacBile, or something close to that? And the soldier who stuffed the Chicken Cannon?

He will be missed.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 16 November 2004 04:12 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I guess he had left the show a couple of years ago, runner, although you'd think they'd put something up anyway. Maybe they still will.
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miles
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posted 16 November 2004 04:47 PM      Profile for miles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was just emailed this link from the cbc about the death of Mike from Canmore:

http://www.cbc.ca/story/arts/national/2004/11/16/Arts/JohnMorgan041116.html


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Sharon
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posted 16 November 2004 05:33 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Just heard that John Morgan died yesterday. Remember when you had him and Chris and Doug and me over for dinner? As if one would forget such an occasion! And then we went with Chris to the show and she sighed and said "he's the love of my life."

I just got this from my friend, Valerie. John was very romantic. He sat with our friend, Chris, on the airport bus from Pearson into Toronto and he looked at her and said, "You are the most beautiful woman I've ever seen." She was smitten. They were together for quite awhile -- he was at least 30 years older than she.


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 16 November 2004 10:08 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I always liked his imitation of Debra Grey.
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mayakovsky
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posted 16 November 2004 10:35 PM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Iris Chang was found dead of an apparent suicide. She was an important Asian-American academic and activist. Two of her major works were 'The Rape of Nanking' and 'The Chinese in America'

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2004/11/11/MNGB59PKL01.DTL


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remind
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posted 16 November 2004 10:35 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Me too, on the Deb Gray amongst others, like Mike. What a sad day for satire.
From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 16 November 2004 10:54 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by runner:
CBC Air Farce website does not carry any news of John's passing, thought they would.

It does now, and their forum has posts about it since this afternoon.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 18 November 2004 08:13 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"By moving my body back and forth, I can become invisible to human eyes - because my nervous reactions are twenty times faster than normal - what to me is just a little weaving motion is so fast to the human eye that I cannot be seen"
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Klingon
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posted 18 November 2004 09:47 PM      Profile for Klingon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Heghlu'meH QaQ jajvam

By now most folks may have heard that Margaret Hassan, who was held hostage by a sect of Iraqi resistance fighters for two months, has been killed.

She was a tireless worker for social justice and international relief and development, working in Iraq for CARE. She was also, an outspoken opponent of the US invasion there.

While I support the Iraqi people in their fight against the US military, I think this group was totally out of line, and I think the whole taking of innocent people as hostages and killing them is out of line.

Maybe some folks will say it's not my place to tell the locals there how to fight against the US. But I think most people around the globe do have a general sense of fair play, even if governments and corporations don't. It's a military invasion. I say stick to military targets and accomplices.

She didn't deserve this fate. My condolences to her family and friends, and all of the International Aid workers out there doing a hell of a job.

Heghlu'meH QaQ jajvam The Klingon


From: Kronos, but in BC Observing Political Tretchery | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
miles
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posted 24 November 2004 01:25 PM      Profile for miles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
this is the worse news ever about a persons death

quote:

Dayton Allen, a comedian and actor best known for his work as the voice of the cartoon character Deputy Dawg and Mayor Phineas T. Bluster on "The Howdy Doody Show," has died. He was 85.

Oh the humanity....deputy dawg is dead....I must now run off to send a condolence bone to mrs dawg

[ 24 November 2004: Message edited by: miles ]


From: vaughan | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 24 November 2004 01:46 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's far worse than that. Jimmy Tapp, the Mighty Hercules died on November 20, 2004 at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital in Oakville, Ontario. Mr. Tapp was 87 years old.

Hercules, hero of song and story.
Hercules, winner of ancient glory.
Fighting for the right,
Fighting with his might,
With the strength of ten, ordinary men.

Hercules, people are safe when near him.
Hercules, only the evil fear him.
Softness in his eyes,
Iron in his thighs,
Virtue in his heart,
Fire in every part,
Of the Mighty Hercules.

(Hey Newton, get your hand off his butt!)

[ 24 November 2004: Message edited by: RealityBites ]


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 24 November 2004 03:24 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Watching that show and some other old cartoons late one night -- Spider-Man, Rocket Robin Hood, etc. -- it occurred to me that just as there are fashions in animation styles, so there are fashions in voices.

The best tribute ever to a cartoon voice-actor was when Mel Blanc of Warner Bros. fame died in 1989. Warner's did a cartoon of a stage. At the front is an old-fashioned microphone on a stand. There's a spotlight shining on it, but no-one standing there. Behind this, Bugs Bunny, Daffy, Foghorn Leghorn etc. are standing in a line side by side, with their heads bowed. The caption consists of the single word "Silenced."

[ 24 November 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 24 November 2004 03:40 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Boy, RB, that brings back memories; I can hear the opening song and see ol' Hercules rippling his muscles. Remember that idiotic centaur who constantly repeated himself, long before Jacob Two-Two was invented? I much preferred the kid with the panpipes.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hinterland
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posted 24 November 2004 04:04 PM      Profile for Hinterland        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Remember that idiotic centaur who constantly repeated himself, long before Jacob Two-Two was invented?

To quote our own Briguy (I'm pretty sure it was him) "Don't touch me there, Herc...don't touch me there!".

I know that's awful, but we were making those kinds of jokes when we were kids and watching that show. Also, we'd change a line of the theme song to "Iron between his thighs!". Ah, the sweet memories of childhood innocence.

[ 24 November 2004: Message edited by: Hinterland ]


From: Québec/Ontario | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
miles
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posted 24 November 2004 05:14 PM      Profile for miles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
McMaster University has created a schollarship in memory of Canada's first female cabinet minister Ellen Fairclough.

quote:

The Right Honorable Ellen Fairclough, Canada's first female federal cabinet minister, made significant contributions to Canadian political life and to women’s equality of opportunity. Fairclough, who passed away Nov. 14, will be remembered at McMaster University with the establishment of The Ellen Louks Fairclough Memorial Scholarship in Political Science.

This scholarship will help a graduate student in political science at McMaster.

Those who wish to make a donation to the Ellen Louks Fairclough Memorial Scholarship can contact McMaster University at 1-877-622-3863


[ 24 November 2004: Message edited by: miles ]


From: vaughan | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 24 November 2004 05:22 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Did anyone else notice this week the death of Terry Melcher, son of Doris Day, record producer, and apparently the person to whom Charles Manson wished to send a message when he loosed his Family that first night in 1969?

Melcher was 62; am I remembering rightly that he had prostate cancer? I believe that Doris carries on.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
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posted 24 November 2004 05:42 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Did anyone else notice this week the death of Terry Melcher, son of Doris Day, record producer, and apparently the person to whom Charles Manson wished to send a message when he loosed his Family that first night in 1969?

skdadl, I did not see this. I was reading about him very recently because I bought Candice Bergen's (pre-Murphy Brown) autobiography at a second-hand book sale. Candice lived with Terry in the very house which was later rented to Roman Polanski and Sharon Tate - and where the terrible Charles Manson thing happened.


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 24 November 2004 05:47 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I heard someone talking about him on the radio, that he refused to produce Manson's music or something and that he had formerly owned the house where Sharon Tate was murdered. But I'm not sure if that is accurate or urban legend.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 24 November 2004 10:46 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't know exactly when this happened, but I just checked the Jazz Oracle site and discovered that one of the world's great sound engineers, John R. T. Davies, has died.

His digital reissues of vintage 78 recordings are unsurpassed by anyone.

Apparently he died last May. I must have somehow missed the announcement on the Jazz Oracle site on the other occasions I've visited there in the last few months.

[ 24 November 2004: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 25 November 2004 09:19 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Contrarian:
I heard someone talking about him on the radio, that he refused to produce Manson's music or something and that he had formerly owned the house where Sharon Tate was murdered. But I'm not sure if that is accurate or urban legend.

Read Helter Skelter, Vincent Bugliosi's stunning account of the murders, the investigation, and the trial of Manson and his co-accused. (Bugliosi was the crusading DA in the case; the book was co-written with Curt Gentry, one of the old-school New Journalists.)

Melcher and Bergen had indeed vacated the house within the previous year. Manson knew that, because he had turned up at the door only weeks before looking for Melcher, and saw Tate, although didn't meet her, IIRC.

Yes, he and Dennis (?) Wilson had for a time encouraged Manson, but when they finally got him in for a studio session, he went freaky, and they dumped him.

In the aerial photos of the scene included in Helter Skelter, you can see, along the fences, the Christmas lights that Candice Bergen had put up the year before and no one had ever taken down.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 25 November 2004 02:32 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I did read Helter Skelter many years ago but have forgotten most details. That bit about the Christmas lights is interesting; it makes these movie stars seem almost human!
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 25 November 2004 05:12 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Arthur Hailey has died at 84.

Airport.

He was the first to perceive, I guess, how deeply scary airports and planes would become to us all.

He was actually not such a bad writer, either.

I've talked to editors who worked with him, who saw the way he mapped out his plots. He was an interesting character, and, I gather, a mensch.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 25 November 2004 05:16 PM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Arthur Hailey also wrote Runway Zero Eight, which is of interest because (1) the skeleton of the plot was used as the basis for the movie Airplane, and (2) it was set in Canada (the food poisoning results from some food loaded in Winnipeg, actually).
From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 25 November 2004 05:43 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Keenan:
(the food poisoning results from some food loaded in Winnipeg, actually).

As if.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
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posted 26 November 2004 02:22 AM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Arthur Hailey: novels found at the family cottage. I am reading adult books! One develops a soft spot for good mass market. Forward to 2004 and explaining to someone that it wasn't the author of 'Roots' who has died.

If I had done the film in Winnipeg I would have mentioned the mosquitos. 'Big as Cessnas they were! And you could hear them talking all night, just waiting for me to put my suit on, yum freshly shaven neck!'


From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 26 November 2004 08:45 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Paladin
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posted 26 November 2004 04:45 PM      Profile for Paladin     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A tv version of Runway Zero Eight was produced by the CBC, I believe, and starred James Doohan...without the Scottish accent.
From: Jugular knotch | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
sgm
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posted 30 November 2004 07:39 PM      Profile for sgm     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
CBC Radio has just reported that Pierre Berton has died. No links available yet.
From: I have welcomed the dawn from the fields of Saskatchewan | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 30 November 2004 07:42 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Just saw it on the television. I missed his speech on AIDS a few weeks ago. Oi, that was a mistake.
From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 02 December 2004 06:51 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Journalist Leroy F. Aarons, dead at age 70

quote:
Pioneering journalist Leroy F. Aarons, who founded the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association (NLGJA), died of heart failure on Sunday night after a long battle with cancer. He was 70 years old and lived in Sebastopol, Calif.

A veteran of the Washington Post and the Oakland Tribune, Aarons founded the NLGJA and came out publicly as a gay man in 1990 after conducting the first-ever survey of lesbian and gay journalists at U.S. newspapers. His vision for the group involved improving media coverage of gay-related issues and enhancing the lives and careers of gay and lesbian journalists, including lobbying for domestic partner benefits from media companies.

Today the organization has more than 1,200 members in 24 chapters.



From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
miles
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posted 02 December 2004 06:54 PM      Profile for miles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
David Vienneau of both Global News and The Toronto Star has lost his fight with cancer. From canwest global

quote:
He was the Ottawa bureau chief for Global National, having been hired away in 1998 after 24 years at the Toronto Star where I first met him as a still-green reporter in 1977 while I was working as a copy runner.

David's death should serve as a life affirmation to all baby boomers who will soon, if they haven't already, start losing loved ones to a middle age when cancers and other life-terminating conditions are increasingly likely to strike hard and without warning.


David's death

[ 02 December 2004: Message edited by: miles ]


From: vaughan | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
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posted 02 December 2004 07:07 PM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Our family was touched twice by death this week. We are very sad. I doubt the wire services will produce anything about their departure. However, we will remember them.

Dr. Rodney Sawatsky was the President of Messiah College is Pennsylvania. He had been a professor and later a dean a Conrad Grebel College, University of Waterloo. He died at age 61 of inoperable brain cancer.

Joan Marie Kuisak was a clerk in the library at Wilfrid Laurier University. She was very kind to my wife, my son, and me. She died at age 50 of the consequence of three serious strokes.

Both will be sorely missed by us.


From: the process of recovery | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Macabee
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posted 02 December 2004 07:13 PM      Profile for Macabee     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by miles:
David Vienneau of both Global News and The Toronto Star has lost his fight with cancer. From canwest global

David's death

[ 02 December 2004: Message edited by: miles ]


David Vienneau was a true journalist, ethical to the core, he had moxy and courage. Im deeply saddened by his death. We are all the poorer today . May he rest in peace.


From: Vaughan | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 03 December 2004 11:32 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Vienneau deserves these tributes. Don Martin's tribute is interesting in its rawness, and I'm glad that he felt free to write what he did the way he did.

So young, but so fast.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 03 December 2004 11:37 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Fathi Arafat, 67, younger brother of Yasser Arafat, has died of stomach cancer at the Palestine Hospital in suburban Cairo.

Arafat was the doctor-founder of the Palestinian Red Crescent Society.

He had had stomach cancer for about four years.

I am trying to hold my tongue here against some of the dreck of the universe who have speculated in disgusting ways about his brother's death, but I am only semi-succeeding.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 03 December 2004 11:38 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands has died, aged 93.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
miles
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posted 03 December 2004 01:19 PM      Profile for miles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mona Van Duyn, the United States first female poet laureate and a Pulitzer Prize winner, died Thursday morning at her home from bone cancer, her husband said. She was 83.
quote:
Van Duyn won a National Book Award for her book of poems To See, To Take in 1971. The year before, she was awarded the Bollingen Prize from Yale University, one of many honours for her poetry.


Her other works include Firefall (1994), Merciful Disguises (1973) and Bedtime Stories (1972). Her first book of poetry, Valentines to the Wide World, was published in 1959.



From: vaughan | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
aldo
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posted 03 December 2004 09:47 PM      Profile for aldo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
help please, I'm new here, can't get a response from the help desk. There was a "pierre berton is dead" thread a few days ago, I can't find it now, pls avise how to find it. thank you
From: victoria | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hinterland
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posted 03 December 2004 10:18 PM      Profile for Hinterland        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Pierre Berton thread is here.. It's in the News forum.
From: Québec/Ontario | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 20 December 2004 11:47 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
anthony sampson, biographer of nelson mandela:

quote:
His book The Seven Sisters (1975) on the world's major oil companies, was awarded the Prix International de la Presse in Nice.

Mr Sampson's lifelong commitment to human rights and social justice began in the 1950s, when after graduating from Oxford University, he was invited to South Africa to edit what became the influential anti-apartheid magazine Drum.

It is said that he had a major input into Mr Mandela's famous speech from the dock in the Rivonia Trial, in Pretoria, in April 1964.

Mr Mandela said: "He cared about Africa in a way that is rare among those from the developed world and he never stopped caring.



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 20 December 2004 11:51 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A noble man, and a life very well lived.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
aka Mycroft
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posted 29 December 2004 09:48 PM      Profile for aka Mycroft     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Jerry Orbach who played Lt. Briscoe on Law & Order has died of prostate cancer. Before joining the show he was best known as a song and dance man in Broadway musicals such as Guys & Dolls and Chicago.
From: Toronto | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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posted 29 December 2004 10:47 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Susan Sontag, one of the premier intellectuals in the USA.

Her writing on the cultural underpinnings of fascism were unparalleled; but she took the most criticism for deconstructing the propaganda and thoughtless boosterism of the media post 9-11. The reaction at that time would have done Andrei Zhdanov proud.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/obituaries/story/0,3604,1380528,00.html


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
steffie
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posted 29 December 2004 10:51 PM      Profile for steffie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Jeff beat me to it.

[ 29 December 2004: Message edited by: steffie ]


From: What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow / Out of this stony rubbish? | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 04 January 2005 10:12 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
shirley chisholm, the first black member of either the US house or senate.

quote:
After her first two terms in Congress, she campaigned to become the Democratic candidate to fight Richard Nixon. "I am not the candidate of black America," she asserted. "I am not the candidate of the women's movement of this country. I am not the candidate of any political bosses or special interests. I am the candidate of the people."

From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 05 January 2005 12:32 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't believe nobody has yet mentioned this, but one of the top musicians of the 20th century, Artie Shaw, died last Thursday.
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
sgm
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posted 07 January 2005 04:06 AM      Profile for sgm     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As a Saint John boy, this saddens me:

Louis Robichaud has died.

When I was an undergrad in Fredericton in the late 80s/early 90s, anti-francophone rhetoric from the CoR party still carried much force.

I can't say that force is entirely spent, but Louis Robichaud's efforts in the 60s did a lot to make people see that kind of prejudice as intolerable.

Rest, Louis.

“First I'll be a New Brunswicker,” he once said. “Then I'll be a Canadian, and finally I'll be a Liberal.”

People before party. Imagine.


From: I have welcomed the dawn from the fields of Saskatchewan | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 17 January 2005 12:10 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The guy who read the news the way it is supposed to be read, Earl Cameron.
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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posted 17 January 2005 01:20 AM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes he did.
From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 18 January 2005 05:33 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
They broadcast the memorial service for Lois Hole today; wonderful choir music, tributes from various people including a very emotional one from her 18-year-old granddaughter; then for his tribute, her son played her 1993 interview on Mountaintop Music and at the service they performed the music she had chosen then. It was very well done. For her book she chose Mel Hurtig's Canadian Encyclopedia and I felt like cheering.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 30 January 2005 12:17 AM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ray Peterson.
quote:

Tell Laura I Love Her, Peterson's signature hit, reached No. 7 on the Billboard chart with its combination of romance and tragic love.

The song tells the story of a young man who enters a stock car race in the hopes of buying a ring for his girlfriend, only to die when his car bursts into flames.

"As they pulled him from the twisted wreck," the lyrics intone. "With his dying breath they heard him say, Tell Laura I love her, Tell Laura I need her, Tell Laura not to cry, My love for her will never die."



From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 31 January 2005 10:36 AM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Philip Johnson

Was not what you'd consider a prolific architect by any stretch, but was certainly one of the most influential.


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
You'll always be a Marshall
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posted 03 February 2005 06:19 PM      Profile for You'll always be a Marshall     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Wojeck" himself, John Vernon. Younger audiences will probably remember him as Dean Wormer in "National Lampoon's Animal House".
From: . | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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posted 03 February 2005 06:49 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here
From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 04 February 2005 12:19 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Jacques Villeret, star of Le Dîner de cons.
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
johnpauljones
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posted 04 February 2005 02:12 PM      Profile for johnpauljones     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ossie Davis has died at 87. An artist and a gentleman. He will be missed by all.

quote:
Davis, who wrote, acted, directed and produced for the theater and Hollywood, was a central figure among black performers of the last five decades. He and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, "In This Life Together."



From: City of Toronto | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
audra trower williams
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posted 04 February 2005 02:16 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh that is SO sad.
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 04 February 2005 03:47 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ossie Davis was also a major player in the civil rights movement, something I only found out recently. He was a VERY cool guy, and someone I would have *loved* to have met!
From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
bittersweet
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posted 04 February 2005 04:37 PM      Profile for bittersweet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
His son Guy is an awesome blues guitarist/singer/songwriter.
From: land of the midnight lotus | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
audra trower williams
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posted 04 February 2005 04:52 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's true! I've seen him play a few times. The last time, he seemed tired. He told the same joke twice, an hour apart.
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 28 March 2005 12:31 PM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Crowded House drummer Paul Hester

quote:
Paul Hester, the drummer from the Australian rock band Crowded House, was found hanged in a park near his home, say health officials in Melbourne.

Hester died from strangulation and was already dead by the time an ambulance reached the park on Saturday, according to Liraje Memishi of the Metropolitan Ambulance Service. The 46-year-old had failed to return home Friday after taking his two dogs for a walk.

Police say the death was not suspicious.

Hester formed Crowded House in 1985 with singer Neil Finn and bass player Nick Seymour. The group blasted to international success with hits such as "Don't Dream it's Over" and "Something so Strong."

"I have lost one of my best mates," said Finn, speaking to newspapers in London where he is currently touring. "I am devastated."



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Walker
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posted 28 March 2005 08:20 PM      Profile for Walker     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Very sad. Paul Hester was a very funny man, very gifted in lots of ways, and will be sorely missed in Australia. Those outside of Aus won't know, but he was very active on the local music and entertainment circuit, a great raconteur on TV and radio, and a very vocal opponent of the Commonwealth govt's viciously racist policies on asylum seekers and our indigenous peoples.
From: Not Canada | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 29 March 2005 08:35 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Johnnie Cochrane
quote:
LOS ANGELES - Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., who became a legal superstar after helping clear O.J. Simpson during a sensational murder trial in which he uttered the famous quote "If it doesn't fit, you must acquit," died Tuesday. He was 67.

Cochran died of a brain tumor at his home in Los Angeles, his family said.

"Certainly, Johnnie's career will be noted as one marked by 'celebrity' cases and clientele," his family said in a statement. "But he and his family were most proud of the work he did on behalf of those in the community."



From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged

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