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Author Topic: Canada has no logos
atlantis
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posted 22 October 2001 06:56 PM      Profile for atlantis     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In some Canadian books I think some of the best parts about them are their titles. Take Naomi Klein's book No Logo. What is most interesting about this title is that if you check businessweek.com and punch in global brands, you will find that the G7 country of Canada has no brand in the top 100. Which is defined a company with $1 billion in sales and at 20% of the company's sales are derived from outside the home country.
Smaller countries like Switzerland have three global brands, Sweden three, the Netherlands two, Finland one, and Ireland one.
Roots may be on its way to a global brand, but it does not chart here.
No Canadian company sells retail, $200 million dollars worth of anything even in the United States.
Seems like Canada is missing out on the global economy.
To me, this is a cruel joke being played on Canadians by the English language.

From: Vancouver | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
sherpafish
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posted 23 October 2001 12:54 AM      Profile for sherpafish   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Welcome, atlantis!!

Ah, but you are forgeting the biggest national brand of them all! The MAPLE LEAF. We are a country without a flag at all, but instead a logo - to be sure. Still, all in all, I kinda like the leaf branded banner. Easier to draw than the old flag.


From: intra-crainial razor dust | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 23 October 2001 08:11 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

What kind of company are you talking about here? You say "no Canadian company" -- but the names that spring to my mind first of all are Nortel and Bombardier, and I would think they both put the lie to all those claims above.

Or is this just about clothes? In which case, tant pis.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
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posted 23 October 2001 10:07 AM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
no Canadian company

Because American and European companies bought most of them! Thanks largely to "free" trade agreements, no less

One thing I absolutely love about Canada is that, while our establishment certainly isn't left of cenre, let alone left wing, we certainly have a rich abundance in leftist thinkers and writers! In many cases, renowned (Is that the right word? sp?) around the world! Oh, Canada! our home and...


From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 23 October 2001 11:14 AM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Sea-Doo and Ski-Doo logos are probably fairly well-known, but I agree that Canadian logos probably wouldn't do very well in global name-recognition surveys. The Bombardier logo certainly wouldn't rate very high. The Nortel logo would only rate well among high-tech folk.

The CN logo might rate a little higher now that CN trains are seen more often in the USA.

Corel was a higher-profile brand a few years ago, when CorelDraw had a higher-profile as a product. I think Adobe has managed to blow it out of the water though.

Whether or not the lack of recognition for Canadian brands and logos is a "good" or "bad" thing depends entirely on one's point-of-view. It could mean that Canadian business is content to service American companies, and aren't interested in making a name for itself in it's own right. Doesn't that indicate a lack of innovation, and an unwillingness to take risks?

One could argue that Canadian brands just can't compete against the US juggernaut.

One could also argue that companies that keep a low profile can get away with more. When a high-profile company screws up, they get more press, and the "value" of their high-profile brand suffers.


I bet the highest profile Canadian brands would be Labbatt, Molson, Canadian Club and Seagram's. We can probably thank prohibition for that.

And then, there's always Canada Dry.


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
atlantis
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posted 24 October 2001 05:49 AM      Profile for atlantis     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The definition of global brand skdadl is $1 billion dollars US in sales (the lowest on the chart), with 20% of those sales outside the home country. Canada has no multinational corporation in this category.
Bermuda does, coming in at # 75 is Bacardi rum with a brand value of $3.2 billion US dollars.
This is humbling, why does Canadian business say they are "global" when they do not chart here? And have no global brands?
Plus, like Mexico, almost 90% of Canadian exports go to one country, the USA.
No logo for Canada.

From: Vancouver | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
NP
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posted 28 October 2001 01:41 AM      Profile for NP   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I hate to be the mundane one here, but I'd say that Molson has a very recognizeable international logo. And it's Canadian owned too.
From: The city that rhymes with fun | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
saskzen
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posted 28 October 2001 02:26 AM      Profile for saskzen     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
First of all, Canada DOES have a logo. You can check it out at: www.saskriders.com
From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
David Kyle
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posted 28 October 2001 11:18 AM      Profile for David Kyle     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And all of their fans are living in Alberta.
From: canada | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 28 October 2001 11:37 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The definition of global brand skdadl is $1 billion dollars US in sales (the lowest on the chart), with 20% of those sales outside the home country. Canada has no multinational corporation in this category.

Well, y'see, that's my problem -- I am very dubious about the absence of some Canadian corps on that very basis, and I'm wishing Dr C would come along and tell us what he thinks about that table. I'd really like to know their sources.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
sherpafish
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posted 28 October 2001 05:34 PM      Profile for sherpafish   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
To me, this is a cruel joke being played on Canadians by the English language.

I might have just got this. CaNaDa, NoLoGo.
Am I on the right track


From: intra-crainial razor dust | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
NP
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posted 29 October 2001 04:15 PM      Profile for NP   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Amen to Saskzen.

Rider Pride!!!


From: The city that rhymes with fun | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
MJ
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posted 29 October 2001 05:01 PM      Profile for MJ     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Part of this discussion depends on how you define 'brand'. If it's a single, high-profile consumer item, e.g. Coke, then no, we probably don't have one. Even companies like Molson (Labatt is now foreign-owned) probably don't have international sales at the requisite levels ($1B US = $1.5B Cdn approx. = $300M Cdn international sales).

But, if the term is defined simply as a well-known company with sufficient sales outside the domestic market, the questions is different. Nortel and Bombardier could fit into that definition (Nortel probably more of a 'brand' than Bombardier.) Thomson Corp. would also fit (highly recognised brand on Wall Street).

However, there's not too many other companies that might. The lastest list of the biggest Canadian Corporations by sales is here. You'll see that a lot of them are either Canadian divisions of US corps, or companies that do most of their business domestically.


Edited 15 minutes later to add:

Okay, I actually checked out the site and by the criteria they used, Canadian companies would qualify. They list Cisco, which means Nortel fits too; they list Reuters which means including Thomson; ditto for Boeing and Bombardier. TD Bank counts too - they own discount broker TD Waterhouse, which is a highly recognised brand, was a very hot stock a few years ago, and did about $650M or so in sales in the US last year.

Whether any Canadian companies should be on a list of the "Top 100" is a subjective question. But if the question is simply whether Canada has global brands, period, by BusinessWeek standards, we do.

[ October 29, 2001: Message edited by: MJ ]


From: Around. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
atlantis
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posted 31 October 2001 02:37 AM      Profile for atlantis     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
MJ has a good point that was a little vague in my mind. I was thinking of a global brand being a "retail" global brand. High profile like Coke or Guinness beer. That is, an ordinary person can go into a car dealership, bar, or department store and buy with money in plastic or paper form the product with the brand name in question. It requires personal use. You know, the customer is king idea. Marketing to the masses.
This a person cannot do with a Cisco System product or Nortel, nor Reuters or Boeing. Corporate sales to other corporations should not count in the Businessweek.com top 100 Global Brands.
People in China and Mozambique are aware of Toyota, MTV, McDonald's and Rolex, not Nortel or Cisco I bet. BW may have some homework to do here.
Roots is supposed to be close to being a global brand, but it not there yet.

From: Vancouver | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
saskzen
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posted 17 November 2001 01:59 AM      Profile for saskzen     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I friend told me once that: "Those with the logos get all the girls." Is that true?
From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trisha
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posted 17 November 2001 02:36 AM      Profile for Trisha     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Those with the logos have the most money. You figure it out.
From: Thunder Bay, Ontario | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged

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