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Author Topic: Great tune I heard: American Idiot by GreenDay
Performance Anxiety
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posted 10 August 2004 02:30 AM      Profile for Performance Anxiety        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Download it if you want to hear a song that is fairly political and damn hard to get out of your head. American Idiot by GreenDay:

quote:
GREEN DAY LYRICS

"American Idiot"

Don't wanna be an American idiot.
Don't want a nation that under the new media.
And can you hear the sound of hysteria?
The subliminal mindfuck America.

Welcome to a new kind of tension.
All across the alien nation.
Everything isn't meant to be okay.
Television dreams of tomorrow.
We're not the ones who're meant to follow.
Convincing them to walk you.

Well maybe I'm the faggot America.
I'm not a part of a redneck agenda.
Now everybody do the propaganda.
And sing along in the age of paranoia.

Welcome to a new kind of tension.
All across the alien nation.
Everything isn't meant to be okay.
Television dreams of tomorrow.
We're not the ones who're meant to follow.
Convincing them to walk you.

Don't wanna be an American idiot.
One nation controlled by the media.
Information nation of hysteria.
It's going out to idiot America.

Welcome to a new kind of tension.
All across the alien nation.
Everything isn't meant to be okay.
Television dreams of tomorrow.
We're not the ones who're meant to follow.
Convincing them to walk you.


Please feel free to post your thoughts on this tune.


From: Outside of the box | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
faith
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posted 10 August 2004 12:07 PM      Profile for faith     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
YES! I miss the folk and protest songs of the late 60's and early 70's. I grew up watching the Vietnam war on TV and listening to the protest songs.
I often wonder as the wars get dirtier, environment gets weaker, corporations make the laws , and government abandons their mandate to represent their citizens in favour of corporate cronies, where are the protesters ,where is the protest culture that was so widespread?
It seems to take a global conference like the WTO to get a major protest together.
I always encourage young people to be active and vocal if they have a point to make and sometimes I feel like a voice in the wilderness doing so.
The songs , poetry , and visual art acts like a conduit for thought spreading a message much more effectively than a political speech. I hope this is the start of something .

From: vancouver | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Malek
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posted 10 August 2004 10:26 PM      Profile for Malek     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by faith:
[QB]where is the protest culture that was so widespread?
It seems to take a global conference like the WTO to get a major protest together.
QB]

Most people have come to realize the nature of our society and its' so called 'democracy.' Politicians "are" the corporations. Police do the bidding of politicians as they beat, pepperspray, taser and arrest people in the street during protests. The writing was on the wall even during the 60s as to who is really in charge, and it ain't the people. The masses have simply resigned themselves to their place in the order of things. The mass movements of the 60s weren't enough to change the course of humanity in the long term. Is there anybody left who truly believes that the few who pen protest lyrics or attend demonstrations today will change anything where so many have failed in the past. The overwhelming odds against humanistic ideals have reduced people to disgruntled observers of their own fate.


From: Upper Canada | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
faith
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posted 10 August 2004 11:04 PM      Profile for faith     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh mygawd Malek, I'm glad I was in a good mood when I read your post because if I was in a bit of a depressed state I might have done myself harm.(just kidding)
The revolution against the established system has never been easy but there have been successes all through history . If there were no victories the Catholic church could still rule the world , kings would still bow to Rome and peasants would still be peasants.
The sustained effort of revolt takes enormous energy and resources. When the left or rather the people decide they've had enough and push hard they can get change to happen the problem (IMO) is hanging on to it. The right has been ascendent for about 25 years and it's about time change started happening. I don't think the musicians and artists cause the change they just spread the word.
There was some discussion on the Venezuela thread about the will of the citizens to hang on to their progress, perhaps we could all take a lesson from them.

From: vancouver | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Performance Anxiety
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posted 11 August 2004 04:36 AM      Profile for Performance Anxiety        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Malek, open your eyes! Look at the differences between now and 100 years ago. If there weren't the protests and dissent there wouldn't be the gains in human rights we enjoy today. Every little bit helps, especially catchy songs that diss the media.

BTW,

quote:
The mass movements of the 60s weren't enough to change the course of humanity in the long term.

I see it as a prelude as to what is to come. The next generation won't give in to yuppyism - with the $ in the hands of the few rich we won't even have that option. Plus we have the internet. Late capitalism doesn't stand a chance against us.

[ 11 August 2004: Message edited by: Performance Anxiety ]


From: Outside of the box | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 11 August 2004 04:48 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Green Day's catchy tune "warning" kept playing round the time of the Québec summit/countersummit. "....or shut up and be a victim of authority"...

There have been huge protests in the antiglobalisation and antiwar movements, even after the predicted demise of the movement following the September 11th terror attacks. Despite everything, there is a real turnabout after the discouragement and renewed social conformism of the 1980s.

And PA, who you calling a yuppie??? There are a fair number of us who never bought into that crap."warning"

[ 11 August 2004: Message edited by: lagatta ]


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Malek
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posted 11 August 2004 10:31 PM      Profile for Malek     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by faith:
[QB]Oh mygawd Malek, I'm glad I was in a good mood when I read your post because if I was in a bit of a depressed state I might have done myself harm.(just kidding)The right has been ascendent for about 25 years and it's about time change started happening. I don't think the musicians and artists cause the change they just spread the word.QB]

I don't like being the harbinger of doom either. The right has only regained what they momentarily let slip away. The right is represented by every facet of the world around us. Most of the things we hear, read, see, eat and experience is bought to us by that ideology. Musicians with any talent who have messages to spread are permitted to pipe their wares through the available mediums if it serves the purpose of the lucrative entertainment industry. Bands like Greenday have enough permissable leeway to 'spread the word' as you put it, to a new disenfranchised generation who have by and large become walking billboards for GAP, Nike and the like. They don't even comprehend the way in which the clothing on their backs is manufactured, let alone grasp anything fundamentally wrong about it. Is this where the renewal of change is supposed to be cultivated?


From: Upper Canada | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Malek
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posted 11 August 2004 10:46 PM      Profile for Malek     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Performance Anxiety:
Malek, open your eyes! Look at the differences between now and 100 years ago. If there weren't the protests and dissent there wouldn't be the gains in human rights we enjoy today. BTW, I see it as a prelude as to what is to come. The next generation won't give in to yuppyism - with the $ in the hands of the few rich we won't even have that option. Plus we have the internet. Late capitalism doesn't stand a chance against us. [ 11 August 2004: Message edited by: Performance Anxiety ]

Yes, yuppyism gave way to grunge, which gave way to the GAP generation. I don't know what to call it nowadays, it shifts more frequently than the margins. We're free to consume whatever we can afford, to the limit of our credit ratings. We're free to complain about this, that and the other thing, and to climb onto certain bandwagons that are provided by establishment such as the media, if they want to affect government policy for their own reasons. Yes, we have the internet, with a few venues still out there for dissent from the wilderness. We're living in an enormously wealthy world, where debacles like Sudan are a regular occurance, but we're ok cause we've got a few catchy tunes. Who doesn't stand a chance?


From: Upper Canada | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jacob Two-Two
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posted 11 August 2004 11:08 PM      Profile for Jacob Two-Two     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Dude, lighten up!! You think you're the first person to declare the struggle hopeless? It wasn't true then and it isn't true now. We live in a paradise of rights and freedoms that our ancestors could not have conceived of. It's true that if you take the last thirty years you might think we've gained little ground (although you'd be overlooking very important social advances), but that's just a tiny chunk of history. In general, the story is positive. We have thrown off monarchies and rigid social orders. Democracy itself is still very young and finding its feet. It has a long way to go from here, and so do we.
From: There is but one Gord and Moolah is his profit | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Malek
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posted 11 August 2004 11:47 PM      Profile for Malek     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Jacob Two-Two:
Dude, lighten up!! You think you're the first person to declare the struggle hopeless? It's true that if you take the last thirty years you might think we've gained little ground (although you'd be overlooking very important social advances), but that's just a tiny chunk of history. It has a long way to go from here, and so do we.

I never at any point said I was the only person to declare the struggle hopeless, nor did I use the term hopeless. I mused about the current reality. Down the road, who knows. BTW, I think Green Day does play some good catchy stuff. We all need a diversion every now and then. Now if I can only find my roach clip....


From: Upper Canada | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
HellofaSandwich
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posted 16 August 2004 11:48 PM      Profile for HellofaSandwich   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thank you, Jacob Two-Two, for some refreshing optimism.

Sometimes I don't know what's worse - listening to right-wing conservatives talking about how the world is going to hell in a socialist handbasket, or socialists themselves moping about corporate hegemony all day.


From: Edmonton | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
robertjohn
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posted 22 August 2004 11:45 PM      Profile for robertjohn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I, too, like that new Green Day song. Though, not sure if anyone yet has the lyrics correct. Do they use the word "faggot" and the word "fucker"? Not sure. 'Cause they don't bleep out any portion of the song I hear on my radio station (and they have been bleeping out things since the U.S. FCC feigned anger at the Janet Jackson incident).

But good song and it's a welcome sight to see bands getting more involved (like Springsteen, Mellencamp, and R.E.M.). Hopefully these artists pique the interest of all the kids in america who don't vote (kids being relative to the 18-25 year old block of voters).

I mean, you can't get more "american" than Mellencamp and Springsteen, as hard as the Republicans try to pretend that it's not them but guys like Lee Greenwood who represent more of what america is about.

Go John Kerry! He's no Wellstone, but he's x100 better than Bush!

Bob


From: Saint Paul, Minnesota | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 23 August 2004 08:23 AM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Looks like a good tune, though I haven't heard it yet.

As regards protest songs changing the world, though, I had to laugh at this one from Tom Lehrer:

quote:

We are the folk song army,
Every one of us cares.
We all hate poverty, war, and injustice
Unlike the rest of you squares.

There are innocuous folk songs, yeah,
But we regard 'em with scorn.
The folks who sing 'em have no social conscience,
Why, they don't even care if Jimmy Crack Corn.

If you feel dissatisfaction,
Strum your frustrations away.
Some people may prefer action,
But give me a folk song any old day.

The tune don't have to be clever,
And it don't matter if you put a couple extra syllables into a line.
It sounds more ethnic if it ain't good English
And it don't even gotta rhyme... (excuse me: rhyne!)

Remember the war against Franco?
That's the kind where each of us belongs.
Though he may have won all the battles,
We had all the good songs!

So join in the folk song army!
Guitars are the weapons we bring
To the fight against poverty, war, and injustice.
Ready, aim, sing!



From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
rat*chic
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posted 01 September 2004 09:22 PM      Profile for rat*chic     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I LOVE that song! Does anybody know where i can download it (for free)?
From: Brisbane, QLD, Australia | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sara Mayo
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posted 01 September 2004 09:34 PM      Profile for Sara Mayo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
When I first heard this song last week, I immediately thought of Carolyn Parish and her comment about a coalition of idiots. She should have said, "If Green Day can talk about American Idiot(s) why can't I?"
From: "Highways are monuments to inequality" - Enrique Penalosa | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Jared
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posted 07 September 2004 04:06 AM      Profile for Jared     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Aside. 'American Idiot' soundtracks the new Madden NFL X-Box game, which roughly approximates The Nuge lending 'Wang Dang Sweet Poontang' to a Nader campaign rally.

It's just surprising, considering NFL football cuts to the heart of red meat 'Murrica.

[ 07 September 2004: Message edited by: Jared ]


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
leaflord
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posted 07 September 2004 12:29 PM      Profile for leaflord     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I LOVE that song! Does anybody know where i can download it (for free)?

Anywhere, really. Win MX, Limewire, you name it! There's even a video, too. No images of Bush, or anything, but the green stripes on the flag melting away is cool.


From: Montreal | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 09 September 2004 02:28 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't think it would be too much thread drift for me to post another example of some fantastic anti-Bush music. This time, it's a whole EP instead of just one song...

Dan Bern - My Country (Music to beat Bush by)

quote:
Bush must be defeated
Bush must be defeated
Bush must be defeated
Bush must be defeated

Bush must be defeated
His evil gang unseated
His base of power deleted
His energy depleted

Bush must be defeated
Further services unneeded
His departure speeded
There's a land but you don't lead it

Bush must be defeated
The rose garden weeded
A new frontier re-seeded
We'll no longer let you bleed it

Bush must be defeated
This mistake not be repeated
Our desires not go unheeded
We will not twice be cheated

Bush must be defeated
His goodbye coffee heated
His inaugural spats uncleated
His White House bed short-sheeted

Bush must be defeated
His welcome's been exceeded
Successors must be greeted
The imposter excreted

Bush must be defeated
Bush must be defeated
Bush must be defeated
Bush must be defeated


If you're not already a fan of Dan Bern, I highly recommend his work. He sounds like Bob Dylan while he was still politically relevant.

[ 09 September 2004: Message edited by: Scott Piatkowski ]


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 09 September 2004 02:48 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Keenan:
As regards protest songs changing the world, though, I had to laugh at this one from Tom Lehrer

Nice. Here's another cynical take on rock stars trying to change the world.

July 13th, 1985 by John Wesley Harding

quote:

July 13th 1985 was the day we watched Live Aid
The Global Jukebox came alive
We fed the world that day
We fed the world that day

It was a day for a party we made a lot of food and we ate it sure as hell
Vegetarian salads, they had no meat, there was leftovers as well
Everybody laughed when I said
Thinking of the people either dying or dead
Let's pick up the leftovers, send them to the starving children in Ethiopia
My mother used to say that

Sure I was pleased to give money, cause it was not a political cause
I just remember the smiling faces, the music and the applause
I spent 30 quid on coke
I smoked a little too much dope
I was wiped out from 5 til 7, I missed Spandau Ballet and U2

July 13th 1985 was the day we watched Live Aid
The Global Jukebox came alive
We fed the world that day
We fed the world that day

The music was fucking brilliant and that Madonna she sure can move
By the time Paul McCartney's microphone had failed yeah, we are all well into the Live Aid groove
Paul McCartney, he sang...
Which must have been a bit of an irony
Cos if you 'Let it Be' nothing will ever improve
But it was one of the first times I ever heard one of the real Beatles sing a real Beatles' song live on television, I really wished Julian Lennon had turned up instead of his recently dead father, I was really moved

July 13th 1985 was the day we watched Live Aid
The Global Jukebox came alive
We fed the world that day
We fed the world that day

Well the powerful voice of pop music, solve the problems, feed the world
So what if there weren't any blacks involved there was Everything but the Girl
Bob Geldof has no ego that man should get the Nobel Prize
By the time he sang the solo on Feed the World
I thought he should be canonized

I felt guilty about the starving but I felt good to be alive
And I must admit I shed a tear or two in the very moving video for that great Cars song Drive
Saint Bob made me feel like shit
So I got out an envelope, opened it
Put in a very crisp ten pound note
It was the same one I used earlier to snort my coke
And that made me feel good inside
Sending the money, not snorting the coke

July 13th 1985 was the day we watched Live Aid
The Global Jukebox came alive
We fed the world that day
We fed the world that day



From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Vansterdam Kid
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posted 09 September 2004 04:05 AM      Profile for Vansterdam Kid   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Has anyone listened to the album? Thoughts?
From: bleh.... | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cougyr
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posted 09 September 2004 01:17 PM      Profile for Cougyr     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by faith:
I often wonder as the wars get dirtier, environment gets weaker, corporations make the laws , and government abandons their mandate to represent their citizens in favour of corporate cronies, where are the protesters ,where is the protest culture that was so widespread?

Remember, the baby boom generation which spawned the protests of the sixties. Of course, you remember, "Never trust anybody over thirty." Now, the baby boom generation is the establishment. We created this mess. The young protest against us.


From: over the mountain | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged

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