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Author Topic: 500,000 at SARS-stock, and I don't know a single one of them
rasmus
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posted 30 July 2003 11:08 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Do you?

Well maybe I do, but no one who's admitted it yet.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 30 July 2003 11:18 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have talked to exactly one person who was planning to go. One. Don't know anyone else.

I went to a movie.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 30 July 2003 11:30 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Perhaps after a while a kind of collective embarrassment will sink in, and we'll see a "reverse Woodstock effect" -- whereby far fewer people will claim to have been there than actually were.
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Debra
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posted 30 July 2003 11:37 PM      Profile for Debra   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
OH come on it was cool! If I was younger and unencumbered I would have gone.
From: The only difference between graffiti & philosophy is the word fuck... | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Meowful
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posted 30 July 2003 11:43 PM      Profile for Meowful   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If I lived closer to Toronto -- you bet I'd be there!
I love the Stones and all the other talent like Blue Rodeo, The Blues Brothers... very cool and very Canadian! What impresses me is that the Stones did this (and are donating all proceeds from souvenir sales)!

Thanks Mick and Crew!!


...now what concert can we get in Calgary for the BSE victims??


From: British Columbia | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 30 July 2003 11:46 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I swear to gawd, if I see one more cheesy headline that is a play on some Stones lyric or another...good LORD. It's obnoxious! The Toronto Star has become The Toronto Stone. And don't even get me started on the Toronto Sun.

Today's headline in the Sun?
"Start 'em up".

It's enough to make a grown man cry.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Meowful
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posted 30 July 2003 11:53 PM      Profile for Meowful   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Hey, hey, you, you, get offa my cloud"
From: British Columbia | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Pogo
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posted 30 July 2003 11:54 PM      Profile for Pogo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I would have gone.I know, it's only rock and roll, but I like it.
From: Richmond BC | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
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posted 31 July 2003 12:07 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Some co-workers went, some with their parents. Yoinks. I saw the Stones about 10 years ago at the Ex, and behind us were some greyhairs in tie-dye and their teen kids. The hippie/yuppies were dancing Seinfeld style and talking loudly about wishing they had "doobies". The teens were wishing they could dig a hold and jump in.
From: ĝ¤°`°¤ĝ,¸_¸,ĝ¤°`°¤ĝ,¸_¸,ĝ¤°°¤ĝ,¸_¸,ĝ¤°°¤ĝ, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 31 July 2003 12:34 AM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Has anyone been watching CBC's coverage? They have that idiot, Ralph Ben Mergui on. At one point he was conducting an interview with a fan when you could clearly hear the Rolling Stones playing in the background. I could hear a million people across the country shouting "Shut up Ralph" at their TVs (the CBC showed the entire Stones set later via tape delay).
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 31 July 2003 12:36 AM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have to say unflattering photos in the paper aside, Jagger really doesn't look 60. He certainly doesn't move like a 60 year old.
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Jimmy Brogan
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posted 31 July 2003 12:47 AM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Stones Rule!

What a sound. Brought back all kinds of delicious memories.


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 12:49 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
...all the other talent like Blue Rodeo, The Blues Brothers... very cool and very Canadian!

(sputter!)

Sorry, I did two spit-takes in a row, there -- the first at seeing the words "talent" and "Blue Rodeo" in close proximity, then "The Blues Brothers" and "very Canadian."


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
CocaCola58204
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posted 31 July 2003 12:53 AM      Profile for CocaCola58204     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm mad The Tragically Hip weren't there.
From: Grand Forks AFB, ND | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
CocaCola58204
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posted 31 July 2003 01:01 AM      Profile for CocaCola58204     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
and, uh, I could not foresee this thing happening to me.
From: Grand Forks AFB, ND | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
lonewolf
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posted 31 July 2003 01:21 AM      Profile for lonewolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
What impresses me is that the Stones did this (and are donating all proceeds from souvenir sales)!

Actually 50% of souvenir sales, but still a nice gesture. An unintended side gesture is the opportunity it provided for people to sell $2.50 popsicles a pop and water at inflated prices - but at least all the profits went to the workers.

CBC news is already questioning the event as being a "one day wonder" that won't provide lasting help to hard hit tourist industries. And they have a point: targetted 150,000 ticks for Americans and only 45,000 sold.

It seems to me this event was simply a morale booster for Canadians who already live and buy in Toronto.


From: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Snuckles
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posted 31 July 2003 01:52 AM      Profile for Snuckles   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My parents, and a couple of aunts visiting from New Brunswick, left for SARSstock this morning; but they decided to head for home at around 5:30pm and didn't stick around for any of the evening acts.

They said it was too hot and the line ups to get water, food, use the shitter, etc. were too long. They had to wait in line for over 2 hours just to get onto the concert grounds.

Makes me glad that I didn't go,

My father said that they were too far from the stage to see much of anything. I heard a caller on a local radio station say something similar. He went to the show, was too far from the stage, and the sound was terrible; so he went home and watched the rest of the show from the comfort of his house.

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: Snuckles ]

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: Snuckles ]


From: Hell | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 31 July 2003 02:11 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mycroft:
I have to say unflattering photos in the paper aside, Jagger really doesn't look 60. He certainly doesn't move like a 60 year old.

My theory is that the reason the Stones have stayed together is that Mick Jagger can only look good when standing beside Keith Richards.

Their swagger and misogeny passed as dangerous in the 60s; it was annoying in the 70s; since then its just become more and more pathetic and repulsive.

Greatest rock'n'roll band in the world? No friggin' way!


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
pity sing
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posted 31 July 2003 02:13 AM      Profile for pity sing        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Stones are god, if only for their magnificent bequeath to mankind called "Exile on Main Street". No other record has ever come close to "Exile" -- you can understand the entire genre of rock music simply by owning (and playing) this fantastic album.

Hey Scott: which band would YOU nominate as the best band in the world, and which album?

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: pity sing ]


From: toronto | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 31 July 2003 03:09 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by pity sing:
The Stones are god, if only for their magnificent bequeath to mankind called "Exile on Main Street". No other record has ever come close to "Exile" -- you can understand the entire genre of rock music simply by owning (and playing) this fantastic album.

Oh please, spare me. If "Exile" defines rock music, the genre is in trouble... hell, civilization is in trouble.

quote:
Hey Scott: which band would YOU nominate as the best band in the world, and which album?

Well, there's no need to get about it.

I could randomly pick from my own collection and come up with a thousand or so albums that are better than "Exile".

But, since you've asked, I guess I'd say "Rubber Soul" by The Beatles. It marks the last time that they really recorded as a group, but the first sign that each of the three songwriters was starting to define their own style.


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jimmy Brogan
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posted 31 July 2003 03:13 AM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Beatles vs. The Stones.

Yeah we'll settle that one right here and now.


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
pity sing
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posted 31 July 2003 03:30 AM      Profile for pity sing        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Scott: there's a type of triumphant sadness in "Exile on Main Street" that I have heard on a few other albums (perhaps Springsteen's "Nebraska", most certainly on Emmylou Harris's "Wrecking Ball". On film, I have seen it at the end of certain films such as "The Graduate", "Midnight Cowboy", and "Withnail and I". Sometimes Bryan Ferry of Roxy Music captures this spirit, but he's a bit hit and miss.

And yes, the Beatles captured it on Sgt. Peppers and Abbey Road.

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: pity sing ]


From: toronto | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
natas
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posted 31 July 2003 05:11 AM      Profile for natas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Arrgh, I find the who cares routine brutally elitist. I mean, the fucking rolling stones for twenty bucks! I went because they are going to die before I can ever afford to see them again, and because they have made an incredible quantity of great music. It's like not going to see Cezanne because he's old and you prefer Picasso. Yes it is.

That said, and from a really great front section vantage point (I planted myself at 11:30 and stayed within 10 feet all day), the Stones are clearly not at the zenith of their powers. When Mick says "I'm having a lot of fun. Are you having fun?" it's SO obviously a lie, a crowd pump; he looks a million miles away, counting money in his head between lines. But the others were having fun, and that communicated; the looseness and the flubs made it feel kinda casual and human-scale, which is an incredible accomplishment given the scale of the thing. They did a jam with AC/DC that will go down in history. And no, they don't look 60; they look like escapees from Madame Tussaud.

There were a million nuanced insights to be had on this race-neurotic, thirty-years-past-it show by BEING there. It displayed every deficit of state arts spectacle and was amazing about a quarter of the time anyway - which isn't bad for a show that contains The Tea Party, ONE (white, American) turntablist playing Q107 Jive Bunny, and the horrendous La Chicaine. And Rush reminds us that we should be GRATEFUL that some white artists steal from black culture

In other news, I want to kill the video switcher. He (I think I can assume the gender) seemed to be cheerleading the "Show us your tits" frenzy - all he ever cut to was bosoms on shoulders. But I thought Angus Young provided a perfect corrective - first by showing us HIS tits, then by imitating Brian Johnson's shlong with his guitar and/or pinkie. The Stones' sex hangups are way more depressing, cf this horrid anime video thing they dropped in.

Full agreement on the god damned headlines. The last straw was Julian Fantino going "Let's Spend, duh, ah, the night together." And then Aziz Choudhry did the same thing in today's Znet article on Montreal! Heads UP!

I did see one friend there, but no it was not my crowd. There were a number of macho pricks but it never got out of control - for instance, women could crowd surf without being groped, which can't be taken for granted these days, so hooray. I ended up in a great conversation circle with 6 total strangers at the peak of sardine fever. I got one compliment and no insults for my "End the occupations" shirt.

I'm VERY glad I went.


From: Vineland Station, Ontario | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 31 July 2003 08:00 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not elitist. I just had no desire to spend hours upon hours sitting on the ground in the hot sun in the middle of a huge crowd. The discomfort would outweigh the fun part for me. Sure, I liked some of the acts on the line-up, although I'm not a real Stones fan outside of some of their early stuff. It's not because I'm a musical snob or elitist that I had absolutely no interest in attending.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Debra
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posted 31 July 2003 08:01 AM      Profile for Debra   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 'lance:

(sputter!)

Sorry, I did two spit-takes in a row, there -- the first at seeing the words "talent" and "Blue Rodeo" in close proximity, then "The Blues Brothers" and "very Canadian."


Ok lance pistols at dawn. I LOVE Blue Rodeo.


From: The only difference between graffiti & philosophy is the word fuck... | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
N.R.KISSED
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posted 31 July 2003 09:20 AM      Profile for N.R.KISSED     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm just not sure why anyone would voluntarily put themselves through that sort of punishment.

...then there was the heat, crowds and long waits as well.


From: Republic of Parkdale | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Briguy
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posted 31 July 2003 09:29 AM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Apparantly, the CBC coverage was atrocious (I wasn't home during the concert). One of my friends wrote a letter to the CBC asking for an explanation for the suckiness. That is unfortunate, because I understand that the CBC feed was linked to other broadcasters globally. Does anyone know if the Radio 1 coverage was better than the TV coverage?

I would've liked to have gone, if I could've taken this week off. I know it's only rock and roll, but I like it.


From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 31 July 2003 10:12 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mycroft:
Has anyone been watching CBC's coverage? They have that idiot, Ralph Ben Mergui on. At one point he was conducting an interview with a fan when you could clearly hear the Rolling Stones playing in the background. I could hear a million people across the country shouting "Shut up Ralph" at their TVs (the CBC showed the entire Stones set later via tape delay).


Even though I knew why that was happening (rights problems: the CBC was allowed to show only a certain percentage of any group's performance), I sure as hell was on my feet and cursing.

The crowd around Benmergui were all singing, "Hoo hoo, Hoo hoo," and you could tell what they were being drawn into. So what was the CBC broadcasting? Benmergui manufacturing more and more stupid questions for an airhead from upstate New York (I think?) because someone had ordered him to fill in the time.

Gawd but the TV coverage was awful. A few things broke through, though -- AC/DC were awesome, period.

I couldn't have survived the crowd scene at my advanced age (catching up with Mick, and hey!, even Keef has better knees than I do -- all reports to the contrary, he looks pretty supple, no?), but I really envy you, natas.

Actually, you have restored my faith, natas. Great review. Thanks.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 31 July 2003 10:33 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
no, they don't look 60; they look like escapees from Madame Tussaud.

i guess they have to be careful with the stage lighting, or keith richards will just melt away during a gig.

it made the front page of the BBC news website, and that's more you can say for a lot of canadian news. during living in london for three years, i think the only times i heard about canada were:

- trudeau's death
- a canadian school teacher over in the UK on a one-yr work permit was caught drunk and sexually fooling around with a few of her pupils
- G8 summits

we'd become invisible due to the phrases, "the US, Europe and Japan", or "the US and its European NATO allies",

no one hears about the great secret that is toronto, and then it becomes associated with SARS.

stones or no stones, i'm just glad that the profits went into the hospital workers' relief fund and research into SARS.


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 31 July 2003 10:38 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:

So what was the CBC broadcasting? Benmergui manufacturing more and more stupid questions for an airhead from upstate New York (I think?) because someone had ordered him to fill in the time.


I'm in the minority in that I usually like Benmergui; but, I agree that the whole "stick a mike in their face" approach coverage sucked.

BTW, the airhead was from Fort Lauderdale. She indicated that she and her friends arrived at 1:00 pm and that they were going to sleep in their car and start driving home in the morning. So much for the economic benefits.


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
No Yards
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posted 31 July 2003 10:39 AM      Profile for No Yards   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
About a dozen or so of my friends and co-workers went. Haven't had a chance to talk to any of them yet, but as I was coming in to the office tthis morning, I saw one female co-worker that went to the show last night. She was at here desk, talking to another co-worker (no doubt about the concert last night) and she certainly seemed like she was very happy and excited about something!

I would have liked to go, but like many others here, the "gain" would not have outweighed the "pain".

Not a huge Stones fan myself, but the event itself would have been the important thing.

Note: I have never been any kind of AC/DC fan, but I have to admit, that of the pieces of show that I saw (on CBC like everyone else) they certainly were the most entertaining IMO.


From: Defending traditional marriage since June 28, 2005 | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
mighty brutus
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posted 31 July 2003 10:40 AM      Profile for mighty brutus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Don't like crowds & am no great fan of the stones.
AC/DC sounded fabulous, though!!

From: Beautiful Burnaby, British Columbia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 31 July 2003 10:43 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
WW, apparently one of the MCs last night announced that Geddy Lee and Keef had to be scheduled for after dark because scientists have yet to discover what happens to their bodies when they interact with sunlight ...

But I repeat: you should have seen Keith up and down and all around on those knees! Lee was terrific too, sort of seraphic, really.

If someone made a serious video of that concert, I would buy it. Hey, you guys, trust me: you gotta transcend sophistication! You're gonna get awfully bored with life if you're bored when you're still young!


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
badlydrawngirl
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posted 31 July 2003 10:56 AM      Profile for badlydrawngirl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
avoided the whole thing like the plague. it was a one-off spectacle and that's it. i'm not exactly sure how it benefits toronto other than a couple days of big press.

someone made the comment (when i was volunteering at the arts exhibit at nathan phillips square) that how about funding and supporting toronto artists rather than something like sarstock where no other torontonians will see any benefit? i think he had a good point.


From: toronto | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 31 July 2003 11:08 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Y'know, badlydrawn, I have spent thirty-six years of my life working for the arts in Canada, starving for them most of that time (as one does, mainly), but even I -- maybe especially I, and people like me -- have gotta say that this insistence on a useless comparison --


quote:
Originally posted by badlydrawngirl:
how about funding and supporting toronto artists rather than something like sarstock where no other torontonians will see any benefit?

-- continues to qualify as one of the most deeply boring statements of all time.

It's only rock'n'roll, chicks. And people LIKE it ...

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: skdadl ]


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 11:50 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Ok lance pistols at dawn. I LOVE Blue Rodeo.

OK but if you're throwing down the challenge, I get to choose the weapons.

Water pistols at 300 yards, say I.

quote:
You're gonna get awfully bored with life if you're bored when you're still young!

Yabbut skdadl, when a lot of pompous, overpaid rockstars who've come to believe their own PR, and to all available evidence regard their audiences with indifference at best, and contempt at worst, come on with a lot of bullshit, we should reserve the right to be bored.* That's where punk came from, when a number of people decided to stop being bored and started doing things for themselves.

Of course, punk too ended up with a lot of pompous, overpaid rockstars, etc. & so forth. The Creeping Meatball, i.e. the music industry, wasn't utterly changed, but simply mutated to accommodate the new dispensation. A problem, I grant you.

(*I pinched much of this "critique" from the late great Lester Bangs).

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
kuba walda
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posted 31 July 2003 01:16 PM      Profile for kuba walda        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If I lived in the centre of the universe I would have gone. I know two people that did. Been exchanging emails this morning to get all the scoop. They both said that it was a great time, but the line up to the beer garden was like 2 hours.
From: the garden | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Sisyphus
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posted 31 July 2003 01:31 PM      Profile for Sisyphus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Yabbut skdadl, when a lot of pompous, overpaid rockstars who've come to believe their own PR, and to all available evidence regard their audiences with indifference at best, and contempt at worst, come on with a lot of bullshit, we should reserve the right to be bored.* That's where punk came from

Yabbut, punk was already dying when Malcolm McLaren showed up with The Swindle. Velvet Underground, the Stooges, New York Dolls, Patti Smith...even with Morrisey and Wharhol, it was the Golden Age. After about '78, it was just another genre, notwithstanding the Ramones and post-punk bands like the Clash. From the payola scandals in the '50's to Dick Clark (shudder), I think there has been more marketing than rebellion in the history of rock 'n' roll.

Beatles vs Stones? *yawn*.

Would like to have seen AC/DC, though. "Back in Black" and "Exile" are two of the classics of rock and roll!

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: Sisyphus ]


From: Never Never Land | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
cynic
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posted 31 July 2003 02:24 PM      Profile for cynic     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
AC/DC, The Guess Who, the Stones, Rush. That would have been an awesome concert... 25 years ago. What do the kids say nowadays - don't trust anyone over 60?

"Man I love the Stones, I can't believe they're still doing it after all these years.
Fred, Barney..." - Stephen Wright


From: Calgary, unfortunately | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Albireo
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posted 31 July 2003 02:48 PM      Profile for Albireo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
skdadl: "A few things broke through, though -- AC/DC were awesome, period."
mighty brutus: "AC/DC sounded fabulous, though!"
Sisyphus: "Would like to have seen AC/DC, though. "Back in Black" and "Exile" are two of the classics of rock and roll!"

Wow. I guess the guitar guy in the odd suit sounds pretty good, but that lead singer's whiny voice cries out for some serious pest control.

I have despised AC/DC ever since I spent the summer of '80 at a work camp in Northern Ontario with a group of fellow 17-year-olds, many of whom listened to "Back in Black" constantly. At first I thought it was OK, but by the end of the summer it was like a thousand demons scraping their finger-nails along the blackboards of hell.

AC/DC drove me into the world of classical music for about 10 years.


From: --> . <-- | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 02:49 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
After about '78, it was just another genre, notwithstanding the Ramones and post-punk bands like the Clash.

Even granting that for the moment, the do-it-yourself spirit of punk, if not the actual sounds (or even the same instruments -- viz., hip-hop and DJ culture), kept cropping up in unexpected ways and places, and resulting in all manner of interesting things. Most of which, of course, never did nor ever will make it to radio or MuchMusic. (And of course DIY didn't begin with, and wasn't unique to, punk -- see the hip-hoppers again).

quote:
From the payola scandals in the '50's to Dick Clark (shudder), I think there has been more marketing than rebellion in the history of rock 'n' roll.

On this, I can agree. With the proviso that marketing and real creativity -- never mind "rebellion," which is so often a pose even when there are no marketers within a hundred miles -- are not diametrically opposed.

The Beatles, after all, started off as a kind of boy band, or at least were so marketed for a few years there, after their Hamburg/rowdy rock 'n' roll phase, and before Revolver, Rubber Soul, etc. Didn't stop them producing excellent pop music. And to me it's all pop music, the Pistols not excepted. Lou Reed set out to have a commercial hit with Loaded, and it wasn't his fault that nobody bought it at the time.

One of the sixties slogans I can recall reading was something to the effect of 'don't let the capitalists rip off your culture and sell it back to you.' Which missed the point that a good deal of our culture is made up of stuff the capitalists sell to us, or at least was inspired by it.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 31 July 2003 03:16 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, 'lance, on the one hand (and given your complexity, that one hand is a many-handed hydra), there's that.

On the other:

quote:
when a lot of pompous, overpaid rockstars who've come to believe their own PR, and to all available evidence regard their audiences with indifference at best, and contempt at worst,

One of the few interesting things -- because it was so appalling -- that we saw on TV last night was the five-minute Stones' "news conference" backstage. And I tell ya, it was not the Stones who made it appalling.

The media-persons. Sheesh, but how stupid can people get??? We couldn't see the reporters asking the idiot questions, just heard them. What we could see was the look on Mick's face when some obsequious star-struck hair-do asked things like, "And how do you think this will go down in history?"

Now, c'mon, you guys. Mick Jagger is not responsible for North American media idiots. He just isn't. From the look on his face, and for sure on Charlie's face, I'd say that they were the only people in the room who DIDN'T believe their own PR.

Jagger fell all over himself trying to remain polite and civilized about the creepy questions they were getting. Ron and Keef acted out. Charlie was just trying to survive and conserve the last bit of intelligence in the room, I think, which he correctly (in my view) did by remaining silent.

'lance: it ain't the Stones who have the problems with pomposity, flaccidity, or flatulence.

albireo: My students (at a Toronto community college) were the people who tried to get me listening to AC/DC back in 1980 -- when all I could think was "Noise! Noise! Noise!" So I sort of sympathize with your camp memories.

I wonder what has happened to me since -- because I now seem to find school-boy psychosis charming.

cynic: Don't trust anyone under fifty-five.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Black Dog
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posted 31 July 2003 03:37 PM      Profile for Black Dog   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Stones died in a plane crash in '72.
The Stones died in a plane crash in '72.
The Stones died in a plane crash in '72.
The Stones died in a plane crash in '72....

From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 03:49 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Jagger fell all over himself trying to remain polite and civilized about the creepy questions they were getting. Ron and Keef acted out. Charlie was just trying to survive and conserve the last bit of intelligence in the room, I think, which he correctly (in my view) did by remaining silent.

'lance: it ain't the Stones who have the problems with pomposity, flaccidity, or flatulence.


Sigh. I suppose not, at least not in person (though I'd say that much of their music since the mid-70s anyway has been flaccid and flatulent. But I wouldn't convince anyone, and it'd be pointless, and maybe even pompous, to try). They still seem to have fun, which is the main thing, and like as not they've kept going this long because they don't take themselves, or the whole enterprise, too seriously.

(And it's as true as it was in Lester Bangs' day: most "rock journalists" are embarrassing cretins).

I'm not fair to the Stones, it's true. But I simply find it hard to be fair to any band which has become such a corporate entity. And so I've lumped them in, no doubt carelessly, with those bands who come to dismiss or despise their audiences. It's quite possible to become a rich rockstar and still produce music that's alive, that jumps and changes. (And though I really hate to quote Pete Townshend's lyrics in this or any context, the music must change).

But what so often happens is that after a few years of living a rich, pampered sort of life, the rockstars forget what real, daily life is like for their fans, or what it was like for them on the way up. (As who could blame them on this last point, the small-time pop-music life typically being such a horrible grind that so many artists never make it out of). So their music tends to stagnate, or at best to become self-referential -- to be about the trials and tribulations of the Big Time.

Something like this -- the stagation, I mean -- happened to Elvis, I'd say to the Stones, and even to the Clash, just to pick three big-time acts from different eras. It might well have happened to the Beatles except that they broke up first, which may have kept their critical reputation intact. We'll never know, and there wasn't much point then, as there isn't now, regretting their breakup. They had a great run, and as Harrison said at the time "it's only a bloody rock 'n' roll band, not the end of the world."

Something else bad can happen, though it didn't necessarily happen to the Stones. But Bangs and his Boswell, Greil Marcus (now there's a guy, despite or maybe because of his encyclopedic knowledge, who can get pompous), make out a pretty good case that it happened to Elvis.

An artist can develop such a cult following -- fanatics, rather than fanciers -- that they'll gladly lap up anything s/he produces, and howl for more, no matter what the quality. But if you're reduced for whatever reason to putting out stuff you think is a little dodgy -- even stuff you know in your heart of hearts is rubbish -- how are you likely to feel when your claque accepts it uncritically anyway? You might quell your doubts, and come to believe it's great because, hey, 50,000,000 Elvis fans can't be wrong. Or you might come to look sceptically, even contemptuously, at the fans. "Ah know this is horseshit -- what're all those people thinking?"

Ah, but I don't know why I get so wrapped up in this kind of thing, except that once upon a time good pop was pretty important to me, as it remains, if a bit less so. For that matter I listened to the Stones a fair bit in school, partly because they were one of the few decent bands I could hear then on local (i.e. Ottawa) radio. Their later records I found disappointing, which likely accounts for much of my (residual) rancour now. I should really let it all go, because it is, as they say, only ... but you know the rest.

(p.s. I found AC/DC good fun in their day, but I have absolutely nothing whatsoever good to say about Rush).


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 31 July 2003 04:08 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Ok lance pistols at dawn. I LOVE Blue Rodeo.

Me, too. How's about a lynch mob?

(I'd go to see Blue Rodeo, but I wouldn't cross the street for the Rolling Stones OR AC/DC. )


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 31 July 2003 04:13 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And, of course, the US media completely ignored it as unnewsworthy. I think it's fine that 500,000 people got to see a good concert but as far as what it was supposed to do it was yet another Dennis Mills "think big" flop. Most of the people who went to the concert were Torontonians, the concert hasn't changed Toronto's image in the US media, the benefits for the hospitality industry are short lived and fall far short of what was intended. The whole thing probably cost more than it injected in the economy and the real reason for it was as a self-promotion vehicle for Dennis Mills in his election campaign against Jack Layton.
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 31 July 2003 04:15 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
'lance: Well, like, yeah.

BUT SOME OF IT IS STILL SO GREAT!!! And they are smart guys. I am convinced that Charlie is the smartest of the lot.

Oh, Debra and Zoot, I forgot to say: Blue Rodeo were great, I thought. Jim Cuddy was wearing nicely faded jeans and a white shirt, and one just melted. Quel handsome guy. *sigh*

Where do I sign up for the 'lance-lynch mob?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 31 July 2003 04:21 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Oh, Debra and Zoot, I forgot to say: Blue Rodeo were great, I thought. Jim Cuddy was wearing nicely faded jeans and a white shirt, and one just melted. Quel handsome guy. *sigh*

And the boy's got pipes, too. Gorgeous voice.

We saw them last spring when they passed through. They also put on a good show when they've got more than 15 minutes.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 04:24 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Blue Rodeo played an afternoon main-stage set at the Calgary Folk Music Festival. The DMM and I were there all weekend, but went to the beer garden during their set.

Meanwhile, the previous evening, Jim Cuddy played a guest spot with Kathleen Edwards. The Festival sound system was pretty good, so you could hear her drooling audibly when he came on stage -- "Looking good, Jim!" she said, and "Ladies, you can come up on stage now." Leaving after his appearance, he gave her a peck on the cheek. "I got a kiss!" she crowed at the microphone, adding a smug little "heh, heh, heh" unde her breath.

Bah. What's he got that I haven't got, grumble grumble...

Oh yeah, talent. I was being snarky above, of course. But I can acknowledge that Ani DeFranco has talent too, and yet her music leaves me as cold as does BR's.

So now I guess swirrlygrrl will be joining the lynch mob...


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
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posted 31 July 2003 04:24 PM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Blue Rodeo was excellent. I laughed my ass off at the opening number for the Flaming Lips with the big blue ball and the dancing animals (anyone know what that song was?). I really liked the duo with Rolling Stones and AC/DC doing the classic B.B. King tune.

Apparently some of my friends were there but I didn't see them.


From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 31 July 2003 04:38 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You were there! You were there! You lucky duck! You didn't tell us!


(He had to be there. He saw the good stuff that we didn't get on TV.)

Glad you had a great time, rob dot.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
worker_drone
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posted 31 July 2003 05:00 PM      Profile for worker_drone        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I laughed my ass off at the opening number for the Flaming Lips with the big blue ball and the dancing animals (anyone know what that song was?).

I think it was "Race for the Prize" off of Soft Bulletin, but I'm not sure.


From: Canada | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Sisyphus
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posted 31 July 2003 05:08 PM      Profile for Sisyphus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
On this, I can agree. With the proviso that marketing and real creativity -- never mind "rebellion," which is so often a pose even when there are no marketers within a hundred miles -- are not diametrically opposed.

The Beatles, after all, started off as a kind of boy band, or at least were so marketed for a few years there, after their Hamburg/rowdy rock 'n' roll phase, and before Revolver, Rubber Soul, etc. Didn't stop them producing excellent pop music. And to me it's all pop music, the Pistols not excepted.


*Sigh*. All true.... or, at least I don't disagree.

But as an unhip middle-aged guy who has seen the sun set on good pop music , I still search, like the alchemists of yore for the philosopher's stone, for the definitive objective statement of good music that vindicates my tastes and would allow me to have the discographies of several revered pop icons stricken from historical remebrance, that their caterwauling never pollute the airwaves again, while freezing radio content in endless tribute to bands that no one (idiots, all!) remembers but me .

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: Sisyphus ]


From: Never Never Land | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
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posted 31 July 2003 05:57 PM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I think it was "Race for the Prize" off of Soft Bulletin, but I'm not sure.

I don't think so. It wasn't one of thiers. It was a recording of a classical song. I think they played the song once in the Guinness Draught commercial when everyone is on the train...

quote:

Glad you had a great time, rob dot.

Heehee, thanks skdadl. And thanks for the great name....rob dot, eh? I like it!


From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
pity sing
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posted 31 July 2003 06:34 PM      Profile for pity sing        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Their swagger and misogeny passed as dangerous in the 60s; it was annoying in the 70s; since then its just become more and more pathetic and repulsive.

Misogeny is bad, no doubt, but most guys I've talked to have harboured a little secret: they wouldn't have minded being one of the Stones circa 1970-72. I haven't met many who daydreamed about being Dan (Sometimes-When-We-Touch)Hill, or Justin Timberwimp.


From: toronto | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 06:43 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
But as an unhip middle-aged guy who has seen the sun set on good pop music , I still search, like the alchemists of yore for the philosopher's stone, for the definitive objective statement of good music that vindicates my tastes and would allow me to have the discographies of several revered pop icons stricken from historical remebrance, that their caterwauling never pollute the airwaves again, while freezing radio content in endless tribute to bands that no one (idiots, all!) remembers but me.

My dear fellow. That goes in the Hall of Fame, forthwith.

But see here. I'm an unhip middle-aged guy, too (not to mention middle-class, Anglo-Saxon, and right-handed. At the very bottom, therefore, of the related Hierarchies of Oppression and Cool). But so far from not having despaired of hearing good new pop music ever again, I manage to hear it all the time. And music an unhip middle-aged guy, etc. can listen to without embarrassment -- I mean I don't bother much with electronica (though does anyone, these days?), or hip-hop (the brilliant, i.e. literate, Blackalicious and one or two others excepted), or other stuff that really belongs to the young people.

Anyway, good new pop music. The New Pornographers and Neko Case spring to mind, just to name two. (Whoo boy do they spring to mind... the fact that Neko Case sings with the New Pornographers, whenever they come together, just adds to their appeal. These grils hereabouts fanning themselves at the sight or sound of Jim Cuddy? Well all I have to say is -- what's sauce for the goose...)

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
natas
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posted 31 July 2003 06:50 PM      Profile for natas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:

how about funding and supporting toronto artists rather than something like sarstock where no other torontonians will see any benefit?

The benefit Toronto saw was a good show, which should count for something. Sometimes rock and roll slides some happiness under the door in the face of hypocrisy.

In other news, the Stones are a corporate entity because they've got something good to sell and there are no other available models for operating on this scale...I think we lefties tend to believe that art should always conform to the 'community' ghetto that lefty art is always stuck in. This leads straight to a misguided, and yes elitist, position too. If people want to hear the stones, give em the fuckin' stones. Why not. If you like catchy songs I dare you to disagree.
The appropriate activist response should be to make the arena contested terrain, not to dismiss the impulse to play to large audiences.

BUT: since the Stones were what everyone was there for, maybe we can go out on a limb and lead in with something more than bleached dinosaur bones. I agree that the lineup was hopelessly out of date, and that the choice of new guys, yank Lips aside, was conservative (Not all bad: Sam Roberts was good and catchy in spite of the frothing spittle in CU, and Kathleen Edwards would have been fine if she hadn't been so defeatingly self-deprecating. Blue Rodeo, like the Tea Party and those QC plodders, are young dinosaurs. 'Reptiles?').

That made the 'greatest concert of all time' stuff downright embarrassing - though not as embarrassing as Mike Bullard calling Have Love Will Travel 'the best blues band in the world!!'

Hey this just occurred to me - the old bands (again, not Rush, but bear with me) were all working some variation on black music, while the new folks were white white white, DJ most violently included. This says something about the state of the music industry, just like the juxtaposition of this show with Caribana on the weekend says something about Canada's current cultural politics: divide and conquer is at work! It suggests a deliberate policy of segregation, and I'll take great-society bullshit multiculturalism over that, by a hair.

There's no reason they couldn't have had a GOOD, LOCAL, BLACK DJ filling the gaps in the afternoon. Maybe even giving them a full set. Hell, throw in an MC. Anyone who thinks this is against the realpolitic thinks TINA to Q107.

I also think that the hostile response to Justin Timberlake had more to do with Luddism (or worse, given the choruses of 'faggot') than musical judgment, whatever you think of him. When Mick brought him up for Miss You (PERFECT choice), it was great art, BECAUSE it ratcheted up the tension unbearably - people were like, do I boo? Do I throw stuff at the STONES because they are supporting this 'faggot'? Some did.

quote:

Greil Marcus (now there's a guy, despite or maybe because of his encyclopedic knowledge, who can get pompous)

Worse than that; have you read this???

http://www.commonwealthclub.org/archive/02/02-06marcus-speech.html

What an asshole. Didn't he write a whole book equating Bill Clinton to Elvis?

quote:

But as an unhip middle-aged guy who has seen the sun set on good pop music

Kind of like Dennis Mills!


From: Vineland Station, Ontario | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 07:05 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I think we lefties tend to believe that art should always conform to the 'community' ghetto that lefty art is always stuck in.

Well I don't know -- I don't necessarily believe that pop music is art. Or more accurately, I can't get interested in discussions as to whether it's art or not, or just which kinds of pop are art, and which aren't.

And what exactly, may I ask, could this mean

quote:
The appropriate activist response should be to make the arena contested terrain...

?

I hadn't read that Marcus speech. Perhaps I'll work my way through it. Bbut if he did equate Clinton with Elvis, my interest in his stuff -- his new stuff, anyway; I still think "Mystery Train" an excellent book -- only wanes further than it has already.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
natas
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posted 31 July 2003 08:04 PM      Profile for natas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:

Well I don't know -- I don't necessarily believe that pop music is art. Or more accurately, I can't get interested in discussions as to whether it's art or not, or just which kinds of pop are art, and which aren't.

Oh boy, I get to invoke 'elitism' in the third straight post.

For me it's a given that pop music is art. As a musician (and as an audience member), I find the suggestion to the contrary truly infuriating. I wouldn't (and didn't) touch the subjects you invoke with a ten-foot pole either.

But it would be even more eccentric to suggest that a non-artistic phenomenon called pop music should be treated as a 'community art' in the name of good politics!

quote:

And what exactly, may I ask, could this mean


quote:
--------------------------------------------------
The appropriate activist response should be to make the arena contested terrain...
--------------------------------------------------

?


Sorry, sometimes shorthand = jargon. I mean that the left vision for the arts (or non-arts, ahem) could take into account that arena rock and the popular desire for it exists, and organize to democratize the way it happens, rather than ignoring/dismissing it or insisting that people learn to like something else. Obviously that's the first principal of a much bigger inquiry, and doesn't preclude working on other forms. But it's a logical possibility that we could take that project on, if we were concerned about it...

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: natas ]


From: Vineland Station, Ontario | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 08:24 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Oh boy, I get to invoke 'elitism' in the third straight post.

Eh?

quote:
For me it's a given that pop music is art. As a musician (and as an audience member), I find the suggestion to the contrary truly infuriating.

Dude. I didn't say it wasn't art. I simply don't care either way.

(Though maybe, since you follow up with

quote:
I wouldn't (and didn't) touch the subjects you invoke with a ten-foot pole either.

you're not accusing me of making the suggestion. Again, I think I'm confused).

quote:
But it would be even more eccentric to suggest that a non-artistic phenomenon called pop music should be confined to the art gallery in the name of good politics!

Eh (II)?

quote:
I mean that the left vision for the arts (or non-arts, ahem) could take into account that arena rock and the popular desire for it exists, and organize to democratize the way it happens, rather than ignoring/dismissing it or insisting that people learn to like something else.

Perhaps, though I can't imagine what it would mean to "democratize" arena rock. The form would seem anti-democratic by definition. But I don't and wouldn't insist that people like to learn something else either. Perhaps, were I a left-wing activist, I'd just continue to ignore/dismiss it. (OK, I haven't been ignoring it here, but this is just chat). Ignore because I don't like it much, and can't understand the tastes of those who do -- I just have to accept that different people have different tastes. Dismiss because I can't see that arena rock -- or pop music in general, perhaps -- has any more political significance than do, say, big professional sporting events.

Now, my problem with understanding majority, or mass tastes might be significant for my politics, whatever exactly they are. Maybe I do have elitist tendencies. Probably just as well, if so, tthat I'm not a left-wing activist, and don't aspire to be one.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 31 July 2003 08:38 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:

Hey this just occurred to me - the old bands (again, not Rush, but bear with me) were all working some variation on black music, while the new folks were white white white, DJ most violently included. This says something about the state of the music industry, just like the juxtaposition of this show with Caribana on the weekend says something about Canada's current cultural politics: divide and conquer is at work! It suggests a deliberate policy of segregation, and I'll take great-society bullshit multiculturalism over that, by a hair.

There's no reason they couldn't have had a GOOD, LOCAL, BLACK DJ filling the gaps in the afternoon. Maybe even giving them a full set. Hell, throw in an MC. Anyone who thinks this is against the realpolitic thinks TINA to Q107.

I also think that the hostile response to Justin Timberlake had more to do with Luddism (or worse, given the choruses of 'faggot') than musical judgment, whatever you think of him. When Mick brought him up for Miss You (PERFECT choice), it was great art, BECAUSE it ratcheted up the tension unbearably - people were like, do I boo? Do I throw stuff at the STONES because they are supporting this 'faggot'? Some did.


With all this I agree. natas, you interest me strangely.

'lance, dearest, I promise you: some day soon, or maybe ten years from now, but that's soon enough, you may suddenly find yourself, as I have recently, surprised at yourself for the things you are appreciating again that you haven't appreciated for a long time. Even arena rock may be one of them.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 08:44 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm sure you're right, skdadl -- except about the arena rock.

I've been to three (3) stadium/arena type shows in my life. I can track some of the changes in my musical tastes that way. In '79 there was April Wine and Loverboy (haw haw haw), in '82 The Who (sigh -- too late; this was the beginning of the end of my interest in that band), and in '85 The Pretenders and Iggy Pop (Iggy good, Pretenders mediocre).

Then I decided: never again. The Lonely Crowd was just too depressing.

(Edited to add:

No, the Who in '82 was the end of my interest in that band).

[ 01 August 2003: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
pity sing
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posted 31 July 2003 09:27 PM      Profile for pity sing        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I also think that the hostile response to Justin Timberlake had more to do with Luddism

You mean the crowds didn't like Justin because of their collective antipathy towards machinery that displaces workers?

Maybe they just didn't like his style of singing. Maybe they don't like effeminate boy bands. Who knows ... it doesn't really matter.


From: toronto | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 31 July 2003 09:32 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
You mean the crowds didn't like Justin because of their collective antipathy towards machinery that displaces workers?

Well, insofar as most boy bands amount to carefully-calibrated machines of a sort....

Apparently a lot of critics have been grudgingly admitting that his solo album is pretty good. I don't know, I haven't heard any of it. But I wouldn't dismiss the possibility out of hand, just because N'Sync's music was mostly fluff.

By the way, what's wrong with boy bands who happen to be "effeminate," as you put it?


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
pity sing
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posted 31 July 2003 09:35 PM      Profile for pity sing        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well ... there's good effeminate and bad. Lou Reed "Transformer", British glam rock = good effeminate. Karma Karma Caramel Cameleon Boy George = sickly sweet bad effem. rock. Ditto for current crop of boy bands. As you can see, this is very subjective and very unfair.
From: toronto | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
Secret Agent Style
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posted 31 July 2003 09:45 PM      Profile for Secret Agent Style        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wonder when we'll find out whether or not the concert was worth it financially. I'm curious about how much money the different government levels actually spent, how much money was generated, and where that money went.

[ 31 July 2003: Message edited by: Andy Social ]


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natas
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posted 01 August 2003 01:18 AM      Profile for natas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
OK now I'm feeling guilty for calling everyone names. I'm not saying Scott, Michelle or Lance are mean and nasty, and I'm not blaming anyone for liking what they like. Just the opposite. Sorry, I'm working on my articulation.

Personally, for a while I let my own bounding contempt for all levels of government distract me from my desire to eat bread and watch circuses. Then I saw the light, and now I am here to convert you!

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
You mean the crowds didn't like Justin because of their collective antipathy towards machinery that displaces workers?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No, that's why the musicians' union doesn't like Justin Sometimes I like to put sewing machines in my ears, myself.

Don't forget that Mick is also the standard-bearer, practically the originator, of Good Effeminate. But I don't find that good effeminate-bad effeminate has much to do with the effeminate part. It's the music, guy. Ooh now I'm tempted to get all harsh again...the justinphobia just reminds me of "disco sucks," it goes deeper than liking what you like, you know? But I will say this about Timberlake: he does a lousy human beat box.

I have been informed that the CBC was quite hung up on heaving bosoms as well. I should also say that I was right in the middle of the AC/DC crowd surfers/mosh pit - in my sandals, did I say that already? - and loved every minute of it. If you wouldn't do the same, then you are obviously an - ELITIST!


From: Vineland Station, Ontario | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
natas
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posted 01 August 2003 01:34 AM      Profile for natas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Check this Timberlake review, from robertchristgau.com (where you can play review-that-record for hours, if you're interested):

Justified [Jive, 2002]
He's one giant step ahead of his audience, just like always, and though his talent and character were there for all to see, who knew he'd turn out this heady or beatwise? Maybe his mom, or his manager--a woman and an African American, respectively. There's plenty of Neptunes records, but none as nice; plenty of Timbaland records, but none as sexy. Tagging the lead track, he sums up his growth curve in six simple words that, somehow, no one ever thought of before: "Gentlemen, good night. Ladies, good mornin'." Then, as if he wasn't already in the door, he gooses the play with a relieved, knowing, friendly chuckle. Five straight hook tracks at the beginning are topped in the end by lubricious Janet and experimental Timbo. Any jerk who disses the awkwardness with which Justin calls out "Drums!" or gets guys and gals trading come-hithers should have been half as coltish at 21. He can still make *NSync records if he wants--the Brian McKnight mawk proves it. But if he does, it'll be out of the goodness of his heart. A-


From: Vineland Station, Ontario | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Flowers By Irene
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posted 01 August 2003 04:50 AM      Profile for Flowers By Irene     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ok, I haven't read through this thread yet, but I just gotta share my experience:

SARStock, as I believe it is now widely known as, was just amazing. We (my GF & myself) got into the park about noon, getting to within eye & earshot of the stage just in time to see the opening. (BTW, the security was very good - I found the lines to enter the park moved pretty quick, at least from Wilson (We waited only 15 minutes) - and though they took our food {wasn't in a sealed package} they let me keep my pot, because as Officer Smiley told me, they weren't looking for it.)

Mike Bullard is a hack, but the Aerobatic team was pretty cool, and I'm glad Oh Canada was sung, (Jan Arden) & even more that many (including myself) joined in. About halfway through the Blues Bros. set, we started wandering, trying to find some cell reception (I borrowed friend's phone for the show) to try and hook up with the people I was meeting there. Took about an hour for us all to find each other (7 people coming in three groups)

Once we were all organized, and had gotten a bite to eat, and stocked up on free water, we started for the stage, and found an open patch of, well not grass exactly, but straw-like covered dirt in the second section out, about in line with the rightmost end of the stage, just in time to see the Flaming Lips set. Fucken eh. They rocked hard, for all of three songs. But their stage show was beautiful. Sass Jordan followed, and meh. I mean, she was good and everything, but still, meh. The Isley Brothers rocked though.

Then we all decided it was time for beer. Which was interesting. It took a while to find a beer tent with a moving line, but after 45 minutes or so, we stumbled over to Beer Tent 12, which had the shortest line for anything all day. 20 minutes later, we were sipping some Molsons.

After everyone had finished their 3 beers (at six bucks a pop, plus the heat, who could drink more?) We did a little more wandering, taking in the sights, the smells (mainly pot & fire cooked beef) & the general atmosphere radiated by 460,000 beautiful people, and ended up being split up into two groups.

Myself & the three left with me then lost all hope of getting a decent cell signal, and decided to just head back for the stage. Or more precisely, in the general direction of the stage, until we could get no further. We ended up just about forty feet from marker 203, and stayed put for The Guess Who,(actually, we got to our final position just as they were beginning No Time ) Rush, AC/DC & the Stones.

The Guess Who were solid, and Rush was, well, Rush, (I'm not exactly a Rush fan, but Bubbles would've gone apeshit for that set, I'm sure.)

AC/DC was by far, hands down, &etc. the highlight of the day. All of the lineups, the hassles, the overpriced everything, the sunburn (I am as red as the flag now, except for my shortslines) the Justin Timberlake, (if you're a fan sorry, but I am quite not - no question of his talent insinuated herein, & other fine print...) was worth it for that set alone. Even the sunset agreed. I lost my voice screaming for more Angus, and then there was more Angus. (And again more when the Stones played.)

Then the Stones came on, and well, we showed our appreciation, but AC/DC was untoppable. And we were all by that time running only on nerve impulses like a chicken without a head.


So many more things to mention, but fingers getting tired... All considered (the drawbacks like the garbage - we just took a year off the life of the planet, I'm sure; - the short sets for most of the bands; that none of my group remembered to pick up a disposable camera or two; the amount of people that asked me to sell them pot; (dude, come prepared, or at least be friendly and accept handouts when offered, no demanding allowed. {Well, that only happened once, and Mr. Demander had a couple of friends to push him along to away from us, so../}) the acts I missed; and the lineups, oh dear whatever, the lineups...) I had a blast, and I want to do it again next year. Or next week - whenever it can be organized.

Ed. to clear up a couple typos & that, hope I caught them all.

[ 01 August 2003: Message edited by: Flowers By Irene ]


From: "To ignore the facts, does not change the facts." -- Andy Rooney | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Meowful
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posted 01 August 2003 12:26 PM      Profile for Meowful   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What I think is too cool is the fact that the Stones (well, Rock in general) have been going for YEARS! And are still very popular. Can you imagine back in 1973, anyone wanting to listen to music from 30 years hence? (say, 1943?) Not!

Rock and Roll forever!


From: British Columbia | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
pogge
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posted 01 August 2003 12:35 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Meowful:
Can you imagine back in 1973, anyone wanting to listen to music from 30 years hence? (say, 1943?) Not!

Wrong. Ever hear of swing? People still listen to it, including me occasionally. And the other day I listened to an anthology of blues tunes recorded in the 50's, which would make them fifty year old recordings now. I like Rock too, but let's not get carried away.


From: Why is this a required field? | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Meowful
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posted 01 August 2003 12:48 PM      Profile for Meowful   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Okey dokey

How many teenagers in 1973 were rushing out to purchase "swing" albums??

Today, in 2003, many teenagers are buying Stones, AC/DC, Led Zepplin, Beatles, ZZ Top, Bruce Springstein... Hell, most all of the great bands from the "hard rock" era are still very popular with the young people.

You certainly cannot say the same for "swing" or "big band" music.
Actually it is only very recently that "Ole Blue Eyes" has realized an insurgence of popularity. (But its probably the baby boomers, not teens)


From: British Columbia | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
pogge
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posted 01 August 2003 12:50 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Your original comment was "can you imagine...anyone". Yes, I can - me. And when I was a teen, I didn't have to buy swing music - Dad had taken care of that for me.

[ 01 August 2003: Message edited by: Slim ]


From: Why is this a required field? | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 01 August 2003 12:51 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Wrong. Ever hear of swing? People still listen to it, including me occasionally.

Funny you should mention swing.

At the Calgary Folk Festival I found the funniest performers -- most kinetic, even goofy on-stage -- were some Inuit drummers/dancers. But the wittiest, verbally, was of all people Al Stewart of "Year of the Cat" Fame. I came prepared to dislike his stuff, and I'm still no great fan, but within a minute or two of his appearance I decided I liked him, and was laughing aloud besides. He has ironic, deadpan self-deprecation down to an art, and just generally comes across as the most genial, pleasant fellow. At the worst I found his songs just uninteresting, but the best of them were as witty as his patter.

Anyway: he introduced one song by saying, more or less: "Every few years some musician or other tries to revive swing. It never seems to take off, though I suppose the Squirrel Nut Zippers made it work. Well, with my unerring instinct for what sells [he'd earlier talked about spending 35 years doing "historical folk-rock" despite the fact that such stuff never gets radio play], I did a swing song. I wrote music in the style of Django Reinhardt, then put words to it. Being me, they could have come from the plot of an espionage film from 1942." And away he went. Of all the songs he performed I liked this one the best.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
pogge
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posted 01 August 2003 12:59 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 'lance:

Anyway: he introduced one song by saying, more or less: "Every few years some musician or other tries to revive swing. It never seems to take off, though I suppose the Squirrel Nut Zippers made it work..."


He's right, swing does surface every once in a while through a "modern" artist. A few years back, Lyle Lovett was touring with a fairly large band that dipped into that style. And Colin James had a band with a horn section for a while that walked the line between blues and swing.

As for Al Stewart, I feel about the same way you do.


From: Why is this a required field? | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 01 August 2003 01:02 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
How many teenagers in 1973 were rushing out to purchase "swing" albums??

Today, in 2003, many teenagers are buying Stones, AC/DC, Led Zepplin, Beatles, ZZ Top, Bruce Springstein... Hell, most all of the great bands from the "hard rock" era are still very popular with the young people.


In my last high-school yearbook, from 1982, there's a list of the "top 100" songs of that year, probably courtesy of some Ottawa radio station. Or perhaps it was albums -- can't remember just now. What I do remember is looking at it at some point within the last year and being struck by the fact that it was all fairly new, i.e. contemporary music. Few if any songs (or albums) dated from before about 1980.

I'd be very surprised if the same was true today. One big difference is that in 1982, although Ottawa radio played some older stuff, the Klassik Rawk format hadn't been invented yet. In fact I think all radio "formats" were somewhat vaguer and more informal. Certainly commercial DJs had some choice as to what to play.

What did John Prine say? "Things aren't now, but like they used to was"? It's for sure, anyway, that the past isn't what it used to be.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sisyphus
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posted 01 August 2003 01:52 PM      Profile for Sisyphus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Clarification: The "sun has set on good pop music" line refers to my unhipness and is not an artisitc statement.

Fact is, I don't keep up with New Music(TM), because there is so much already out there that I like to listen to. As a musician of sorts, I listen to players and try to steal anything not nailed down .

Otherwise, there are so many exponents of genres that I already admire (anything but rap/hip hop, operatic, modern jazz and dissonant modern classical, and all pop played on radio stations with cutesy call letters like "KOOL" and MAJIC" )whose work I have not listened to, that I do not feel compelled to seek out more. I'm not hostile to new sounds, though I haven't heard anything NEW in years. Anyway, I have two boys who I'm sure will be only too eager to sneer at my moldy oldies and show me what's cool.

I don't know Justin Timberlane from a hole in the ground, but the reaction of some troglodytes in the crowd is depressing. Reminds me of a Police Picnic I have hazy memories of in the '80s when Joe Jackson was pelted with detritus...idiots.

An aside about Swing revivals: Joe Jackson's "Jumping Jive" is a top-notch tribute to the Great(TM) Louis Jordan, a jazz-swing-blues player from the 40's and '50's who was, IMO, the first rock 'n' roller. Even young whippersnappers might recognize some of his tunes: "choo choo ch'boogie" gum commercial" "Conjunction junction" from Schoolhouse rock are but two examples.


From: Never Never Land | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
pogge
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posted 01 August 2003 02:05 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sisyphus:
As a musician of sorts, I listen to players and try to steal anything not nailed down .


You're not stealing, you're paying homage. It sounds much better when you put it that way.


From: Why is this a required field? | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 01 August 2003 03:08 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
You're not stealing, you're paying homage. It sounds much better when you put it that way.

I love it!

TS Eliot said something like "Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal." I've always liked that, for some reason.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
pogge
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posted 01 August 2003 03:17 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ironically enough, I just stumbled across this joke:

Q: How many lead guitarists does it take to change a light bulb?

A: None--they just steal somebody else's light.

I found it here. But he's just a bass player so what does he know?

[ 01 August 2003: Message edited by: Slim ]


From: Why is this a required field? | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 01 August 2003 03:43 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ah, class spleen among bandmates! Drummers probably tell bass-player jokes. And everyone tells lead-singer jokes.

He has some good ones:

quote:
How many Deadheads does it take to change a lightbulb?
12,001. One to change it, 2,000 to record the event and take pictures of it, and 10,000 to follow it around until it burns out.

From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sisyphus
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posted 01 August 2003 04:09 PM      Profile for Sisyphus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
From a guitar-player pal :

What's the difference between a drummer and a drum-machine?

You only have to puch the song information into a drum machine once!

*silence*

*tapping foot*


*silence*

Where's my snare and high-hat ????

Oh, right.


From: Never Never Land | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 01 August 2003 04:09 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks for the review, FBI. We could see just enough on TV to suspect that the right person would have just that kind of fun -- and you did!

quote:
I want to do it again next year.

What a good idea. Can you face getting in touch with Dennis Mills to start him up in that direction? I would go -- especially if you'll be guide, you and/or rob dot.

Swing: If you ever need music for someone who is beyond words and cannot take agitation (goodbye much classical music), swing is ideal. Even when it's exciting (Swing Swing), it's mellow -- and the mellow stuff (Glen Miller), apart from being suitably mellow for those who need that, can be mathematically fascinating for the more hyped-up.
What is the name of the song I'm remembering right now, Moonlight something? Listen to it, and try tracking the instruments that head up, the ones that head down. Very trippy.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
pogge
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posted 01 August 2003 04:29 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
What is the name of the song I'm remembering right now, Moonlight something? Listen to it, and try tracking the instruments that head up, the ones that head down. Very trippy.

Moonlight Serenade?


From: Why is this a required field? | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 01 August 2003 05:36 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rick Salutin weighs in ... and he favours the Stones
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
micah/imc
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posted 01 August 2003 09:27 PM      Profile for micah/imc        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm in BC and we are really hurting with the softwood lumber dispute, there are fisheries problems,the asian markets are down ,and we have a really brutal govt. Needless to say, our GDP shows the lowest growth in Canada, our unemployment is higher than the national average, we're have a deficit of nearly 4 billion thanks to tax cuts, and things are harsh in lotus land. We need a fundraiser as much as TO esp for the increasing numbers of homeless people and there will be more in April of 2004 when thousands are cut off welfare for good( yeah, there is a two year time limit on welfare in BC, now. it's against the charter, but who says the Liberals care about int'l standards or rights and freedoms as they follow neo liberal dogman like george bush's ranchhands). I saw the CBC clips of the concert and thought it was embarassing because it was very poorly done--as in why am I seeing this dude announcer talk to women with tits, teeth and ass to kill time when they said they would broadcast the concert? to the point, i didn't think to needed a concert, i think it was on a military base and there wasn't a theme except to get business booming in to so that it is a far cry from woodstock. not only that, but my cousin went to the concert with her mum and who wants to attend a concert with their parents? stones are fossils and it shows and they only want money--mick's voice sux and keith richards looks like he should be permanently in rehab. the music sucked except for that brave chick, kathleen edwards, who seemed really authentic and ac/dc are rock n roll for such a large venue.
people are still dying of sars in to and we thought who was right to put to on the hitlist out this way. it didn't look as if to or ontario or health canada knew what they were doing and three health authorities didn't look as if they wanted the responsibility of sars.
why have a concert? is a concert like a food bank or something? why can't the govt,the unions and others do what they are supposed to do?
no, this was a stupid and embarassing event and the people at to needed to be in montreal protesting the wto, instead of toking, tanning and showing off tits.

From: BC | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Flowers By Irene
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posted 02 August 2003 03:29 AM      Profile for Flowers By Irene     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't see anything wrong with toking, tanning, and showing off tits. Especially at this kind of event. Everyone needs to just rock n roll sometimes. Sure SARStock was übercommercial, but hey, what can you do? And its not like no money from this event is going to health & hospitality workers in T.O, (I thought maybe more should be donated, but I didn't get a say in the matter.)

Anyway, if something like this were to be held in Vancouver or anywhere in BC next year, (or next week) I'd go. No question, I'd go (I would think a different lineup would be needed though.)I need to get out to the left coast sometime anyway. 'Twould be the perfect excuse.


Also, for those complaining about the TV coverage, perhaps you just shoulda shelled out the $21.50 eh? Besides, I hear a DVD of the concert is upcoming.


From: "To ignore the facts, does not change the facts." -- Andy Rooney | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
natas
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posted 02 August 2003 02:05 PM      Profile for natas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Does anyone else find Salutin's analysis somewhat, er, wanting?
From: Vineland Station, Ontario | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
rosweed
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posted 02 August 2003 07:49 PM      Profile for rosweed   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As a 52 year old now living in America, permit me some observations after reading this whole thread. First, it's only rock n roll, but I like. To give it any more weight than that is a waste of time. Or a lifelong job a la Greil Marcus. You saw the THE STONES for 20 bucks. If you didn't want to go or watch it, why did you? If you did go, why complain? As for the lines for everything, well, ever been to a Yankees game at the stadium? Same for the prices. If you truly expected a show like that to be the solution to all of Toronto's (and Canada's) problems, welcome to Kansas, Toto. And what's wrong with tits, anyway? If they wanna show 'em, I'm gonna look at 'em. A great time was had by anyone who wanted to have a great time, I'm sure. Wish I could've been there.

Shawn
www.medhatcom.com


From: Brooklyn NY | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
5strings
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posted 03 August 2003 01:05 AM      Profile for 5strings     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Greedstock - July 30/03

I congratulate a half million people who came, & Dennis Mills, Sen. Grafstein, Michael Cohl, Rolling stones, other bands, and for the organizers and police who backed off in the last week and half, and the perfect weather.

We watched the concert on CBC and we could see the huge success in it all coming together in a short time - maybe this could work as well as it did in TO, because TO seems to have some sort of sublimated 'cool' that the stones recognized a long time ago, and it translated into this massive cool.

But what I thought was uncool for the most part, but interesting, was Benmergui, particularly when he was questioning Mills & Grafstein, about the money aspect of the event. He looked like he was fishing for more than the 'philanthropic' view. They awkwardly spun it back to 'it's not about the money'.

But I ask myself, if one of the main objectives was to help other biz's that are particularly dependent on tourism that are suffering, such as ours (artists), how did Molsons arrive at the decision to knowingly encumber us at the last minute with difficult conditions, and one condition that was impossible: no vehicles within 4 km of the park leaving vendors to walk in their setups and 'merch'. (posted previously elsewhere on babble) And considering that Charlotte Creamer's Arts Marketplace vendors were included from the very beginning before Molsons participated when it was to be a free concert, why couldn't Molsons have the generosity of spirit to let sleeping dogs lie? It is obviously not the competition for the buck, as other major corporate players such as the GAP were rented the green flag by Molsons. And did Molsons require them no vehicular access with in 4 km too?

Other than the natural knee-jerk survivalist, kick to your groin that is the corporate mindset, they could have seen the the negative reaction it would generate had anyone in their employ had half a brain. As it was, the shit did hit the fan and they still decided to cancel all concessions and give nothing to anybody, other than themselves and band merch, granted that percentages went to part of the cause.

Of the inventory I made up in the last few weeks for the show, (albeit I have it to sell at other shows) I was forced to give up one of the greatest possible income sources for the year, but also the promotion that would generate many sales, custom orders, and commissions, which as artists is crucial, not to mention one being part of an historic occaision.

Sour grapes you say? Not at all. Flat beer!

My consolation was that I was able to tape the CBC show, with all it's faults, but must have some kind of collector value, and the Q107 audio to rock out to anytime I want.

Psssst...Anyone want to buy a bootleg?


From: Totoland | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
rabble-rouser
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posted 04 August 2003 08:31 PM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
well......it's official. I was going to post this on the weekend, but I was at the cottage.

I caught Bronchitis at the SARS concert. I found it kind of amusing that I caught a virus at a rock concert dedicated to a virus.

Anyways, having liquids and perscription pills that upset my stomach. Nothing too big.


From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
marcy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3562

posted 05 August 2003 07:56 PM      Profile for marcy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not an elitist but I find it incomprehensible that people (any people) still think the stones are worth listening to. They were entertaining the first time I saw them - along with 2,000 other 12 year olds - in 1964 at the Forum in Vancouver. They were o.k. the second time I saw them a year later at the Agrodome (a most suitable environment, as they soon proved they had the politics of pigs) and by the third go round at a larger and more stupid venue (also at the PNE grounds) they made me yawn. For some reason, they kept playing the same song, only with different words. Can anyone out there explain why? At least Bill Wyman had the good sense to leave just before he turned 64 and write books on archaeology, an obviously relevant topic. As I understand it, they got paid for this gig and have never, ever done anything charitable in their careers. Before the Iron Lady's demise, Jerry Hall and Mick were great fans, the lovely Jerry avowing her dedication to British Conservative politics all the while. Oops, sorry if I wrongly malign Mick - naw - his politics are even worse now, even if he is no longer sort of married to Jerry. What a treat it was a couple of weeks ago to listen to a dynamite CBC radio interview with Bob Geldof (former Georgia Strait employee) and to see Bianca Jagger kick the shit out of Ron Silver on CNN about the Iraq war question. She was more articulate than the interviewer. Now those are admirable pop culture icons. But "the stones" - ugh - they creep me out. I was out in the bush, 90 kilometres from electricity when the concert was on, but everyone I've talked to here (Lotus Land) said it sucked. Oh well, too bad the Clash (now there was a meaningful band) can never be reconstituted. Spanish Bombs would have been a great way to vanquish SARS.
From: vancouver | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 13 October 2003 05:53 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
but, you know, the stones did SARS-stock because they love toronto so much, and they really care about how hard we were hit by SARS.

Fury over Hong Kong SARS concert fiasco, BBC, Oct 12

quote:
Politicians and residents in Hong Kong have attacked a Sars benefit concert season for turning into a "fiasco" after the Rolling Stones pulled out.

The band withdrew from a gig, part of the month-long HK$80m (£6.2m) series, in a dispute over the contract and fee.

There has been anger at reports that foreign stars had been offered big fees from taxpayers' money while local acts were treated as "side dishes".

The series of shows from 17 October to 9 November was planned to boost morale and tourism in the territory, which was crippled when 299 people died in the Sars outbreak earlier this year.



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 13 October 2003 01:06 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Do Hells Angels still take care of security at Stones' concerts?

"I was there, in a rocking chair...
...Pleased to meet you..."


The Stones never caught on in Scotland.

"Hey, McCloud, get offa my ewe."


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
windymustang
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4509

posted 13 October 2003 01:46 PM      Profile for windymustang     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey al-Qa'bong, you break me up, hee,hee,hee
From: from the locker of Mad Mary Flint | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged

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