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Author Topic: What're you reading NOW?
audra trower williams
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posted 27 June 2001 03:48 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Stiffed, by Susan Faludi. I like reading it out loud to people, and talking to them about it. It makes me think more, and not just woosh through it, half in daydreams.
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 27 June 2001 04:17 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Inherit the Wind.

There's an absolutely classic line from it, by Henry Drummond:

"And how do you know that God didn't spake to Charles Darwin?"

I love it every time I hear it being said by Spencer Tracy in the 1960 movie.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 27 June 2001 04:17 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Idoru by William Gibson.

My next book will probably be Less Than Zero by Bret Easton Ellis.


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
sean s.
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posted 27 June 2001 04:18 PM      Profile for sean s.   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
The Oxford History of the Roman World
From: montreal | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
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posted 27 June 2001 05:01 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
My course material. When I'm not "babbling". Sigh.

But luckily that material is pretty interesting. Just read a fantastic early feminist article by Olive Schreiner which would make an excellent dramatic reading. It's from "Women and Labour", and her basic thesis was that when men of her time said that women should be content to be "divine child bearers" due to their delicacy and let men do the labouring, they only felt that way when it was well-paid, male-dominated jobs that women wanted - they didn't seem to think women's "delicacy" excluded them from back-breaking work like washing clothing (by hand then), being a maid, landlady (carrying coal up and down stairs), and doing all the heavy work around the house.

It is one of the most satirical pieces I've read from turn of the century writing. Example:

quote:
Should his landlady, now about to give birth to her ninth child, send him up a poorly-cooked dinner or forget to bring up his scuttle of coal, does he send for her and thus apostrophize the astonished matron: "Child-bearer of the race! Producer of men! Cannor you be contented with so noble and lofty a function in life without toiling and moiling? Why carry up heavy coal-scuttles from the cellar and bend over hot fires, wearing out nerve and muscle that should be reserved for higher duties? We, we men of the race, will perform its mean, its sordid, its grinding toil! For woman is beauty, peace, repose! Your function is to give life, not to support it by labor. The Mother, the Mother! How wonderful it sounds! Toil no more! Rest is for you; labor and drudgery for us!"

The rest of the article is similar. I went into hysterics when I first read it.

[ June 27, 2001: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jared
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posted 27 June 2001 06:20 PM      Profile for Jared     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just finished Adbusters founder Kalle Lasn's "Culture Jam: The Uncooling Of America." It's basically a compendium of the ideas found in the magazine, with equal parts corporate expose, jammers guide and personal manifesto. Lasn has some good ideas (he's the orchestrator of TV Turnoff Week and Buy Nothing Day for those not in the know), but is overly idealistic. He visualizes a vast change in the societal landscape by 2003 - hell, I'd just be happy if boy bands and those stupid Adidas anger-rock groups have attained their inevitable laughingstock status by then. Still, I'd recommend it. For one thing, it's a fairly quick read. For another, parts of it got a rise out of me, which is one of my criteria for a worthwhile book.
From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 27 June 2001 06:31 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Ok, I pretty much stumbled on this almost by accident. But I'm glad I did. I spent over 6 hours (I *think*) reading this from beginning to end. Warning: It's rather deep reading.

"Oswiecim"*

* Yes, that is the Polish name for Auschwitz-Birkenau.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 28 June 2001 10:09 AM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
I'm waiting for Culture Jam (and No Logo for that matter) to hit the bargain bins before I pick them up.
From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dawna Matrix
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posted 28 June 2001 01:07 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
mediaboy - don't bother with Less than Zero - American Psycho is where it's at with Ellis.
From: the stage on cloud 9 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 28 June 2001 01:11 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
I kinda like to make up my own mind about what books I want to read.
From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dawna Matrix
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posted 28 June 2001 01:21 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
It's just not as good, thassal.
From: the stage on cloud 9 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
writeaboutit
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posted 28 June 2001 07:16 PM      Profile for writeaboutit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm reading "Nobrow" by the New Yorker's John Seabrook. It looks at "the culture of marketing and the marketing of culture." It's great, if you're into media studies. It looks at everything from Magazine reputations, MTV, designer clothing, and generational differences in the context of how culture sells.
From: Guelph | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
John Hansen
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posted 29 June 2001 02:28 PM      Profile for John Hansen     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"Take the Cannoli" by Sarah Vowell. Very thoughtful and funny collection of her essays
about America. Just finished a book by her friend David Rakoff, "Fraud." - EXTREMELY funny collection of essays and articles.
I'm probably going to finally get around to reading "No Logo." next.

From: Saint John | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dawna Matrix
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posted 29 June 2001 05:30 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Disco 2000, edited and compiled by Sarah Champion. It's got Grant Morrison and Douglas Coupland...(follow the crumbs to a good book). It's all stories from the last hours of 1999.
From: the stage on cloud 9 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 29 June 2001 05:33 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
That DOES sound good.

Have you read "Ecstacy Club" by Douglas Rushkoff? Really good. Really f'ed up too. It's written in the first person, and the narrator is less and less sure of what's real as the book goes on so, in turn, the reader is less and less sure of what's real.


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Brodie
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posted 30 June 2001 06:01 AM      Profile for Brodie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I just finished reading For Whom The Bell Tolls for the first time and I was totally blown-away.

Of the Hemingway's I've read so far, it is the best.


From: Victoria, BC | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 01 July 2001 02:43 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well I just finished reading a very good book in the Open Media Pamphlets Series from Seven Stories Press:

Seven Stories Press

It's called "Globalizing Civil Society" by David Korten:

Globalizing Civil Society

It's a condensation of his book When Corporations Rule the World, and it very lucidly outlines the ethos of the anti-global-capital movements without resort to hysteria or hyperbole. It's one of the best little things I've read recently. I'll try to summarize it tomorrow, though, since it's already quite compact, this will be hard. The one and only thing I'll say right off the bat is that there is an inexcusable number of typos, like 12 in a very tiny book (octavo?) of 74 pages. One of them is quite serious, bottom of page 15 "one third of one percent of the world population" has become "one third of the world population", which I fear is the work of an overzealous copy-editor.


In other news, I am right now listening to very poignant 1950's archival recordings of Faiyaz Khan, my favourite singer of classical Indian music, and my heart is aching for India


[edited to remove --eek!-- a plural verb agreeing with "number"]

[on second thought -- "a number of them is coming tonight" -- that don't sound too good, do it?]

[ July 01, 2001: Message edited by: rasmus_raven ]


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dawna Matrix
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posted 03 July 2001 01:54 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I've gotta raise an old fave, VURT by Jeff Noon. I like the concept of a drug trip that can be co-experienced by tickling the back of your throat with a feather. If everyone takes a tickle, you all join each other in a virtual reality. The only bad (good?) thing is is that you forget your real life, so that if you trip too long, your body wastes away. Also, if one person pulls out of the trip by being 'haunted' by their real life, everyone gets pulled out with him/her.
I seem to get that feeling of haunting without the use of feathers or other illegal substances...weird, huh?

From: the stage on cloud 9 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
markhoffchaney
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posted 03 July 2001 04:09 PM      Profile for markhoffchaney     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Rules for Radicals by Saul Alinsky.

I'm waiting for the library to call with a copy of Love in the Time of Cholera.


From: winnipeg | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jared
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posted 04 July 2001 09:25 PM      Profile for Jared     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I just finished this wickedly funny book called "Red Lobster, White Trash, and The Blue Lagoon" by a guy named Joe Queenan. The gist of the book is that this self-proclaimed "highbrow" spends a year partaking in what I guess he would consider "lowbrow" Americana such as Joan Collins books, Michael Bolton records and Atlantic City. Some of it is so cynical and mean-spirited that I felt honestly guilty for laughing. My guilt was somewhat placated by the fact that I hate "highbrow" culture as much as "lowbrow." (I think 'brows are a bunch of shit; culture should be free to flourish outside classification and exclusion).

A book that I'm starting (and have been looking forward to for a while) is titled "Way Out There In The Blue" by Frances Fitzgerald. It's this fairly recent Reagan bio. As a veteran of a couple of previous Bonzo tomes, I'm still looking for any semblence of method behind the madness.

I also picked up "White Teeth" by Zadie Smith, that much ballyhooed first-novel that beat out Margaret Atwood for some award a time back. Too bad that I can't get some kind of reverse restraining order with book and record stores; stay at least 100 metres away at all times. At least I wouldn't be broke all the time.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 04 July 2001 10:28 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Jared, if I sit on your feet will that help?

*Meows*


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dawna Matrix
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posted 05 July 2001 03:59 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Today and yesterday, plowed through a great book 'Going Down Swinging' by Billie Livingston. 'Canadiana' everyone, and Dr.C will be sure to love the cover, a kitten in a martini glass.

Concentrates on the lives of a single mother and her two daughters from separate marriages. Alcoholism, familial abuse, hypoglycemia, etc. The best parts are written from the view of the eight year old daughter Grace. Not exactly cheerful, but kind of cathartic.


From: the stage on cloud 9 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jared
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posted 05 July 2001 09:52 PM      Profile for Jared     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
There's a zine called Punk Planet (www.punkplanet.com) that I want to give a plug to. Yes, some of it deals with punk music, which may not be your cup of tea (it's one of mine though ), but there is also large sections on activism and all things DIY. For instance, the May/June ish has an interesting cover story titled "Become The Media: Reference Guide To A Revolution." There's also a great interview with Howard Zinn in which he mainly gripes about Bush The Sequel. And, except for independent record labels, it's ad free!

[ July 05, 2001: Message edited by: Jared ]


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
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posted 06 July 2001 05:18 AM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Global Showdown by Maude Barlow and Tony Clark. Has anyone read the book co-written by Jeneane Gorofolo (sp) and Ben Stiller? It's called "Feel this book" and it's a mock-self help book. quite funny, but that could just be my lack of maturity speaking
From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dawna Matrix
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posted 06 July 2001 11:33 AM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Just read about it yesterday in the star.

Am now reading 'the Bear Went Over the Mountain', by William Kotzwinkle. Very funny, dry humour.


From: the stage on cloud 9 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Croesus_Krept
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posted 08 July 2001 08:37 AM      Profile for Croesus_Krept   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm reading "The Temper of a Man" by Catherine Drinker Bowen, and it is a brief but intriguing biography of Francis Bacon, thinker and statesman... (It could be more detailed, especially as it makes no attempt to detail how his thought developed....)

I am also reading the Footprint guide to India, and have too little time. Somebody take away my DVD machine... Too much crap and no good movies in the shop... America has arrived everywhere, hoo, hoo... Wait and see.

Croesus


P.s.:

Somebody go back and take me apart in the thread about funding - I need a canadian woman or an american woman to talk to - otherwise I'll forget how bitchy you all are... Actually, it would be nice to meet a deaf-mute blonde at the nightclub... But I suppose I'll keep looking for a new color to paint myself with...

[ July 08, 2001: Message edited by: Croesus_Krept ]


From: Taiwan | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 08 July 2001 12:03 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Is that Croesus Krept or Croesus Kreep? Your first posts didn't bother me but the last two, this one and the quiz one, do. Would you mind keeping your poor taste to yourself? So far we've been lucky here.

Thanks.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
prowsej
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posted 09 July 2001 03:21 AM      Profile for prowsej   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I read the first 50 pages of Linda McQuaig's "Shooting The Hippo". That was as much as I could stand of her writing style. I desire more of a factual basis in my readings rather than her quasi-factual semi-narative. Not recommended reading.
From: Ottawa ON | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 09 July 2001 04:44 AM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
I read the first 50 pages of Linda McQuaig's "Shooting The Hippo". That was as much as I could stand of her writing style. I desire more of a factual basis in my readings rather than her quasi-factual semi-narative. Not recommended reading.

It's not that bad, honestly. Yes, it's a bit of a "hump" to get over in the first chunk of the book, but once you're over that W5 bit with Malling, it's a can't-put-the-damn-thing-down, and the same thing is true for her Cult of Impotence book, which was a real epiphany for me, because I until then had no idea that we could control capital flows without extremely draconian measures.

Incidentally, I just finished two excellent books - IBM and the Holocaust, which documents the close connections between the IBM upper echelons and its European subsidiaries during the 1930s and 1940s, to the point of being a willing supplier of sophisticated (for the time) punch-card sorting and collating technology to Nazi Germany.

The other book was Imagine Democracy by Judy Rebick, which has some excellent ideas. It reads a bit like a more erudite version of Sam Smith's Great American Political Repair Manual (ISBN # 0393316270) which has similar criticisms about the way politics tends to be rigged for the benefit of those in the system rather than out of it, and has a whole chapter devoted to why first-past-the-post and related electoral issues need to be fixed.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
prowsej
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posted 09 July 2001 06:25 AM      Profile for prowsej   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
It's not that bad, honestly. Yes, it's a bit of a "hump" to get over in the first chunk of the book, but once you're over that W5 bit with Malling, it's a can't-put-the-damn-thing-down, and the same thing is true for her Cult of Impotence book, which was a real epiphany for me, because I until then had no idea that we could control capital flows without extremely draconian measures.

I guess I had rather high expectations for "Shooting the Hippo." I also got the Cult of Impotency and I'm liking it rather more.

quote:
Incidentally, I just finished two excellent books - IBM and the Holocaust, which documents the close connections between the IBM upper echelons and its European subsidiaries during the 1930s and 1940s, to the point of being a willing supplier of sophisticated (for the time) punch-card sorting and collating technology to Nazi Germany.

I remember hearing the author of that book interviewed on CBC. One thing that I remember from the interview was that Nazi involvement was common with many large American corporations.

From: Ottawa ON | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Thandiwe
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posted 11 July 2001 08:49 PM      Profile for Thandiwe   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I had to wade through a lot of new-age babble, but I just finished The Legacy of Luna by Julia Hill. It's a quick read, but a good story, and was a unique window into west coast environmental activism, something I knew little about. Hill is an admirable woman.
From: Winnipeg | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 11 July 2001 09:46 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I thought "Shooting the Hippo" quite readable.

I've interupted my reading of Casanova's autobiography, as a lady friend has sent me "At Home With the Marquis de Sade" by Francine du Plessix Gray.

I remember being bored to tears by my grade ten teacher who taught the pre and post Revolutionary France.

Quite a freakin' trick that is, making the era of the French Revolution boring.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 12 July 2001 09:48 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
du Plessix Gray is one terrific writer, yes, Tommy P? She's one of my favourites -- I'd read her grocery lists if she published them. Are you enjoying the book?

It's amazin', isn't it, that schools (university lit courses, too) have managed to make pre-revolutionary France seem boring. I share your fascination with that great glorious mess -- we gotta recruit, eh?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 12 July 2001 01:05 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Yes, I find her very readable, and I've got to find some truly distraction free chunk of time to savour both the information and the prose.

I don't think there is any danger of running out of reading material on this period of time. I've still got to read Casanova yet, and more of Voltaire. I find Rousseau tedious, I am afraid. And, besides his first and second Innaugural Address, I've not read much by or of Jefferson, either.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
guy cybershy
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posted 12 July 2001 04:00 PM      Profile for guy cybershy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I just finished "The ingeniuty gap", by Thomas Homer-Dixon was completely captivated. Insightful, intriguing and uplifting!
From: Calgary | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dustin
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posted 12 July 2001 06:21 PM      Profile for Dustin     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hi, I'm new here. Please feel free to welcome me aboard.

My present reading selection is a bit low-brow: it's HP#4, or Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. I wanted to see what all the hype was about with respect to J.K.Rowling's so-called insightful, provocative children's writing.

The truth is, it's quite an engaging book. I don't think it's the best book for young people I've ever read, but I certainly appreciate what she's trying to do. These books seem to get kids reading too, which is never a bad thing. (Bad TV, bad.)

I don't usually read much fiction, though. Is anybody reading any books about spirituality right now? Do you like, and why?


From: Nova Scotia | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 12 July 2001 06:33 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hi Dustin, welcome aboard!
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dawna Matrix
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posted 16 July 2001 12:44 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Welcome Dustin. We need your name, identification number, how many eggs you've eaten in the last week and your favourite colour. After that you'll need to demonstrate your sanity.

I'm reading If On a Winter's Night a Traveler by Italo Calvino. I bought it because of a quote that a friend had copied in a notebook. Right now it is frustratingly slow...as spokenword artist Jem Rolls says, the post-modernist always knocks twice...


From: the stage on cloud 9 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 16 July 2001 12:51 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hi, Dustin -- I think we've already met.

Dawna, if Winter's Night continues slow for you, I bet you would get a faster Calvino kick from a little paperback story collection of his called Cosmicomics. The main character is a little guy called qfwfq, who has been around since the Big Bang (as, in theory, we all have been). Each of the stories is supposed to dramatize a theory in C20 theoretical physics -- no no, don't run: it really is great great fun. And ole qfwfq really does become compelling. Well -- you get fond of him.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 16 July 2001 12:55 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
skdadl: Got an ISBN for that? Been too long since this chemist-boy brushed up on modern physics (which is what we scientists pompously term 20th/21st-Century physics )
From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 16 July 2001 01:15 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
DrC: My edition says:

Calvino, Italo. Cosmicomics. 1965 (Italian). 1968 (hardcover English). New York: Harvest/Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1976 (1st pb). ISBN 0-15-622600-6 (the pb, I should think).


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 17 July 2001 05:13 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
No Logo. Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives. The Bible (no kidding! some of that stuff is seriously warped!). Best American Erotica 2000, ed. Susie Bright.

What can I say? I'm a Gemini.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 17 July 2001 05:33 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I like that Hitler and Stalin one by Alan Bullock, incidentally.
From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 17 July 2001 06:12 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Grim reading, H & S, but endlessly fascinating. I particularly like Bullock's constant reminders of contingency -- things could have turned out differently, although (wisely) he doesn't waste much space on specific might-have-beens. So far, anyway (I'm maybe 250 pages in).

The last photographs of Hitler, inspecting a unit of the Hitler Youth in April 1945, I found remarkable. He's patting a boy's cheek, even smiling. I couldn't help myself -- the adjective "grandfatherly" came to mind.

Incidentally, I'm even newer here than Dustin. My first day and all. A big shout out to y'all, as the wigger kids say (don't they?)


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 17 July 2001 06:15 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Nah, that's the southerners. Anyway, hullo to you, and glad to see your comments.

One thing I read somewhere is that Hitler and Stalin often had pictures taken of themselves with children as a way of "humanizing" them to their people.

I think it's somewhat... icky, but I guess it worked or they wouldn't have done it.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 17 July 2001 07:01 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
One thing I read somewhere is that Hitler and Stalin often had pictures taken of themselves with children as a way of "humanizing" them to their people.

Of course. (Another picture in the book shows a five-year-old Svetlana, Stalin's daughter, playing on Beria's knee while Stalin himself works diligently in the background). And I'm not saying it worked on me, just that it's one of those photographs a person might pause over.

I suppose even in 1945, with total collapse imminent, the great alimentary canal that brought Germany so much Nazi propaganda was still squeezing out a few last nuggets.


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Liam McCarthy
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posted 17 July 2001 07:44 PM      Profile for Liam McCarthy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
That reminds of a poster my English teacher had up in his classroom. It was a drawing of Lenin beside a christmas tree handing out gifts to adoring children.
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Marsin
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posted 17 July 2001 10:03 PM      Profile for Marsin   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Does everyone read such heavy stuff all the time? Try Janet Evanovitch, Paul Doherty, Rohinton Mistry, Barbara Kingsolver and lighten up.
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Trisha
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posted 18 July 2001 02:38 AM      Profile for Trisha     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm relaxing with the latest Clive Cussler. He only gets better as time goes on.
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'lance
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posted 18 July 2001 12:23 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Does everyone read such heavy stuff all the time? Try Janet Evanovitch, Paul Doherty,Rohinton Mistry, Barbara Kingsolver and lighten up.

Well, you're right, of course. I spent June reading almost nothing but Terry Pratchett novels. Now, *he's* brilliant. I'm beginning to think he's even wittier and funnier than Douglas Adams.


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Dawna Matrix
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posted 18 July 2001 02:02 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Okay, the Italo Calvino was an utter waste of my time. I am now almost through THE BIRDS, a play by Gwendolyn MacEwan. Lotsof fun.
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Dawna Matrix
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posted 18 July 2001 07:55 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
MM. Just finished the play THE BIRDS. Much better reading than the Italo Calvino. Next? A collection of bits and pieces of Jack Kerouac's stuff. Back to the old standbys.
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alldaybreakfast
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posted 19 July 2001 02:59 PM      Profile for alldaybreakfast     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
It might be hard to find, but I highly recommend The Age of Uncertainty by John Kenneth Galbraith.

The first half is a short history of capitalism. The second half goes all over the place, but it's mostly a lament about the rise of global corporate power -- and the book was written in 1979! It's refreshing to read an Establishment economist considering the possibility that the mainstream of his field might be seriously misguided.

I guess right-wing economics wasn't a religion yet... I wonder how Galbraith would view today's world? I doubt if he's still around; does anyone know?

[ July 19, 2001: Message edited by: alldaybreakfast ]


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andrean
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posted 19 July 2001 03:24 PM      Profile for andrean     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I read almost exclusively fiction (far more believable than the real world) and just finished Alistair MacLeod's 'No Great Mischief' which was excellent.

I'm grudgingly making my way through 'The Last Samurai' by Helen de Witt, which is a little too self-concsiously clever for my liking, but I'm assured that it improves.

And, 'cause I'm planning to go back to school next year and figured I should start training my brain with some academic reading, I'm making my slow-but-sure way through 'Looking Like What You Are: Sexual Style, Race and Lesbian Identity' by Lisa Walker. It's fairly heavily theoretical but is also an interesting analysis of the construction of 'femme-dom' (and a bit of a comfort for those of us who are never recognized for what we are ).


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'lance
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posted 19 July 2001 03:41 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
It might be hard to find, but I highly recommend The Age of Uncertainty by John Kenneth Galbraith.

The first half is a short history of capitalism. The second half goes all over the place, but it's mostly a lament about the rise of global corporate power -- and the book was written in 1979! It's refreshing to read an Establishment economist considering the possibility that the mainstream of his field might be seriously misguided.

I guess right-wing economics wasn't a religion yet... I wonder how Galbraith would view today's world? I doubt if he's still around; does anyone know?


Galbraith's still with us, bless him. He's getting on, though (born 1908).

Here's a good link:

John Kenneth Galbraith

He's always been an iconoclast, from The Affluent Society (1957) on. But I think most of his books are still in print. If your local library doesn't have any of them, run away!

You can tell a worthwhile thinker by the nature of hir enemies. Here's the view from the hard right:

Galbraith sucks eggs

[ July 19, 2001: Message edited by: freelance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 19 July 2001 05:00 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
alldaybreakfast, if you want some vintage Galbraith fun, find his little book about growing up in southwestern Ontario called The Scotch. Once you start to twig to the dry, very dry wit, you'll laugh all the way through.

andrean, have you seen MacLeod's two story collections? If you liked the novel, you'll be blown away by some of those stories. I think he's even better at that length.

To the Hitler/Stalin/WWII enthusiasts: What do y'all think of Shirer? Every once in a while, when I need a WWII fix, I pull out my old pb (so old and well-thumbed that it's now in about four separate pieces -- cheap spine) and get fascinated all over again. I'm sure he's all kinds of outdated, but it's a virtuoso performance all the same, yes? Have you read his Berlin Diary?

[ July 19, 2001: Message edited by: skdadl ]


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'lance
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posted 19 July 2001 05:18 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I wouldn't say I was an enthusiast (although I was fascinated by the David Irving trial, and watched a great Nova documentary on it last night). But I love Shirer. Haven't read him in years, though.

I'm planning to buy MacLeod's book(s) as a birthday present for my mother, a coal miner's daughter (though from Springhill, not Cape Breton).

Speaking of Cape Breton, I finally read Fall on Your Knees, which I loved. My mater had a funny story about that... someone in her book club dismissed it as "trash," because of the plot I guess. Mum just shrugged and said, "It's Cape Breton. Odd things happen there."


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skdadl
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posted 19 July 2001 05:33 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Springhill turns up in one of the stories, at least one -- sorry, I forget now which one, but each of those collections is such a slim volume that the pair would make a nice gift. MacLeod's characters are on the road a lot, of course. The last story in The Lost Salt Gift of Blood, "The Road to Rankin's Point," just never goes away from me -- I think it's one of the greatest stories I've ever read.

Still have to get to Fall on Your Knees m'self -- thanks for the recommendation.


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'lance
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posted 19 July 2001 06:09 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Anne Marie Macdonald is a gifted playwright, as well. I saw Goodnight Desdemona, Good Morning Juliet a few years ago in Victoria, and can recommend that. I think it was recently re-mounted in Toronto.

And of course she has a nice comic turn as a frazzled bookstore owner in Better than Chocolate.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Marsin
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posted 19 July 2001 09:31 PM      Profile for Marsin   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Thank you nFreelance, I am greatly relieved! I've just started Shauna Singh Baldwin's What the Body Remembers. It is a family epic which takes place in India of the 30's. Wonderful prose.
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Jared
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posted 19 July 2001 09:50 PM      Profile for Jared     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I have never actually seen "Goodnight Desdemona, Good Morning Juliet" performed, but it's certainly one of the funniest plays I've ever read.

Seeing as I'm already blabbing about drama, I recently reread Guillermo Verdecchia's one man play "Fronteras Americanas." It's alternately poignant and hilarious, and I heart anything that cleverly mocks societal stereotypes/cliches.

[ July 19, 2001: Message edited by: Jared ]


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'lance
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posted 20 July 2001 12:51 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Thank you nFreelance, I am greatly relieved! I've just started Shauna Singh Baldwin's What the Body Remembers. It is a family epic which takes place in India of the 30's. Wonderful prose.

Dunno why you'd be relieved, but you're welcome. And that's 'lance to my friends .

I haven't read What the Body Remembers, but I heard it read out on CBC Radio. Sounded really good.

Perth, eh? I grew up in Renfrew, and my parents and brother still live in Arnprior. When I toured the Valley with my wife last Thanksgiving we had lunch in Perth.

I've been away a long time. Can you recommend any good Valley writers?

[ July 20, 2001: Message edited by: freelance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 20 July 2001 05:40 AM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
To the Hitler/Stalin/WWII enthusiasts: What do y'all think of Shirer? Every once in a while, when I need a WWII fix, I pull out my old pb (so old and well-thumbed that it's now in about four separate pieces -- cheap spine) and get fascinated all over again. I'm sure he's all kinds of outdated, but it's a virtuoso performance all the same, yes? Have you read his Berlin Diary?

I like. Mr. Shirer is quite good, IMHO.

I read the Berlin Diaries some time ago. I particularly loved the way he, in several places, compares the crowds listening to Hitler speak, as well as Nazis in the Reichstag, to the "Holy Rollers".


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chatnoir
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posted 20 July 2001 04:19 PM      Profile for chatnoir     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Was that Ann-Marie Macdonald in Better Than Chocolate? I had no idea.

I think I may have said it in this forum already, but Fall on Your Knees is my all time favourite book.

I just finished Atwood's latest: The Blind Assassin. I have to say that it's one of her best yet.


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Dawna Matrix
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posted 20 July 2001 04:37 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Are we talking better than Lady Oracle, chatnoir? I am midway through Over an Underwood, a Jack Kerouac collection. It's great. I can just feel my appreciation level of life going up when I read him.
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'lance
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posted 20 July 2001 04:38 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm pretty sure that was AMM in BTC, yes.

Fall on Your Knees is a great choice. Another recent favourite of mine is Fugitive Pieces, by Anne Michaels.

[ July 20, 2001: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pankaj
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posted 21 July 2001 04:45 PM      Profile for Pankaj   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"Ka: Stories of the Mind and Gods of India" by Roberto Calasso (translated from the Italian)

This is one fab, beautifully written book. I've read it a few times and continue to go to it for the sheer beauty of its language as well as its intelligent treatment of the subject.

"Ka", a sanskrit word means "Who?" and this is in reference to the question: " Who is the highest God that we worship?" and the answer is "Ka".


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Michelle
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posted 21 July 2001 07:34 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
I've been away a long time. Can you recommend any good Valley writers?

Well, there's Sweet Valley High...

HAHAHA

Okay, that was dumb. By Valley writers, would you mean Ottawa Valley, or is that a literary term that has eluded me?


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 21 July 2001 09:29 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Speaking of Sweet Valley High, I used to read the novels a lot when I was younger.

I quit back in 1993/4, and since then only sparingly even *try* reading the darn things.

(Don't laugh, please )


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Dawna Matrix
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posted 21 July 2001 10:03 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This is the first time I've heard of a cat reading garbage. I guess you also like to curl your tail around a little VC Andrew's kiddie porn?
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preprecocious
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posted 21 July 2001 11:08 PM      Profile for preprecocious        Edit/Delete Post
Funny, I've been wondering what had happened to Sweet Valley High...I did a net search and apparently they're still going on strong...Anyways, I happened to catch Ann-Marie McDonald in "G-night Desdamona...g-morn Juliet", which was fabulous...I had read some tepid reviews about the show (it's elaborateness?? seemingly was at issue), but I thought it was great...

I'm reading "Labrinyth of Desire" by Rosemary Sullivan, actually I'm trying to finish it...I find it terrible to follow, and I actually have no "desire" to continue...but the reviews rave(?) WHY? I have no idea, it just seems like a useless exercise in addressing "obsessive romantic love", which is ludicrous to those of us who engage in it on a daily basis...I mean write about something I don't know...

Fugitive Pieces, Ann Michaels-Amazing! It's so beautifully written, if you want to read about love...read this...

"The shadow past is shaped by everything that never happened. Invisible, it melts the present like rain through karst. A biography of longing. It steers us like magnetism, a spirt torgue. This is how one becomes undone by a smell, a word, a place, the photo of a mountain of shoes. By love that closes its mouth before calling a name" (17).

That is how one describes love.

Oh, and "Elizabeth and After" by Matt Cohen...LOVED IT...


From: Toronto | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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posted 22 July 2001 12:25 AM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
This is the first time I've heard of a cat reading garbage. I guess you also like to curl your tail around a little VC Andrew's kiddie porn?

I am shocked, I say, shocked, that someone would accuse this pseudofelinoid of prurient intentions.

In all seriousness, since I'm gay, what kind of porn do you think I'd *look* at?

(Clue: Think Matt Damon and go from there)


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Michelle
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posted 22 July 2001 12:40 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I used to read Sweet Valley High too - but that was back in the 80's when the series first began. I think I pretty much gave up at about the 38th book or something (there are, like, hundreds now I believe). But you know, even in my early 20's when I wanted to while away an hour reading trash, one of those old SVH books really came in handy. I would probably still do it occasionally if I hadn't given them all away in a great burst of housecleaning a few years ago. I have no pride. I like trash on occasion. I used to be completely addicted to V.C. Andrews as well, but after she died and every single book that came out afterwards was the same story, different names, I stopped wasting my money. There's only so many incest scenes you can read before they lose their fascination...

Anyone remember The Great Brain books? They were REALLY great. I can't seem to find them these days. I hope they aren't out of print, because when my kid gets a little older I want to buy the whole series for him. They were narrated by the younger brother to the "great brain" - a boy who schemed and connived his way through boyhood and got great rewards (and punishments) for doing so. They were just such a fantastic series. If I could find them, I would buy them just to read by myself. They're by J.D. Fitzgerald.

Edited to say, I found The Great Brain books at Indigo, so I guess they're still in print. And they're not very expensive either!

[ July 22, 2001: Message edited by: Michelle ]


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DrConway
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posted 22 July 2001 05:33 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Michelle, I LOVE those books too!

My fave is "The Great Brain at the Academy". Seeing the Great Brain put one over on students at a Catholic school plus the priests is pretty fun


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Michelle
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posted 22 July 2001 05:45 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
You know, Doc, I don't remember the plot lines from any of them. I just remember the big punishment their parents had for them when they did something wrong - "silent treatment" sentences of varying length. My parents always thought that was horrible, but if you think about the alternatives around the turn of the century (of the "spare the rod, spoil the child type), it seems pretty progressive to me...

I can't wait to read them again when I get enough money to order a few online.


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JayW
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posted 24 July 2001 02:41 AM      Profile for JayW     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
'lance may I suggest anything by Tim Wynne Jones if you are serious about aa valley author?
I am currently reading
dropped threads, WHAT WE ARNE'T TOLD
Dropped threads is a collection of reflections from the Canadian literary community . The authors, women all , talk about that which has amazed them in their lifetimes . Events, behaviours, and incidents that came out of the clear blue and caught them unawares. The dropped threads are the threads in the fabric of womans communication

I have picked this book up and put it down over the last 6 weeks several times. Between lunch breaks with no glasses, to evenings with broken glasses, to camping trips with the wrong glasses some parts have been read and re read and I have skipped from here to there. Yesterday I finally sat down for an hour and began to read from where my book mark was placed forward,the right glasses firmly in place.

The piece I read was " if you can't say anything nice don't say anything at all" by Canadian author, Margaret Atwood. She discussed the roles and attitudes that post-feminist women and more specifically Canadian women authors can be expected to fit into. The need to be good wife , a devoted feminist , to be a counter culture figure, to fit the agenda of the moment. I highly recommend the reading of this essay specifically and this book.

" The fear that dares not speak it's name, for some women these days , is a fear of other women. But you aren't supposed to talk about that : If you can't say anything nice don't say anything at all.

There are many stong voices; there are all kinds Does it make sense to silence women in the name of Women?

quote:


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Trinitty
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posted 02 August 2001 04:53 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Has anyone read Battlefield Earth?

I have some questions


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
verbatim
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posted 02 August 2001 04:59 PM      Profile for verbatim   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
If that's the L. Ron Hubbard book, I question why you're reading it!
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Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 02 August 2001 05:00 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Hey now, Battlefield Earth was written before Hubbard and Heinlein made that little bet about how easy it would be to start a new religion, wasn't it?


I'm currently reading A Clockwork Orange, by the way. These days, I seem to go through books faster than I go through underwear.

[ August 02, 2001: Message edited by: Kneel before MediaBoy ]


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 02 August 2001 05:01 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Uh, yeah, that's the author... what's weird about him other than starting a Church?

Have you read it?


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 02 August 2001 05:05 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
He was a science-fiction writer before he was a cult-leader.

Actually, reading Dianetics with a critical mind is a great way of seeing how to play with people's heads. All Hubbard really did was take everything Freud ever wrote and change all the terms and jargon.

IMHO, of course.


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 02 August 2001 05:06 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
HAVE YOU READ IT?!
From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 02 August 2001 05:10 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
"Are you talkin' to me?" - DeNiro


Sorry, I thought you were asking VT if he'd read it. I haven't read Battlefield Earth. I've never been into that kind of grand "space opera". My sci-fi tastes are limited mostly to Arthur C Clarke and cyberpunk.


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 02 August 2001 05:16 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
HAHA! You crack me up.

Space opera? Pigs in Spaaaace.

I'm just having trouble picturing the aliens in the book... and I want to find someone that's read it.

Are you a Roddenberry fan?


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 02 August 2001 05:23 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Yeah, I'm a Trekkie and a Star Wars freak. For me, space opera works on the big screen or on tv, but I just can't bring myself to read it. Star Trek and Star Wars novels just don't work IMHO.
From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 02 August 2001 05:26 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Agreed.

Do you include Phantom Menace in your freakism of Star Wars?'

THEY HAVE a new Star Trek starting next month!!!!


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 02 August 2001 05:47 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
I bought TPM, widescreen. I'll probably buy the DVD. It had potential, and was a pretty good story. It just fell apart in the delivery.

There's a version of TPM floating around the net where somebody re-edited it so that it's actually good. They cut out all the scenes that Lucas couldn't bear to see end up on the cutting-room floor.

That's the real problem with it. Lucas was way too close to it to let the editor do his/her job. In the re-edited version, Jar Jar Binks is virtually eliminated.

I fear the next Trek series. Scott Bakula as the captain? Give me a break. The premise of the show sounds really cool though.


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 02 August 2001 05:51 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
You weren't a Quantum Leap fan eh?

I hated the TPM. I nearly wrote Lucas a letter, but, I was worried he'd hock it to Lays, Pepsi, Proctor and Gamble and Kenner to make fifty cents.

I may bring myself to watch the edited version. Did they fix the fuck-up with the Force, take that kid out of most of it, and change Yoda's eye colour back?


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
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posted 02 August 2001 05:52 PM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I started reading Jan Wong's latest book. It's a collection of her 'lunch with' columns. The book is apropriately titled 'lunch with'. The interviews are amazing. Did anyone else know that Stockwell Day was a pot smokin' hippie? Aparently he came to Pentacostalism in rebellion against his agnostic parents.

She can be quite mean sometimes (I'm afraid to admit it, but I love the clumns! Even the mean-spirited sarcasm!) Valerie Pringle has actually told her to fuck off! Well, I took that out of context. The interview with Valerie Pringle was actually quite flatering (there's not a whole lot of bad things you can say about Valerie Pringle).

Anyway, I'm also reading Global Showdown as I had mentioned before, and a book called "ideologies: and analytic & contextual aproach" by Larry Johnston. It's very fair, and very informative.


From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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Babbler # 554

posted 02 August 2001 05:56 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Actually, I was a HUGE Quantum Leap fan. I just can't see Bakula in the Star Trek universe. He really seemed out of place on Murphy Brown as well.

If you ever have a chance, you should see episode 4 of Clerks: The Animated Series. In that episode, they put Lucas in the witness stand and badger him about TPM.


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
StephenGM
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Babbler # 305

posted 02 August 2001 07:54 PM      Profile for StephenGM     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Hey, Trinitty - I've read Battlefield Earth, although it was years ago. What were you wondering about?

quote:
Mediaboy said: "Hey now, Battlefield Earth was written before Hubbard and Heinlein made that little bet about how easy it would be to start a new religion, wasn't it?"

Actually, Mediaboy, it was written much later, only a few years before Hubbard died, if I recall correctly.

As for what I'm reading, right now I'm in the middle of 1867: How the Fathers Made a Deal, a fascinating look at the Fathers of Confederation, and I'm re-reading Christopher Vogler's The Writer's Journey.


From: Toronto, Ontario, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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Babbler # 826

posted 03 August 2001 01:11 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Stephen!! Thanks!

Okay, the Psychlos... I know, real subtle name, anyways, what skin colour do they have? I'm at the part where Johnny has gottent he core sample of gold with the Scots, and I read back to the begining...

Fur, amber eyes, claws, purple suit, 8 feet tall, "bones" for eyelids/brows and lips, Numph was described as have a human-type face, but, what colour is their skin? Did I miss that description, or am I just supposed to imagine it?

MEDIABOY: THERE'S an animated series of CLERKS!? WTF?! I didn't know that! Where can I find this series in this great city of ours? I'd LOVE to see them, especially that episode.

I'll find the edited version of TPM somewhere... as long as it deletes that shit about the Force being determined by a bloodtest... that pissed me off even more than Jar-Jar.


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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Babbler # 888

posted 03 August 2001 01:15 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I know, wasn't it silly? Especially with "midichlorians." Like, I already read the Choose-Your-Own-Adventure where the mitochondria take over the galaxy when I was 8.
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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Babbler # 826

posted 03 August 2001 01:19 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
NO KIDDING Mandos!

I was nearly in tears leaving that theatre at 2 am... with my cinnamon-bun hair and Han at my side.

Hey, want a new thread?


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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Babbler # 554

posted 03 August 2001 01:32 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
StephenGM: Well don't that beat all?

Trin: I do not know if Clerks: TAS is available for rent. I bought my copy of the series on DVD(autographed!) directly from Kevin Smith's comic book shop in New Jersey.

The show was on ABC. They only made 6 episodes, and ABC only ran two episodes before it was cancelled. When it premiered, it was up against a little show called "Survivor". It never really had a chance. Episode 4 is by far the best. Jay sues the QuickStop, and the case is heard in court by Judge Reinhold (seriously!).

The DVD includes scenes that the ABC censors wouldn't approve, like the "Flintstone's List" scene.
http://www.clerksthecartoon.com http://www.viewaskew.com


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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Babbler # 826

posted 03 August 2001 01:51 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm so jealous. I've seen all of them except for Dogma.

I'd really like to see the series, I don't have Quicktime though and will have to find it on another format.... I bet Virgin Records carries it.


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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Babbler # 554

posted 03 August 2001 02:04 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
If you're just going to buy it, I'd suggest going to the source. If you buy the VHS from Kevin Smith's own comic shop he'll autograph it for you.
http://store.yahoo.com/jsbstash/


The guy gets way too much of my money. It's really quite sad.


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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posted 03 August 2001 03:00 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Thanks for the link!

I'm trying to convince myself to rent Dogma tonight, but, I'm apprehensive.


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 03 August 2001 03:22 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
If you've got a DVD player, you can borrow my copies of Dogma: Special Edition and Clerks:TAS.
From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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Babbler # 826

posted 03 August 2001 03:29 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Thanks Mediaboy! But... We are still in the movie stoneage as of now.

We're getting a Playstation II for Christmas, I'd love to borrow it from you then.

I just found a place to rent one of the animated shows, I'm not sure what one it is... I'm going to go rent that tonight.

I'd better quit before I get in trouble for being off-topic. Does Kevin Smith write books?


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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Babbler # 554

posted 03 August 2001 03:50 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post
Well, the scripts for Clerks, Chasing Amy and Dogma are sold in book form.

He also writes comic books. He's done a Daredevil series, a Green Arrow series, and he will be doing a Black Cat (Spiderman's ex-girlfriend) series pretty soon. These are very cerebral comic books. The Daredevil series was all about a crisis of religious faith Matt Murdock (Daredevil) was going through. The Green Arrow series includes a 15 year old prostitute and her abusive pimp. These ain't no Archie comics!

[ August 03, 2001: Message edited by: Kneel before MediaBoy ]


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Croesus_Krept
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posted 06 August 2001 10:09 PM      Profile for Croesus_Krept   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Besides the labels on my sauce bottles, I am trying to pace through Herodotus and his Histories... It has some revealing moments... I bought a novel the other day, Soul Mountain, by the last nobel laureate. (Hope to compare my perceptions of contemporary China with a native son's...)

c......


From: Taiwan | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cosmorific
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Babbler # 33

posted 13 August 2001 04:45 PM      Profile for Cosmorific        Edit/Delete Post
I just got finished reading L'Hiver de force by Rejean Ducharme, and now I'm starting on L'avalee des avales.
From: Right here, right now | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jared
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Babbler # 803

posted 13 August 2001 10:14 PM      Profile for Jared     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
All the Cohen fanatics on here have driven me to begin reading a bio titled "Various Positions." If I remember, I'll let y'all know how it turns out. I've also pulled out my brother's Cohen records and have been spinning them ad nauseum.
From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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Babbler # 1064

posted 14 August 2001 12:41 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
"Various Positions" is a good read, although one thing that emerges is that Ira Nadel evidently wishes he was Leonard Cohen. Or at least had his effect on women.

I read Herodotus last year, largely on the Richmond bus. Parts are tedious, and incomprehensible without maps of the ancient world, but he tells great stories. Of course, he was probably suckered in a good many cases, at least according to the editor of my edition.

I'm reading the latest Granta (#74), with its cover story "Confessions of a Middle-Aged Ecstacy Eater." That alone is worth the purchase price, although most everything else is very good too. "Confessions" manages to be both harrowing (not the E-descriptions, but the author's and his son's life experiences) and sublime.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
paperdoll
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Babbler # 1165

posted 16 August 2001 05:04 PM      Profile for paperdoll     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
at the moment i'm working on midnight's children. also, the collection '9 stories' by j.d. salinger. i read one of those stories every night, been doing it for years. last night was 'a perfect day for banana fish'.
the best line in the world.
'he calls me miss spiritual tramp 1948' the girl said, and giggled.
it's an amazing collection.
and i just finished reading l'étranger by camus for the millionth time. genius.
and note to 'lance, yep, you're right, fall on your knees is excellent. and ms. macdonald was wonderful in better than chocolate. she has roles in plays at the GCTC in ottawa some seasons. brilliant. she's actually an amazing actor.

From: onscario | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
verbatim
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 569

posted 16 August 2001 05:15 PM      Profile for verbatim   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
J.D. Salinger = My Favourite Author.
From: The People's Republic of Cook Street | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dawna Matrix
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Babbler # 156

posted 16 August 2001 05:33 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
OUch, VT. Salinger worked for the CIA. Catcher in the Rye was a thought control experiment. That's enough to eradicate him from my bookshelves. Plus I though Holden Caulfield was an unimaginative twerp.

I just finished 'Time's Arrow' (Martin Amis), and am starting Clockwork Orange, sans glossary.


From: the stage on cloud 9 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
verbatim
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 569

posted 16 August 2001 06:19 PM      Profile for verbatim   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, I don't read much, really. I guess my attention-span's too short most of the time.
From: The People's Republic of Cook Street | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dawna Matrix
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Babbler # 156

posted 16 August 2001 06:27 PM      Profile for Dawna Matrix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
They got to you too...
From: the stage on cloud 9 | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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Babbler # 888

posted 16 August 2001 07:05 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I agree with DM. Holden Caulfield is a twerp. The Catcher in the Rye was drivel.
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
verbatim
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 569

posted 16 August 2001 09:01 PM      Profile for verbatim   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, it kept my flea-sized/like brain entertained, and Holden Caulfield reminds me of myself (not so much at that age, but when I'm very drunk). I have to say my favourite Salinger story is "Raise High The Roof Beam, Carpenters."

I also like the image of writer as intellectual snob and social curmudgeon that Salinger has cultivated. Most writers I have met were weeds whose only talent was an eternal self-aggrandizing obsessiveness (no offence to the obvious exceptions found herein). Funny how I kind of identify with the image of "writer."


From: The People's Republic of Cook Street | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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