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Author Topic: Unusual architecture
Contrarian
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posted 01 June 2005 03:43 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Found a cool new website about octagon, hexagon and round houses. At the bottom, below the US links is a link for houses in Canada; some photos linked.

It also linked to another website, Round barns and covered bridges. Includes some references to Canada if you search a bit and various interesting links. The website owner's wife made this quilt.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 01 June 2005 05:18 PM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Concerning the covered bridges and the round barns, the vast majority of both are in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Illinois and Indiana.

Mennonite and Quaker areas. Also some of the harshest winter weather in the US.


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
ephemeral
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posted 01 June 2005 07:45 PM      Profile for ephemeral     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
wow, thanks for posting this, contrarian. love the roof art!

speaking of unusual architecture, have you heard of the tallest hotel (burj al-arab) in the world? it's built on a man-made island which is somehow supposed to withstand erosion from the water (some sort of enclosure, i'm guessing). here's some info on it. there are some exquisite pictures of the interior here.


From: under a bridge with a laptop | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
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posted 01 June 2005 07:48 PM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw that hotel profiled on Frontiers of Construction, or Extreme Engineering, or something. Really interesting stuff. It's amazing how computers have fine-tuned the principles of architectural and construction engineering.

[ 01 June 2005: Message edited by: Anchoress ]


From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 01 June 2005 07:59 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's impressive, ephemeral.

Calgary used to have a round hotel, The Summit Hotel. Back in the 1970s, it actually looked tall, but it was dwarfed by development and torn down long ago.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 01 June 2005 08:07 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Incidently, some of you might be interested in the Doors Open events in parts of Canada; on specifc days various buildings are opened to the public. Here is the links page for Doors Open Alberta:
quote:
...The Doors Open initiative originated in Scotland, spread throughout Europe and eventually came to Canada via Toronto. The following links provide access to international, Canadian and Albertan participants and contacts. As well, we have included some resources to do with historic preservation and the built heritage...
Here's to the Scots!

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ephemeral
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posted 01 June 2005 08:12 PM      Profile for ephemeral     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
that's a shame. some of the nicest architecture in the world is ancient history. one place i would love to visit is the ice hotel in quebec. i don't know why, but i'm so taken with the idea of being inside a fancy-schmancy igloo.
From: under a bridge with a laptop | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Hawkins
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posted 04 June 2005 12:17 AM      Profile for Hawkins     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The roundish houses of worship are favourites of the Baha'is

Baha'i Houses of Worship

And the new one they are building in Santiago, Chile .

Pretty fancy.


From: Burlington Ont | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
verbatim
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posted 04 June 2005 12:44 AM      Profile for verbatim   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Hawkins:
The roundish houses of worship are favourites of the Baha'i.

Wow! I really like the ones in India and Chile.

From: The People's Republic of Cook Street | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Raos
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posted 04 June 2005 12:53 AM      Profile for Raos     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Edmonton still has a round hotel, the Crowne Plaza Chateau Lacombe, complete with La Ronde, a revolving restaurant as the top floor. It's a pretty nice place too. Pity it's built on top of its own 8 story car park. Really ruins look of the hillside, IMHO.

I remember hearing that the reason quakers build round barns is because of a belief that the devil hides in corners, or something similar. Is that true?

[ 04 June 2005: Message edited by: Raos ]


From: Sweet home Alaberta | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 04 June 2005 01:03 AM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's true - there's a former youth hostel north of Dundee, in Scotland that is laid out like the pie in a game of Trivial Pursuit for that very reason.
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Diane Demorney
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posted 04 June 2005 01:08 AM      Profile for Diane Demorney   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just left the "Rose & Crown" in Calgary. Lovely pub. Apparently, it used to be a funeral home. They've tried to keep most of the original fixings. It reminded me of "Six Feet Under". We (from work) were put into this tiny room with a fireplace. It wa s lovely!
From: Calgary | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 04 June 2005 01:13 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The circle is important to prairie first nations; The Tsuu Tina at Calgary have circles inside their administraiton building including the Council Chamber Link here and space surrounding a tepee. [The third last and second last rows of pictures to the left.] The council chamber looks more impressive in person. I think the Siksika Nation also has some circular architecture, but haven't seen it.

[ 04 June 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
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posted 04 June 2005 02:15 AM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Contrarian:
octagon houses.[/URL]

The one in Bracebridge is very like the one in Port Hope.


From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 04 June 2005 09:01 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There are some groovy covered bridges in New Brunswick.

Thorfinn once designed for us a (fantasy) round house made of glass. All the works were to be in the central core, and living would go on in the circle around. It was quite a good plan, actually, I thought. M'self, I am still strong on courtyards.


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Wilf Day
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posted 04 June 2005 09:04 AM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
All the works were to be in the central core, and living would go on in the circle around. M'self, I am still strong on courtyards.

Exactly how Octagon houses work: a two-story central core, or courtyard.

[ 04 June 2005: Message edited by: Wilf Day ]


From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 04 June 2005 09:10 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, but Thorfinn's core would have been filled with all the electronics and plumbing and so on.

Me: I'm still stuck in the C17. I like my right angles.

The other design that always tempts me, though, is the late-mediaeval Scottish tower house, where the stone stairs circle up a round tower on one corner, with stop-offs at each floor. I shall find picture.


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Wilf Day
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posted 04 June 2005 09:14 AM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
the late-mediaeval Scottish tower house, where the stone stairs circle up a round tower on one corner, with stop-offs at each floor.

I have walked up just such stairs in the tower of a ruined tower house in Northern Ireland.


From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Crippled_Newsie
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posted 04 June 2005 09:16 AM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I would take this one, if nobody minds:

From: It's all about the thumpa thumpa. | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 04 June 2005 09:19 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

Craigievar Castle, Aberdeenshire

An unusually splendid example, of course.

Will look for the Maxwell House in Galloway.

[ 04 June 2005: Message edited by: skdadl ]


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skdadl
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posted 04 June 2005 09:32 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Old Place of Monreith, Galloway

This great old tower house, aka "The Dowies," was the family home of the author Gavin Maxwell, author of Ring of Bright Water (remember the otters?).

It is owned now, and rented out, by the Landmark Trust. You could get a group of friends together and rent it for a couple of weeks. We did.

I've linked to the whole page because you can see the floor plans at the bottom.

Dumfries and Galloway is the most southwesterly part of Scotland, the part that juts out towards Ireland. Palm trees grow on that coastline -- not well, mind, but they do grow.

All those wee touns -- och, I loved them. At Isle of Whithorn there is the greatest pub/restaurant/hotel I have ever visited, called the Steam Packet. It sits almost out in the sea. The fish is superb, of course, barely dead when it reaches you, and they have caboc, enormous rolls of it.


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Américain Égalitaire
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posted 04 June 2005 10:05 AM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If its unusual motel architecture your interested in, the Gobbler in Wisconsin (recently, finally, mercifully in some ways, torn down) was perhaps the most unusual (putting it mildly) example of all.

Take a guided tour at the shrine site on James Lileks' Institutte of Official Cheer webpage


From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
ephemeral
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posted 04 June 2005 07:40 PM      Profile for ephemeral     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
that is so unique, AE. i couldn't see how the gobbler even remotely resembled a turkey from the outside though. a 'passion pit' for a bedroom, and it's all so colourful. my eyes are hurting a bit now.
From: under a bridge with a laptop | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged

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