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Author Topic: Terrorism In Canada
jeff house
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posted 15 June 2006 02:47 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Recently I read a new book which documents the existence in Canada of a cell which supports the enemy, and has actually called for kidnappings and the takeover of police departments and similar government facilities.

The group bears the name LX. This group planned terrorist/revolutionary acts in favour of Canada's enemies. The leaders of the group were priests.

This occurred in 1942, during World War II, and the cell favoured Vichy France which was then allied with Nazi Germany.

One of the highest leaders of the group, Pierre Elliott Trudeau, specifically said that kidnappings could be undertaken for the ends of the cell. Mr. Trudeau was 22 years of age at the time.

The authors of the book, Max and Monique Nemni, professors in Quebec and friends of Mr. Trudeau, place much blame on the kind of schooling he received from a religious institution which fed him with ideas about what God would require of youth in those troubled times.

I think of this in connection with the recently arrested "terrorist cell" which allegedly involved a few adults, and a number of very young people whose involvement was limited to "training" at a paintball camp.

Whatever becomes of them, I think those parallels are worth remembering.

trudeau


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Brett Mann
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posted 15 June 2006 03:05 PM      Profile for Brett Mann        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well worth remembering, Jeff. I would hope that even if these folks are found guilty of serious charges, that an element of rehabilitation tempers the severity of their sentences.Particularly when it comes to home-grown terrorism, this is a war of ideas. In the internet age, people can surround themselves with like-minded (and often like-deluded) individuals and lose track of what the majority around them thinks and perceives. Merciful and creative sentences might be in order in the event the accused are in fact guilty. One thinks of drunk-drivers who as part of their early release agreements go to schools to warn teenagers about the dangers of drunk driving. And boy I'm proud of the response of average Canadians on this issue - nothing like the kind of retaliatory, fear-driven madness seen in some other places, and predicted by some to happen here.
From: Prince Edward County ON | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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posted 15 June 2006 03:09 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Merciful and creative sentences might be in order in the event the accused are in fact guilty

The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act requires automatic deportation in cases of "terrorism".


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Brett Mann
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posted 15 June 2006 03:18 PM      Profile for Brett Mann        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
But it's my understanding, Jeff, that all the accused (in Canada - there's a US and a British suggested connection here too) are Canadian citizens. Canadian born citizens, in fact. Whatever else happens, they won't be deported anywhere. (sorry, perhaps I'm missing your point).

I have long since stopped looking to Canadian Immigration agencies for fairness, justice etc. I'd be happy if I could get basic humanity out of them, like not sending somebody to get tortured somewhere, even if he's guilty as hell, and not a Canadian citizen. In the case of five Canadian Muslims held under security certificates, this could indeed be the outcome. I thought Canada was signatory to international treaties which criminalized this kind of behaviour by immigration officials?


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Patrick Ross
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posted 15 June 2006 04:39 PM      Profile for Patrick Ross   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You are indeed, Mr. Mann. The trouble with terrorism is the nature of the battle.
Showing a degree of leniency to convicted terrorists could go a long way toward winning the hearts and minds of some of those who could become extremists -- concievably.
However, this could also be taken as a show of weakness that will only embolden those who have already made the choice to take up terror as a weapon.
We have to walk a very delicate balance.
But here is an idea I think is interesting: is torturing detainees (as the Americans have done) not a show of weakness?

From: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
Bubbles
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posted 15 June 2006 09:05 PM      Profile for Bubbles        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is still unclear to me what a terrorist is. Strong convictions will lead to all kinds of actions. At what point does the action become an act of terror? We seem to be clear on not wanting the parliament buildings blown up, but seem to embrace turning the Alberta Tarsands into an environmental time-bomb.

We apear to be willing to club the rabbits that could consume some flowers in our garden, but refuse to deal with the buldozer that wants to turn our garden into a parking lot.

[ 15 June 2006: Message edited by: Bubbles ]


From: somewhere | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged

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