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Author Topic: Lord Of The Rings movie - your impressions
Performance Anxiety
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posted 20 December 2003 06:42 PM      Profile for Performance Anxiety        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw the LOTR movie yesterday at a megaplex and was totally disappointed. Not only was it a hefty $10, but I had to see reality advertising installations for Grolsh beer in the lobby, wait in a line for an hour in a food court (if you can call that s**t food), then was forced to watch 30 minutes of commercials on the big screen. By the time the movie actually started I was so agitated from all the corporate adcreep that I just couldn't enjoy it at all - especially because what I did see appeared to be excessively violent, patriarchal, Aristotelian, and cliched.

Next time I think I'll pass.

ps: What did YOU think of the movie-going experience??


From: Outside of the box | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
majorvictory
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posted 20 December 2003 08:44 PM      Profile for majorvictory     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Surprise: Mr. Cranky didn't like it!

I spent the last 40 minutes of this thing wondering when in the hell it was going to stop. It fades to black more times than Ozzy Osbourne taking an I.Q. test.

quote:
Instead of ending his massive retelling of the Tolkien series with a bang, director Peter Jackson has turned "The Return of the King" into the fat, lumbering relative who won't leave when he's supposed to and simply lingers, sweating, on the living room couch.

I spent the last 40 minutes of this thing wondering when in the hell it was going to stop. It fades to black more times than Ozzy Osbourne taking an I.Q. test. Frodo (Elijah Wood) and Sam (Sean Astin) start slowly hoofing it up Mt. Doom while Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) and the other members of the Fellowship battle the evil Orcs. It's almost as if the hike takes place in real time. It made me think that Mt. Doom badly needs a gondola.

And is it just me or is there enough man-love in this film to make a Promise Keeper weep?


[ 20 December 2003: Message edited by: majorvictory ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
banquosghost
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posted 20 December 2003 08:59 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Stop going to movies.
From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Performance Anxiety
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posted 20 December 2003 11:13 PM      Profile for Performance Anxiety        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Stop going to movies.

Nah, I'd rather incite the spectators to reclaim the cinema!


From: Outside of the box | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 05 January 2004 10:15 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, I saw the Return of the King over Christmas. While it was pretty much at the same level as the other two films I did feel a bit disappointed. I would have preferred it had they not done the Smeagol flashback (didn't they already have one in the first film) and done the scouring of the Shire instead. I've been a Jackson apologist for changes made in the story in the previous two films but I really thought chopping Saruman's story wasn't a good move even though the scouring was something of an epilogue and not "essential" to the main story - it did encapsulate the real theme of the book, I thought, and was a very nice denoument.

The problem with ROFT was there really wasn't a tangible villain. Jackson tried to build up Gollum but I still felt sorry for him more than anything else and, indeed, turning Gollum into more fo a villain really undercut Tolkein's point that Gollum was a character one should pity and be charitable towards. As for Sauron, well, what can you really say about a disembodied eye? The film really needed a bit of Saruman and the scouring of the Shire would have provided that.

I also didn't like the changes to the Mount Doom episode. In the book Frodo capitulates and puts on the ring, Gollum bites it off and falls into the abyss. Frodo later makes the point that he wouldn't have been able to fulfill his mission without Gollum. The film changes this slightly by having Gollum not fall in until Frodo attacks him and basically tips him over. This allows Frodo some redemption which didn't exist in the book and I thought it weakened the story as a result.

This review by Ralph Wood summed up my reservations quite nicely - it's a good read and I recommend it.

Good news is Jackson has "officially" said he wants to direct the Hobbit. New Line has the rights to it so it'll likely become a reality in the next few years, hopefully with Ian McKellan as Gandalf and maybe a few recasts from LOTR.

[ 05 January 2004: Message edited by: Mycroft ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 05 January 2004 10:27 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Still, the trilogy is heads and shoulders above Star Wars. I saw the original (pre-retrofitted) Star Wars film a few years ago, after having not seen it for over a decade and was struck by how *bad* it was. Boring camera work, horrible dialogue, plodding story and wooden acting.

The only thing it had going for it - at least when it came out- was the special effects which blew kids away in 1978 and made the film a blockbuster and revived the SF film genre. But take the FX away and imagine the same film, with the same camera work, acting etc and say make it a youth oriented WWII adventure and it wouldn't have made an impact. The only good film in the series was Empire Strikes Back (*not* directed by Lucas) which had a relatively complex downer ending that made one anxious and left one waiting for more. By far the worst in the series was Attack of the Clones. Dunno what 2005's episode III will be like (though the major plot points are fairly obvious) but I dread it because I know I'll *have* to see it for the sake of being a completist. (I've also seen every Bond film even though I really outgrew them years ago).

[ 06 January 2004: Message edited by: Mycroft ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 05 January 2004 10:32 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Still, the trilogy is heads and shoulders above Star Wars.

coughcoughcough*faintpraise*coughcoughchokegag...


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 05 January 2004 10:59 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Come come, 'lance. Even the New Yorker reviewed it favourably, although actually, Anthony Lane's review could be read as somewhat hedged and ambiguous.

More LOTR spin-off ideas:

*Galadriel's Isle. The ship of the ringbearers encounters heavy seas on its way to the far shore, and a foul wind blows it to a desert island, where the shipmaker's handiwork is dashed to pieces, and all aboard are marooned. Follow the madcap antics each week as a wizard, three elves, and two hobbits try to escape their desert island and make it back to the straight path to the world beyond.

*Hoosier Dwarf. Gimli, looking for a new direction in life after the major anticlimax of saving the world from ultimate evil, goes south to the economically depressed and crime-ridden lands of the Haradrim, where the diminutive Celtic axe becomes a basketball coach to a team of giants.

*Pippin's Place. Pippin and Merry open a pub back in Hobbiton. It's a prank and a nyuk-nyuk a minute as the bungling hobbits move in together and try to make a go of it in their quaint Shire home county. Look for special appearances by their old friends Samwise and Rose.

Other ideas include a Bonanza-type show set in Rohan (Rohanza?), and a comedy featuring Arwen, Aragon and their gay friend Legolas.

The fun need never stop.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
banquosghost
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posted 05 January 2004 10:59 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw it over Xmas. It's brilliant IMO. Jackson did a superb job of paring the narrative sufficiently for the screen without sacrificing either the story or it's forward thrust.

This trilogy is one of the greatest achievements in cinematic history.


From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 05 January 2004 11:20 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I could see a tv anthology series taking stories from the Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales. Only problem - no hobbits.

Oh yeah, I thought the Sam/Frodo interplay was great though I don't think I saw the kiss that was in the commercials in the actual final cut of the film.


From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 05 January 2004 11:21 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Do you know how many times I've almost been beaten up for suggesting that Star Wars might just not be the best film of all time (or even in the top 100)?
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banquosghost
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posted 05 January 2004 11:33 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Beaten up by 10 year olds?

The kiss was during Frodo's departure to the west with Gandalf and the elves.


From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 05 January 2004 11:40 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by banquosghost:
Beaten up by 10 year olds?


No, by 20-35 year olds who haven't reevaluated the film since seeing it as children and confuse nostalgia with critical acumen.

From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 06 January 2004 01:11 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Even the New Yorker reviewed it favourably, although actually, Anthony Lane's review could be read as somewhat hedged and ambiguous.

Oh, I don't doubt it's a decent movie. But saying it's better than Star Wars is, I repeat, faint praise. Xanadu is better than Star Wars. I'm with Mycroft. Star Wars is good fun if you're a kid, but is otherwise a Bad Movie, full stop.

But I love your sitcom treatments, rasmus...

quote:
*Galadriel's Isle. The ship of the ringbearers encounters heavy seas on its way to the far shore, and a foul wind blows it to a desert island, where the shipmaker's handiwork is dashed to pieces, and all aboard are marooned. Follow the madcap antics each week as a wizard, three elves, and two hobbits try to escape their desert island and make it back to the straight path to the world beyond.

See, the beauty of this one is, we could have Galadriel, Arwen, and yes, even Legolas in different combinations of scanty, ragged, yet surprisingly stylish and form-fitting desert-island-type outfits each week...

[ 06 January 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 06 January 2004 01:50 AM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have to admit I kind of liked Phantom Menace but that's probably because unlike most people I wasn't expecting much from it. I thought the light sabre fights were cool (the pod race was ok but very derivative of the chariot race in Ben Hur). The light sabre fights in Attack of the Clones were just dorky.

As for Return of the King the battle at Minas Tirth was too much like the batte of Helm's Deep so I found it kind of boring and I agree with the review I cited above that Denethor's behaviour made little sense without reference to the planitir..

[ 06 January 2004: Message edited by: Mycroft ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Jimmy Brogan
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posted 06 January 2004 01:52 AM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
See, the beauty of this one is, we could have Galadriel, Arwen, and yes, even Legolas in different combinations of scanty, ragged, yet surprisingly stylish and form-fitting desert-island-type outfits each week...

No no no, especially Legolas. Best eyes since Newman.

As for LOTR, I can't wait till it's done. When it's one twelve hour film in 3 parts it will be a magnificent experience. The extended editions of the first two films were much better, in many ways than the theatrical releases. We already know the EE of Return of the King will add in the Grima/Saruman scene, and the confrontation between the witch-king and Gandalf.

As it was ROTK was a brilliant achievement. I was choking up right and left during the last hour. And the cgi vistas and battles were the best ever.

Lance, Star Wars is fun for kids of all ages. I'm sad for whatever has died in you that you can't enjoy it.

[ 06 January 2004: Message edited by: JimmyBrogan ]

[ 06 January 2004: Message edited by: JimmyBrogan ]


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 06 January 2004 02:33 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Funny you should mention being choked up Jimmy. When I saw ROTK saturday last, a man two seats over was unabashedly weeping during a couple of scenes.

Not me though. Being English in heritage if not in ethnicity, I can squelch such feelings at the first tightening of the Adam's apple.

I was happy with the movie. I thought Jackson missed two out of five moments of high drama between the Ride of the Rohirim and the arrival of Aragorn with the army of the dead, but as you say, those moments seem to be available in the extended version.

I tried hard to separate my reading experience from the movie experience. They are two different media, and it's quite unfair to compare the two.

Unfortunately, having read the books several times it's impossible to do so.

With that bias in mind, it's been my feeling from the start that Jackson did best when he trusted Tolkien's story telling.

And for the first time in the three movies, Gimili had a comic relief line that actually made me laugh instead of cringe.

I think I watch movies, particularly the first time through, much less critically than a lot of people. I just demand to be entertained. And all three movies did that for me.

Mr. Preformance Anxiety's objections to the movie experience are duly noted. It's part and parcel of the whole entertainment industry, from music both recorded and live to movies, which is so sorely mistreating it's audience that they not only deserve to be put out of business, but put in jail for fraud.

(aside-- did anyone see "South Park" last week? hillarious send up of the recording industry)

But then, I shudder to think what would happen if we took back the cinema. We'd have movies made by and for people who love the art form of film.

And the end result would be the wonderful artistic writting we have in Can Lit.

*YAWN*


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
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posted 06 January 2004 03:42 AM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
a man two seats over was unabashedly weeping during a couple of scenes.

That coulda been me. My mother & sister blubbered with abandon too.

As with the first two films, it took me 'til the third viewing of ROTK to finally stop clinging to the book and just drink in the movie for what it was: one damn fine cinematic experience. I liked it the first time, now I'm just enthralled.

Like others, I miss the bits that got chopped for time too. Saruman obviously; and Denethor too. I'm sure there was a lot more interaction between him and Faramir that didn't make the final cut. And the Tower of Cirith Ungol scenes were obviously heavily trimmed. Not to mention Gandalf vs. the Nazgul, and the Mouth of Sauron displaying Frodo's tokens at the Black Gates.

But really: when the only major criticism one can make of a 3.5-hour movie is that it's too short, it's time to tip the hat to the creators for a job exceptionally well done. Bring on the DVD!


From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Jingles
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posted 06 January 2004 03:56 AM      Profile for Jingles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I agree with Mr. Cranky. The thing was agonizing to sit through. Just end the damn thing already.

It was tedious. One deux ex machina after another:
"oh look, the orcs are winning. Surprise, here comes the cavalry. (didn't I see this already in the last one?). Oh oh, they're in trouble again. And look, here comes the other cavalry...."

Not much tension when you know the character will be saved in the nick of time, again and again and again and again.

LOTR lives up to the maxim that if a movie has dazzling special effects, it's trying to hide how bad it actually is. Jackson should have done what Tolkien didn't do: hire a damn editor. Someone who knows how to make a story make sense, and not get bogged down with stupid, irrelevant side stories like Denethor trying to burn Faramir for no apparent reason, or the 15 minutes of fire signals being lit over and over again. We got the point after the first one, Pete. And the battle scenes looked entirely like a big commercial for the video game.

The shit people will pay good money to see. It was the only movie I went to all year, and it is just 3 and a half hours of my life and $6.50 that I'll never get back.


From: At the Delta of the Alpha and the Omega | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 06 January 2004 04:19 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Not much tension when you know the character will be saved in the nick of time, again and again and again and again.


I know what you mean. That's the kind of stuff that made Raiders of the Lost Ark such an insufferably boring movie.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 06 January 2004 06:25 AM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
or the 15 minutes of fire signals being lit over and over again. We got the point after the first one, Pete.

Actually, I liked that scene -sent a shiver down my spine - very nice camera work.

Denothar would have made more sense if they'd had something about his palantir.

Yes, the film will be better on DVD with extra scenes but, sadly, no scouring of the Shire scene was ever shot and I guess it's too much to hope that Jackson will film one just for the DVD - especially with Christopher Lee in a sulk over being completely cut from the cinematic release and the Hobbiton set being partly dismantled.


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 06 January 2004 09:02 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i thought theoden riding along his front row and clinking everyone's swords and spears was a nice touch.

i was doing the traditional-looking-at-movie-screen-through-fingers-like-dr-who thing with the shelob stalking sequence, but looking back on it, it was pretty funny. oh ho, i'm such a clever spider, i'm the size of a ford escort and i'm so quiet, frodo can't see me.

what kind of horse did elrond find to get him from rivendell to dunharrow that quickly?

i always thought of elessar the king as clean-shaven vs aragorn the ranger as sleeping in his clothes for 4 months. didn't they have four-blade razors in middle-earth?

[ 06 January 2004: Message edited by: Willowdale Wizard ]


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
HeywoodFloyd
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posted 06 January 2004 11:46 AM      Profile for HeywoodFloyd     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I cried during both the Two Towers (Theodens speech @ the battle of Helms Deep) and the ROTK (the charge of the 6000).
From: Edmonton: This place sucks | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Lima Bean
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posted 06 January 2004 12:06 PM      Profile for Lima Bean   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Having not read the books, I was free of expectations and any scenes or storylines to miss. I also was fully prepared to experience a Mega Movie (no delusions that this would be an art film here), and so I thoroughly, enthusiastically enjoyed it.

I loved how much ass that girl kicked, and I liked all the jokes between the dwarf and legolas. I was really scared for Frodo and really hated nasty gollum, even though he was weak and little. I agree that the scene above the molten lava was a little long, and I think that even though Jackson changed that part (my BF told me about it), the scene still upheld the necessity of Gollum's survival and persistence, and showed still that no man could have destroyed the ring alone.

And lots of it was really pretty--including the scene with all the beacon fires being lit.

I do agree, though, that it dragged a bit at the end (even though I didn't want it to be over), and the scene(s) in which they re-forged the sword was awfully choppy and incongruous...

But really, I just loved it.


From: s | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 06 January 2004 12:29 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Lance, Star Wars is fun for kids of all ages. I'm sad for whatever has died in you that you can't enjoy it.

A roller-coaster ride is fun, too (though I detest the phrase "kids of all ages," if it's meant to include anyone over 17 or so). I expect more from a movie. And please spare me your sorrow.

[ 06 January 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
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posted 06 January 2004 12:37 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Like others, I was a bit disappointed in the treatment of Denethor. It was unfortunate they didn't treat his situation in the context of using the palintir. The actor who portrayed him was perfectly competent as far as they took it, but he was supposed to represent what the race of Numenor were like at thier height. I had heard that they wanted to cast Donald Sutherland for the role. He could really have brought it everything it deserved.

I thought Minis Tirith was a bit cheesy. More of William Randolph Hearst's original vision of San Simion rather than the highest expression of the golden age of the Numenorians.

By the third movie I was able to let go of the books, but I still think leaving out the scouring of the shire was a crime. A lot of other things could have been tightened up to make room for it.

[ 06 January 2004: Message edited by: oldgoat ]


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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posted 06 January 2004 01:25 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Like a tad fewer teary huggy kissy scenes?
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Black Dog
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posted 07 January 2004 05:00 PM      Profile for Black Dog   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Saw it twice and I must say that I was awed the first time and underwhelmed the second. I dunno if repeat viewings suck the magesty out of it, or if I just got bogged down in minor details (ie. How did Shelob's stinger get through Frodo's mithril shirt?) or maybe it was because I was hungover. Nevertheless, it's still a good old fashioned epic and Jackson cut out enough of Tolkien's meandering, bloated prose to make it a coherent story. All in all, good stuff.
From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 07 January 2004 05:31 PM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My only complaint about this trilogy (besides the overweening length of it) is the use of so many names ostensibly from different languages.

How I yearn for an elf named Gus or an Orc named Jim. Gus the Grey. Perfect.

I don't know how fantasy fans keep them all straight.


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 07 January 2004 05:34 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In The Hobbit, at least, Tolkien used names from Norse mythology. The names of the dwarfs are from something called the Elder Edda, I think.

As for names from "ostensibly different languages"... Tolkien, a philologist, did create several perfectly workable languages. In fact he started doing this as a boy, by way of a hobby.

Meanwhile, I imagine there are fantasy fans out there who've learned Elvish, say, and communicate with each other that way.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Lima Bean
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posted 07 January 2004 05:57 PM      Profile for Lima Bean   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
thread drift:

My mom's got a kling-on dictionary. There are crazies out there who speak kling-on, tho thankfully mom's not among their ranks!


From: s | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 07 January 2004 07:16 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Bible's been translated into Klingon now, I hear.

It'd be bizarre to hear "Love thy neighbour as thyself" rendered into Klingon. It'd sound so fierce, like everything else.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Dogbert
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posted 07 January 2004 08:49 PM      Profile for Dogbert     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For someone who hasn't read the trilogy and doesn't really care to... what's a palantir?
From: Elbonia | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 07 January 2004 08:57 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
http://www.glyphweb.com/arda/p/palantiri.html
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 07 January 2004 08:57 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Looks like a crystal ball, works like a videophone.
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
marcy
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posted 07 January 2004 09:39 PM      Profile for marcy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey, folks, after seeing the flick (which I liked but agree was truly mushy and drawn out at the end) I re-read the end of the ROTK, it's even more drawn out, especially when one includes the scouring. Except for that, Jackson really did stick to all the stuff that ties up the ends but, I think he needed to do so with far more finesse. It seemed clunky and çorny. I think Christopher Lee needs to be back in, too.
From: vancouver | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Dogbert
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posted 10 January 2004 03:19 PM      Profile for Dogbert     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
So I take it Sauron was crank-calling him in the wee hours of the morning?
From: Elbonia | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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Babbler # 1064

posted 10 January 2004 06:05 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
No, I think Sauron's calls were more like you'd expect from a really really nasty collection agency -- the kind that's also involved in running wrecking yards and "waste management" companies.
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hinterland
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Babbler # 4014

posted 12 January 2004 12:56 AM      Profile for Hinterland        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I completely avoided this thread until I saw the movie yesterday. Loved it, loved it, loved it. And this from someone who can't remember whether Mordor is a character or a land. But it was also hilarious...I saw the movie at Starcité Hull, and just after the fourth false-ending fade-out (when the scene re-opens on Hobbit-land, or whatever you call it), the guy behind said "ah, 'sti". Everyone around us laughed. Too many endings, unfortunately, but still great.

[ 12 January 2004: Message edited by: Hinterland ]


From: Québec/Ontario | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
mighty brutus
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Babbler # 3148

posted 12 January 2004 12:34 PM      Profile for mighty brutus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You LOTR nerds make trekkies seem hip!
From: Beautiful Burnaby, British Columbia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
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Babbler # 2836

posted 12 January 2004 12:40 PM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
*raises setting on hand phaser*

Pardon??


From: the process of recovery | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
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Babbler # 2475

posted 12 January 2004 12:54 PM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I still enjoy this site for a lot of laughs.

I really like ROTK and thought that it ended decently. I couldn't help but laugh at Legolas' one-liners though......

"The Horses are restless!"

Dear gods........


From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Debra
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 117

posted 12 January 2004 04:48 PM      Profile for Debra   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A. The film was not the book, it was "based" on the book.

B. It rocked!!!!!!

So there.


From: The only difference between graffiti & philosophy is the word fuck... | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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Babbler # 1064

posted 12 January 2004 04:51 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A Debra sighting, a Debra sighting! 'Ray!

How've you been?


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
banquo
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2124

posted 12 January 2004 05:03 PM      Profile for banquo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Saw it for the second time yesterday. It's still terrific. This time I paid more attention to Sam's journey. Sean Astin really did a good job on this role.

I'm looking forward even more to the extended version now.


From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Rufus Polson
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Babbler # 3308

posted 12 January 2004 05:37 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by black_dog:
(ie. How did Shelob's stinger get through Frodo's mithril shirt?)

Well, not sure in the movie, but in the books Shelob stung him in the back of the neck. Given how short hobbits are, seems reasonable.


From: Caithnard College | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Rufus Polson
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Babbler # 3308

posted 12 January 2004 05:56 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by black_dog:
Jackson cut out enough of Tolkien's meandering, bloated prose to make it a coherent story.

Heathen infidel.
For any of you who have not read the books, and whose taste in reading runs more interesting than Mike Hammer, pay no attention to this wrong-headed person. Tolkien's amazing prose and his beautifully-worked plotting and narrative structure are among the things that make Rings still stand head and shoulders over nearly all the fantasy released since.
One thing you can track in Tolkien is the varied levels of style, sometimes very elevated and quite archaic (and, indeed, archaic in various different substyles appropriate to the subject), sometimes very simple. Chapters about the Shire read somewhat like a Jane Austen novel, full of small gossip and lighthearted character barbs. The siege of Minas Tirith reads very differently indeed, and in various ways the prose makes you feel the weight of what's going on in a way the movie cannot, although it makes a nice try some of the time.

The movie was fun, but it has been throughout and remains essentially a teaser for the book.


From: Caithnard College | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Lima Bean
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Babbler # 3000

posted 12 January 2004 06:03 PM      Profile for Lima Bean   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh Rufus, you do make it sound good, but I have to say, I'm quite sure I'll never read the books. And now that I've seen the movie, and read this thread and conversed with other fanatics about how the book is different etc., I am quite happy about that. I feel I've had my fill of the LOTR (oh, how the acronym must make a purist cringe!).

The big impediment to me is the sheer weight and volume of the books. I've always had a short attention span, and just looking at them, I know there are way too many pages for me to ever get through. I couldn't even finish the illustrated version of The Hobbit I once borrowed from a friend. He finally demanded it back because I was taking too long!

[ 12 January 2004: Message edited by: Lima Bean ]


From: s | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
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Babbler # 826

posted 12 January 2004 07:29 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I love the books. Read them and listened to them on CD twice. I've listened to the Silmarillion on CD... it is a little dry to read through, though, I will eventually do it. We own all of the other books that Christopher put together too. I'll dive into them eventually.

I was much happier with ROTK than I was with the Two Towers. I really enjoyed the movie for a MOVIE. I really liked Theoden, I loved the Riders of Rohan, the battle scene was excellent.

I liked the scene with Faramir and Denethor when he sends him off to battle, Pipin singing over it was really awesome.

I loved Frodo and Sam. I didn't like how Sam hesitated in giving the Ring back to Frodo - since he never did that in the books, and that's the whole point of Sam, the truly pure of heart and faithful friend. Same thing when he actually turned around to go home, he would never do that.

But, I like how the actors did the characters. They didn't skimp on all of the crying and hugging, which I was worried they would. The scene where he carries him on his back choked me up just like it did in the book.

Gollom was too static for my tastes, missing one of the major points of the whole story, but, they did him very well physically.

The Olaphants were amazing. The Elves were beautiful. The Men were proud and courageous and Eowyen was strong.

I really enjoyed it. Disliked the changes. But, liked the MOVIE.

I hear the extended version of TT is much better, I will watch it, since the original left me pissed off.

PS: they did Shelob really well...... but, Sam should have bloody well been with him.


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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Babbler # 214

posted 13 January 2004 02:30 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The big impediment to me is the sheer weight and volume of the books.

Gimme a big thick honkin' book any day. I don't want to just read a book. I want to lose myself in it.

As for Tolkien's prose, I never had much of a problem with it. Yes, for my sensibilities the affection between Hobbits was skewn to the maudlin from time to time. There was a bit too much poetry for my taste. And, I never much liked the formal dialogue Tolkein employed for Aragorn.

Until the Potter books came along, I never read anything since from the fantasy genre. After Lord of the Rings, everything else seemed to be a pale, even ludicrous, imitation.

What I find interesting about the movie comments here and amoungst others, is that those who have actually read Lord of the Rings seemed to be concerned that those who haven't might not fully appreciate or understand the significance of this scene or that.

However, it's my experience that those who haven't read Lord of the Rings didn't have any such moments.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
s-vendy
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posted 13 January 2004 03:17 AM      Profile for s-vendy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
These(LOTR) just don't click for me.Maybe should have read the books first. Most bored I've been since "Excalibur". They certainly are appealing to most people,though. Star Wars is more fun,more inspiring and shorter.
From: here | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
Erstwhile
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Babbler # 4845

posted 14 January 2004 05:12 PM      Profile for Erstwhile     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought the movie was wonderful, and except for a couple of moments I lost myself utterly in it, which is what I look for in a film. I almost cheered at the Charge of the Rohirrim, got kinda choked up at Aragorn's speech at the Gate, thought it was wicked cool when Eowyn killed the Nazgul...

...yeah, I'm a big ol' geek. I admit it.

(Though I'm enough of a geek that some things dragged me "out of the movie", like Faramir's charge - cavalry against fortified troops?! - or the buildings of Minas Tirith crumbling when struck by catapult stones - c'mon, this is teh.biggest.fortress.EVAR, it's not gonna fall apart like Lego.)

('Coz, y'know, those scenes weren't very realistic.)

(Unlike the rest of the movie, with, y'know, magic rings, orcs, dragons and whatnot...)

And anyone who dislikes both the LotR movies and Excalibur is, well...not as geeky as me, I guess.

E.


From: Deepest Darkest Saskabush | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Trinitty
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 826

posted 15 January 2004 08:03 PM      Profile for Trinitty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Have you taken the Geek Test?

http://www.innergeek.us/geek.html

49% baby.

I don't know how anyone can't like this stuff. But, I guess that's why I don't get a lot of things.

[ 15 January 2004: Message edited by: Trinitty ]


From: Europa | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 15 January 2004 08:47 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
29%. I'm only a "total geek".
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hinterland
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Babbler # 4014

posted 15 January 2004 09:21 PM      Profile for Hinterland        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I started that quiz, then, when I saw how long it was, I thought "only a total geek would finish this", so...well, anyway.
From: Québec/Ontario | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
googlymoogly
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Babbler # 3819

posted 15 January 2004 09:38 PM      Profile for googlymoogly     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Only 26% . I guess actually finishing the quiz counts for something .

[ 15 January 2004: Message edited by: googlymoogly ]


From: the fiery bowels of hell | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Erstwhile
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4845

posted 15 January 2004 09:55 PM      Profile for Erstwhile     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
38.65878% - Major Geek

Good Heavens, I've redorkulated!


From: Deepest Darkest Saskabush | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 15 January 2004 10:00 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Um, "redorkulated" is worth at least another 10% tacked on, dearie.

(I love it. I'm going to use that.)


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Erstwhile
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4845

posted 15 January 2004 10:06 PM      Profile for Erstwhile     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Michelle:
Um, "redorkulated" is worth at least another 10% tacked on, dearie.


SWEET!

...no, wait, is that a good thing?

Plus, "redorkulated" is a Simpsons quote, so it's probably more like 15%. I noted with some dismay the dearth of Simpsons-related questions on the quiz. How can you be a geek without Simpsons quotes?

[ 15 January 2004: Message edited by: Erstwhile ]


From: Deepest Darkest Saskabush | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hinterland
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4014

posted 15 January 2004 10:17 PM      Profile for Hinterland        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
*Sigh*...I felt proud about my "19.13215% - Geek" score, but then realised I should add a few points for knowing both the meaning of "redorkulated" and the reference.
From: Québec/Ontario | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Jimmy Brogan
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Babbler # 3290

posted 15 January 2004 10:21 PM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
ROTK box-office returns as of January 14, 2004:

North America: $315,555,000

Overseas Gross: $466,866,724 / 51 countries

That's a lot of geeks.


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
arborman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4372

posted 16 January 2004 12:07 AM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
29%

I demand a recount!

I was actually surprised at all the things I answered yes to. Memories....

No mention of the beard/Tilley hat/paunch combination (would be worth 5 points, I'd say)

As for the movies, I enjoyed them a lot. I thought the end could have been a little smoother, and it would have been if they'd done the scouring of the Shire. I've always seen that as closing the loop (the hobbits return, grown men, and run the nasties out of town).


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3838

posted 16 January 2004 05:05 AM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Except that the one consistent criticism I've heard of ROTK is that the end already "goes on too long" -- even without the Scouring! I can't see how they could possibly have squeezed it in without causing irreparable damage to the audience's patience (and buttocks).

An extended epilogue works just fine in a book -- but after a movie which has already taken 3 hours to reach the main climax, it would be cinematic death.

I only got 21.5% -- down from 23% last June. My geekitude is in decline!

[ 16 January 2004: Message edited by: beluga2 ]


From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged

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