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Author Topic: Babble Reads vs CBC Reads...
Farmpunk
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 12955

posted 26 February 2007 04:30 PM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
CBC has Canada Reads, let's have our own babble lists of Canadian Fiction. Or, if you like, just pick on the lists of the panelists: http://www.cbc.ca/canadareads/shortlists.html#samson

My top five, in no order:

Neuromancer, William Gibson. Yes, I know he was an American, but he's lived in BC forever.

Home Movies, Ray Robertson. A perfect slice of Southern Ontario.

Couchwarmer, Greg Kramer. A perfect slice of Toronto sub-cultures.

Lady Oracle, Margy Atwood. A funny book.

Temper Temper, Sonja Ahlhers.

This isn't counting the entire sub-genre of politicians or journalists who have written truly fictional books of their own. One my personal favourites here is Jean Chretien's From The Heart. A classic.

And my list is bit of a mishmash. I have trouble ranking books once they get to a certain level.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
laine lowe
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 13668

posted 26 February 2007 10:31 PM      Profile for laine lowe     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I loved this one:

Solomon Gursky Was Here by Mordecai Richler

Was Canada Reads always crammed into a week? I thought it was spread out over months (once a week) originally.

[ 26 February 2007: Message edited by: laine lowe ]


From: north of 50 | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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Babbler # 12955

posted 27 February 2007 03:15 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hmm, that's testing my memory. I think it was spread out, originally.

I liked Solomon Gursky, too. Not my favourite Richler, but it has some memorable characters.

Some of the panelists' expanded choices are terrible books. "Homer In Flight" is painful. And "Galveston"? "All Hat" is about a hair removed from pure genre fiction. Country Noir, my ass.

I wish that Stephen Page had chosen Hard Core Logo to defend.

[ 27 February 2007: Message edited by: Farmpunk ]


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 27 February 2007 03:18 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking of Richler, I absolutely LOVED Duddy Kravitz. I've wanted to read Solomon Gursky for ages and have never gotten around to it.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 27 February 2007 04:01 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've been meaning to try one of John Ralston Saul's works of fiction. Has anyone got a recommendation?
From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Catchfire
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posted 27 February 2007 05:00 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Best Canadian Novel (and hence, best Richler) is the 1997 Giller Prize winner (the exception proving the rule that the Giller Prize is a corporate sham) Barney's Version. It's his crowning achievement, and pulls in everything he's ever done before and smashes it together in a beautiful and hilarious book.

Plus, Beautiful Losers by Leonard Cohen is one of the best books ever.


From: On the heather | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 27 February 2007 08:19 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Michelle, Solomon Gursky is a good book. But I like St Urbain's Horseman better.

Catchfire is right. Barney's Version is a great book. But I don't think it should be read first, for people new to Richler. I think to get the best of his books they should be read in published order.

JR Saul writes fiction?


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 27 February 2007 09:59 AM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Farmpunk:
JR Saul writes fiction?

The Paradise Eaters I've read. I'm indifferent.

I do, however, really like Obasan by Joy Kogawa - probably one of my favourite books.


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
-=+=-
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Babbler # 7072

posted 27 February 2007 08:56 PM      Profile for -=+=-   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lard Tunderin' Jeezus:
I've been meaning to try one of John Ralston Saul's works of fiction. Has anyone got a recommendation?

The only one of Saul's novels I can recommend is his first, Birds of Prey -- which concerns secret Gaullist machinations in France.

IMHO, its the only that can actually be considered a novel, the others read like dressed-up philosophy. Saul's non-fiction is so good, that his fiction is something of a let-down.


From: Turtle Island | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 27 February 2007 09:21 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Duddy Kravitz
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 28 February 2007 02:34 AM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
After attempting some of Saul's non-fiction, I doubt I'll be signing any of his fiction out of the library.

Hey, what is this? Are babblers afraid to put up and defend their own books lists?

So far we have a fairly resounding victory for Mordecai and no one else. I would make the argument that a reader new to Richler would be best served by reading Duddy Kravitz first.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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Babbler # 370

posted 28 February 2007 05:34 AM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Une saison dans la vie d'Emmanuel, Marie-Claire Blais , Éditions Fides
A Season in the Life of Emmanuel, translated by Derek Coltman, Farrar, Straus & Giroux

Not Wanted On the Voyage, Timothy Findley, Penguin Books


From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
spooner
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posted 28 February 2007 10:27 PM      Profile for spooner     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture by Douglas Coupland is well worth reading.
From: Prince George | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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Babbler # 12955

posted 04 March 2007 05:06 PM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Lullabies For Little Criminals won. I was sure the Song of Kahunsha was going to be picked. As much as I found John Samson annoying, I'm probably going to read Lullabies sooner or later.

Not too sure I liked the way Canada Reads was put together this year. The last show seemed very hurried. None of the books this year felt up to the earlier standards.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
clandestiny
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posted 04 March 2007 08:23 PM      Profile for clandestiny     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Farley Mowat's 'Coppermine Journey' NOT!!!! (never imagined myself using such a wiseacre device as 'not' before but goddam sometime circumstance dictates)
I have no idea why Farley Mowat would attach his name to samuel hearn's gobbleygook journal, but he did. hearne was a nasty minded racist with all sorts of contradictory impulses to dehumanise the 1st nations people he encountered, at the same time as he let slip that they knew the country and were capable stewarts of it(?) - nevertheless it's clear hearne thought the people would one day be displaced... his reporting is so full of holes one wonders what he was really doing. I had just read a remarkable book by british schoolteacher named Clive Powell-Williams (Cold Burial) about 3 englishmen who died of starvation near Fort Resolution in 1926, the 'Hornby' case for anyone wants to 'ask.com'...Mowatt seems to understand that what is in fact might not survive a story telling, yet he praises samuel hearne for 'discovering' etc when hearne's ultimate hope (to rip off the land/people) was evident even in his own words!
Farley's 'Whale for a Killing' was a wonderful story, made piquant in my case because i sailed with guys from Burgeo, who still thought of Mowatt as someone they'd like to hang up and whup - and i nearly cried for that poor hapless creature that lost its life! Mowatt's book on Dian Fossey and the Mountain Gorillas also hurt to read
none of these are fiction, of course, but they could easily be!

[ 04 March 2007: Message edited by: clandestiny ]

[ 04 March 2007: Message edited by: clandestiny ]


From: the canada's | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged

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