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Author Topic: A Literary Enemies List
Mandos
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posted 01 June 2005 12:55 AM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
http://humaneventsonline.com/article.php?id=7591

quote:
HUMAN EVENTS asked a panel of 15 conservative scholars and public policy leaders to help us compile a list of the Ten Most Harmful Books of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Each panelist nominated a number of titles and then voted on a ballot including all books nominated. A title received a score of 10 points for being listed No. 1 by one of our panelists, 9 points for being listed No. 2, etc. Appropriately, The Communist Manifesto, by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, earned the highest aggregate score and the No. 1 listing.

(Some of the ads are great too.)


From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 01 June 2005 01:15 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One woman [Phyllis Schafly] among the 15 judges; "honorable mentions" which received at least two votes each include two of Darwin's books!! Golly gee whiz, modern biology and medicine sure do a lot of harm; we'd all be much better off just bleeding and purging each other.

[ 01 June 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 01 June 2005 08:59 AM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Also in the "honourable mentions" list:

John Stuart Mill, On Liberty (!)
Rachel Carson, Silent Spring
Ralph Nader, Unsafe at Any Speed
Paul Ehrlich, The Population Bomb

I wonder how many schools are going to start using this list as an "Index of Prohibited Books"?


From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 01 June 2005 09:23 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There it is again: the utter inability of high-profile Americans to think outside the celebrity box. Like, is that a boringly predictable list or what?

(I will admit that Auguste Comte is not my favourite thinker either. It always amazes me, though, that right-wingers don't recognize that positivism does a lot more for their team than it does for mine.)

I think we should come up with our own list of books that right-wingers should consider threatening, only we'll show our originality, ok?

I'll start us off:

E.B. White, Charlotte's Web.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
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posted 01 June 2005 09:30 AM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
John Maynard Keynes, General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money (because if the U.S. has an 8 billion dollar debt today, it's because of this guy's ideas, of course... )

And Silent Spring!?

Too bad they didn't do an 'all times' list, because books such as Deutoronomy, Leviticus and Revelation would've had to be included...


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fern hill
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posted 01 June 2005 09:31 AM      Profile for fern hill        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Kind predictable but: Orwell, 1984.
From: away | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
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posted 01 June 2005 09:34 AM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Skdadl - I'm reading Charlotte's Web right now with my kids! It's a great book!

I'll add: Harry Potter


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Crippled_Newsie
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posted 01 June 2005 09:38 AM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Aaron Fricke, Confessions of a Rock Lobster

Jessica Mitford, The American Way of Death

William Shawcross, SIDESHOW: Kissinger, Nixon & the Destruction of Cambodia

[ 01 June 2005: Message edited by: Tape_342 ]


From: It's all about the thumpa thumpa. | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
GJJ
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posted 01 June 2005 10:07 AM      Profile for GJJ        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Lord of the Rings drew quite a bit of fire from conservatives, and Brave New World would if any of them read it.

[ 01 June 2005: Message edited by: GJJ ]


From: Saskatoon | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 01 June 2005 11:57 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
the judges are an interesting group.

harry crocker's regnery publishing is a hoot. they've also published one of stephen presser's books.

robert george at princeton is a member of the "President's Council on Bioethics" and formerly served as a presidential appointee to the "United States Commission on Civil Rights."

mark molesky's book, "Our Oldest Enemy -- A History of America's Disastrous Relationship with France" gives his perspective away.


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 01 June 2005 12:02 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The only US conservative left who can still read is William F Buckley - ironically none of the rest of the conservatives can understand what he's saying.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
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posted 01 June 2005 12:05 PM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sinclair Lewis, Elmer Gantry
From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
anne cameron
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posted 01 June 2005 12:17 PM      Profile for anne cameron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
All of James Lee Burke's novels.

The Book of Timothy

The Book of Revelations

All of Carlos Castenada

Movies? "Panic In Needle Park"


From: tahsis, british columbia | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
anne cameron
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posted 01 June 2005 12:20 PM      Profile for anne cameron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, and for sure, "Fast Food Nation"
From: tahsis, british columbia | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
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posted 01 June 2005 12:21 PM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
By default, the entire CanLit canon. They're all pinkos, sauf exception.
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ronb
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posted 01 June 2005 12:24 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A Christmas Carol
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Hinterland
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posted 01 June 2005 12:32 PM      Profile for Hinterland        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For these brainless book-burners, you could conceivably come up with a reason for any book to be considered dangerous. I mean, Silent Spring? OMFGWTFBBQ!

Here's my pick...Jughead with Archie Digest Magazine, no. 195, [s.d.], featuring the bare knees of a blond trollop and a lusting Archie and Jughead on the cover. Absolutely satanic.

[ 01 June 2005: Message edited by: Hinterland ]


From: Québec/Ontario | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 01 June 2005 01:02 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm disappointed that Lenin's State and Revolution wasn't singled out for special hatred by the conservative thinkers. But it is good to see that Marx is still the most hated and gets two selections in the top 6. There's a backhand shot at Fred Engels who is described as a "limousine leftist", presumably because the only thing a conservative hates more than an organic intellectual is one of their own (social class) that switches sides, like old Freddy Engels.

With the Darwin books added, it's clear that, contrary to right-wing clap-trap, it is the conservatives who are stuck in the 19th century, continuing to fight old battles that they have long since lost.[Edited to add: But then, isn't that what conservatives...do? ]

quote:
Thus he stood, sword in hand, and thus he battled, in his "masterly conduct of the attack," this St. George of the German Manufacturers' Association, whilst the infernal dragon Marx, "in deadly shifts," "speedily" breathed his last at his feet.

Fred Engels, Preface to the 4th German Edition of Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, Volume 1 , 06 25 1890.


It's too bad more people don't read Marx & Engels for the laughs. These guys were hilarious and serious at the same time. Sparkling dialectical razzle-dazzle at its best.

[ 03 June 2005: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
gopi
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posted 01 June 2005 02:08 PM      Profile for gopi     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
One woman [Phyllis Schafly] among the 15 judges

Ms. Schafly once remarked that human rights should not be extended to non-christian Americans. As I remember, her group the Eagle Forum were also supportive of the Meese/Falwell attempt to rid America of subversive magazines like Tiger Beat.


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Tommy_Paine
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posted 01 June 2005 07:33 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Funny. Their synopsis of "Good and Evil" would perhaps put this on their list of ten best books, one would think. But maybe they are saying it is dangerous because it spills the beans?

Same with Mien Kampf. The synopsis leaves out the part about how Hitler's blueprint for political power included reliance of emotion over rational thinking.

Again, dangerous for spilling the beans, I think.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
remind
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posted 01 June 2005 07:38 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
All of the Life and Teachings of the Masters of the Far East series by Baird T Spalding

All of the Gear's Peoples of... series

Man's Eternal Quest: Paramahansa Yogananda.


From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 01 June 2005 07:45 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm all for threatening those folks:

All of Charles Dickens, especially Hard Times; honourable mentions: Bleak House, Nicholas Nickleby, David Copperfield, Our Mutual Friend.

John Steinbeck, whose books some have tried to ban.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
GJJ
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posted 01 June 2005 08:14 PM      Profile for GJJ        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
Funny. Their synopsis of "Good and Evil" would perhaps put this on their list of ten best books, one would think. But maybe they are saying it is dangerous because it spills the beans?

"Beyond Good and Evil" by Nietzche? Actually its a pretty sophisticated book ... it has a reputation of being right wing because Hitler decided he liked it without bothering to try understanding what Nietzche was trying to say. I think its on the conservative lists because it uses complex sentences structures that they just couldn't understand (at least in German ... no idea how the translations are).


From: Saskatoon | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 01 June 2005 08:23 PM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by N.Beltov:
Fred Engels who is described as a "limousine leftist"

Interesting choice of words. I don't think the term "limousine" was used in Engels' time (at least the Wikipedia article on limousines doesn't say anything about the term being applied to horse-drawn vehicles, not that that's the last authority). But then, you wouldn't expect these folks to have a good understanding of history. I'm surprised they even knew some of these books existed, actually.


From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
anne cameron
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posted 01 June 2005 08:54 PM      Profile for anne cameron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
They probably havent read any of them..they just got Ho'land Security to do a security check of the libraries, got a list of furrin books and then played pin the tail on the donkey to come up with their list.

I have to admit, though, it sends a shiver down my spine and makes me feel really really REALLY a failure because none of them have listed any of MY stuff...now I'll be up all night feeling inadequate...

Phyllis Schafley... ah, yes, now there's a name from long ago...

The only "Marx" this pack of mouth breathers knows are Harpo, Zeppo and Groucho and Phyllis would never stoop so low as to watch comedy. She probably can't laugh. Face cracks when she tries.

She's sure to hate The Stone Angel by Margaret Lawrence!! She'll have a fit if she reads The Diviners.


From: tahsis, british columbia | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 01 June 2005 09:33 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You jogged my memory for that other Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale seems more and more prescient.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Américain Égalitaire
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posted 01 June 2005 10:50 PM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I could cry sometimes, really.

If these people were serious enough to publish this list of "banned books" why not go all the way and have a ceremonial burning if these works are so dangerous? Certainly they would be doing their patriotic duty by setting an example for others to follow. Merely listing ones banned books is just so . . . passive.

This is the face the US is now showing the world. One scared of alternative ideals, one scared of anything that might empower ordinary people, one scared of anything that might challenged the established monied order.

Our time is coming fast. RichardFlorida has a new book out that sounds the warning bell for USian dominance - continue on this path of willful ignorance and the creative class will desert the US. Hmmm, I just knew there was something behing my strong desire to have my son attend university in Canada.

Here's the interview with the author:

The Flight From America

quote:
Q: You argue that the post-9/11 turn to the right -- the lack of tolerance and hostility toward foreigners in the United States -- is a serious threat to the United States' economic dominance of the world. But it's not going to be India or China, according to you, right?

A: I don't think the economic threats are China and India. I think that's been way overblown by people who run the United States' international and security policy, who see the world in terms of big countries.

The global competition for talent actually pushes competitive advantage down to the regional level. Not to say that Canada is going to overtake the United States, but Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal are major immigrant gateways where people can live their lifestyle and build economic opportunity. Australia has the largest percentage share of immigrants in the world and the largest share of foreign students in its major cities, Sydney and Melbourne, and even in its smaller cities like Perth and Brisbane. I think of what's happening in places like Amsterdam, Stockholm, and certainly what's happening under the leadership of the new prime minister in Spain.

What is likely to happen is that the society that can do the three Ts is going to figure this out. And that place will become just like the United States [in the early 20th century]. Britain had a much stronger science and Germany had much stronger technology, but as the United States, under the leadership of Roosevelt, overcame its class divide and built an industrial society, it created a tremendous level of social cohesion.

I hope the United States could regain this advantage, but I'm nervous that this division is so deeply ingrained in our country now. It's in that sense -- not the economic sense -- that I fear that we may be a declining power. What I fear is that we may not have the social cohesion anymore and we'll end up fighting one another instead of building a stronger more creative economy and society.



From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 02 June 2005 02:01 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:

(I will admit that Auguste Comte is not my favourite thinker either. It always amazes me, though, that right-wingers don't recognize that positivism does a lot more for their team than it does for mine.)

[/i]


I found Comte a strange addition to that list as well. Perhaps his name is easier to spell than Proudhon's?

How did they miss Babbitt, The Great Gatsby and The Theory of the Leisure Class?


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
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posted 02 June 2005 02:36 AM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm adding:

Robertson Davies - The Fifth Business.


From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
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posted 02 June 2005 09:26 AM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's one already slated for banning, at least in Pennsylvania. Anybody read it? The Buffalo Tree

Edited to fix link. I can never get it right the first time.

[ 02 June 2005: Message edited by: brebis noire ]


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
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posted 02 June 2005 09:51 AM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
On Liberty is considered dangerous????
From: Arkham Asylum | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 02 June 2005 09:57 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I see they went after Simone de Beauvoir, as well. At best it was dangerous in a literary sense.

I mean what of The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair? Or Soul on Ice, by X?


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 02 June 2005 12:19 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have a copy of Soul on Ice, but it's by Eldridge Cleaver.
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 02 June 2005 12:50 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
my fellow babblers, i am confused by some of your "dangerous" book choices.

these self-appointed censors have targetted these books, since they are books that have led people to think in a different way ... in a dangerous way.

a book like "homage to catalonia" would score higher on their "better not think this way" scale than "1984",

similarily, i don't think that people reading "fifth business" is going to cause them to lose sleep.


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
fossilnut
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posted 02 June 2005 01:32 PM      Profile for fossilnut        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's a bit strange reading Canadians being critical of free expression via books south of the border. In Canada we have institutional 'Anti-Hate' laws. It's not that some books would not only be 'banned' but that they wouldn't be written and distributed in the first place.

We refuse the entry of many books into Canada. However revolting you or I may think particular social or poitical views may be, an American can access those books and Canadians can not.

I don't endorse censorship.... not the material I agree with or the material I find revolting. Censorship is in the eye of the individual.

A 'bunch' of individuals can comment all they want on the danger or inappropriate of a book in the USA...that doesn't preclude another American citizen from purchasing and reading that book. In Canada we actually ban access and distribution.

[ 02 June 2005: Message edited by: fossilnut ]


From: calgary | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Blueiris46
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posted 02 June 2005 02:28 PM      Profile for Blueiris46     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Fossil, give 'em time...

"Tresury Department Retreats in Conflict With Publishers

In her article, Donadio also expressed skepticism over a lawsuit filed in September challenging a Treasury Department regulation that requires publishers to obtain a license from the government before they can publish a book by an author living in a country that has been banned from trading with the United States. In April, the American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression (ABFFE) joined other free expression groups in condemning the regulation, which affects authors in Iran, Cuba, Iraq, Libya and Sudan. Donadio suggests that restriction is not really as significant as the plaintiffs claim. The plaintiffs are the Association of American University Presses, the Professional/Scholarly Publishing Division of the Association of American Publishers, PEN American Center and Arcade Publishing. A second suit was filed by Iranian author Shirin Ebadi and her agent, the Strothman Agency.

However, the government apparently believes that plaintiffs have a good chance of winning. On December 15, the Treasury Department issued new regulations that remove many of the restrictions that were challenged in the suit. While reserving the right to demand further changes after they have studied the new regulations more carefully, the plaintiffs called the government's action "clearly a step in the right direction." To read the plaintiffs' statement, click here.


Alabama Legislator Seeks Library Purge of Books on Homosexuality

 A member of the Alabama legislature has drafted a bill that makes it a crime for a state employee who works in a library, school or university to purchase books and other material that "recognize or promote homosexuality as an acceptable lifestyle." Rep. Gerald Allen, a Republican representative from the Tuscaloosa area, denies that his bill violates the First Amendment because it only places restrictions on government purchases. Individuals would be free to buy any books they want, he said. Critics argue that the measure could lead to the purging libraries of all books that deal with the subject of homosexuality, including books that portray homosexual characters or are written by gay authors. "Not only is the bill unworkable, it is discriminatory and unconstitutional," the American Library Association said in a statement."

http://www.abffe.com/update01-07-05.html

[ 02 June 2005: Message edited by: Blueiris46 ]


From: TOP OF THE MORNING | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
KingMob
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posted 02 June 2005 02:35 PM      Profile for KingMob     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by fossilnut:

A 'bunch' of individuals can comment all they want on the danger or inappropriate of a book in the USA...that doesn't preclude another American citizen from purchasing and reading that book. In Canada we actually ban access and distribution.

[ 02 June 2005: Message edited by: fossilnut ]


Went a did a google on baned books in Canada and found this timeline of banned books: http://www.efc.ca/pages/chronicle/chronicle.html

Seems a lot of them were banned for some of the same reasons used in that list.


quote:
Meanwhile, the school district in Sechelt, B.C. bans from classrooms an anthology of Canadian and American poetry originally published in 1971, because of its "anti-establishment" stance, profanity and sex. The book includes works by Margaret Atwood, Irving Layton, George Bowering and others.

blarg!


From: Syntho-Womb 5, Planet Scumdogia. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
maestro
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posted 03 June 2005 07:00 AM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
OK, here's my two entries into the

'enemies of the right' books list.

Thomas Paine - The Age Of Reason

quote:
I do not believe in the creed professed by the Jewish church, by the Roman church, by the Greek church, by the Turkish church, by the Protestant church, nor by any church that I know of. My own mind is my own church.

All national institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions, set up to terrify and enslave mankind, and monopolize power and profit.

I do not mean by this declaration to condemn those who believe otherwise; they have the same right to their belief as I have to mine. But it is necessary to the happiness of man, that he be mentally faithful to himself.

Infidelity does not consist in believing, or in disbelieving; it consists in professing to believe what he does not believe.

It is impossible to calculate the moral mischief, if I may so express it, that mental lying has produced in society.

When a man has so far corrupted and prostituted the chastity of his mind, as to subscribe his professional belief to things he does not believe, he has prepared himself for the commission of every other crime.

He takes up the trade of a priest for the sake of gain, and in order to qualify himself for that trade, he begins with a perjury. Can we conceive any thing more destructive to morality than this?


Or takes up the trade of President...

Mark Twain - Letters From The Earth

quote:
This is a strange place, and extraordinary place, and interesting. There is nothing resembling it at home.

The people are all insane, the other animals are all insane, the earth is insane, Nature itself is insane.

Man is a marvelous curiosity. When he is at his very very best he is a sort of low grade nickel-plated angel; at is worst he is unspeakable, unimaginable; and first and last and all the time he is a sarcasm.

Yet he blandly and in all sincerity calls himself the "noblest work of God." This is the truth I am telling you. And this is not a new idea with him, he has talked it through all the ages, and believed it. Believed it, and found nobody among all his race to laugh at it.


I particularly chose these two because they are both US authors. Wish they were still with us.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
aRoused
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posted 03 June 2005 08:21 AM      Profile for aRoused     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
edit: not worth the trouble.

[ 03 June 2005: Message edited by: aRoused ]


From: The King's Royal Burgh of Eoforwich | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged
Spinnicks
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posted 03 June 2005 05:57 PM      Profile for Spinnicks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Why do the book-burners aim so much of their fear and loathing at political or economic treatises? Far more damage is being done to our vulnerable youth by such works as:

“Naked Lunch,” by William Burroughs, 1959
“Snow White,” by Donald Barthelme, 1967
“Gravity’s Rainbow,” by Thomas Pynchon, 1973
“Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” by Lewis Carroll, 1865. (Well, the Caterpillar smokes a hookah, the Duchess indulges in child abuse, the entire book can be read as a critique of established society, and…oh heck., we know that Carroll had a fondness for young girls.)


From: New York, NY | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4795

posted 03 June 2005 06:16 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mandos:
...a list of the Ten Most Harmful Books of the 19th and 20th Centuries...

My nomination is for Tim LaHaye

the man responsible for the book series, the movie, and the website...


From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 03 June 2005 06:20 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
How about Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
bigcitygal
Volunteer Moderator
Babbler # 8938

posted 05 June 2005 05:17 PM      Profile for bigcitygal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
1. The House at Pooh Corner by A. A Milne. What kinda communal commie living situations are those critters engaged in?

2. Stupid White Men by Michael Moore


From: It's difficult to work in a group when you're omnipotent - Q | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged

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