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Author Topic: The Giller Prize
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 12 November 2004 10:12 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Alice Munro wins the Giller Prize. Again.

I feel we should mark this.

I don't sound inspired, do I? YMMV.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7136

posted 12 November 2004 11:10 AM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
At first, I really enjoyed Alice Munro's stuff. Until I suddenly started getting the feeling I was reading the same story over and over again.

Now, reading her reminds me of crocheting or knitting. Not that these activities don't have their value, they're just not very...inspiring.


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 12 November 2004 11:18 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Dang, this makes her a shoe in for the "GG", putting my recently released "fictional" potboiler about a Governor General gone spend crazy at risk for the reward......
From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
BLAKE 3:16
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2978

posted 12 November 2004 07:32 PM      Profile for BLAKE 3:16     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Giller Prize is totally coma inducing. Alice Munro is a great writer. Her stories tend towards a sameness, but what a sameness! Can't beat em, just others can do something else.

The whole awards things is really quite terrible for the art and literary worlds. They tend to re-enforce very dreary hyperindividualist norms and create tiny turf wars. For some winners, the win can be really detrimental to their social lives and artistic careers. For losers or non-nominees, they just get to feel shitty.

Make sure everyone has a living wage, art is celebrated in daily life, and make culture accessible to ordinary people. I guess that's a taller order than throwing 10 or 20 or 100K at somebody, but much preferable.

It's also blecky if the GG is the respectable prize -- honouring the Queen's representative? Fuck that.

Edited to remove an "e" from Munro's name that B316 thought should be there, but would be referring to someone else, I guess. Lives of Girls and Women is absolutely superb. Please do read it if you have a chance.

[ 12 November 2004: Message edited by: BLAKE 3:16 ]


From: Babylon, Ontario | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 12 November 2004 07:50 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by BLAKE 3:16:
For some winners, the win can be really detrimental to their social lives and artistic careers.

This is interesting, BLAKE. Can you expand on this? I'm not disagreeing, I'm just wondering how it affects their social lives and artistic careers in a bad way.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
BLAKE 3:16
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Babbler # 2978

posted 12 November 2004 08:21 PM      Profile for BLAKE 3:16     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The prizes may draw attention to some good art and interest regular folks in work theywouldn't know how to access other ways.

However...

I know a couple winners of the biggy prizes, and whole whack more of non-winning folks, and it just seems to set people up for a certain failure. It applies a system of winners and losers, where neither is necessary.

One semi-young writer who won a biggy was turned into some kind of stupid debating point minor rockstar for two minutes, that had little to do with the actual writing, which was very good. Another friend recently won a smallish prize, the equivalent of a nice review and a few months rent, and her "manager" (it's not the correct term, but close enough) wanted half. They've parted ways. Just creates tempest in teapots. Prize money makes it sound like the artist is rich -- which they might be for a month or two.

Then you've got folks that really don't need the money or prestige -- Munro or Atwood or Ondaatje, because they're already got it.

It turns art making into the equivalent of winning Jeopardy. It also discourages collaboration -- "It's mine all mine!" -- which is sad and ridiculous.


From: Babylon, Ontario | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
asterix
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2419

posted 18 November 2004 04:21 PM      Profile for asterix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I like Alice Munro. I really do.

However, I do have to say that the Giller pretty consistently rewards a very particular type of literature: it invariably goes either to one of Canada's established literary elite (Munro, Atwood, Richler, Ondaatje, Adams Richards, etc.) or to a writer who's not as well-known but fits right into that model (Bonnie Burnard, Richard B. Wright).

As a rule, it just doesn't speak to me and my tastes.


From: deep inside the caverns of my mind | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 18 November 2004 04:30 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I will admit that I was a bit embarrassed at the memory of my first post here when I pulled this week's NY Times Book Review out of the paper and saw, in enormous letters, starting on the front cover and continuing forever inside, an absolutely rapturous review of Alice by Jonathan Franzen.

He, of course, has probably come to her much more recently than many Canadians, but still, it is a great review, and she deserves it.

Also, Munro didn't win the GG -- Miriam Toews did. I quite like the short stories of hers that I've read.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
asterix
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2419

posted 18 November 2004 07:08 PM      Profile for asterix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I haven't read Toews' book yet, but it's gotten quite good reviews, and looks interesting. Certainly having been a misfit teenager in a small town (well, okay, small city) myself, it sounds like a lot of fun. And I do try to read new and emerging Canadian writers as much as I can.

Her book was already on my list of books to purchase if and when I ever actually have the money to spare.


From: deep inside the caverns of my mind | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
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posted 18 November 2004 07:17 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Her book was read on Between the Covers and also on CBC's Round-up in the afternoon. I thought it was wonderful. I loved it -- and the reading was great too.
From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged

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