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Author Topic: Cinco de Mayo (I know, this is late)
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 06 May 2006 02:38 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I had never even heard of Cinco de Mayo until yesterday when I was over at a friend's place watching the US late night talk shows. Pretty much all of them had a Cinco de Mayo theme, where they broke pinatas and stuff. (Sorry, can't find the special character for the "n" in "pinata".) They were saying that it's a Mexican holiday marked by lots of drinking and celebration.

So, did anyone here celebrate it? If so, happy belated. Er, perhaps I should say, get well soon from your hangover.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
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Babbler # 4090

posted 06 May 2006 02:51 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Michelle, I find it very interesting that the U.S. late night talk shows concentrated on Cinco de Mayo -- as I never recall them doing that before -- and I wonder if there's any connection to the big demos and the new militance about illegal Mexican workers in the U.S.

The day commemorates Mexico's declaration of independence from Spain.


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 06 May 2006 02:58 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh really? Ha, that's funny, because Conan O'Brien last night was claiming that it's a celebration of the Mexicans winning a battle against the French. (The punchline being that even Mexico has conquered France.) I'm glad I didn't say anything about what I thought the holiday was celebrating in my first post, in that case. I thought everyone was laughing at the punchline of the joke, but come to think of it, they started laughing as he was setting it up with that statement about France as well, so I guess that's probably why!

One of the comedians, I forget who, had a joke about how George Bush gave a Cinco de Mayo greeting to Mexican Americans. I forget the punchline, but I was muttering at the television, "Yeah, his greeting was 'Get the fuck out of our country'". But I didn't hear any jokes that alluded to the recent immigrant demonstrations or the immigration policy.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
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posted 06 May 2006 03:20 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Now that I've read a little more about it -- you sent me to the many websites -- I see that it's more complex than I first thought and the French were very much involved. So my apologies for being misleading.

Here's some of what I read:

quote:
Cinco de Mayo's history has its roots in the French Occupation of Mexico. The French occupation took shape in the aftermath of the Mexican-American War of 1846-48. With this war, Mexico entered a period of national crisis during the 1850's. Years of not only fighting the Americans but also a Civil War, had left Mexico devastated and bankrupt. On July 17, 1861, President Benito Juarez issued a moratorium in which all foreign debt payments would be suspended for a brief period of two years, with the promise that after this period, payments would resume.

The English, Spanish and French refused to allow president Juarez to do this, and instead decided to invade Mexico and get payments by whatever means necessary. The Spanish and English eventually withdrew, but the French refused to leave... In 1862, the French army began its advance. Under General Ignacio Zaragoza, 5,000 ill-equipped Mestizo and Zapotec Indians defeated the French army in what came to be known as the "Batalla de Puebla" on the fifth of May.



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Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 06 May 2006 03:35 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh! So he was right. That's good. That'll save him a few letters.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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