babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » right brain babble   » culture   » Now who's dead?

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: Now who's dead?
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 05 August 2004 12:22 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The other thread was too long.

Up-and-coming Toronto/Newfoundland actor Andre Noble met an unfortunate demise:


quote:
The eye Weekly editorial staff was greatly saddened to hear of the sudden death on July 30 of 25-year-old actor Andre Noble, recently featured on our cover (May 27) and in our Pride Guide (June 24), in his hometown of Centreville, Newfoundland, after he inadvertently ate a poisonous plant while camping with his aunt.

Noble had recently starred in The Young Company's play In Between and in the feature films Twist, a Toronto update of Oliver Twist, and Sugar, based on stories by former eye columnist Bruce LaBruce.

A memorial service will be held in Toronto in the next two weeks. Those interested in attending should email youngcompany AT hotmail.com. Donations can be made in Noble's name to his alma mater, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, at any Royal Bank branch.


[ 05 August 2004: Message edited by: rasmus raven ]


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 05 August 2004 01:11 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What a hell of a thing.

It always seems so horribly unfair, but then, as we all know ... Life is fragile.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 05 August 2004 01:57 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
henri cartier-bresson, the last living co-founder of magnum ...

quote:
There are as many photographers as there are owners of cameras. Just as any sensitive human being is potentially an artist. But if you have a gift, it's your obligation to pursue it. You have to live, you have to read, and you have to look. So few people really look - I mean search with their eyes. Looking is questioning, searching. Questioning the relationship of one thing to another and enjoying. It needs concentration. And it needs time. It was Rodin who said, "What is done with time, time will respect it."

[ 05 August 2004: Message edited by: Willowdale Wizard ]


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 05 August 2004 03:01 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Apparently Noble died after eating Monkshood (Friar's Cap, Garden Wolfsbane). Why on earth, I wonder. Quite sad. He was cute and seemed charismatic, probably could have had a good career.

Newfoundland is famously bereft of native greens.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2836

posted 05 August 2004 03:06 PM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was amazed by Cartier-Bresson's work from the moment I first saw some examples. Someone once tiold me that he snapped a whole lot of "duds" to get one of his brilliant "decisive moment" photographs. I say who cares? His body of work is wonderful. I'm sad to see him go.
From: the process of recovery | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 05 August 2004 03:12 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hmmmn -- is Monkshood one of those native plants that Russell Smith is using to make fun of Canadian writers who toss botanical details into their stories and novels? (Smith annoys me. He reinvents the critical wheel weekly, the li'l whippersnapper. He's not always wrong, but he's such a smarty-pants.)

Is it true, rasmus, that Newfoundland is not green? I thought that it would be, with small Arctic things. Those are often quite lovely, and in gardens down here, they grow like gangbusters.

Back to the death, though. We just never know, do we? I wonder why he would eat it, too. I wish he hadn't died, but it is a fascinating story in a way, the details ... like ... camping with his aunt. ? I mean, it's interesting. There's something very definite about all the details. At least it wasn't banal, and maybe he would have appreciated that.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 05 August 2004 03:19 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
WW, that is a superb profile of Cartier-Bresson. Och, he and Brassai on Paris. I want to go back to Paris!

These are my favourites of the ones I could find quickly, but anyone can image-google for many more.



From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 05 August 2004 05:38 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was going to say, Cartier-Bresson must have been OLD.

On Monkshood: it's not native to Canada, hence the wonderful old English names. Newfoundland is not bereft of green, merely of greens. It's covered in forest and bogs and such, at least what I saw of it. But to my knowledge, other than the bakeapple berry, partridge berry, blueberry, and marsh berry, there are no significant edible plants native to Newfoundland. Which might explain why the various peoples who experimented with living there over the millenia tended to die out.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rand McNally
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5297

posted 05 August 2004 09:03 PM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
rasmus raven said
quote:
Newfoundland is not bereft of green, merely of greens. It's covered in forest and bogs and such, at least what I saw of it. But to my knowledge, other than the bakeapple berry, partridge berry, blueberry, and marsh berry, there are no significant edible plants native to Newfoundland. Which might explain why the various peoples who experimented with living there over the millenia tended to die out.

I am going to have to disagree. First, besides the various types of berries and mushrooms which Newfoundland is abundant in; there are several types of greens that are common to Newfoundland. Fiddleheads, dandelion greens, wild onions and chives, chickweed, lilly root, sheep’s sow and lamb’s purse for example. (I don’t know the real name for the last two items, but that is what they are locally called. Plus there are many wild herbs, and plants with medicinal uses, like mints, and juniper berry.

Secondly, I think that the extinction of the Beothuk had more to do with European disease and “lead poisoning” than not getting enough greens. The population that became the Beotuck crossed over in to NF around 50 BC, and seemed to do just fine until the 1700s when Europeans begain to move into the exploits valley region.

[ 05 August 2004: Message edited by: Rand McNally ]


From: Manitoba | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 05 August 2004 09:32 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well I take your point on the fiddleheads et al.

However, I wasn't referring to the Beothuks, but the archeological evidence about previous inhabitants. The Beothuks were a relatively recent arrival to the island. The theory is that existence on the island is too marginal... any sort of crisis could simply wipe out a population, which happened several times over the millennia.

By the way, how many of those plants are native species?

[ 05 August 2004: Message edited by: rasmus raven ]


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rand McNally
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5297

posted 06 August 2004 08:21 AM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rasmus, are you confusing the Beothuck with the Micmac, who inhabited NF around 1620. The Beothuck were descended from Martime Archaic have had fairly long history on the island.

quote:
By 200AD, the Beothuck had established themselves in Newfoundland and no longer moved off the island. Though they were part of the Algonquin family of tribes, they developed their own culture and traditions.

http://ctct.essortment.com/beothucknation_rmiw.htm

As for the plants, I am fairly confident that the plants I listed are native. There is also a rich abundance of game and fish for food on the island. I think if various Inuit groups can make a go of it in Labrador, I do not see how the Island could be “marginal”. I think the main reason that Native populations were low, was the fact it is an island. The area that is the most accessible is the Northern Peninsula, which is the harshest region of the island. Also the groups most likely to cross over would have been the Dorset, whose skill set would have kept them in that region because of access to seals.

I tried to reply last night but the site seemed to be down.


From: Manitoba | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 06 August 2004 10:04 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I didn't remember details well, but anyway, here is a site that describes the archeological picture:

http://www.heritage.nf.ca/aboriginal/prehist.html

[ 06 August 2004: Message edited by: rasmus raven ]


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4717

posted 06 August 2004 04:18 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Supposedly Rick James.
First person to say 'I'm Rick James...BITCH!' gets a slap. Oh, hang on. (gives self slap).

From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4668

posted 06 August 2004 07:55 PM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
He is. I just heard on the radio.
From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 06 August 2004 08:10 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
ObCanCon: they said he spent time in Canada in the 60s after going AWOL from the US Navy ('ray!), and while he was here put together his first band, the Mynah Birds, with Neil Young ('ray!).

Edit:

Stop the presses; he was also a thug.

quote:
James was convicted in 1993 of assaulting two women. The first attack occurred in 1991 when he restrained and burned a young woman with a hot pipe during a cocaine binge at his house in West Hollywood. He was free on bail when the second assault occurred in 1992 in James' hotel room.

James was sentenced to more than two years in state prison.


[ 06 August 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jingles
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3322

posted 06 August 2004 10:37 PM      Profile for Jingles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
dandelion greens,

The dandelion is not a native species, hence its great success in colonizing the whole continent.

It was brought over by, would you believe, the Hudson's Bay Company to provide a garden food that would grow at their namesake Factory in the 17th or 18th century.


From: At the Delta of the Alpha and the Omega | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4668

posted 06 August 2004 10:44 PM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
At least partly true. The dandelion that we see most commonly is not a native species. There are other species, some of which I think may be native, but they're less common.
From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
beverly
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5064

posted 06 August 2004 10:46 PM      Profile for beverly     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Dandeloin kinda like that stuff in Victoria that was brought over by some Scotsman - what is it??? - brain freeze alert --- hmmmm Anyhow it now threatens native species.
From: In my Apartment!!!! | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Rand McNally
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5297

posted 06 August 2004 10:56 PM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Damn you Jingles; attacking my position with facts. Everything is relative, there is no objective truth, all is subjective. I win.

OK, now that is out of my system; google seems to back up you absurd claims of a European origin for Dandelions. (Is everything the fault of Europeans and their evil corporations for you.) I checked the others, fiddleheads, wild onions and chives, chickweed, and lily all appear to predate the Europeans. So I think my original point about there being greens on the island still stands; however I guess I will have to tone down the stories of Beothucks drinking dandelion wine.

One of these days when you are not expecting it, I will use FACTS on you, we will see how you like it.


From: Manitoba | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 06 August 2004 11:09 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Apparently, wild chives are also an introduced species.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jingles
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3322

posted 06 August 2004 11:25 PM      Profile for Jingles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hah! Luckily, I'm impervious to the effects of facts and factoids.
From: At the Delta of the Alpha and the Omega | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Rand McNally
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5297

posted 06 August 2004 11:26 PM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Damn you people. I know the normal chives are an import, but the source I found for wild chives, said “They grow wild from Siberia to China to Canada to Sweden--they're native to most of the Northern Hemisphere”. Your Google-fu seems to be better than mine.

I am going to go into bunker mode and claim fiddleheads. So there, as long I hold the fiddlehead card, my position is unassailable.

Quote from http://www.gardenguides.com/articles/chives.htm


From: Manitoba | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
flotsom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2832

posted 06 August 2004 11:47 PM      Profile for flotsom   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Dandeloin kinda like that stuff in Victoria that was brought over by some Scotsman - what is it??? - brain freeze alert --- hmmmm Anyhow it now threatens native species.

Scotch Broom. They're really bad for ticks. Reckless kids sometimes smoke the yellow flowers. I've heard it just gives one a bad headache.

Fiddleheads: Most bracken ferns are carcinogenic. Some also contain cyanide. I think there's only one safely edible fern shoot on the east coast; from the ostrich fern if I'm not mistaken. On the west coast they're all carcinogenic.


From: the flop | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Rand McNally
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5297

posted 07 August 2004 12:08 AM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Allium schoenoprasum, which is a type of wild chive is native to North America. The grow wild in NF, and I can find no evidence they are introduced.

http://www.pnl.gov/ecomon/Species/Plant.html

Well it is getting late in my part of the world, and I feeling like a loser for spending the last hour reading up on wild chives. So night all.

And for you doubters, next your going to try and tell me that moose were introduced as well. I am not going to fall for it. When the vikings landed in NF they found the locals drinking dandelion wine and eating moose burgers, that is my version of history, it as vaild as all other versions, and it is mine.


From: Manitoba | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1299

posted 07 August 2004 12:17 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rick James. Surprisingly enough, reports are citing natural causes.
From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
steffie
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3826

posted 07 August 2004 12:22 AM      Profile for steffie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Dandeloin kinda like that stuff in Victoria that was brought over by some Scotsman - what is it??? - brain freeze alert --- hmmmm Anyhow it now threatens native species.

We have something called Purple Loostrife here that completely chokes out native plants. People are instructed to dig the plants out by the roots, taking care that no leaves or pollen fall to the ground, as it takes but a spore to propogate itself. Pretty, though.

It's a super weed, super weed. It's super weedy. Yeah.


From: What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow / Out of this stony rubbish? | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 07 August 2004 12:32 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Relativism is true for you, but not for me.

What happens when you google "Allium schoenoprasum introduced"? It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks.

I suppose it is possible that it is native to Newfoundland, but not elsewhere.

Apparently, the wild onion is also introduced.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rand McNally
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5297

posted 07 August 2004 12:47 AM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rasmus, I surrender. I was joking about the relatively thing. The site I listed above has Allium schoenoprasum listed as being native. You site looks to be more comprehensive, I will retract my claims of wild chives. Well, I guess you learn something-new everyday. It is impressive how wide spread those introduced species are in NF. I had assumed that they were local. Do I get to keep fiddleheads, or are you going to crush me completely.

I admit, I know F*** all about botany. I had spend enought time in the outdoors to know that those plants were fairly common; I assumed from there. That will teach me to stray from what I know.

[ 07 August 2004: Message edited by: Rand McNally ]


From: Manitoba | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 07 August 2004 01:06 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was joking about relativism, too. (That's a philosopher's joke, I guess.)

[ 07 August 2004: Message edited by: rasmus raven ]


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rand McNally
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5297

posted 07 August 2004 01:09 AM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Do I get points for admitting being wrong; that seems to be fairly rare on Babble.
From: Manitoba | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 07 August 2004 01:13 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes! 10 points for admitting you're wrong!

Has anyone else heard those BBC radio quiz shows where you get one point per question right? But then at the end the person who has the most points doesn't get anything, other than the points. That always sort of annoyed me.

I like you, Rand. You're clever.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rand McNally
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5297

posted 07 August 2004 01:24 AM      Profile for Rand McNally     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks, I liked you up till a couple hours ago; I will most likely like you again in a day or two when my pride has healed, and I have convinced myself that I somehow came out on top of this debate.
From: Manitoba | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 07 August 2004 01:28 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You're so honest! 10 more points!

But this thread is supposed to be about dead people. Maybe you could make amends by mentioning someone who died.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
saturnena
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6632

posted 07 August 2004 03:10 PM      Profile for saturnena     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
hello ,

I grew up in the same town as Andre Noble ,he comes from a well respected family.In a town such as ours we are all feeling the loss of his senseless death.

This incident took place on a small island called Fair Island ,years ago people lived out there and today alot of people have cottages and those of us who have experienced the beautiful of sitting on a deck overlooking the Atlantic Ocean feels so blessed to know it.He was not camping with his aunt , they were on a daytrip 'out the Island' as us newfies call it.

The local people are all shocked this flower grows wild there and we never realised how dangerous it was.I am 37 years old and have not lived 'back home' in 19 years but i remeber seeing them all around.It is such a shame this has happened and we will forever remember Andre in his thoughts and prayers.

Nena


From: toronto | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 07 August 2004 03:31 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Has anyone else heard those BBC radio quiz shows where you get one point per question right? But then at the end the person who has the most points doesn't get anything, other than the points. That always sort of annoyed me.

I can't remembr how they tabulated scores, but there used to be a radio show in the 70s called "Yes, You're Wrong".

The CBC carried it, but I think it originated with the BBC.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 07 August 2004 03:33 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Welcome to babble, saturnena, and thank you for that testimonial.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 07 August 2004 03:42 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A young actor's cruel exit
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
beverly
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5064

posted 07 August 2004 06:25 PM      Profile for beverly     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was just reading that rasmus on cbc.ca. SO tragic. You wouldn't think people would eat things that are poisionous in this day and age.
From: In my Apartment!!!! | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 08 August 2004 11:13 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Red Adair, legendary oil-well firefighter

For once, I can't believe that he was that old! He was eighty-nine, but obviously very vital until recently.

I know a writer who covered one of the fires that Adair and his crew coped with in Alberta back in the seventies. Will get some details, but I remember well the general view that Adair was both smart and charming.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4140

posted 08 August 2004 11:33 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Canadian (chess) IM (International Master) Bryon Nickoloff (1956 – 2004)
quote:
In 1999 doctors told Bryon Nickoloff that he had cancer and less than six months to live. But the well-known Canadian IM survived for five years, playing strong chess tournaments to the very end. ...

Nick was respected by all who met him for his tremendous fighting spirit and creative, combative style of play. He won or shared the Canadian Open (1992, 1995) and Canadian Closed (1995) titles. Nickoloff captured numerous Open tournaments in Canada, several even after he was diagnosed with cancer. Nick played six times (Buenos Aires 1978, Dubai 1986, Thessaloniki 1988, Novi Sad 1990, Moscow 1994, Elista 1998) on the Canadian Olympiad teams, and took the measure of many of the world's best players. IM Nickoloff regarded the Cuban World Champion J.R. Capablanca as his chess hero, and wrote that he strived for the chess perfection, clarity, and harmony which Capablanca achieved in so many games.


IM Nickoloff remembered

FYI...there are two "titles" that a competitive chess player can achieve. These are: International Master...and Grand Master. They are awarded by FIDE, the world governing body for chess.

quote:
In this crazy game, using his Arkhangelsk specialty, Nick came within an eyelash of knocking off the number three rated player in the world.

Alexei Shirov – Bryon Nickoloff
North Bay International Open 1994
Spanish, Arkhangelsk, C78
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bb7 7.d3 Bd6 8.c3 0-0 9.Nbd2 h6 10.d4 Re8 11.Re1 Bf8 12.Nf1 d6 13.Ng3 Na5 14.Bc2 Nc4 15.b3 Nb6 16.a4 c5 17.dxc5 dxc5 18.Qe2 bxa4 19.bxa4 a5 20.Nd2 c4 21.Nxc4 Nxc4 22.Qxc4 Rc8 23.Qa2 Rxc3 24.Bb3 Re7 25.Bb2 Rd3 26.Bc4 Rd2 27.Qb3 Bc6 28.Nf5 Nxe4 29.Nxe7+ Qxe7 30.Rad1 Rxf2 31.Rxe4 Qc5 32.Ba3 Rxg2+ 33.Kxg2 Bxe4+ 34.Kg3 Qxa3 35.Bxf7+ Kh7 36.Bxg8+ Kg6 37.Bf7+ Kf6 38.Rf1+ Bf5 39.Qxa3 Bxa3 40.Bd5 g6 41.h4 h5 42.Be4 Bb4 43.Kf3 Bd7 44.Bc2 Bh3 45.Rg1 Bg4+ 46.Rxg4 1/2.


[ 08 August 2004: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 08 August 2004 03:30 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
On Red Adair, and the Amoco blowout west of Edmonton in 1977, news of which Amoco sought to suppress, with the connivance of the RCMP (I have permission to quote this from the friend who covered the incident for the CBC):

quote:
The blowout was a deep oil well in the West
Pembina field west of Edmonton in Dec 1977. At a depth of more than 25
thousand feet, the drill bit smashed into a formation of ultra-high
pressure gases. The safety or stab-valve was frozen to the rig floor,
and so when the pressure "kicked" all the way up the drill stem, the
roughnecks had no way to block it. Hence the "uncontrolled flow" -
industry doubletalk for blowout.

A geyser up to 180 feet high went up,
much of it poisonous hydrogen sulfide gas. The smell of it drifted as
far as Edmonton and Calgary; silverware all over Alberta turned black
within days. A huge swathe of countryside had to be evacuated, and Red
Adair was called.

The oil company, Amoco, got the RCMP to drop an
"exclusion zone", ie censorship, around the site; we went in on
snowmobiles guided by oil industry scouts (company spies - Amoco's
competition).

A month later, on New Year's Day '78, Red and Richard and
the guys blew out the flame with dynamite and capped the well. Red had
been most helpful guiding us throughout the final weeks ... Mike [the cameraman]
and I drank Chivas Regal with him and his guys every night at the motel in
Drayton Valley, much to the annoyance of the Amoco PR and security
goons.

He was a rough guy and a bit of a redneck. Totally politically
incorrect, and something of a throwback to the worst excesses of Texas
he-men. But he was a total original, an irresistible character, and one
of the most remarkable, fun and energizing individuals I've ever met.


And an afterthought:

quote:
Re my comment on
his "ways," when I asked him, on camera, how long he intended to keep
working, he answered: "I hope I get arrested for rape when I'm 120."

From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 09 August 2004 04:22 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Fay Wray, King Kong's main squeeze, at 96.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000603180


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 09 August 2004 04:23 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Someone else I'd sort of assumed had long since gone to that great green room in the sky.

[ 09 August 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 09 August 2004 04:45 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good night! She was born in Cardston, Alta!

Imagine Cardston a century ago ...


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 09 August 2004 04:53 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm having trouble imagining Cardston today. You can take the boy out of the city, but...
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trisha
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 387

posted 10 August 2004 03:14 PM      Profile for Trisha     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Dr. Tanis Doe, Canadian advocate, educator, researcher and writer.

See her obituary and memorial pages at:
dawn.thot.net/tanis/obit.html


From: Thunder Bay, Ontario | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
beverly
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5064

posted 10 August 2004 03:21 PM      Profile for beverly     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Good night! She was born in Cardston, Alta!

Imagine Cardston a century ago ..


I understood it was "near" Cardston but that is a minor point. BBC last night reported she was born in California!!!! They got my scathing email about getting their facts straight this morning.


From: In my Apartment!!!! | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 10 August 2004 03:26 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Cardston. California. It's all the same to the Brits.
From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 10 August 2004 03:31 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Trust me: it wouldn't be to the Californians.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 10 August 2004 03:31 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Cardston. California. It's all the same to the Brits.

You're an honourary (sp) Canuck, josh -- ever listen to As It Happens, with their "that's only [x km, or y duck-steps, or whatever] from Reading," every time they do a goofy story from Merrie Olde?

Odd bit 'o' Canadiana, that.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 10 August 2004 03:33 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've heard As It Happens. It usually runs at 9:00 p.m. on NPR. But I've never caught that segment.
From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2836

posted 10 August 2004 03:33 PM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I am proud to say that I actually got off the train and had lunch with a friend in Reading on one of my last trips over.
From: the process of recovery | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 10 August 2004 03:37 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I've heard As It Happens. It usually runs at 9:00 p.m. on NPR. But I've never caught that segment.

Silly running gag they've had for over 30 years, for which I finally heard an explanation last year.

In the early 70s, some young British guy was working on the program and produced a segment which took place in some obscure English town. Reckoning that Canadians wouldn't have heard of it, he added "that's about 30 miles east of Reading [pron. Redding]."

Of course, his boss said afterwards, "just about nobody in Canada has heard of Reading, either." But for some reason it caught on and stuck.

[ 10 August 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 10 August 2004 03:45 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Doesn't everyone know where Reading is?

Actually, there's Reading, Pennsylvania, pronounced the same way.

And, actually, I think I have heard that line. I just haven't listened to the show for a while.


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 10 August 2004 03:50 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I just haven't listened to the show for a while.

(sssshhhhhh... not so loud... you'll have your Honourary (sp) Canuck StatusTM suspended, and it's ever such a pain to re-apply...)


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 10 August 2004 03:54 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Not as much pain as you might think.
From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 10 August 2004 03:55 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
my last name is redding, and i live in england. when i apply for jobs, about 20% of the response letters come back addressed to "mr. reading", since obviously, i can't spell my own name.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4717

posted 10 August 2004 03:59 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Willowdale Wizard:
my last name is redding, and i live in england. when i apply for jobs, about 20% of the response letters come back addressed to "mr. reading", since obviously, i can't spell my own name.

There's an office of the Otis Elevator Co. in Reading, PA. I've often wondered if they answer the phone 'Hello, Otis Redding'.


From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 10 August 2004 04:03 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Doesn't Honourary Canuck Status have to be renewed, kind of like a driver's license?
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 10 August 2004 04:08 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
First BWAGA, now this? We don't like such ad hoc rule making down here.
From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
beverly
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5064

posted 10 August 2004 04:08 PM      Profile for beverly     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Doesn't Honourary Canuck Status have to be renewed, kind of like a driver's license?

NO all Josh has to do is have back bacon and pancakes with maple syrup and all will be fine and dandy!!!


From: In my Apartment!!!! | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 10 August 2004 04:12 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
back bacon

Translated into USian, of course, that's "Canadian bacon."

Either way I've found it much more prominent in USian grocery stores, for some reason.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 10 August 2004 04:12 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
But if it's the wrong kind of bacon, or he reaches for the "table syrup", he's out on his ass.
From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 10 August 2004 04:13 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by kuba:
NO all Josh has to do is have back bacon and pancakes with maple syrup and all will be fine and dandy!!!

I think the process should be more rigorous.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 10 August 2004 04:14 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I think the process should be more rigorous.

What, you reckon he should actually have to trek in person to... Vegreville?

(cue ominous music)


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
beverly
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5064

posted 10 August 2004 04:16 PM      Profile for beverly     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
More RIGOUROUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!! What could be more painful than eating maple syrup and feeling your teeth slowly rot out of your head!
From: In my Apartment!!!! | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 10 August 2004 04:17 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
No, no...

...although getting him to try to weed through the red tape of the Government of Canada might be a decent re-initiation test.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4717

posted 10 August 2004 04:17 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think there has to be some sort of ritual in which he dresses as Geddy Lee, is driven mad from too much Extra Old Stock and must sing Taking Care of Business while pummelling fleeing members of Great Big Sea with Timbits. For starters, that is. After that, who knows?
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 10 August 2004 04:19 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hee hee!

(...and right now, josh is thinking to himself, "What's a timbit?")


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 10 August 2004 04:20 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I think there has to be some sort of ritual in which he dresses as Geddy Lee, is driven mad from too much Extra Old Stock and must sing Taking Care of Business while pummelling fleeing members of Great Big Sea with Timbits.

I think this would not only be setting the bar too high, it might violate the Universal Charter on Human Rights or something. Certainly the Extra Old Stock would (trans. for Ontarians: think Brador, if Molson's still produces that... that product; I can't think of Quebec or Atlantic equivalents offhand).

quote:
No, no...
...although getting him to try to weed through the red tape of the Government of Canada might be a decent re-initiation test.

Yabbut he's a lawyer, and so should be used to red tape. A test like this might err in the other direction.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 10 August 2004 04:24 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't know, being a lawyer might work to his detriment. He'll expect the red tape to be LOGICAL. Don't forget, he'll be dealing with a bunch of administrative bureaucrats trying to interpret and enforce legislation that even they don't fully understand.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
josh
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2938

posted 10 August 2004 04:43 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm touched by all your concern, but there must be a less painful way than eating fatty, high cholesterol food and singing bad 70s music.
From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 10 August 2004 04:47 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Actually, there's Reading, Pennsylvania, pronounced the same way.

I hear they have a swell railroad.

[ed. never babble before breakfast....]

[ 11 August 2004: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Stephen Gordon
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4600

posted 10 August 2004 04:50 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Nah. Lousy return. You're better off buying real estate.
From: . | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 10 August 2004 05:06 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm sure we can think of something, josh.

We'll get back to you on that.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 10 August 2004 05:14 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I don't know, being a lawyer might work to his detriment. He'll expect the red tape to be LOGICAL.

He will? Come on, USian law can't be that different to the Canuckistan variety.

quote:
Don't forget, he'll be dealing with a bunch of administrative bureaucrats trying to interpret and enforce legislation that even they don't fully understand.

What I said.

[ 10 August 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4795

posted 11 August 2004 07:22 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
More on monkshood and Andre Noble

quote:

Monkshood has a history dating to the Middle Ages, when it was used as a poison on the tips of arrows and swords, or for medicinal purposes in smaller quantities. Its name is derived from the cowl-like shape of the blue flowers and the hardy plant can grow to almost a 3 feet in height.

Alkaloids in the plant are responsible for its poisonous effect and as little as two to five milligrams, or just a few drops, of its sap can kill an adult.

``Cases of poisoning have been reported when the leaves were mistaken for wild parsley, or the roots were mistaken for horseradish,'' said local horticulturalist Jack Strong.

Even coming in contact with the plant can cause poisoning.

``That's why, if you do come in contact, you have to wash your hands quickly, or I'd be inclined to wear gloves,'' said Strong.

Death results from respiratory failure and cardiac arrest.



From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 11 August 2004 10:21 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Last Friday's episode of Cadfael featured Monk's Hood as the medieval murder weapon of choice.
From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 11 August 2004 10:22 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There's always at least one Monkshood in Cadfael.

Where is it on, Mr Magoo?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 11 August 2004 10:27 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For the last 3 Fridays, 9pm on History. I think it's on this coming Friday too. It comes and it goes.
From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 13 August 2004 02:45 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Andre Noble, shortly before his death (on the left/on top):


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
flotsom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2832

posted 13 August 2004 06:05 PM      Profile for flotsom   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Earlier I declined the obvious segue when I learned of Noble's death by Monkshood.


I hike alot when I'm out west and I've learned a little about plants, and I'm always taken with a sense of awe when I come upon certain poisonous plants. Out of the two thousand plant species in BC the one that really impresses for it's toxicity is this one:

Indian Hellebore

Even a leaf fragment as tiny as one's pinly fingernail will ensure one's almost immediate destruction. Coastal Firts Nations would make a sort of lozenge from the plant using Scotch Pine sap and Hellebore for severe medical conditions such as epilepsy and psychosis. It was thought that if one survived the cure...


I've been informed that it was an effective treatment, though.


From: the flop | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 25 August 2004 07:24 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
irvin yeaworth, director of "the blob"

quote:
Steve McQueen once said of his role: "The main acting challenge in this one consisted of running around bug-eyed and shouting: 'Hey, everybody, look out for the Blob!' "

Yeaworth: "The Blob will follow me to my grave."

Yeaworth, an elder in the Presbyterian church, would rather have been remembered for the more than 400 Christian educational films he made, some for evangelist Billy Graham, than for a schlock film about teenagers battling an insatiable gelatinous creature from outer space.

Yeaworth once said he took on The Blob "to see if I really could communicate with the secular audience".

He certainly did.



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 28 August 2004 10:47 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
George Johnston, a great Canadian poet.

Sandra Martin has written this exceptionally fine obituary of Johnston in today's G&M.

Johnston was 91 years old, and died of Alzheimer disease. His wife survived him by nine days.

Two of his poems appear at the end of the obit.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kevin
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3645

posted 28 August 2004 10:50 PM      Profile for Kevin   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
David Gibbons, Vancouver trial lawyer, Glen Clark's defense counsel, and my uncle. Rest in Peace.
From: Simon Fraser University | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 28 August 2004 10:54 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Aw, Kevin. He sounds as though he was a wonderful man. Big hugs. *heart*
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 28 August 2004 11:04 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Lovely obit, skdadl.

As for back bacon, Michelle, t'aint kosher or halal. Though Yves makes an ersatz that is.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Kevin
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3645

posted 28 August 2004 11:17 PM      Profile for Kevin   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
Aw, Kevin. He sounds as though he was a wonderful man. Big hugs. *heart*

Thanks skdadl.

[ 28 August 2004: Message edited by: Kevin Harding ]


From: Simon Fraser University | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 28 August 2004 11:24 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wish I had words of wisdom, Kevin, but I don't.

It helps sometimes to train oneself to say, right away, What a fine life he had, or something like that. It does help. A bit. But it still always takes the stuffing out of me for a while.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Doug
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 44

posted 29 August 2004 03:36 AM      Profile for Doug   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sic transit Gloria, Gloria!

"Laura Branigan, a Grammy-nominated pop singer best known for her 1982 platinum hit 'Gloria,' has died. She was 47.

Branigan died of a brain anuerysm Thursday in her sleep at her home in East Quogue, said her brother Mark Branigan. He said she had complained to a friend of a headache for about two weeks before she died, but had not sought medical attention."


From: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5594

posted 29 August 2004 05:34 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"I'm not dead." - Johnny Depp as William Blake in "dead man"

way too funny


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 30 August 2004 09:09 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Kevin, I hope that you've seen it by now: the Globe & Mail is running, big and above the fold on page 3, a terrific! profile of your uncle.

Gee, Kevin -- even big celebs are usually consigned to the back of the review section.

It is a fond and admiring and funny piece. What a terrific tribute -- to, of course, a terrific man.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kevin
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3645

posted 30 August 2004 01:00 PM      Profile for Kevin   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks skdadl, I'll have to go get a copy of the G&M. There was full page dealy in the Vancouver Sun Yesterday.

Thanks so much for letting me know!


From: Simon Fraser University | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 30 August 2004 01:04 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, it's grand, Kevin. Great big picture, too.

What a cutie! Do you look like him?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kevin
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3645

posted 30 August 2004 01:34 PM      Profile for Kevin   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
At the moment, slightly. I've just had jaw surgery so I look like I weigh twice what I do.
From: Simon Fraser University | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 30 August 2004 01:37 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

I liked the curls, Kevin. I bet yours aren't white.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Kevin
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3645

posted 30 August 2004 01:44 PM      Profile for Kevin   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Unfortunately not! My hair used to be curly, not anymore.

Anyways, thanks for the kind comments, skdadl. Very kind. This man was a great person in the legal profession, he's whats interested me in it. Not to mention the giant house he used to live in near Horsehoe Bay. lol.

I'll have to go grab a copy of the GM.


From: Simon Fraser University | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3674

posted 08 September 2004 09:06 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
the rev beyers naude

quote:
The Rev Beyers Naudé, who has died aged 89, was one of the most respected and loved stalwarts of South Africa's liberation struggle, and a man who played a crucial role in supporting the underground movement of the African National Congress (ANC).

What was remarkable about Naudé, however, was that instead of becoming an icon of the liberation struggle, he could easily have risen to the top of white exclusivity - and, in particular, of the Dutch Reformed Church, which played a central role in justifying the philosophy of apartheid. He came from an entrenched Afrikaner nationalist background, and spent his early years as a Dutch Reformed minister. After his rejection of apartheid, he was denounced as a traitor and ostracised by many whites.



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 14 September 2004 11:36 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Bill Glassco (1935-2004), co-founder of the Tarragon Theatre in Toronto, great director, and by all reports a gentleman and all-round mensch.

Note that his Tarragon co-founder, Jane Gordon, is the daughter of nationalist icon Walter Gordon and thereby connected through her mother to the George Grants -- I think her mother was George Grant's sister.

There is a pretty good obit in the Toronto section of today's Grope and Flail, but good luck finding it online on the site of that benighted, godforsaken organ.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 14 September 2004 11:43 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here it is.

quote:
Mr. Glassco was a major player in what is referred to as the "second wave" of Canadian theatre artists in the late 1960s and early '70s whose mission to foster a distinctly Canadian dramatic tradition, away from touring British and American light fare, is the most definitive chapter in the evolution of homegrown theatre.

The success of Mr. Glassco's inaugural production at the Tarragon of David Freeman's Creeps marked the beginning of a decade-long tenure at the theatre. In 1982 he stepped down as artistic director of the Tarragon and after a few years of freelancing became artistic director in 1985 of CentreStage, which he then merged with Toronto Free Theatre in 1988 to establish what is now CanStage.


[ 14 September 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
candle
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3103

posted 16 September 2004 01:35 AM      Profile for candle     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Johnny Ramone died this afternoon:

Joey died in 2001, Dee Dee in 2002, and now Johnny.

Johnny Ramone dead at 55


From: Ontario | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 16 September 2004 02:43 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good grief. What a shock. Not Johnny too!

Hey, hey, hey, the Big C's taking the world's greatest band away.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 16 September 2004 08:53 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Walter Stewart (1931-2004), crusading journalist, editor, author.

I knew Walter and worked with him for a time in the seventies, so it was a sad surprise to turn the page this a.m. and see him smiling out at me from an obit.

Canadian readers will probably best remember Shrug (1971), his most-acute profile of Pierre Trudeau (perfect title, eh?). Walter was something of an old-fashioned muck-raker -- tireless researcher, unflinching with his conclusions and judgements, and fast -- but he was a craftsman, too, a master of crystal-clear prose, exceptionally talented at producing accessible analyses of financial, bureaucratic, or political tangles and scams.

I don't know whether he ever belonged to the CCF/NDP -- somehow I suspect he would have felt he shouldn't belong to any party -- but in his political views he was a classic CCFer. He wrote biographies of Tommy Douglas and M.J. Coldwell, and worked into the nineties producing close to a dozen no-nonsense, behind-the-scenes readings of Canadian political, social, and financial stories and scandals.

He was personally an absolute straight arrow, and the moment you met him you knew that. When he was working, he was quick with people as with his writing -- he was "just the facts, m'am, just the facts" all the way, kind but utterly focused on the work at hand, immune to game-playing himself and fairly scornful of it in others, although it so often gave him topics for books. I can still hear that clipped, flat, no-nonsense voice.

He had a very long and happy marriage -- at least forty years, it appears.

I can think of a few babblers who are quite a lot like Walter, and that is a good thing. The world needs more Walters.

[ 16 September 2004: Message edited by: skdadl ]


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Briguy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1885

posted 16 September 2004 10:16 AM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sigh. My musical icons are dropping like flies. And most of them haven't even hit retirement age, yet! double sigh.
From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1299

posted 16 September 2004 10:41 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Former CCF MPP (Waterloo South) Ted Isley

quote:
ISLEY, Theodore (Ted) H. - At K-W Health Centre of Grand River Hospital, on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2004, peacefully surrounded by his family. Theodore Henry Isley, aged 91 years. Ted was a member of St. Boniface Church, Maryhill, the Church Choir and the Holy Name Society, Past Grand Knight of Maryhill Knights of Columbus and a member of the Guelph Assembly of the Fourth Degree Knights of Columbus, was very active in community affairs, a member of the Maryhill Historical Society and was very active in Waterloo Farm and Safety Committee. He was Reeve of Waterloo Township from 62-71 and was on the County Council. He represented South Waterloo in the Ontario Legislature from 1948-51, County Warden in 1968 and was on the first Regional Council. He was a member of the Waterloo Regional Police Commission and farmed in the Breslau area for many years.

From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Surferosad
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4791

posted 16 September 2004 10:51 AM      Profile for Surferosad   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by candle:
Johnny Ramone died this afternoon:

Joey died in 2001, Dee Dee in 2002, and now Johnny.

Johnny Ramone dead at 55



I think that's the first time that a republican’s death won’t make me happy…


That's a little bit of political black humour there for ya...


From: Montreal | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Black Dog
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2776

posted 16 September 2004 05:58 PM      Profile for Black Dog   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 21 September 2004 12:31 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Eddie Adams, the photojournalist who took this picture:


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
audra trower williams
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2

posted 22 September 2004 04:23 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Russ Meyer.
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Briguy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1885

posted 22 September 2004 04:29 PM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I find it amusing that Russ Meyer is being remembered (in some circles) for being an artiste, while Russ himself spurned that accolade. Russ was clearly only in it for the money, and quite proud of that fact. The Guardian obit mentions that he talked about The Valley of the Dolls being his best movie ever because it made him more money than any of his previous movies. He was an American icon, to be sure.
From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 22 September 2004 04:37 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There's a quote about all great artisits being obsessed with money that would be apropos about now. Unfortunately I can't remember who said it though. I think it was Picasso...

Oh well.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 22 September 2004 05:20 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Russ was clearly only in it for the money...

... and so that he could cast large-breasted women and film them jumping, draped across the hoods of cars, being "discovered" half-buried in desert sand by Charles Napier, and so forth and suchlike...

Happy the man who can make a living from his hobby, I suppose.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6718

posted 30 September 2004 01:59 AM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
http://www.canoe.ca/JamMusic/sep29_girl-ap.html

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Izora Rhodes Armstead, who sang the 1980s dance club hit It's Raining Men as one-half of the Weather Girls, has died.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
RealityStick
recent-rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6761

posted 01 October 2004 08:24 AM      Profile for RealityStick   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Tim Choate, the actor who played Zathras on Babylon 5 has died.

http://tinyurl.com/4ulen

"Zathras gone! Zathras warned Zathras, but Zathras never listened to Zathras. Zathras was quiet one in family." - Zathras


From: the last lonely refuge | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 02 October 2004 04:50 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Richard Avedon (b. 1923), fashion photographer:


He was reported to be the model for the Fred Astaire character in Funny Face (1957):


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca