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Author Topic: 22 November 1963
skdadl
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posted 22 November 2001 12:51 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It was a Friday. I was sitting in a first-year English class. Our prof finally stuck his head in the door, said he'd run upstairs for our papers and hand them back, but that we'd then want to adjourn to the cafeteria to listen to the news. What news? we all said.

In spite of everything we've learned since about the Kennedy administration, and in spite of everything that's happened since, good and bad, I still think that Kennedy's assassination marks a profound change in the political culture of the U.S. It was perhaps more of a beginning than an end, the beginning of a public culture of mistrust and suspicion, to a degree, and all the coarsening of political views that results from such a climate.

I couldn't decide where this kind of memory should go. Perhaps it's just the crickety who still remember every year what a shock it was. But I always do. If you were young, and even in Canada, the myth, at least, had been inspiring.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
JCL
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posted 22 November 2001 03:18 PM      Profile for JCL     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
the beginning of a public culture of mistrust and suspicion, to a degree, and all the coarsening of political views that results from such a climate.

I totally agree with you. I think the rumours of who was really behind the killing of JFK started it all about a culture of mistrust, suspicion and changing of political views.

I think prior to JFK's assasination, a lot of people took what the government said as face value and what the media reported. Since then, there are more people that are vocal towards politics nowadays than there ever has been. There are more people who evaluate whatever information they're given is accurate or not. I think there are more people in the world today who think critically. And that's a very good thing.


From: Winnipeg. 35 days to Christmas yet no snow here. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
NDB
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posted 22 November 2001 03:33 PM      Profile for NDB     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've been fascinated by JFK and the assassination since I was about 11. It's been interesting to contemplate what he, and his presidency, meant to Western democracy. It's also fun (sorry maybe that's not appropriate) to think about what may, or may not, have been if he hadn't been killed.

Just one for instance, how much of Lyndon Johnson's terms were dictated by Kennedy's actions? Anyway, I've only read about all of this from books and chats with the folks, but I always get goosebumps on this day. Thanks for the reminder.


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DrConway
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posted 23 November 2001 12:58 AM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
On second thought, forget this post.

[ 22 November 2003: Message edited by: DrConway ]


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Catalyst
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posted 24 November 2001 12:29 AM      Profile for Catalyst   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wasn't born yet and have no memories of the event in question, but it nearly at least my parents' wedding. My mother's priest did not want to marry my parents the day after the death of the first Catholic President. My Dad, not being Catholic, was furious as he had his entire family out from the boonies of Northern Saskatchewan for the wedding and was due to be shipped overseas on the following Monday for a year of peacekeeping. He still is unsure if the reluctance of the priest was due to Windsor's proximity to the USA or the religious affiliation. But, perhaps my elder brother and me would not have been born had my father had decided to wait until he got home again.

Anyway, I just returned from helping them celebrate their 38th anniversary. (It's still November 23 in this time zone.) And I will thank them for all they've done for my brother and me (although there are times my foreman would regret their choosing to reproduce a second time.)


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sherpafish
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posted 24 November 2001 12:53 AM      Profile for sherpafish   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Despite my visit to to site of this murder, it is an event that happened only in books and in the movies for me, I am too young. At the same time I can sence how the assasination built a large part of my life's political/social environment. People my age still talk about the grassy knoll, and doubt it's analogous offspring. The pop manifestation of this doubt-meme is the X-file generation. It goes deeper than that, have no doubt.
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DrConway
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posted 24 November 2001 04:26 AM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I concur. De-drifting from the thread I would say that that day in history was the first pebble that ended in the avalanche known as Watergate.

It's kind of sad when you can't trust your government to do the right thing, even though you have the capability to change who runs things.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
saskzen
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posted 28 November 2001 12:50 AM      Profile for saskzen     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I visited the site last Feb. along with crowds of others, who also simply wanted to be there. They actually have an X painted on the road where the shot hit. Never mind that there were thre shots, two of which hit!

While I have read some of the books, and wondered about some of the questions, being there made me realize that it would take an excellent marksman a lot of luck to make that shot. Once, that is, let alone twice.


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skdadl
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posted 22 November 2003 11:12 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Many younger people, I understand, are vaguely annoyed by us old fogies and our memories of where we were when, but since it's the fortieth anniversary, I figured I should resurrect this thread.

Forty years. Amazing.


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banquosghost
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posted 22 November 2003 11:28 AM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yup.

I was in study hall in Sheldon-Williams Collegiate Institute in Regina. The principal, Mr. Pollard, came on the intercom and without preamble said, "President Kennedy has been assassinated in Dallas. Go home." As though any second some previously undiscovered Cuban missiles were going to be launched.

Is there a personage in the Kennedy assassination saga similar to Dr. Mudd in the Lincoln saga, whose name will pass into vernacular useage? I used to wonder if Ruby might.


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skdadl
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posted 22 November 2003 11:48 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Maybe Mr Pollard kept his message short and curt because he was afraid he would cry. Rhetorically speaking, and in hindsight, that order is most effective.

Wasn't Dr Mudd unfairly treated? I can't remember how much, if anything, he had known about the conspiracy beforehand, but it is my vague memory that he was mainly innocent.


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banquosghost
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posted 22 November 2003 12:02 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, Mudd was just an MD doing his Hippocratic duty but the "your name will be mud" phrase passed into the language anyway.

Mr. Pollard, I'm sure, just wanted to be sure we all at least had the opportunity to witness history rather than be stuck inside classrooms with teachers who didn't want to be there either.

That day, the few following and the Kennedy mythos, have become so central to the psyche of our generation it's almost beyond comprehension.


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DrConway
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posted 22 November 2003 01:52 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'd forgotten about this thread.

I was just thinking earlier this week about November 22 1963. Even though the Kenendy/Camelot myth is now firmly embedded in our culture, and in actual fact Kennedy was a human being like any of us, I still see something redeeming in the idea that a leader of a country can personally inspire other people to at least dream of greatness, if not achieve that greatness.

"Don't let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment that was known as Camelot."

[ 22 November 2003: Message edited by: DrConway ]


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audra trower williams
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posted 22 November 2003 02:13 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've read that the 50's lasted until Kennedy was killed.
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 22 November 2003 02:30 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by audra estrones:
I've read that the 50's lasted until Kennedy was killed.

I dunno. Something definitely shifted as soon as Kennedy was elected. And then, so soon, something shifted again.

Hard to believe now, but only two months after the assassination, the Beatles appeared on Ed Sullivan.

That was another shift, and one that lasted longer, although it also came to a sad end soon enough.


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banquosghost
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posted 22 November 2003 02:50 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Beatles have never come to an end. The release of Let It Be...Naked minus all the Phil Spector layers will likely be another best seller just as the release a couple years ago of that CD with all their #1 hits was.

Something that began it's quiet expiration with the end of the Kennedy/Camelot era was the idea of the honourable American Liberal political tradition. It took a while to develop but I believe JFK's death was the beginning of the end of that tradition.


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skdadl
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posted 22 November 2003 02:54 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
bg: I wanna hold your hand.
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banquosghost
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posted 22 November 2003 04:52 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Help!
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'lance
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posted 22 November 2003 04:54 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
(psst... bg... she loves you!)

Well, at least sexual intercourse began in nineteen sixty-three.

[ 22 November 2003: Message edited by: audra estrones ]


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banquosghost
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posted 22 November 2003 06:12 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Come Together.
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'lance
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posted 22 November 2003 06:13 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Why Don't We Do It in the Road?

Edit:

< pendantry >

quote:
Yes, Mudd was just an MD doing his Hippocratic duty but the "your name will be mud" phrase passed into the language anyway.

This phrase actually originated, and was current, before Mudd was born, and appeared in a dictionary of slang in 1823.

< /pendantry >

[ 22 November 2003: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 22 November 2003 06:28 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Because.

Because the world is round it turns me on
Because the world is round...aaaaaahhhhhh

Because the wind is high it blows my mind
Because the wind is high......aaaaaaaahhhh

Love is all, love is new
Love is all, love is you

Because the sky is blue, it makes me cry
Because the sky is blue.......aaaaaaaahhhh

Aaaaahhhhhhhhhh...


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skdadl
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posted 22 November 2003 06:33 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Humph. Editorial pendantry just spoiled my continuity. Humph.
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'lance
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posted 22 November 2003 06:36 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
... er, Here Comes the Sun?
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 22 November 2003 06:44 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Humph. Day tripper. Sunday driver, yeah.
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'lance
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posted 22 November 2003 06:54 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, baby, you can drive my car...
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 22 November 2003 07:06 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Eckshully, I don't have a licence ... But I got love, and, as we all know, that's all you need.

Apart from supper. Which I must now go to cook. Goodnight, sweethearts, goodnight.


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banquosghost
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posted 22 November 2003 07:11 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
See how they run...
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'lance
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posted 22 November 2003 07:35 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
... while my guitar gently weeps...
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marcy
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posted 22 November 2003 08:35 PM      Profile for marcy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Imagine .... but back to Jack. I was a little junior high kid ... our Socials teacher was in tears and couldn't talk about it. Then, we were mercifully freed from the generally hated gym class and sent home. Two days later, on the Sunday when Jack Ruby shot Lee harvey Oswald, my dad came to pick us up from our usual Sunday morning in the comfortable pew of the local C of E with the shocking news. He'd seen it live. He drove home like a maniac in order to position himself back in front of the black and white. A news junkie, he didn't realize he was participating in a new role for a newish medium.
From: vancouver | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
banquosghost
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posted 22 November 2003 09:40 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Marcy, I think that you've touched the heart of the matter. This was television's coming of age news coverage event. I watched the Oswald assassination live as well.
From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 23 November 2003 06:14 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i was born in 1972, so i can't say where i was or what i was doing in 1963 ... but i can say that i can't understand the myth-making around JFK, oddly i can see it for bobby's campaign in 68, but not jack. and i definitely don't tolerate all this "JFK would have seen the morass of vietnam and got us out of it" b.s.
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minimal
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posted 23 November 2003 06:32 PM      Profile for minimal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was on a No. 10 bus in Vancouver on my way to UBC after having missed a class or two. The only reason I remember (and that anyone remembers) is that it was such a big news story for so long. One was almost forced into remembering where one was at the time.

JFK was the first Catholic to be US president, he defeated Nixon who was mistrusted by many (but I'm not sure JFK won the popular vote), he was considered to be a good looking guy with all the hair and great smiles, and he uttered phrases which people considered messianic or something ("ask not what..blah blah, etc. etc.). I think the Vietnam war fiasco did more to change political trends than JFK ever did. People just wanted to believe that he was a symbol for something new. As for me, I was never impressed with him.


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Polunatic
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posted 23 November 2003 08:18 PM      Profile for Polunatic   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was in Grade 3 and our teacher announced it in class. When I went home, my mother was crying and said something like, "I felt like he was my brother" (words she later has no recollection of but which I distinctly remember).
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Michelle
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posted 23 November 2003 11:08 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't believe I missed that whole Beatles exchange!
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
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posted 24 November 2003 03:37 AM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Me either!

What have I done to deserve such a fate
I realize that I've left it too late

I'm a loooooser...


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banquosghost
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posted 24 November 2003 09:54 AM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Don't Bring Me Down.
From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 24 November 2003 10:05 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Instead: please please me.
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Michelle
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posted 24 November 2003 10:18 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't know, skdadl - if I give my love to you, I must be sure from the very start.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 24 November 2003 10:23 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
But Michelle! Ma belle!
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al-Qa'bong
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posted 24 November 2003 11:12 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by audra estrones:
I've read that the 50's lasted until Kennedy was killed.

Well. I've read (it was in the High Times "60s" edition...I just checked, High Times has a website!) that the 60s started when some female reporter returned to her office and announced to her Washington press colleagues that she had just left the President's bed.

My brother was born a week before Kennedy was shot. I've always linked the two events. I was three at the time, so memories are very hazy.

I do remember the all-day (well, maybe it was just an afternoon) TV coverage of the train carrying RFK's body to its burial place.


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BleedingHeart
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posted 24 November 2003 11:15 AM      Profile for BleedingHeart   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
How many people think there was a conspiracy and how many people think Oswald just got off a lucky shot.

I'm leaning towards the latter.


From: Kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 24 November 2003 11:20 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oswald got off two lucky shots and one stray.

I think that the Warren Commish was incredibly badly done and handled, and to the dismissive, paternalistic attitude of that commish can be traced many awful things that have characterized USian culture ever since. No wonder people are mistrustful of all official pronouncements.

And yet I accept the science that has traced the bullets, especially the stray. I don't believe in any conspiracy, but I can see how the clod-hopping elites provoked conspiracy-mindedness in ordinary people.


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jeff house
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posted 24 November 2003 02:11 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I can see how the clod-hopping elites provoked conspiracy-mindedness in ordinary people.

On balance, I don't think there was a conspiracy either. I do think that the Warren Commission didn't want to look too closely at such possible motives as 1)Use of the mob to murder Castro and 2)Sexual relationship between Kennedy and mobsters' girlfriends. Those areas should have been dealt with because of Jack Ruby's mob connections.

They skated quickly by these areas, and so gave later theorists the chance to raise questions.

We should also not forget that a Committee of the House of Representatives concluded, in about 1978, that Oswald had not acted alone.


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jingles
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posted 24 November 2003 03:22 PM      Profile for Jingles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Getting shot was the best career move he could make. If he had lived, he'd just be another in a series.

The whole mythology around him is because of it. Just because he got shot, people are quick to forget that he was just as brutal, hawkish, and corrupt as all the rest. They blame Johnson for Vietnam, forgetting it was Jack that started the whole thing, and had no reason not to do exactly what as Johnson would later do.

Remember that he was a member of the wealthiest of wealthy oligarchic families, and his job was to protect his own.


From: At the Delta of the Alpha and the Omega | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
josh
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posted 24 November 2003 03:40 PM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Remember that he was a member of the wealthiest of wealthy oligarchic families, and his job was to protect his own."

Sure. Let's elect those representatives of the "common man" like Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan rather than those horrid "upper crust" folks like JFK and Franklin Roosevelt.

As for the assassination, I do believe there was a conspiracy based on the auditory evidence that a fourth shot was fired from the grassy knoll, the witnesses standing in front of the grassy knoll who heard shots come from behind, and the extreme unlikelihood that one bullet could cause the numerous wounds it caused and come out in near pristine condition.

However, there is so much contradictory and inconclusive evidence in the case that the exact nature of the conspiracy cannot be determined. I do lean to the theory, based on all the evidence, that organized crime played a major role in the conspiracy.


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
banquosghost
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posted 24 November 2003 04:16 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oliver Stone was one of the conspirators. He already knew he wanted to one day make a cheesy movie with Kevin Costner about a presidential assassination so he helped set one up.
From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 24 November 2003 04:45 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good God!

Of all the nefarious conspiracies yet suggested, this has to be the nefariousest.

Oliver Stone: wanted for crimes against film and history.

[ 24 November 2003: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
banquosghost
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posted 24 November 2003 11:36 PM      Profile for banquosghost     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Theory?"
"Theory?"

Why I oughta...

Another I've always fancied was Jackie and her derringer. She was finally up to here with the philandering and snapped. Just snapped.


From: north vancouver, bc | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
timbit00093
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posted 26 November 2003 03:41 AM      Profile for timbit00093        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Bang! Bang! Stones's silver hammer
came down upon his head ...

From: Calgary | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
windymustang
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posted 26 November 2003 05:19 AM      Profile for windymustang     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Koo Koo Ke Chew
I am the Eggman
I am the Eggman
I am the Walrus

I was only days before my 3rd birthday when JFK was shot. I remember Dad calling Mom to the TV to see the news report. It was obviousely a very traumatic event in our families lives for me to have such clear memories of it at less than 3.

I believe it was a conspiracy. From everything I've seen and read, there is no possibility that 1 man shot JFK. Eye witnesses at the time reported hearing shots from 2 different directions. Also, if JFK was shot by LHO, why was Jackie trying to crawl off the back of the car, in the direction of the school ____ bldg? How was Kennedy's head blown backwards when the bldg and Oswald were already behind them?

The Kennedy's have a long history of power and corruption. I don't trust anything that came out of that family, but recognize Kennedy's immortal words, "Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country."

Kennedy apparantly tried to get out of the Viet Nam war that he had got the US into before he was shot. That is one of the theories behind the conspiracy theory.


From: from the locker of Mad Mary Flint | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 22 November 2004 08:16 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In memory of everything that went wrong afterwards.

Interestingly, although I did only a quick scan of the paper this morning, I didn't see any reference at all to the anniversary.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
josh
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posted 22 November 2004 09:24 AM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Probably because last year's 40th anniversary drew a lot of attention. And as the years continue to go by, except for the ten year marks, there is likely to be less and less attention. For me, it was the first big event I remember. And the images from the event, particularly the funeral procession and burial, remain vivid.
From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
arborman
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posted 22 November 2004 06:15 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Did anyone see 'Fog of War', the documentary that interviews Robert McNamara?

He seemed to imply that Kennedy had no intention of getting caught up in a long and futile war. They also play some clips of White House tapes where LBJ is overriding McNamara and increasing the troop levels etc.

How selective his memory is would be another question entirely. It was a gripping documentary though, interesting look inside the mind of a person that is often seen as one of the monsters of the 20th century.


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 22 November 2004 06:54 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not sure that I think of McNamara as a monster, arborman, or at least not one of the major monsters of the C20 -- more one of your garden-variety "Quiet Americans," from whose blindly arrogant good intentions God save us all.

I didn't see Fog of War, but I was infuriated by what I read of his late recantations about Viet Nam. A privileged American, free in his privileged old age to leaf through his guilty "feelings" and luxuriate in his self-righteous penitence. *sticks tongue out*

I think I prefer an honestly defiant crook/murderer to one who meditates on his guilt mainly to let the rest of us see how sensitive he is.


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Contrarian
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posted 22 November 2004 07:06 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was seven, and it didn't mean anything to me, but I recall my father talking about it in a shocked voice.

...The fool on the hill
sees the sun going down
and the eyes in his head
see the world spinning 'round.

The first colour TV I ever saw had a cartoon of the Beatles playing on it.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 22 November 2004 08:50 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A yes, I remember it well. I would've been a glean in me dad's eye then.

The thoughts of JFK pulling 50 000 US troops from South East Asia didn't sit well with the military industrial complex at the time.

After the incident in Dallas, they'd go on to shovel several hundred billion more borrowed taxpayer dollars to the MIC and friends of the Republican party.

Uncle Sam has bombed 21 countries since Nagasaki and Hiroshima. And which of them is more democratic for it today ?. Oh aye, a handful have become filthy rich though.


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 22 November 2005 12:40 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
In memory of everything that went wrong afterwards.

Interestingly, although I did only a quick scan of the paper this morning, I didn't see any reference at all to the anniversary.


I wrote that last year. My thoughts haven't changed. The newspaper hasn't changed, either.

But in memory.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rinne
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posted 22 November 2005 03:06 PM      Profile for rinne     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was nine, it was lunchtime and I was in the classroom with my teacher, another teacher walked in and announced that President Kennedy had been shot and killed. Today, reflecting on that moment I am once again flooded with deep feelings of sadness, of something gone wrong, deeply wrong.

I do not think John F. Kennedy was the man we were led to believe he was, we saw him as a heroic figure, a man of courage, action and integrity, and it was our confidence in this ideal that died that day. We are more cynical now and less deluded about these supposed heroic figures.

As to what went wrong I suspect a series of events from the very beginning of human existence, or as Leonard sings, “and even though it all went wrong, I’ll stand before the Lord of Song with nothing on my tongue but Hallelujah”.

I think that moment embedded itself so deeply because it was the first moment I knew suffering with certainty.


From: prairies | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 22 November 2005 03:25 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As you say ACoW, something went wrong that day and just kept rippling out, getting worse and worse. Whoever JFK was personally, in our innocence we had hoped for so much more, and suddenly even the innocent began to grasp the surreal.

I've thought that about Watergate too. Learning how bad things can be does not make us resolve to correct what is wrong and make things better. Sometimes, it just unleashes something worse.


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Sharon
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posted 22 November 2005 04:36 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I wrote that last year. My thoughts haven't changed. The newspaper hasn't changed, either.

skdadl, our dailies had an eight-inch AP story, headlined "JFK assassination still baffles after four decades" (Daily News) and "Debate over who killed JFK rages on 42 years later" (Herald).

It begins thusly:

"In the 42 years since the assassination of president John F. Kennedy, here's what has been agreed on by those who still pursue one of the most sensational crimes in history: very little, if anything."

The Herald

[ 22 November 2005: Message edited by: Sharon ]


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Boarsbreath
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posted 22 November 2005 04:52 PM      Profile for Boarsbreath   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was 6. My mother cried. I'd seen her cry before, but I couldn't understand why the death of an American president would make her cry...I thought the world was tidier, as Canadians we'd only be affected by Canadian events.

So the assassination showed me how untidy the world was, which near enough I guess it did generally.


Boy, you're gonna carry that weight a long time


From: South Seas, ex Montreal | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged

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