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Author Topic: Fashion: Likes/Dislikes
Left Turn
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posted 28 March 2006 05:08 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
This is a thread about what fashion styles you like/dislike. The styles you mention don't have to be current; they need not be exaustive; they need not even be for your gender. If you want to mention what clothes you wear, that's fine; but I acknowledge that people may like styles that you can no longer buy.

OK, here goes.

Fashion Likes:

T-shirts
checkered flannel plaid shirts
Light stonewashed denim
straight leg pants
Cargo pants
Skater sneakers
Black canvas sneakers
Dr. Martens
Round glasses
Brown, Black, Hunter Green, Indigo, Maroon, Red

Fashion Dislikes:

Corporate logos on shirts
Acid-washed denim
Distressed denim
plunging necklines
Halter tops
Furry boots
High heels
Spandex
Fluorescent Colours
Floral or other similar patterns
Lightweight fabrics (chiffon, linnen ect.)

I also dislike women wearing skirts, though some skirts are definitely worse than others. I can tolerate women wearing dresses as evening wear, but I don't care for women wearing them otherwise (prefer women wearing sheath/straight dresses over pouffy ones).

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


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ephemeral
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posted 28 March 2006 05:16 PM      Profile for ephemeral     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I love goth fashion, but it has always been too expensive for me to buy. Where do these teenagers get the money to blow on these clothes? I'm not so big on goth makeup though. I don't think I really need it anyway with my jet black hair and dark eyes.

I love wearing skirts, though I don't wear them often because it is hard to ride my bike wearing a skirt. What is it that you don't like about women wearing skirts, left turn?

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: ephemeral ]


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Left Turn
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posted 28 March 2006 05:28 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Ephemeral, I have a general dislike of clothing that is overly gendered female. It stems from a gramscian analysis I have developed about fashion and the fashion industry.

Clothing that is overly gendered female helps to keep women as second class citizens. Women who wear clothing that is overly gendered female become objectified (to varying degrees depending on the outfit). Also, much clothing that is overy genered femle, like skirts, dresses, and high heels, serves to limit the movement of the women who wear thenm (ever seen a woman wearing high heels and a mini-skrt try to run?). To take the argument toits logical conclusion, women who wear clohing that is overly gendered female are partiipating in their own opression.

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


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ephemeral
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posted 28 March 2006 05:36 PM      Profile for ephemeral     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
You don't seriously believe that, do you? Besides just the appearance aspect, I like wearing skirts precisely because they make me feel more feminine. I don't look at it is I'm contributing to my own oppression, but rather a statement that says I am proud to be a woman, and look and act like a woman. I don't have to try to downplay the fact that I am female.

p.s: Some women whom I've seen running in heels run somewhat clumsily, and some run gracefully, and some run like they're really running, surprisingly.


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peppermint
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posted 28 March 2006 05:45 PM      Profile for peppermint     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Skirts can be quite liberating. I feel sorry for men who have to wear long pants (never mind a tie) in 30+ degree weather
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'lance
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posted 28 March 2006 05:48 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by peppermint:
Skirts can be quite liberating. I feel sorry for men who have to wear long pants (never mind a tie) in 30+ degree weather.

That's why this year I might finally buy myself a Utilikilt. I have a kilt already, but it's made of wool, and besides is really for special occasions.

Then again, in these parts it almost never gets hot enough that long pants are uncomfortable, if they're made of light enough cotton or linen.


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Sleeping Sun
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posted 28 March 2006 05:52 PM      Profile for Sleeping Sun     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
NO, 'lance, NO!!!

I am traumatized by the utilikilt. Most likely becuase of a former co-worker that used to wear one. In the traditional style. And had a habit of propping one foot up on his desk when talking. AGHH! Must. Repress. Memories.

I'm a very basic jeans and shirt kind of person. I'll wear the occasional skirt in the summer (they are comfortable), but it will be a kakhi cargo-style longer skirt or one of mec's 'hiking skirts'.


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Amy
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posted 28 March 2006 05:57 PM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
My typical dress style is:
-tightish light-coloured jeans, rolled up
-black t-shirt (either plain, or silkscreened, or for a band)
-black hoodie
-black sneakers/doc martins
-black rimmed glasses
-dark grey tailored wool coat

I kind of like some of the more fun/interesting 'professional' wear, especially if it's in dark grey or black. I also really really like Jackie O style stuff.


I dislike:
-plastic as a fashion accessory
-spandex or its modern incarnation (lululemon)
-"Boho"
-anything embroidered with flowers or the like
-branded clothes (le barf)
-pastel colours
-super conservative anything

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Amy ]


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Left Turn
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posted 28 March 2006 06:00 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
peppermint wrote:
quote:
Skirts can be quite liberating. I feel sorry for men who have to wear long pants (never mind a tie) in 30+ degree weather

I agree with you on the pants and tie thing. Most offices enforce bourgeois/petty-borgeois dress codes even in weather that is far too hot for such clothing.

Bourgeois dress codes create a visible distinction between those who can afford these clothes, and those who cannot (or who have manual labour jobs and have to wear working class clothes to work). When white colar workers wear different clothes to work than blue collar workers, they are more likely to think of themselves as middle class, rather than working class as they really are. Serves to foster class collaboration between white collar workers and management, and to prevent soidarity between white and blue collar workers.

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


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'lance
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posted 28 March 2006 06:02 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Sleeping Sun:
NO, 'lance, NO!!!

I am traumatized by the utilikilt. Most likely becuase of a former co-worker that used to wear one. In the traditional style. And had a habit of propping one foot up on his desk when talking. AGHH! Must. Repress. Memories.


There are some traditions that are better not maintained, in my opinion.


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Jimmy Brogan
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posted 28 March 2006 06:08 PM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Like 501's

black or white T's

Leather accessories - boots, belts, bands.

But not leather clothes like pants or shirts.

Hate the whole baggy, ridiculously baggy, and ludicrously baggy styles, though I love cargo shorts/pants for all the pockets.


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Mr. Magoo
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posted 28 March 2006 06:15 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Any shirt you could picture on Chandler from Friends (think bowling shirt type-thing) I'll wear, along with plain jeans.

Among my least favourite fashion disasters:

- those absurd "Louis the fourteenth" stacked up platform shoes that were wider at the bottom than the top.

- big, retro "Hollywood/porn star" sunglasses.

- "saggin'" ('nuff said)

- very expensive athletic shoes worn like casual shoes

- track suits

- sweatshirts with nature paintings on them

- adults with backpacks that look like panda bears, or sweatshirts with balloons all over them, drawings of Care Bears, slogans like "Hugs are Special!", or anything like that


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Sineed
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posted 28 March 2006 06:31 PM      Profile for Sineed     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
A couple of months ago, I saw a guy on the subway whose pants were so baggy the waistline was below cheek level! His shirt was also oversize and pulled over his ass so we didn't have to see his skivvies. When he left the train he had to do a sort of duck-walk to keep his pants from falling off the top of his thighs.

If you think women wearing skirts is clothing apartheid, check out men in skirts.


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lagatta
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posted 28 March 2006 06:34 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I love skirts - almost always wear skirts, even while riding my bicycle, except when it is very cold. I find Left Turn's aversion to anything feminine and a bit sexy (don't mean vulgar) very strange indeed, and having read almost all of Gramsci's oeuvre, I don't think il compagno Tonino would disagree.

I look utterly dreadful in unisex clothes.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
kuri
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posted 28 March 2006 06:43 PM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I also take issue with Left Turn's analysis. For one thing, it problematizes the condition of femininity rather than male privilege: I shouldn't have to conform to any dominant paradigm in order to escape oppression.
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RP.
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posted 28 March 2006 06:48 PM      Profile for RP.     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I won't wear anything that doesn't have a wolf on it.
From: I seem to be having tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Left Turn
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posted 28 March 2006 06:49 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
kuri, if by the condition of femininity you mean the wearing of what bourgeois society has deemed "feminine", then you are referring to a social construct. It is learned behaviour for women to wear overtly feminine clothing, just the same as it's a learned behaviour for men to wear suits and ties. In the absence of the bourgeois culture that promotes ultra-feminie clothing, I'm not sure women would be clamouring for it.

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


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obscurantist
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posted 28 March 2006 06:54 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by RP.:
I won't wear anything that doesn't have a wolf on it.
(Keeping in mind the possibility that I'm being set up here....)

That must make clothes shopping very difficult, not to mention dangerous.

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Yossarian ]


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fern hill
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posted 28 March 2006 06:54 PM      Profile for fern hill        Edit/Delete Post
Oh, fer crying out loud.

quote:
Originally posted by Left Turn:

I can tolerate women wearing dresses as evening wear, but I don't care for women wearing them otherwise (prefer women wearing sheath/straight dresses over pouffy ones).

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


Um, so somehow it's OK for women to be gendered in the evening? Why?

Sheesh, even so-called progressive men want to tell us what to wear.


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lagatta
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posted 28 March 2006 06:56 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm still trying to imagine myself in a checkered plaid jacket and cargo pants... The world is not made up only of 20 something year old men.

I want to get this kind of ultra-packable skirt for travel, but I'd rather find a domestic source for travel clothes. NOT Tilleys, that, on the other hand is far too matronly and "old" looking. Any ideas?

I guess to be progressive we have to be straight up and down, with the body type (whether slim or stocky) that looks good in sheath, straight-up-and-down dresses. Mediterranean hips are a sure sign we are backward, and doomed to cook for our brood.

Can't wait to get back to Italy - the men are even more concerned about how they look than the women. And yes, even the Gramscians.

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: lagatta ]


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 28 March 2006 07:01 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by fern hill:
Sheesh, even so-called progressive men want to tell us what to wear.

Didn't realize before that Left Turn was male.

quote:
Originally posted by Left Turn:
kuri, if by the condition of femininity you mean the wearing of what bourgeois society has deemed "feminine", then you are referring to a social construct. It is learned behaviour for women to wear overtly feminine clothing, just the same as it's a learned behaviour for men to wear suits and ties. In the absence of the bourgeois culture that promotes ultra-feminie clothing, I'm not sure women would be clamouring for it.

If it's all dependent on what "bourgeois society" has "constructed," then how do you explain masculine and feminine styles of dress in hunter-gatherer societies, say, or those based on subsistence agriculture?


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RP.
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posted 28 March 2006 07:03 PM      Profile for RP.     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Yossarian:
That must make clothes shopping very difficult, not to mention dangerous.

My real worry is when my wife quotes Conway Twitty, "Cowboy, there's a tiger in these tight fitting jeans."


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Left Turn
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posted 28 March 2006 07:04 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Fern Hill, I merely said that I could tolerate women wearing dresses as evening wear (for formal evening functions, which I would keep to a minimum anyways). I never said I had a problem with women wearing tuxedos (I don't).

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


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Boom Boom
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posted 28 March 2006 07:05 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I wear polo shirts all year round, if it's cold I'll wear a turtleneck and sweater. And, blue or black jeans. Haven't worn anything more formal in years, I guess being a slob now is an over-reaction to having to dress formally for so long. Besides, I'm retired, and jeans and a polo shirt are soooo comfy.
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Norse of 60
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posted 28 March 2006 07:11 PM      Profile for Norse of 60     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Summer: Muu muu

Winter: Ski-doo suit

*underwaer optional


From: rabble is now the monster it once hunted | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
fern hill
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posted 28 March 2006 07:11 PM      Profile for fern hill        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Left Turn:
Fern Hill, I merely said that I could tolerate women wearing dresses as evening wear (for formal evening functions, which I would keep to a minimum anyways). I never said I had a problem with women wearing tuxedos (I don't).

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


You'd keep evening functions to a minimum? You got control problems, dude.

And you didn't answer the question -- why is OK (by your lights) for women to wear dresses for functions? Seems inconsistent to me.


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Left Turn
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posted 28 March 2006 07:17 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Fern Hill, I would only keep "formal" evening functions to a minimum, as in most evening events would be informal.

As per your question, yes it is an inconsistency, I admit it; but I never meant to imply that clothing should be completely unisex. I still beieve in seperate mens and womens clothing departments. It's just that I would keep the styles more or less the same.


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'lance
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posted 28 March 2006 07:27 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Norse of 60:
Summer: Muu muu

But don't the blackflies and mosquitos get up inside it pretty easily?

Seems risky to me, especially without underwear.


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lagatta
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posted 28 March 2006 07:32 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Julia Schucht (aka Gramsci's wife).

I'm glad he's so magnanimous as to allow us women's clothing sections, though he'd make the items similar to men's.

Left Turn, aren't you confusing the type of man and/or woman you are attracted to with what is acceptable dress for feminists? Your dictates bring to mind the worst excesses of the Maoist cultural revolution, not anything Gramsci ever wrote or said.

Edited to correct tpyo in Gramsci's name, utterly unacceptable for an Italian history studiosa!

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: lagatta ]


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Left Turn
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posted 28 March 2006 07:39 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Okay,I accept that Gramsci's wife did wear feminie clothing. Yet she did so at a time when it was not yet accpetable for women to wear pants. We do not know what clothing she would have worn in this day and age.

Lagstta wrote:

quote:
I'm glad he's so magnanimous as to allow us women's clothing sections, though he'd make the items similar to men's.

Similar, but not necessarily identical. There are varying dgrees of femininity. A dress shirt with the buttons on the left instead of the right is technically a blouse, and therefore gendered female.

Lagatta wrote:

quote:
Left Turn, aren't you confusing the type of man and/or woman you are attracted to with what is acceptable dress for feminists? Your dictates bring to mind the worst excesses of the Maoist cultural revolution, not anything Gramsci ever wrote or said.

Okay, maybe my theory isn't consistent with Gramsci's theory of Hegemony. I just figured that rejecting overly feminine clothing would be part of rejecting the cultural hegemony of the fashion industry.

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


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fern hill
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posted 28 March 2006 07:50 PM      Profile for fern hill        Edit/Delete Post
One more try, then I'm outta here. Life is too short. Left Turn, you have your head up your bum.

As 'lance said upthread there, all societies have 'gendered' clothing. Something to do with female/male bodies, p'haps?

It is ALL a social construct.

You are assuming that male clothing is natural, normal, better. And that's fucked.

BTW, don't try this shit in the feminist forum.


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lagatta
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posted 28 March 2006 08:01 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
It's an example of the hegemony (sorry) of male, western dress as a cultural norm. In many societies past and present, men also wore flowing robes, or skirts. Nothing much more comfy and elegant in the heat than the djebella or boubou of North or West Africans. Going beyond the well-known examples of "skirt-like" garments among Scottish and Greek troops, many men in South Asia (I believe Sri Lanka, and among the Tamils in India - please correct me, South Asian origin babblers!) wear a sarong-like garment.

Now what really oppresses women is having to wear sheer stockings every day! (Being an old boho, I wear dancer's tights or leggings when it is cold). And nothing on the legs in the summertime.

I have a good friend (my Spanish teacher) who is a rather "masculine" lesbian - and I'd fight for the death for her right NOT to wear anything feminine. But she finds I look rather fetching, and it is mutual.


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thwap
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posted 28 March 2006 08:02 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post
i like to wear REALLY tight pants and tie my shirts in a knot at my chest.

Top it off with a bowler hat and bottom it off with fuzzy animal slippers that make sound effects.


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Left Turn
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posted 28 March 2006 08:06 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
fern hill wrote:
quote:
You are assuming that male clothing is natural, normal, better. And that's fucked.

You're right, I shouldn't have assumed that.


From: Burnaby, BC | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
CMOT Dibbler
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posted 28 March 2006 08:22 PM      Profile for CMOT Dibbler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
You are assuming that male clothing is natural, normal, better. And that's fucked.

I agree, but don't you find that sneakers are more comfortable then high heals?


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lagatta
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posted 28 March 2006 08:27 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Speaking as someone twice your age (alas!) I don't find either particularly comfortable if I have to walk a lot. Sneakers are VERY flat, and don't provide much arch support.

But I'm very relieved I don't have to undergo liposuction on the (unused) child-bearing hips to be a proper feminist!!!!


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
CMOT Dibbler
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posted 28 March 2006 08:58 PM      Profile for CMOT Dibbler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Clothing that is overly gendered female helps to keep women as second class citizens. Women who wear clothing that is overly gendered female become objectified (to varying degrees depending on the outfit). Also, much clothing that is overy genered femle, like skirts, dresses, and high heels, serves to limit the movement of the women who wear thenm (ever seen a woman wearing high heels and a mini-skrt try to run?). To take the argument toits logical conclusion, women who wear clohing that is overly gendered female are partiipating in their own opression.

Shit! It's the thong wars all over again!


From: Just outside Fernie, British Columbia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Raos
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posted 28 March 2006 08:59 PM      Profile for Raos     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by lagatta:

I look utterly dreadful in unisex clothes.

I tend to wear unisex clothing quite well. I have a slim, boyish form that tends to fit well into something designed to be neither broad shouldered or hipped, since I really have neither.

Likes
- loose (not the overly baggy, all my clothing would fall off if I let go) and comfortable clothing
- sandals
- jeans
- t-shirts
- loose skirts (don't really wear them myself, but they look mighty comfortable, especially in the summer)
- the modern spandex incarnation lulumenon that Amy dislikes. Which I don't understand. Lululemon is so comfortable, if admittedly horrendously overpriced.
- witty statements (hehehe, my friend who's an uber math/physics geek got the best shirt for Christmas from his brother. It's just plain and says "2+2=5 for extremely large values of 2". I bloody love it!)

dislikes
- ultra baggy everything
- "ganster", "pimp", "slut", "pornstar" styles and the like
- long nails
- stretched piercings with jewlery that you can see through. If I can see through the whole in your ear, I find it very creepy
- plastic accessories, as somebody mentioned before
- ludicrously oversized hoop earings

There's probably a lot more things I could put on either list for me, but that's as much as I can think of right now.


From: Sweet home Alaberta | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 28 March 2006 09:06 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Like:

Clean clothes on my floor
Clean enough clothes on my floor
Clothes that are in my closet and clean
Clothes that are kind of clean, might have a slight amount of funk, but can be covered up with deodorant on my floor or in my closet
The socks under my bed that are actually clean, but coated in dust which I brush off out my window

Dislike:

Effort
Spending money on new clothes
Caring


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Vansterdam Kid
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posted 28 March 2006 09:21 PM      Profile for Vansterdam Kid   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Likes
-t-shirts, polos, track jackets, jeans, skate shoes/ tennis shoes, rectangular-ish glasses and blue or black stuff
Dislikes
-circular glasses (It's hard to explain, they sort of remind me of Tin-Tin or something corny, I just don't like them it's not overly logical)
-running shoes (they just always seem tacky to me, I'll wear them when I have to but I don't like them) & 'atheletic wear' - I'm glad that wearing track pants without going to the track went out of style last century
-formal stuff, or wearing the sort of clothes you'd wear to go clubbing in on a friday/saturday night when your just going to work or school (supposing your work is casual) its presumptious/annoying to me
-people who don't recognize their body types and think they can wear just about anything and look ok, because actually...you can't!
-innapropriate clothes for kids, ie: 'porn star' shirts on a twelve year old (just don't okay!)

The last one isn't so much of a dislike, as a *sigh* "Ohh that's...too bad". Mom jeans elicit that response. They make me sad, when Mom's have to wear Mom jeans cause they're sacrificing too much, don't care, don't know any better, or just don't have the time. It's not 1992 and your Mom probably doesn't live in Surrey or Scarborough so if your Mom wears Mom jeans, do her a favour and buy her a new pair.

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Vansterdam Kid ]


From: bleh.... | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Raos
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posted 28 March 2006 09:51 PM      Profile for Raos     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Ooh, I also dislike socks. They pull at my leg hair.

VK, what exactly are "mom jeans"?


From: Sweet home Alaberta | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
kuri
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posted 28 March 2006 10:34 PM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
My likes:

- wrap shirts (almost always look good on the curvier among us and feel very comfortable)
- correspondingly, wrap skirts
- again correspondingly, kimonos and kimono style sweaters (seriously, this is the best garment design in the history of clothing, IMHO)
- most anything brown
- wool coats
- bright colours
- flamboyantly patterned socks (I have a good collection of crazy socks to wear with boring suits when I go to work )
- that said, I kind of like my suits
- those knit hats with kitten ears on them
- dresses over jeans
- capris

My dislikes:

- any outfit that's 100% black (unless you're at a funeral)
- hip-hugger jeans (they really only look decent on about 1% of population and any garment for which decent is your *best* hope should never have been created)
- fur (not out of any ideological persuasion, but it looks like you're dressing up as a bear or something)
- prissy, after-the-fact details like little bows
- anything ill-fitting (too big or too small, even if it's on purpose)
- bermuda shorts


From: an employer more progressive than rabble.ca | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 28 March 2006 10:38 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post
Oops! aaarrrggghh, this is ephemeral. I forgot to log thwap off. Logging him off right now.

quote:
Originally posted by lagatta:
Scottish and Greek troops, many men in South Asia (I believe Sri Lanka, and among the Tamils in India - please correct me, South Asian origin babblers!) wear a sarong-like garment.

It's men all over India, lagatta (though not all men). The garment is called a lungi, pronounced 'loongee'. It has no buttons or zippers or any other fastening devices. It's just tied in a knot around the waist, and goes down to the ankles. It is usually a plaid pattern. Sometimes, men will fold up the bottom half so it only goes down to their knees.

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: thwap ]


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
The Evil Twin
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posted 28 March 2006 10:45 PM      Profile for The Evil Twin     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
It's men all over India, lagatta (though not all men). The garment is called a lungi, pronounced 'loongee'. It has no buttons or zippers or any other fastening devices. It's just tied in a knot around the waist, and goes down to the ankles. It is usually a plaid pattern. Sometimes, men will fold up the bottom half so it only goes down to their knees.

Another similar garment worn by South Indians is the dhoti. The big difference between it and the lungi is colour...with dhotis being white. Both are worn in much the same way. Many immigrants to Canada (like my father and grandfather) also wear this for comfort when indoors.


From: Toronto | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
Left Turn
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posted 28 March 2006 10:52 PM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Lagatta Wrote:
quote:
In many societies past and present, men also wore flowing robes, or skirts. Nothing much more comfy and elegant in the heat than the djebella or boubou of North or West Africans. Going beyond the well-known examples of "skirt-like" garments among Scottish and Greek troops, many men in South Asia (I believe Sri Lanka, and among the Tamils in India - please correct me, South Asian origin babblers!) wear a sarong-like garment.

I want to state for the record that I have always supported the right of peoples from different ethnicities to wear their traditional ethnic clothing. I never intended to suggest otherwise.

[ 28 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


From: Burnaby, BC | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
ephemeral
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posted 28 March 2006 10:59 PM      Profile for ephemeral     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by thwap:
i like to wear REALLY tight pants and tie my shirts in a knot at my chest.

Top it off with a bowler hat and bottom it off with fuzzy animal slippers that make sound effects.



I prefer those fuzzy puppy slippers that don't make sound effects, thwap. The sound effects get on my nerves.

Left Turn, I think that if, as you propose, we women consciously made an effort to avoid being feminine (for example, we never buy skirts) because we think that asserting ourselves as feminine beings makes us look like second class citizens, we would actually be giving in to the pressure of oppression, not fighting it. We would be promoting such oppression, not eradicating it. I think that one of the struggles of feminism has been to give women the freedom/right/power to make their own personal choices, and not be judged by those choices. You are very much judging women who choose to look feminine.

It really doesn't matter what the dominant social construct of the day is; what matters is that a woman can wear what she chooses, and nobody thinks any less of her what she has chosen to wear. Women may or not give a fuck about what anybody else thinks of their clothing. In the end, women make the final decision on what they are going to don their bodies with; not you, nor any other man.

I could very easily say to you that flowery, puffy skirts are not really feminine. You just think they are because you have been socially conditioned to think they are. Maybe skirts are really gender neutral, and all of us (men and women) should be wearing skirts if we don't want to be strongly identified with our gender.


From: under a bridge with a laptop | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Grizzled Wolf
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posted 28 March 2006 11:15 PM      Profile for Grizzled Wolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I like to wear green - or camoflague....
From: Wherever they send me - currently lovely Edmonton | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 28 March 2006 11:22 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
When I see people wearing camo, I ask myself if they're trying to draw attention to themselves, or setting themselves up as targets. Camo works in the setting it's designed to conceal the wearer in, doesn't work so well in the city or the suburbs. That's part of why I think Hillier looks like such a fucking dork when he wears camo in the television studio for an interview.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jacob Two-Two
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posted 28 March 2006 11:51 PM      Profile for Jacob Two-Two     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
What would urban camo look like, I wonder? Surely someone's done a study on what sort of patterns and colours would blend in with the buildings and streets and neon, etc.
From: There is but one Gord and Moolah is his profit | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Left Turn
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posted 29 March 2006 12:02 AM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I don't like cameo as civilian wear. It has too many negative associations with right-wing libertarian gun totting militia types. Plus, I just think it looks ugly.

[ 29 March 2006: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


From: Burnaby, BC | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 29 March 2006 12:20 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Originally posted by Jacob Two-Two:
What would urban camo look like, I wonder?

Drab colours mostly, I'd guess, if you really want to be hidden against concrete and pavement. I'd wager the people in the city that get noticed least are municipal workers doing the trash collection and street maintenance and construction, except for those orange vests and hardhats.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Nikita
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posted 29 March 2006 12:20 AM      Profile for Nikita     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I'm a curvy gril so I don't wear skirts or capris becuase they are definitely not flattering on me. No sirree. But I do like clothes that complement my femininity. Guess what? I'm not a man, and I don't want to dress like one. I look ridiculous in unisex because it's cut all wrong for my body. Oh, and enjoying a sequin here and there does not make one less progressive than the woman who prefers track pants or a bunnyhug.

That being said... I really like tailored suits! What was it Stephen Colbert said the other day? "A good suit gives the appearance of a physique"
My favourite is my pinstriped suit (black with silver pinstripes) with a wine coloured blouse - the blouse has french cuffs with gorgeous small sterling silver links. It's got a small ruffle all the way down the front that covers the tiny buttons. But I have a royal blue blouse that I like as well with that one. Oh heck, I like the formal/office attire in general! I like dark suits (creates a better silhouette, IMO) so my blouses and tops are usually colourful.

kuri - I really like wraparound tops too! My favourite is black with black sequins on the edging, which gives a little sparkle to the decolletage if and when I want to feel sexy.

[ 29 March 2006: Message edited by: Nikita ]


From: Regina | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Yst
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posted 29 March 2006 12:45 AM      Profile for Yst     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Likes:

- "Business Dyke" - this is how I tend to characterise most of my dailywear. Mixed women's and men's formalwear that would look right at home on a real butch. I tend to wear affectations of masculinity like the affectations they are when I do wear them. And hence,
- Formal black women's business jackets
- Ascot ties
- Plain black neckties
- PVC/pleather
- Boots: unisex or women's platforms or heels.
- Velvet
- Eyeliner

Dislikes:
- Baby Doll dresses: what the hell? I've never been able to understand this fashion. I understand the aesthetic goals of this look less I think than I understand any other fashion known to me. Fostering the appearance of having one's waist located just below one's breasts would seem to be an inherently negative thing, inasmuch as this particular freakish deformity (the total absence of the torsoe) is, aside from being so far as I know unattested in human history, not apparently something widely desired.


From: State of Genderfuck | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged
Amy
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posted 29 March 2006 01:24 AM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Raos:

the modern spandex incarnation lulumenon that Amy dislikes. Which I don't understand. Lululemon is so comfortable, if admittedly horrendously overpriced.

Part of the reason that I don't like it is that it's marketed to be fitness clothing, and it's worn as stylish clothing. Comfy, but not very nice looking, IMO (they're generally referred to as "ass pants" in my social group). It's kind of like my aversion to proper running shoes worn as street shoes. Also, in any given class, there's bound to be 5 out of 30 women wearing practically identical pants. The price is a factor, too.


From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Vansterdam Kid
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posted 29 March 2006 02:55 AM      Profile for Vansterdam Kid   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Raos:

VK, what exactly are "mom jeans"?


http://www.devilducky.com/media/30138/

The link requires quicktime, but its a perfect explination of "mom jeans". Say it with me folks, they're AWFUL.

Camo is funny, I don't like them in pants. And I don't like cargo pants. But I like camo t-shirts.

It's kind of bad and funny how arbitrary all of this is.

[ 29 March 2006: Message edited by: Vansterdam Kid ]


From: bleh.... | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sineed
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Babbler # 11260

posted 29 March 2006 07:30 AM      Profile for Sineed     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Baby Doll dresses: what the hell?
They're one of those fashions that only look good on women with supermodel bodies. On the rest of us, they make us look pregnant. When those dresses first sprang on the scene in a big way, I thought there was a baby boom going on.

From: # 668 - neighbour of the beast | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 29 March 2006 07:47 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I think mimicing the dress of a prominent woman who was pregnant (was it Josephine?) played a part in the fad for "Empire Dress", as did a neo-classicism echoing the supposed dress of ancient Greece and Rome (see the paintings of David ou Ingres). Jane Austen fans will see a lot of this fashion (known as Regency in Britain) in the many films and series adapting her works.

Isn't the baby doll fad over?


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 29 March 2006 08:03 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Vansterdam Kid:

but its a perfect explination of "mom jeans". Say it with me folks, they're AWFUL.


Hmmn. I resemble that remark.

Most of my trousers are loose-ish because I like them that way. You gotta problem with that?

I mainly don't dress the way I would like to because I am poor, generally distracted, and often depressed.

But I have been giggling all the way through at Left Turn's condescension towards women, which he does not recognize as highly gendered condescension.

Silly fellow. Get over it.

I love skirts too, especially in the summer, but any time I can be bothered to think about looking alert, really. My fashion eye was trained back in the late fifties, early sixties, I fear, so I tend to admire highly constructed clothes, although I wear them so seldom now. I'm probably the only person here who actually liked shoulder pads when they appeared in the eighties, although I'll admit that they went through an extreme period.

I love red.

I love big sweaters and cowl necks. I also like the look and feel of slightly too large men's shirts with my jeans, which is good because I just inherited a whole bunch of slightly too large men's shirts.

I love caftans and French artists dressed in smocks and berets, and I love cloche hats.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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Babbler # 478

posted 29 March 2006 08:05 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
There was a baby-doll fad in the late fifties, but those were filmy pyjamas, eh?
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
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Babbler # 6061

posted 29 March 2006 08:13 AM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Likes:

- PVC tops, like corsettes
- Comfortable shoes for work
- high PVC or latex boots
- Lululemon pants (they are great at the gym and excellent for wearing around, comfort wise)
- Tops that look like lingerie
- Flares and/or bell botton jeans with band t's
- clogs (yes I love them)
- nice fitted suits for work
- tank tops
- doc marten boots
- the layered look for tops
- those half sweaters

Dislikes:
- track pants
- high-waisted pants (yikes!)
- pants that are tight at the ankles
- those really pointy shoes or boots
- camo pants on guys (for me big turn off)
- short skirts and bare legs in winter
- leg warmers
- any clothing that looks far too big on anyone (bad fashion statement)


From: Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 29 March 2006 08:18 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I love red as well. If I wear a lot of black, there is always a red touch. I also love violet, and some purples (though some are violent, not violet, and a bit garish - I like a bit of grey in purple.

Skdadl, have you found a cloche yet? That will look so chic with a coupe au carré.

I fear there is an undercurrent of dislike for women, womanly women, and perhaps middle-aged or older women. Some people of a certain age (and not just if they are overweight) are very uncomfortable with the type of waistband in jeans.

As for Renzo, he is always well turned-out, in glistening black, with a small white bib and white toes.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
RP.
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posted 29 March 2006 08:19 AM      Profile for RP.     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Norse of 60:
Winter: Ski-doo suit

*underwaer optional


Watch the zipper!


From: I seem to be having tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 29 March 2006 08:22 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, I don't actually have bangs. I like them, but they don't look so good on me.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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Babbler # 6718

posted 29 March 2006 08:29 AM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
Well, I don't actually have bangs.

As befits the treasurer of BWAGA.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 29 March 2006 08:30 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I guess I've done my straight-line duty for the day.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 29 March 2006 08:40 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
i used to dress like this man. it was a phase. i still have the leather jacket, though.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
aRoused
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Babbler # 1962

posted 29 March 2006 08:43 AM      Profile for aRoused     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Urban camouflage: click leftmost photo link.
http://www.hyperstealth.com/pages/8/index.htm
Urbane camouflage:
http://www.thechap.net/latestissue.html

From: The King's Royal Burgh of Eoforwich | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 29 March 2006 09:02 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Originally posted by aRoused:
Urban camouflage: click leftmost photo link.
http://www.hyperstealth.com/pages/8/index.htm

comment: That photo reinforces my utter dislike for camo.

Urbane camouflage:
http://www.thechap.net/latestissue.html

comment: Hilarious!

[ 29 March 2006: Message edited by: Boom Boom ]


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
kuri
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posted 29 March 2006 09:35 AM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I have a good reason to dislike LuluLemon (although I'm rather neutral to that style of clothing): it apparently turns people stark, raving mad. They had a warehouse sale in downtown Edmonton last week. I saw the sign advertising it on my way to work, thought, "Hmm, maybe I'll check that out..."

On the actual day of the sale, though? People were lined up for blocks outside of the store in what was then -20C weather plus windchill. They were hassling with the security guard to be let in sooner and were even lining up early in the morning before opening to get in. That's mad. I don't care how good a deal it was (probably only in comparison to their normally outrageous prices), any brand of clothing that can compel people to do such things has to be evil.


From: an employer more progressive than rabble.ca | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Fed
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Babbler # 8926

posted 29 March 2006 10:29 AM      Profile for Fed        Edit/Delete Post
People seem indelibly marked by whatever was "cool" in their late teens/early 20s.

Thus, it brings me to no end of giggles, whilst observing the foibles of current teenage fashion, to imagine these same kids some 50 years hence as denizens of old-folks homes: little old ladies wearing low-cut jeans, their belly-button rings long lost in the wrinkles of abdominal flab, and little old men shuffling along awkwardly in enormously baggy pants, faded tattoos sprouting hair in funny places......


From: http://babblestrike.lbprojects.com/ | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
aRoused
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Babbler # 1962

posted 29 March 2006 10:30 AM      Profile for aRoused     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
comment: That photo reinforces my utter dislike for camo.

To be honest, it was the very first link I found with a good photo of urban-specific stuff. I could have shopped around for something non-Jordanian..I didn't even look if the image had some caption.

Anyways, about not liking camo..if I go bowhunting for deer and wear Mossy Oak patterns, is that acceptable? Personally I admire the technical expertise involved in finding new ways to hide something in plain sight!

ETA: As timing luck would have it, I'm currently trying to source a correct shade of naval camouflage paint..for a bicycle. I'm weeeerd.

[ 29 March 2006: Message edited by: aRoused ]


From: The King's Royal Burgh of Eoforwich | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 29 March 2006 10:38 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I dislike camo for any but the military. In the bush, I dislike it even more because I'd like the hunted to have a better odds-on chance at evasion. I think camo is sneaky, but that's the reason for it, which likely works well for the military. I'm not against hunting, I'd just like to keep the odds in favour of the hunted, otherwise it becomes in my mind just a matter of point and shoot, and less a matter of true hunting skill. I truly dislike seeing forest and desert camo worn in the cities, by the military and civillians, alike. In my mind, they look like a bunch of knobs.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 29 March 2006 10:45 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I still don't get why soldiers wear camo in the city, as I've seen in Ottawa, walking down the street. One of the most incongruous sights I've ever seen is a soldier in camo and high black boots and dark red beret carrying a briefcase. This was just outside DND HQ.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Crippled_Newsie
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posted 29 March 2006 10:58 AM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
When I used to work in a so-called professional setting, I took a cue from Doug Coupland's Generation X.

He wrote of a thing known as an Anti-victim Device (AVD):

quote:
A small fashion accessory worn on an otherwise conservative outfit which announces to the world that one still has a spark of individuality burning inside: 1940s retro ties and earrings (on men), feminist buttons, noserings (women)....

That being so, I was partial to white, short-sleeved 'dress' shirts w/ ugly ties, rumpled chinos, and black Chuck Taylor hightops.

I had long had geeky specs, a crew cut and earrings in both ears. The shirts showed off the tat on my forearm. I found myself to be oh-so subversive in a sort of Mission Control meets punk rock kind of way. I was an idiot.


From: It's all about the thumpa thumpa. | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
aRoused
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Babbler # 1962

posted 29 March 2006 11:11 AM      Profile for aRoused     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Fair enough.
quote:
I still don't get why soldiers wear camo in the city, as I've seen in Ottawa, walking down the street. One of the most incongruous sights I've ever seen is a soldier in camo and high black boots and dark red beret carrying a briefcase. This was just outside DND HQ.

Probably (someone correct me!) because the CF dress uniform is a *dress* uniform, special occasions only.
.
.
Or he just came back from a Hillier press conference!

From: The King's Royal Burgh of Eoforwich | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged
ephemeral
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8881

posted 29 March 2006 11:34 AM      Profile for ephemeral     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Left Turn:
but I acknowledge that people may like styles that you can no longer buy.

I like skirts, but I can no longer buy them for fear of contributing to my own oppression.


From: under a bridge with a laptop | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
RP.
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Babbler # 7424

posted 29 March 2006 11:43 AM      Profile for RP.     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by aRoused:
Probably (someone correct me!) because the CF dress uniform is a *dress* uniform, special occasions only.

I might be totally wrong, but I think their tan uniforms (if Army) are what they wear when doing office work, and their combats (i.e. the camoflage) for .. for lack of a better term, non-office work. Obviously, they're not always trying to blend in, but it makes sense to have one uniform for all kinds of non-office work, including times when one wants to blend into a green environment.


From: I seem to be having tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
pookie
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posted 29 March 2006 11:46 AM      Profile for pookie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
ephemeral: tee hee!

I've been hanging back, but what the heck.

Likes

pantsuits
jeans (i admit i like the pricey ones)
tops with ruffles, lace, mesh (not all together)
long suede skirts
patterned stockings
red
chocolate
black
hats

Dislikes

baggy sweaters
pleated pants on men under 40
skinny pants tucked into ankle boots
acid wash anything
more than a couple pieces of jewellry
yoga pants worn everywhere


From: there's no "there" there | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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Babbler # 2534

posted 29 March 2006 11:58 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I have to go out, so I'm going to put on one of those oppressive skirts (a long one). As I type, I'm wearing roots exercisewear trousers that are sort of like yoga pants, or loose leggings, and effectively I won't wear things like that out of the house - they remind me too much of the horror of sweatpants, although they aren't quite as ugly. I had the roots thing on because I was cleaning the kitchen. (I bought them at a cheap shop here for 15$ - think they are irregulars).

I have to check over all my oppressive spring and summer skirts to see whether they are in good shape, but I'm not putting the winter ones away quite yet.

Just thinking - if I had more money, of course I'd dress rather differently from how I do now. My main priority would be finding travel stuff that takes up little place in luggage, and pretty but comfortable footwear.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 29 March 2006 12:04 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Originally posted by aRoused:
Or he just came back from a Hillier press conference!

That was a good one!


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 29 March 2006 01:52 PM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I like:

Single breasted suits
Thomas Pink shirts
Ties
T-shirts
docs
jeans a little short in the leg (well any pant for that matter). I hate the bunching-up cuff effect.
shorts
chuck taylors

I hate:
tight pants
double-breasted anything
sweaters
long-sleeve golf shirts
turtle necks
dress shirts you can see through
jewelery on men (including watches)
baseball caps that have so much room under them they make your head look twice as tall.
bicycle shorts for anything else except bicycling

I go from side to side, wearing a suit most days then flinging that off for a pair of shorts (anytime at home or between easter and halloween)
and an old t-shirt.


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
ephemeral
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posted 29 March 2006 01:55 PM      Profile for ephemeral     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by lagatta:
My main priority would be finding travel stuff that takes up little place in luggage, and pretty but comfortable footwear.

Oh no, lagatta, not the "pretty" footwear. You silly girl, dontcha know that "pretty" is generally considered feminine, and therefore, gak, oppressive?


From: under a bridge with a laptop | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 29 March 2006 02:12 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
No, I don't, because I studied in Italy, and the men are even worse about booful stuff than the women are over there.

Even the fellows at Istituto Gramsci...

Moreover, sweetie is European, and though he is a damned German (though not an Aryan) he is a francophilic intellectual type and always wears nice shoes.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Vansterdam Kid
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posted 29 March 2006 02:32 PM      Profile for Vansterdam Kid   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:


Hmmn. I resemble that remark.

Most of my trousers are loose-ish because I like them that way. You gotta problem with that?


Loose is fine, I don't think those are very loose those. It's just, well, I just felt bad for mommy when she was wearing those.


From: bleh.... | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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Babbler # 1448

posted 29 March 2006 03:07 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
To take the argument toits logical conclusion, women who wear clohing that is overly gendered female are partiipating in their own opression.

I find your logic more oppressive than any skirt I've ever worn. Who are you to decide what is overly gendered or not? How did you become the arbiter of what degree of femininity is oppressive or empowering? Perhaps that's something you should leave to women to decide.

I should also point out that women will be objectified no matter what we wear. It'll take more than pants or unisex clothing to change that.

I can and have run in a skirt and high heels. Not as fast as in flats, perhaps, but I daresay there are plenty of people who'd have had a hard time keeping up regardless.

quote:
I can tolerate women wearing dresses as evening wear, but I don't care for women wearing them otherwise (prefer women wearing sheath/straight dresses over pouffy ones).

TOLERATE?! YOU CAN TOLERATE?!

I'm thinking any reasonably assertive woman would tolerate YOU about as far as the curb to which you'd be kicked, bucko!

What makes you think you have the right to tolerate anything anybody else decides to wear? What a completely self-absorbed, snobbish statement to make. I'd rather be objectified than infantilized, thank you very much.

quote:
I'm a gril with real hips and boobs and the like...

Um, Nikita, can I point out a quibble? If you mean "full" hips and boobs, okay, great, super even, but you know, those B cups and angular hips among us are every bit as "real" as yours.

My own tastes are fairly eclectic. I like things that have interesting colours or shapes to them. I have a thing for red shoes. I don't wear especially high heels, anymore, except on special occasions, but a 2" heel can be very nice. I like jeans that sit below the waist, but I'm short in the body and higher waists often don't sit comfortably for me. Some of my favourite things include a raspberry Chinese brocade jacket, a cloche hat, my grandmother's Persian lamb coat (circa 1950), a wine-coloured velvet blazer (very tailored and simple, the fabric and colour are all the zing it needs), an apricot-coloured Thai silk dress, lots of different scarves, a black and gold Indian cotton beaded jacket. I wear things that make me happy. Sometimes that's a skirt, sometimes it's jeans or pants. I love bell-shaped sleeves, you know, with a flare at the cuff. Nice shape, and they're generally long enough for my arms.

Dislike pants that show underwear or plumber butt on anybody. But if it makes 'em happy, who am I to judge?


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
chester the prairie shark
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posted 29 March 2006 03:15 PM      Profile for chester the prairie shark     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
jeans a little short in the leg (well any pant for that matter). I hate the bunching-up cuff effect.
i'm the opposite. i hate pants that are too short and if you can see or almost see the ankle then they are too short for me.

From: Saskatoon | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Black Dog
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posted 29 March 2006 03:31 PM      Profile for Black Dog   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Fashion disasters: baggy, saggy jeans or trackies, oversized ballcaps, giant maternity tees (pretty much the whole suburban gangsta look), ripped or overstressed jeans, blazers with stupid graffiti on them. On the ladies, cowboy boots, mucklucks, Uggs, and jeans rolled up to expose any of the former. All things LuluLemon (when did it become okay to wear sweatpants in public?). Boho chic. Blechh.
From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
rockerbiff
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posted 29 March 2006 03:48 PM      Profile for rockerbiff   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Here is my sense of fashion

I try and buy everything at Value Village or Sally Ann

I refuse to buy anything made in China and preferably made in Canada

I hear Lululemon is made in China these days....


From: Republic of East Van | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
pookie
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Babbler # 11357

posted 29 March 2006 07:01 PM      Profile for pookie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by rockerbiff:

I hear Lululemon is made in China these days....[/QB]


According to my dance pants they are made in Canada.


From: there's no "there" there | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Américain Égalitaire
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Babbler # 7911

posted 29 March 2006 07:41 PM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:
I still don't get why soldiers wear camo in the city, as I've seen in Ottawa, walking down the street. One of the most incongruous sights I've ever seen is a soldier in camo and high black boots and dark red beret carrying a briefcase. This was just outside DND HQ.

Saw the same thing with a CF soldier walking in full cammo through Eaton Centre.

Not unusual in the states - the BDU (battle dress uniform) is almost always the uniform of the day for everyday wear both regular army, reserves and national guard. You'd see soldiers in BDUs in the malls far more often here. Had one the other day in our book store wanting to post something on our bulletin board. The only ones whose normal UOD is the class A green uniform would be recruiters. You can generally spot them a mile away which is good for avoiding them.

BTW, I hate fashion goon squadism. Wear what you like and screw off to anyone who has a problem with it. My tastes are simple:

Jeans - year round.
Beat up running shoes - year round
Shirt - winter - Roots sweatshirt off the discount rack.
Shirt - summer - U of Iowa football jersey.

The shame of it is, I clean up rather well but I just don't like getting dressed up that much. I once bought a very fetching smoking jacket (red and black, of course) on ebay that I too quickly grew out of. I'd still like one (in the Jackie Gleason style). Now that's swank.


From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Raos
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Babbler # 5702

posted 29 March 2006 09:13 PM      Profile for Raos     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by kuri:

My dislikes:


- prissy, after-the-fact details like little bows


I concur!

quote:
Originally posted by Nikita:

My favourite is my pinstriped suit (black with silver pinstripes)

Really? I can't stand pinstripes! They make me watch to retch on the spot.

quote:
Originally posted by Yst:

Dislikes:
- Baby Doll dresses: what the hell? I've never been able to understand this fashion.

You and me both.

quote:
Originally posted by Amy:

Part of the reason that I don't like it is that it's marketed to be fitness clothing, and it's worn as stylish clothing. Comfy, but not very nice looking, IMO (they're generally referred to as "ass pants" in my social group). It's kind of like my aversion to proper running shoes worn as street shoes. Also, in any given class, there's bound to be 5 out of 30 women wearing practically identical pants. The price is a factor, too.


I can understand the price aversion, but I think most of it looks nice. I really like the aesthetic of lulu, and while it is marketed as fitness clothing, it is clearly not all designed to be fitness clothing.

quote:
Originally posted by Vansterdam Kid:

but its a perfect explination of "mom jeans". Say it with me folks, they're AWFUL.

Yah, I definitely dislike those. Really, though, I think I just hate waists on pants in general. I don't wear anything around my waist (well, with the exception of the tux, but those pants are meant to be worn on the waist), it's all around my hips.

quote:
Originally posted by kuri:
I have a good reason to dislike LuluLemon (although I'm rather neutral to that style of clothing): it apparently turns people stark, raving mad. They had a warehouse sale in downtown Edmonton last week. I saw the sign advertising it on my way to work, thought, "Hmm, maybe I'll check that out..."

On the actual day of the sale, though? People were lined up for blocks outside of the store in what was then -20C weather plus windchill. They were hassling with the security guard to be let in sooner and were even lining up early in the morning before opening to get in. That's mad. I don't care how good a deal it was (probably only in comparison to their normally outrageous prices), any brand of clothing that can compel people to do such things has to be evil.


Yah, I had intended to go to that, until I saw that line. It was ridiculous!

quote:
Originally posted by lagatta:
As I type, I'm wearing roots exercisewear trousers that are sort of like yoga pants, or loose leggings, and effectively I won't wear things like that out of the house - they remind me too much of the horror of sweatpants, although they aren't quite as ugly.

I really don't have that aversion to yoga pants and loose leggings. Or even to newer sweatpants. My aversion is to ankle elastics. That's what makes most old sweats look so horrible to me.

quote:
Originally posted by Tommy Shanks:
I like:

jeans a little short in the leg (well any pant for that matter). I hate the bunching-up cuff effect.


No way. I hate pants of any kind that are two short. If the cuff isn't touching your shoe/foot when you sit, the pants are too short for me.


From: Sweet home Alaberta | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Nikita
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Babbler # 9050

posted 29 March 2006 09:35 PM      Profile for Nikita     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Timebandit:
Um, Nikita, can I point out a quibble? If you mean "full" hips and boobs, okay, great, super even, but you know, those B cups and angular hips among us are every bit as "real" as yours.

Good point. Sorry hun!

From: Regina | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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Babbler # 1448

posted 29 March 2006 10:45 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
No worries. I was fairly certain you didn't mean it that way.

Because who in their right mind would try to fake being a B cup?


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
ephemeral
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Babbler # 8881

posted 29 March 2006 11:07 PM      Profile for ephemeral     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Américain Égalitaire:
Beat up running shoes - year round

I like beat up running shoes too. But always so hard when one has to buy new running shoes, isn't it?


From: under a bridge with a laptop | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Raos
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Babbler # 5702

posted 29 March 2006 11:08 PM      Profile for Raos     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Timebandit:
No worries. I was fairly certain you didn't mean it that way.

Because who in their right mind would try to fake being a B cup?


A drag queen?


From: Sweet home Alaberta | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Crippled_Newsie
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Babbler # 7024

posted 30 March 2006 05:30 AM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by ephemeral:
I like beat up running shoes too. But always so hard when one has to buy new running shoes, isn't it?

I feel so exposed when wearing brand new tennies, as if everyone is looking at their overly bright unscuffedness. I'm sure there are people who 'distress' them before first wearing, like we used to do with jeans in the 80s.

Confession: I still have a ritual for new baseball caps. I am compelled to run them through the wash and even soften the edges of the bill with sandpaper before I can wear it for the first time.

And on the subject of ball-caps... fitted caps, please. Those adjustable thingies on the back are horrid, IMO.


From: It's all about the thumpa thumpa. | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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Babbler # 478

posted 30 March 2006 07:36 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
rockerbiff, is that you? Very Hamid Karzai, who has been called by no less than Gucci the coolest dresser (male) on the planet.

And no matter what we think of Karzai's politics (to me, he is a puppet, although with an occasionally discernible capacity for independent thought), we gotta admit it is fun to see him stroll into Washington looking so cool and leaving all the boring suits in the dust.

AE, about Gleason, I agree - not what he wore in The Honeymooners, of course, but in 3D life, that was one elegant man. Smart and nice man too, it always seemed to me.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 30 March 2006 09:23 AM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Raos:

A drag queen?


No way. Most of the drag queens I've met agree with "Go big or go home."


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Américain Égalitaire
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posted 30 March 2006 11:17 AM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by ephemeral:

I like beat up running shoes too. But always so hard when one has to buy new running shoes, isn't it?


Yes indeed. The breaking in period is difficult. I find very few that start comfortably. And as for the old ones, if you scuff 'em or mess 'em up, who cares? And you only have to lace them occasionally because I just slip into them (I know, I'm lazy).

Skdadl: on Gleason. There was just something about the guy I couldn't put my finger on that appealed to me in terms of his style. Yeah, he was short and round but had class and confidence in himself. And style.


From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 30 March 2006 11:25 AM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
If the cuff isn't touching your shoe/foot when you sit, the pants are too short for me.

Nah. When you sit, the cuff should be right at the top of where an 8-hole pair of docs would come.


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
chester the prairie shark
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Babbler # 6993

posted 30 March 2006 12:06 PM      Profile for chester the prairie shark     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Nah. When you sit, the cuff should be right at the top of where an 8-hole pair of docs would come.
I'm guessing you're also positive on pocket protectors and short sleeve dress shirts?

From: Saskatoon | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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Babbler # 3076

posted 30 March 2006 12:53 PM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Oh, har de har de har.

I'll add this so I don't sound like such a pompous git.

[ 30 March 2006: Message edited by: Tommy Shanks ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 30 March 2006 01:18 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Originally posted by Américain Égalitaire:
Skdadl: on Gleason. There was just something about the guy I couldn't put my finger on that appealed to me in terms of his style. Yeah, he was short and round but had class and confidence in himself. And style.

I really miss Gleason's trademark "how sweet it is".


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Amy
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posted 30 March 2006 01:45 PM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy Shanks:

Nah. When you sit, the cuff should be right at the top of where an 8-hole pair of docs would come.


Actually, I like short jeans too, especially when I'm wearing boots. The only thing is, I've gotten a fair number of aggressive/mean looks when I dress like that which I don't get otherwise. It makes me wonder whether people take me for a nazi-punk (ugh).


From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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Babbler # 3076

posted 30 March 2006 02:48 PM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, you could vary the colour of your laces. I'm sure everyone would understand that very understated gesture, especially when you are walking down a street at night.
From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 30 March 2006 02:54 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I've got a pair of 14 hole combat boots that I wear when I'm feeling particularly stylish. They're navy blue and made in the former Czechoslovakia ( ). Wear them with some fairly tight fitting camo pants and a Montreal Canadiens jersey and you're just looking to look awesome.
From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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Babbler # 7791

posted 30 March 2006 02:57 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Okay, I can tolerate the Canadiens jersey, but combat boots and camo pants hurt my eyes. Thank gawd no one wears that crap around here.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Amy
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Babbler # 2210

posted 30 March 2006 04:01 PM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I remember hearing stuff about the colour of bootlaces mattering when I was younger, but I'd forgotten what stood for what, and from what I gather the few nazi-punks in the city blend in rather well.

FWIW I just have the black laces that came with the boots.


From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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Babbler # 3076

posted 30 March 2006 04:23 PM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Well, IIRC there was a bunch of rules and regulation (as with any sub-culture) but I'll stick to what I remember, (which isn't much mind) and this is by no means definitive:

White meant white supremacists
Yellow was to show you hated the police
Red generally meant neo-nazi's and National Fronters, although around Toronto it could also mean you were a straight-edge or anti-racist.
Black meant you didn't tolerate any of this other crap (not applicable to the SEers).

I only really ever saw the only the black-red-white split to any degree. Of course there were other, shall we say, more distinctive characteristics to any neo-nazi moron.

Why I still know this, I don't know.

[ 30 March 2006: Message edited by: Tommy Shanks ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Secret Agent Style
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2077

posted 30 March 2006 07:25 PM      Profile for Secret Agent Style        Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy Shanks:
Well, IIRC there was a bunch of rules and regulation (as with any sub-culture)...]

That was largely true in the 1980s and early '90s, but even then there were country and regional variations, so one colour could mean something totally different depending on where you were.

Lace colour doesn't really have significance any more, although I sometimes see leftist skinheads wear red laces to represent socialism.


From: classified | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
marzo
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Babbler # 12096

posted 30 March 2006 07:45 PM      Profile for marzo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
I love to wear socks with sandals in the summertime. It's cool, comfortable, and the socks prevent blistering from the straps. They also keep my feet clean. People who declare war on socks'n'sandals are full of shit. Either that, or they're members of some cult with a dress code. Smart people dress for comfort and are above the superstitions of fashion slavery.
I hate neckties. I don't mind so much if somebody else enjoys wearing them, but I hate this idea that men have to wear them.
Women get to wear their hair any way they want, but if a man deviates from the standard military/ police/ business style he is regarded with suspicion. You know what some young people are saying nowadays? "Get a haircut,ya fuckin' hippy!"

From: toronto | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
pookie
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Babbler # 11357

posted 30 March 2006 08:39 PM      Profile for pookie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
quote:
Originally posted by marzo:
[QB]I Smart people dress for comfort and are above the superstitions of fashion slavery.
QB]


Right. "Smart" people never just enjoy clothes for their own sake, or like to look good, or believe that how you dress can aid in commanding respect from those around you. Especially, quite frankly, if you're a woman.


From: there's no "there" there | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
audra trower williams
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posted 30 March 2006 09:14 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post
Likes:
Short threads.

Dislikes:
Long threads.


From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged

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