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Author Topic: Who's dead now? rises from the ashes
skdadl
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posted 19 February 2005 10:58 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Previous thread got too long.

Nancy Oakes, 1924-2005

Although she died in January, the Grope just caught up with this story this morning. Here is the obit from the Times of London.

If you enjoy your obits scandalous, you will find this one juicy. Oakes was a major figure in the trial of her husband for the murder of her father, Sir Harry Oakes, in the Bahamas in 1943.

Her husband was acquitted but forced to flee the island. The murder has never been solved, but there are all kinds of intriguing theories about who may have set de Marigny up to take the fall for the murder -- in particular, many have speculated that the Duke and Duchess of Windsor (he then the governor of the Bahamas, to keep him far away from the war) played a role, a theory wonderfully dramatized in Timothy Findley's novel Famous Last Words.

Isn't it interesting that the Times of London does not mention the Duke and Duchess in this obit, although the Grope and Flail does?

Just the sort of life that Tom Lehrer might have written a song about.


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idahopotato
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posted 19 February 2005 12:29 PM      Profile for idahopotato        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Great! I thought I might be the last person to remember the great Tom Lehrer. Too bad we don't have the people with his intelligence, or guts. Laws protecting the "royals" in the British Isles are still used by the press, particularly by the Murdoch trashed "Times".
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Boom Boom
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posted 19 February 2005 12:31 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've got two Tom Lehrer CD's. You want them? I'm hard of hearing and can't make out all the lyrics. My oldest brother was a big Lehrer fan 40 years ago.
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skdadl
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posted 19 February 2005 12:37 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, idahopotato, I'm always up for a rousing chorus of "Alma, tell us ..."

Or "Doin' the Vatican Rag," or "Poisoning Pigeons in the Park."

Boom Boom, idaho has first dibs, but if he doesn't want those CDs, I do.


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Boom Boom
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posted 19 February 2005 12:45 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Since the CD's have some of the same songs (one's live, one's a greatest hits) I'll send you each one. PM me with your mailing address and they'll be in the mail Monday.
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Boom Boom
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posted 19 February 2005 12:51 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Skadl, I'll send you Lehrer's "That was the year that was" with: "The Vatican Rag" and "National Brotherhood Week". IdahoPotato will get "An Evening With Tom Lehrer" with: "Poisoning Pigeons In The Park" and the classic "We Will All Go Together When We Go". Both can be seen online through Google.
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skdadl
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posted 19 February 2005 12:53 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, now, Boom Boom, with idahopotato's permission, could we reverse that choice? I have TWTWTW on LP.
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Boom Boom
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posted 19 February 2005 01:00 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
No problem.
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al-Qa'bong
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posted 19 February 2005 02:13 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Could one of youse do some copyright infringement and burn me one?

My kids like to sing "Poisoning Pigeons in the Park" and "Plagiarize" (it's a cute subject as art...).


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Contrarian
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posted 19 February 2005 03:22 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One of my high school teachers had a Lehrer record and I recall him playing The Irish Ballad:
quote:
One morning in a fit of pique,
Sing rickety-tickety-tin,
One morning in a fit of pique,
She drowned her father in the creek.
The water tasted bad for a week,
And we had to make do with gin, with gin,
We had to make do with gin.

Link to words of some songs, etc.

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skdadl
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posted 19 February 2005 03:29 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
See his comment at the end of "I Hold Your Hand in Mine":

quote:
You know: of all the songs I've ever sung, that is the one I've had the most requests not to.

al-Q, will do, right after I get that tutorial (How To Burn a CD) from my trainer.


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'lance
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posted 19 February 2005 03:55 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Harrumph. Enough frivolity. Back to the thread at hand...

Samuel Alderson, Crash-Test Dummy Inventor, Dies at 90

quote:
Samuel W. Alderson, a physicist and engineer who was a pioneer in developing the long-suffering, curiously beautiful human surrogates known as automotive crash-test dummies, died Feb. 11 at his home in Los Angeles. He was 90.

The cause was complications of myelofibrosis and pneumonia, his grandson Matthew Alderson said.

The dummy that is the current industry standard for frontal crash testing in the United States is a lineal descendant of one Mr. Alderson began manufacturing for the aerospace industry in the early 1950's. It is used today by automakers and government agencies to test safety features like seat belts.


(It's a New York Times story; if you need to sign in, try username "LesterBangs," password "blurt").

quote:
His cultural legacy includes Vince and Larry, the ubiquitous dummy stars of highway safety advertisements in the 1980's and 90's; the television cartoon "Incredible Crash Dummies"; and the pop group Crash Test Dummies.

Mr. Alderson's other work included manufacturing humanlike figures called medical phantoms that were used to measure exposure to radiation, and synthetic wounds that oozed mock blood and were worn by soldiers during training exercises.

"Those things were coming home all the time," Jeremy Alderson recalled. "And they'd be out in the foyer until finally my mom said, 'Don't bring those things into the house!' "


Seriously.


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Boom Boom
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posted 19 February 2005 05:47 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
[QUOTE]Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:
[QB]Could one of youse do some copyright infringement and burn me one?

I could try tomorrow. Please remind me, I have a busy evening tonight, and am busy Sunday morning.


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Boom Boom
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posted 19 February 2005 05:50 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Calling Idaho Potato: your pm is disabled, let me know if you want a Tom Lehrer CD and I'll mail it to you. By tonight or tomorrow noon if possible. Thanks!
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Agent 204
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posted 19 February 2005 05:59 PM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Contrarian:
One of my high school teachers had a Lehrer record and I recall him playing The Irish Ballad:
[/URL]


Which, curiously, is awfully similar to "Wella Wallia", a real Irish ballad about an old woman who lived in the woods, stuck a knife in her baby's head, and didn't deny her crime when the police showed up.

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skdadl
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posted 20 February 2005 08:57 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For those joining this thread in progress, I'd just like to say that while Nancy Oakes and the inventor of crash-test dummies have died, Tom Lehrer is, as far as I know, still very much alive.
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The Hegemo
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posted 20 February 2005 07:35 PM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sandra Dee has died:

quote:

Sandra Dee, the actress who became an icon for a generation of teenagers in the late 1950's and early 1960's, died today at Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, Calif. She was 63.

The cause was complications from kidney disease, said Steve Blauner, a friend of the family.



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lagatta
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posted 20 February 2005 09:51 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Daniel Feist. A journalist my age - I may have met him but scarcely knew him, if at all. His world music show was the only thing I tuned to on commercial radio (not Radio-Canada, CBC or community stations). I'm listening to the memorial show right now, between dancing and crying.

The above link is more about his disease and reaction to it - you can find more about the role he played in world music on The Mix and other sites.


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 20 February 2005 11:37 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Gidget's death is proof that we're all doomed.
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aRoused
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posted 21 February 2005 04:51 AM      Profile for aRoused     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hunter S. Thompson


quote:
In a statement released to the Aspen Daily News, Juan Thompson said his father shot himself to death in his home in Aspen, Colo. on Sunday night. He was 67.

I sat down with _Kingdom of Fear_ just last week, and wondered at one point: How old is this guy, he's been at it for years!. I worked out the 67 figure.

link to News thread

[ 21 February 2005: Message edited by: aRoused ]


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Hephaestion
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posted 21 February 2005 05:18 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
For those joining this thread in progress, I'd just like to say that while Nancy Oakes and the inventor of crash-test dummies have died, Tom Lehrer is, as far as I know, still very much alive.

Really? I thought Lehrer was dead, too. Hmmmff!


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skdadl
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posted 21 February 2005 07:58 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Gosh, all three deaths so hard to hear of.

Some context on Thompson's suicide should emerge gradually -- one can imagine how shocked his family must be. I wonder whether he was coping with an illness -- that's all I can think.

He certainly lived life his way, wrote and lived with great flair, and he had a particular influence on other journalists.

Feist, still so young, although what a packed and productive life he had; and Sandra Dee also -- gosh, but I still see her as a teenager. At least she had a chance to see herself commemorated in Spacey's movie last year -- I haven't seen it, but he says she was pleased with her treatment therein.


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lagatta
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posted 21 February 2005 09:39 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was thinking Thompson may have been ill as well - I mean physically, not depressed, and decided not to let the illness whatever it was kill him slowly and miserably. But we don't really know yet. Wild guy. Not always very nice, obviously. Personally I think he deserves his own thread, straddling media and culture as he changed journalism so much, for better and worse. Actually he was younger than I thought.

As for Gidget, do babblers know the real Gidget was Jewish, and dark - nothing like Sandra Dee? Her parents fled Nazi Germany and her dad's book is filled with admiration but also bewilderment, so it seems (I haven't read it, only blurbs - I'm interested in refugees from Mitteleuropa but not remotely in "sun and surf" culture). Indeed it was such a hiatus from the parents' culture. It seems the real Gidget is still alive and well.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 21 February 2005 09:52 AM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was thinking along the same lines regarding Thompson.

I had no idea there even was a real Gidget.


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lagatta
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posted 21 February 2005 10:17 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Babblers will see that there is another thread on Thompson. As for Feist, they were telling all manner of stories about him - he wandered all 'round Africa wearing a Bob Marley t-shirt without coming across as a wannabee. He learnt fluent Zulu - even the bad words - and yelled at drivers in it in Jo-burg - which one would not think the wisest of moves for a white guy, but he always got away with it, and actually relieved some of the racial tension always seething under the surface. Since he spoke both English and French fluently he also got to know World music stars from Francophone Africa ...

Here is a link about Gidget, though she doesn't belong here, she is very much alive, a pretty, vivacious grandmother in her '60s who still lives in Southern California. I'm thinking how much more interesting a show about the real Gidget would have been.

Gidget lives!


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Hephaestion
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posted 24 February 2005 06:44 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thompson family members unsurprised by "gonzo" journalist's suicide
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pogge
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posted 26 February 2005 08:08 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Peter Benenson, founder of Amnesty International.

Via TalkLeft.

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Papal Bull
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posted 28 February 2005 10:09 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Noburo is dead

Although I doubt many here would know if this man, but is most influential in the gaming industry, penning what is widely seen as the greatest survival-horror script ever. He will be missed by gaming afficandos the world round.


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N.Beltov
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posted 12 March 2005 10:59 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Erika (Katy) Simons (1911-2005).
quote:
ERIKA (KATY) SIMONS was born in Amsterdam, Holland on February 13, 1911 and died in Winnipeg, MB on February 16, 2005. She is survived by a sister Euphemia, in Holland; a brother Siebert, in Montreal; and two nieces, Ruth and Renee. Katy was the daughter of a Jewish father and a Mennonite mother, and her long and productive life reflected this heritage. During the Second World War, Katy and other family members risked their lives to save Jewish people from the Holocaust. The Germans imprisoned Katy and after six weeks her mother managed to barter her release by giving a Nazi officer a handcrafted doll. In 2002, Katy was awarded the Righteous Amongst the Nations Award from the Israeli government for her war efforts on behalf of Jewish people. Katy trained in England to be a nurse and came to Manitoba in 1961 to work in the T.B. sanitarium in Ninette. Many of her patients were children from the far north and Katy has been described as their guardian angel. She introduced unconventional treatments such as bringing a cat into the wards. When she was in her 60s, Katy enrolled at University of Winnipeg to pursue her lifelong dream of a university education. She was a vigorous member of many groups, including the Unitarian Church, Veterans Against Nuclear Arms, and the Humanist Association of Manitoba. She advocated strongly for peace and social justice. On her two crutches, Katy participated in the March for Peace every year. A celebration of Katy's life will be held at the Unitarian Church, 603 Wellington Cres. at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 12. Flowers are gratefully declined. Donations in Katy's memory may be made to Amnesty International, the Unitarian Church, Project Peacemakers, Veterans Against Nuclear Arms, Winnipeg Harvest, or another charity of choice.

The obit is from Wpg Free Press obits

I will be singing as part of the choir at today's celebration of Katy's life. How well I remember Katy on her two crutches in the many "Walks for Peace" in Winnipeg over the years. What an inspiration! And, I might add, even in the last year of her life, Katy carried enough authority to intervene during church services with a contribution of some sort. I understand a little better why she was freely given this privilege.

[ 12 March 2005: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


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Hephaestion
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posted 12 March 2005 01:10 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Bill Cameron

quote:
TORONTO - Veteran broadcaster and author Bill Cameron has died after a battle with cancer. He was 62.

Cameron died around midnight Friday of cancer of the esophagus, which had moved into his brain and liver, said a CBC spokeswoman.

He is best known as anchor, writer, reporter and documentary producer for CBC Television's renowned magazine program The Journal.


Cameron was also an author.

Damn. He was one of my favourite CBC reporters/anchors.

RIP Bill.

[ 12 March 2005: Message edited by: Hephaestion ]


From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 12 March 2005 01:35 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm glad it wasn't one of the puppets. (for those who don't know, Bill also appeared regularly as a newscaster on the series "Puppets Who Kill," reporting on the various atrocities performed by the adorable puppets.
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skdadl
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posted 12 March 2005 01:49 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sorry to hear about Bill. I knew that he'd received that hard diagnosis. I try not to think things like "too early," but sometimes it's hard to resist.
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candle
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posted 15 March 2005 02:32 AM      Profile for candle     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is a bit late but I just read it today and haven't seen anything about it elsewhere. Alex Soria of the Nils was hit by a train in St. Henri, Quebec on December 13th. He was 39. Formed by Alex and his older brother Carlos when Alex was 12 the Nils from Montreal were one of the great post punk bands of the era. Montreal should have been as big as Minneapolis with the Nils and Asexuals vs the Replacements, Husker Du and Soul Asylum. Sell Out Young is considered a seminal release of the genre. The video for Freedom is one of the best videos ever made despite having a budget of probably less than $100.

Alex Soria -The Nils

Alex Soria remembered


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skdadl
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posted 18 March 2005 12:00 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
George F. Kennan, one of the original Cold Warriors, dies at 101.

quote:
PRINCETON, N.J. Mar 18, 2005 — In 1947, diplomat George F. Kennan wrote an article that would guide America's postwar policy for decades. He proposed in the unsigned piece that the United States stop the global spread of Communism through ideology and politics, not war.

The policy came to be known as "containment" and Kennan went on to become a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian.

Kennan, called a role model by his peers in the foreign service, died Thursday night at his Princeton home, said his son-in-law, Kevin Delany of Washington. He was 101.


You can read a bit more about Kennan's famous cable (1946) and the follow-up article in Foreign Affairs, which he signed "X," at Just a Bump in the Beltway, where I first read of Kennan's death.

Note that, in spite of his uncompromising position on the Soviets, Kennan also opposed the Viet Nam adventure, which he did not believe involved U.S. strategic interests.


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jeff house
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posted 18 March 2005 06:11 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Actually, i think Kennan was quite prescient about the Soviet Union. He basically said: encircle it, make sure it conquers no one else, and it will rot from within.

That was the central idea of the 1948 X article, which formed the basis of US foreign policy for a quarter century or so.

At the time he wrote it, the competing policy was "rollback", meaning the US should invade Eastern Europe and impose democracy from above.

Kennan's policy, once adopted, probably saved 10 million lives.


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 18 March 2005 08:52 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You know better than that. Part of 'containment' included slaughter the Indians of Guatemala.
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swallow
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posted 19 March 2005 01:27 PM      Profile for swallow     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The inventor of the cold war is probably worth a thread of his own. But as it's already here...

In the late 40s and early 50s, the two policies contending in the US government were containment and rollback (although the rollback advocates who took power in 1953 under Eisenhower had to recognize that theirpolicy was madness and abandon it). But when Kennan wrote his X article, the two contending policies were confronting the USSR, a school that coalesced under the Kennan containment banner, versus the one-world policy of FDR's former vice-president Wallace. That would have meant an attempt to cooperate with the USSR, for better or worse. The US chose Kennan's path and doomed the world to cold war. Russia replied with the two-camps doctrine.

Kennan opposed the war in Vietnam becuase he thought it ws counter to US national interests. Only the rich parts of the world mattered to him. Containment meant that cold war violence was outsourced to proxy wars in the global south. It cost millions of lives, with Guatemala just one of dozens of examples.


From: fast-tracked for excommunication | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 19 March 2005 06:10 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
it's interesting that kennan disowned the containment idea within 20 years of writing the infamous 8000-word telegram.

quote:
The man who devised it would within 10 years disown it utterly and in his 1967 memoirs would admit to re-reading the Long Telegram with "horrified amusement". But George Kennan, visionary and realist, mystic and nostalgic conservative rolled into one, was never afraid to change his mind.

From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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posted 19 March 2005 09:26 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I read Kennan's Memoirs about thirty years ago, but I don't recall him disowning containment at all.

His testimony at the Senate hearings on Vietnam were important; and what he said was that getting involved in every third world civil war had nothing to do with the containment doctrine he proposed.

That's why the Guatemala example is wrong. Kennan
didn't think the US had to oppose revolution in Guatemala. He thought it was irrelevant to the USA.

And I am not sure Kennan was primarily interested in opposing Henry Wallace, either. The Republicans were roaring at the gates in 1948...remember the headline "Dewey Wins"?

Is there some specific reason you believe it had to do with Wallace in particular, and the policy option he represented?


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swallow
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posted 19 March 2005 10:51 PM      Profile for swallow     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Not Wallace in particular, i guess, more the "one world" idea. The original debate was whether to co-exist with the USSR or contain it. Kennan gave the containment option its manifesto. Walter LaFeber's books paint a good picture of the one-world versus cold war struggle. He paints Wallace as the upholder of the Roosevelt cooperative strategy. Truman emerges as the villain who declared cold war in 1947.

The idea of "rollback" came slightly later, once the US has set on its path of cold war. In my view rollback had more to do with "the loss of China" than anything else. But rollback versus containment was just a tactical battle among cold warriors who agreed on the main strategy of confronting the USSR. And in fact, they amounted to the same thing. In practical terms, the US did not invade China and eastern Europe, it just chose to "contain" the USSR everywhere, not only in Kennan's "world power centres."


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Hephaestion
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posted 20 March 2005 08:16 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

CBC Radio is reporting that Senator Royce Frith has died.


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skdadl
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posted 20 March 2005 08:23 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Gosh, I remember him from the early years of TV. Classic chiselled face, chiselled voice, chiselled hair ...

Seriously, he came from the days when announcers were supposed to project authority that would calm us.

No, really seriously: I thought he seemed a nice man.


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Bobolink
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posted 20 March 2005 09:38 PM      Profile for Bobolink   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Andre Norton has passed away.
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catje
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posted 20 March 2005 10:00 PM      Profile for catje     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
At 93! Man, the rest of us should be so lucky. Props to a prolific writer and feminist trailblazer.
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jeff house
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posted 21 March 2005 01:31 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Back to Kennan for a moment....

quote:
The man who devised it would within 10 years disown it utterly

I still haven't discovered where he "disowned it utterly".

Here are some articles. I don't see any real disowning, more like fine tuning.

http://www.foreignaffairs.org/background/kennan


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thwap
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posted 21 March 2005 03:24 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Re: Kennan "disowning containment" --

my reading of it was he disowned what subsequent policy-makers made of containment.

for the most part, i think Kennan was an elitist snob, horrified at the brutality of Stalinism, but utterly confused about the USA he served.

and wasn't he the guy who said that democracy and human rights was all hokum, and that the main goal was to preserve the US's domination of the world's resources?


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jeff house
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posted 21 March 2005 06:41 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I would be surprised if Kennan said that.

For sure, though, he believed in identifying the real security needs of the United States, and ensuring they were preserved.

I know for sure that he wrote, about the USSR, that rumours of its desire for "global domination" were risible. He clearly believed that global domination by a single power was utterly impossible.


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swallow
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posted 21 March 2005 10:25 PM      Profile for swallow     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Kennan wouldn't have said it so bluntly, but the main thesis of his 1951 book American Diplomacy was to lament what he called the idealism of American foreign policy and argue it needed to be a more hard-headed calculation based on national interest, which would be made by "professionals" without recourse to public opinion.
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thwap
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posted 21 March 2005 10:28 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Policy Planning Study 23
A document written by Mr.Kennan which states: We have about 50 percent of the world's wealth, but only 6 percent of its population. . . In this situation we cannot fail to be the object of envy and resentment. Our real task in the coming period is to devise a pattern of relationships that will permit us to maintain this disparity. . . To do so we will have to dispense with sentimentality and daydreaming; and our attention will have to be concentrated on our immediate national objectives. . . We should cease to talk about vague and. . . unreal objectives such as human rights, the raising of living standards and democratization. (1948)



http://www.answers.com/topic/george-f-kennan

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skdadl
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posted 26 March 2005 03:06 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There's a very fine obit for Royce Frith in today's Grope and Flail (see second-last page of the Sports section -- why do they do that?).

And this surprised me, but only because I almost never think about Monaco: it appears that Prince Rainier is dying, at 81.

"The prognosis for life remains extremely reserved."

One of those stories that, I think, strikes most of us mainly because it tells time against us rather than the dying person. I remember the fairy-tale wedding; I was just a kid; etc.

[ 26 March 2005: Message edited by: skdadl ]


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globetrotter
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posted 26 March 2005 03:25 PM      Profile for globetrotter     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
James Callaghan, British Prime Minister from 1976-79 (Labour), has died on the eve of his 93rd birthday.

[ 26 March 2005: Message edited by: Sarah ]


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skdadl
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posted 30 March 2005 11:55 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Johnny Cochran dies at 67 from a brain tumor.

quote:
His family said they were most proud of his community work in Los Angeles.

In the Simpson case, Mr Cochran turned the murder trial into an indictment of the police department suggesting officers planted evidence in an effort to frame the former football star because he was a black celebrity.

His catchphrase in the Simpson trial - "If it doesn't fit, you must acquit" - would be quoted and parodied for years afterwards.



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Yukoner
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posted 30 March 2005 12:52 PM      Profile for Yukoner   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wonder if Johnny gets a front row seat in hell for his fine work in the Simpson case?
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skdadl
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posted 30 March 2005 12:58 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
On two counts, Yukoner, I would say no.

1. The LA prosecutor's office had that slap in the face coming. They had been allowing the LAPD to do sloppy work, probably racist-leaning in many instances, and that jury knew that and was ready to deliver a message. Given a chance, they did it.

I suspect that that was a good thing for policing and prosecuting in LA. No, Simpson shouldn't have got off, but he's a pathetic creature now anyway and who cares. Fixing the DAs and the police matters a lot more in the long run.

2. Apparently Cochran did a lot of pro bono work in LA, and good for him. He owed it, but he did it, and good for him.


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Reality. Bites.
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posted 30 March 2005 01:16 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Moreover, it's a defense attorney's job to get her clients off. If he succeeds in getting an acquittal for a guilty client, there's plenty of blame to go around, but none of it belongs to the defense attorney.
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Yukoner
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posted 30 March 2005 01:21 PM      Profile for Yukoner   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by RealityBites:
Moreover, it's a defense attorney's job to get her clients off. If he succeeds in getting an acquittal for a guilty client, there's plenty of blame to go around, but none of it belongs to the defense attorney.


HAHAHA. That is funny. If it were me that killed Nicole and her BF do you think for a second I'd be playing golf in Florida right now? I'd be Bubba's bitch in San Quinten. Money got Simpson off and if you call that justice you have a hole in your head.

Edited to add funny pic of Robert Blake

[ 30 March 2005: Message edited by: Yukoner ]


From: Um, The Yukon. | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
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posted 30 March 2005 01:22 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
During the OJ trial it's alleged that Judge Lance Ito had some custom-made Christmas cards printed up that had on the front a press photo of him, weary and slouching at the bench, and inside, the words "Objection overruled Mr. Cochrane. The term 'White Christmas' does not have racist overtones."


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Hinterland
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posted 30 March 2005 01:24 PM      Profile for Hinterland        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Maybe we can split the difference and agree that Cochran's time in Purgatory will be somewhat extended.

I understand that it's the defense lawyer's job to get his or her client off, but if Cochran was in fact aware of Simpson's guilt (...of course, a good defense lawyer would make sure he or she nevers gets wind of details that could lead to such a conclusion) then the defense lawyer's actions are morally condemnable. But, I don't think we'll ever know for sure.


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skdadl
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posted 30 March 2005 01:27 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yabbut who was the cop who was both morally condemnable and utterly incompetent on top of that? And the DA who went to trial with the jerk?
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Hinterland
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posted 30 March 2005 01:29 PM      Profile for Hinterland        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, I agree. Hell's a-poppin' with a lot of the people involved in that case.
From: Québec/Ontario | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 30 March 2005 01:39 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
Yabbut who was the cop who was both morally condemnable and utterly incompetent on top of that? And the DA who went to trial with the jerk?

Mark Fuhrman. And Marcia Clark.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Section 49
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posted 30 March 2005 01:43 PM      Profile for Section 49     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I understand that it's the defense lawyer's job to get his or her client off, but if Cochran was in fact aware of Simpson's guilt (...of course, a good defense lawyer would make sure he or she nevers gets wind of details that could lead to such a conclusion) then the defense lawyer's actions are morally condemnable. But, I don't think we'll ever know for sure.

I am not sure I understand: which actions of Cochrane's are morally condemnable? Lawyers ( myself included) defend clients they "know" are guilty all the time. It changes how you run a case (a lawyer can't mislead the court by submitting evidence he or she knows to be untrue), but doesn't change your role -- to ensure that the Crown/State can prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. I don't have encyclopaedic knowledge of the Simpson case, but none of Cochrane's moves that I remember struck me as unethical.


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Michelle
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posted 30 March 2005 01:47 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Exactly!

Cochrane did nothing wrong. He defended his clients. EVERY person, no matter how heinous the crime they are accused of, is entitled to a lawyer, and entitled to the best defence possible. It is a defence lawyer's job to provide that.

Without defence lawyers, we would have kangaroo courts, not a justice system.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hinterland
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posted 30 March 2005 01:57 PM      Profile for Hinterland        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Don't get me wrong. I agree. But if we're talking about the state of his immortal soul, we're not talking about human justice anymore.

For verily, I say unto thee...blah, blah blah...


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Section 49
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posted 30 March 2005 02:28 PM      Profile for Section 49     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I hadn't thought about my immortal soul...well, if anyone can get me out of hell, it will be Cochrane. I wonder how many indulgences I'll need to start his retainer?
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Reality. Bites.
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posted 30 March 2005 03:36 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Yukoner:
HAHAHA. That is funny. If it were me that killed Nicole and her BF do you think for a second I'd be playing golf in Florida right now? I'd be Bubba's bitch in San Quinten. Money got Simpson off and if you call that justice you have a hole in your head.

I didn't call it justice, but Cochrane did the job he was paid to do. He was doing his job.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 31 March 2005 05:17 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mitch Hedberg died today in a New Jersey hotel room.

God rest his hilarious soul!


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 31 March 2005 05:26 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I had no idea who that was, so I googled his name and came up with these three funny one-liners:

quote:
I don't have a girlfriend. But I do know a woman who'd be mad at me for saying that.
Mitch Hedberg

I used to do drugs. I still do drugs. But I used to, too.
Mitch Hedberg

The depressing thing about tennis is that no matter how good I get, I'll never be as good as a wall.
Mitch Hedberg


Also, considering where PB says he died, this is kind of a weird page from his web site:
http://www.mitchhedberg.net/disturb.html

[ 31 March 2005: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Leuca
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posted 31 March 2005 05:40 PM      Profile for Leuca     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I understand that it's the defense lawyer's job to get his or her client off, but if Cochran was in fact aware of Simpson's guilt (...of course, a good defense lawyer would make sure he or she nevers gets wind of details that could lead to such a conclusion) then the defense lawyer's actions are morally condemnable.

The defense lawyer also plays a role in determining what the crime actually was. Did the guy commit 1st dregree murder or was it 2nd degree? Was it assault or was it attempted murder?

According to Jonnie Cochoran's daughter, he believed in OJ's innocence til his dying day. So too does F Lee believe in his innocence. Clearly the prosecution did not prove their case as enough reasonable doubt was raised.


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The Hegemo
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posted 05 April 2005 09:55 PM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Saul Bellow has died
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skdadl
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posted 06 April 2005 12:24 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's an excellent obit for covering a lot of territory -- thanks for the link, Hegemo.

Herzog was the first Bellow I read, and I thought it was brilliant, a fever all the way through that breaks beautifully at the end. Then I went back and read Seize the Day, a gem, and Augie March, also fun, if a little unformed.

But I quit with Mr Sammler. To me, the more successful Bellow got, the more autobiographical and the more moralising (and the less artful) he got, and it started to bother me. Well, bore me, I fear.

I'm willing to call him great, I guess, and I admire the tremendous gusto that he retained through a long life of hard work. He could be awfully gassy, though, in interviews and in his fiction both.


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Cueball
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posted 06 April 2005 09:42 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I liked Bellow.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Snuckles
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posted 12 April 2005 08:34 PM      Profile for Snuckles   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Andrea Dworkin, Writer and Crusading Feminist, Dies
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SubHuman
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posted 13 April 2005 12:14 PM      Profile for SubHuman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mitch Hedberg was a unique comedian. You would remember him if you had seen him because of his distinctive style.

It happened a month ago, but I only heard this week that Dave Allen, of "Dave Allen At Large" fame, died in London.


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maestro
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posted 15 April 2005 10:53 PM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Johnny B. Goode dies

quote:
...Johnnie Johnson, the self-taught pianist to whom Berry paid tribute in the song Johnny B. Goode, died Wednesday at his St. Louis home. He was 80.

...Berry, 78, called Johnson "the man with a dynamite right hand" and "my piano player who no one else has come near" in an interview with the Associated Press at Missouri's Blueberry Hill nightclub.

...The two men performed together on-and-off over five decades, most recently last year at Blueberry Hill, and their relationship even withstood a potentially friendship-ending lawsuit.

...In 2000, Johnson sued Berry over royalties and credit for songs they composed together. The lawsuit was eventually dismissed because too much time had passed since the songs were written.

...Berry was a struggling musician on New Year's Eve in 1952, when Johnson called him in to help fill for an ailing band member. That gig helped introduce Berry's rollicking new style to audiences and he eventually took over the band, but Johnson never held it against him.


Every guitar player in the world knows how to play Johnny B. Goode. It's almost the first thing the aspiring rock guitarist learns.

While the guitar version was written by Chuck Berry, the actual riff was first composed on the piano by Johnson.

R.I.P.


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skdadl
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posted 21 April 2005 02:20 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
James Houston, writer, craftworker and artist, and advocate of Inuit art

Houston played a major political/promotional role in waking the Canadian government up to the power and (fortunately and/or unfortunately) commercial potential of Inuit art. Many will have seen his gorgeous publications on northern art, or the fine movie made in 1974 (with Timothy Bottoms, if I recall correctly) of his novel White Dawn.


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Contrarian
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posted 21 April 2005 02:26 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
They are talking about him now on Sounds Like Canada. He made that big glass sculpture in the Glenbow Museum, that the staircase winds around.

Here's his gallery.

[ 21 April 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 21 April 2005 02:30 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, I'm sorry I missed the show, and I will look at the glass more closely next time I visit -- didn't know that.

White Dawn was one of those movies I went to under a bit of protest -- I didn't know much about it in advance, and the friend who urged it on me made it sound like good medicine.

In fact, I was riveted all the way through, and devastated at the end.


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pogge
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posted 23 April 2005 02:36 PM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Acting legend Sir John Mills dies

quote:
Sir John Mills, one of Britain's best-known and best-loved actors, has died at the age of 97.

Mills starred in more than 100 films since the early 1930s including Great Expectations, War and Peace, and Ryan's Daughter - for which he won an Oscar.

He died at home in Buckinghamshire on Saturday morning after a chest infection that lasted several weeks.



From: Why is this a required field? | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 23 April 2005 02:41 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What a wonderful man he was, and what a great life.

Och. Tonight I shall slip Tunes of Glory into the VCR (sorry: I'm still old-fashioned, or at least old tech), and salute Guinness and Mills playing off one another as very few actors now are allowed to do.

Standing ovation for John Mills. And let's have an encore for Alec Guinness.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
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posted 23 April 2005 04:24 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, I'm with you, skdadl.

quote:
I'm still old-fashioned, or at least old tech

Unfortunately, they won't allow you to reach a point and then stay there. You will have to get a DVD player because nothing is coming out on videotape any more!


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
remind
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posted 28 April 2005 05:41 AM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Condolences to her family and friends and may she move on in peace.

Christina McCall, the political writer who helped coin the phrase “he haunts us still” about Pierre Trudeau, died yesterday morning after a long illness. She was 70 years old.

Ms. McCall combined a journalism career with literary non-fiction writing, winning several awards for her work and, at one point, challenging former husband Peter C. Newman in a duel played out at the top of the best-seller lists.

It was with her subsequent husband, University of Toronto political economist Stephen Clarkson, that she published two volumes on Mr. Trudeau, establishing the oft-used phrase about the former PM's ability to haunt Canadians.

Last night Mr. Clarkson said she has been seriously ill for more than a year with three progressive incurable illnesses. She had only found out about them one after the other, he said.

G&M


From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 28 April 2005 07:39 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, a salute to Christina.

She should be credited with a share of the success of the early works that brought Peter C. Newman his fame, Renegade in Power, eg, and Distemper of Our Times. He at least calls her his best editor, but she was more than that at times, closer to a collaborator.

She was personally a very warm and generous and funny woman, a daughter of one of those "fine old Ontario families" (FOOFs) who enjoyed nothing more than laughing at their pretensions and the pretensions of social climbers equally. A student of Northrop Frye, she was a product of a literary culture at U of T that barely exists any longer -- rough contemporaries would be, eg, Adrienne Clarkson and, a few years younger, Barbara Amiel and Margaret Atwood.

Although very little was said of this in public, both the Clarkson children came to think of Christina as mother (rather than Adrienne) and her daughter from the marriage to PCN took Christina's surname as her own.

She was also an editor at Chatelaine during the glory years of Doris Anderson, from whom she first learned her feminism and also quite a bit about how to be a great broad.


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 05 May 2005 06:42 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
ny times (login: babblers8, pwd: audrarules)

quote:
Jack Nichols, a writer and early gay activist who campaigned publicly for gay rights nearly a decade before the Stonewall riots of 1969, died on Monday in Cocoa Beach, Fla., where he lived. He was 67.

With Frank Kameny, Nichols founded the Mattachine Society, an early gay advocacy group, in Washington in 1961. When Nichols and Kameny started the Washington Mattachine Society in 1961, identifying oneself in public as gay posed serious risks. Homosexual acts were against the law in every state, and gay men and lesbians who came out risked being jailed or institutionalized.

In 1967, Nichols became one of the first Americans to talk openly about his homosexuality on national television when he appeared in "The Homosexuals," a CBS documentary.

Nichols was a founder of Gay, the first gay weekly newspaper in the United States. He also successfully lobbied the American Psychiatric Association to rescind its definition of homosexuality as a form of mental illness.



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 05 May 2005 09:26 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Jack had also recently become a regular columnist at 365gay.com, and had quickly become one of my favorites. It was a shock to hear of his death, especially at such a relatively young age. Jack will be missed.
From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 10 May 2005 07:56 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Peter Rodino, the New Jersey congressman who was chair of the House Judiciary Committee during the Nixon impeachment hearings, has died.

He became such a familiar figure on television to all of us that last year before Nixon's resignation, 1973-74. I really liked him -- although he had been little known before the hearings, he turned out to be just the right kind of unassuming, steady pilot that those investigations and debates required.

[ 10 May 2005: Message edited by: skdadl ]


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 18 May 2005 07:54 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
ny times (login as above)

quote:
Paul K. Keene, a pioneer of organic farming in the United States, died on April 23 at a nursing home in Mechanicsburg, Pa. He was 94.

When Mr. Keene started Walnut Acres in the mid-1940's, the agricultural gospel called for using chemical fertilizers and insecticides, with their promise of cheaper, more efficient farming. Natural farming was viewed as eccentric, if not downright un-American.

"It doesn't seem that long ago that everyone thought we were kooks or Commies," Mr. Keene told U.S. News & World Report in 1995. "Someone once tossed dynamite on the property. Another burned crosses."



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 24 May 2005 08:42 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thurl Ravenscroft, who provided the rumbling "They're Grrrrreeeat!" for Kellogg's Tony the Tiger and voiced a host of Disney characters, has died. He was 91.

Ravenscroft died Sunday of prostate cancer, said Diane Challis Davy, director of Laguna Beach's Pageant of the Masters.

He also sang "You're a Mean One, Mr. Grinch" in the cartoon classic.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Crippled_Newsie
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posted 25 May 2005 06:47 PM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Filmmaker Ismail Merchant, who with partner James Ivory became synonymous with classy costume drama in films such as "A Room With A View," "Maurice", "Remains of the Day,' and "Howard's End," died Wednesday.

He was 68.


From: It's all about the thumpa thumpa. | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 28 May 2005 12:58 AM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Eddie Albert, star of Green Acres, at 99, of pneumonia.
From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 28 May 2005 01:45 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Guitarist Domenic Troiano dies
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
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posted 28 May 2005 02:00 AM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 06 June 2005 05:05 AM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Miriam Rothschild, 1908-2005.
quote:

A SCIENTIST of scholarship and distinction, Dame Miriam Rothschild was known primarily for her writings on butterflies and fleas, though she also published more than 300 highly technical papers on subjects such as bird behaviour and parasitic castration. Several of the papers concern a group of odoriferous chemicals called pyrazines which — as she noticed in 1961 — are widespread in nature and play a part in triggering brain functions such as memory and alertness.

[ 06 June 2005: Message edited by: Agent 204 ]


From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 06 June 2005 07:11 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Activist Jean O'Leary dies

quote:
Jean O'Leary, a nun who came out, became a lesbian activist, organized the first White House meeting of LGBT leaders and helped create National Coming Out Day, has died. She was 57.

O'Leary died Saturday of complications of lung cancer at home. Her partner of 12 years, Lisa Phelps, was at her bedside, longtime friend Sean Strub said Sunday. O'Leary was diagnosed with the cancer in September 2003.



From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
johnpauljones
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posted 07 June 2005 08:16 PM      Profile for johnpauljones     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anne Bancroft aka Mrs Robinson has died of cancer. Great actress who will be missed.

Thoughts and prayers to her husband Mel Brooks and family


From: City of Toronto | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Américain Égalitaire
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posted 07 June 2005 08:38 PM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Seconded

Here's to you, Mrs. Robinson.


From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 08 June 2005 05:49 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
leslie smith, the inventor of matchbox cars ...
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 08 June 2005 06:45 AM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Willowdale Wizard:
leslie smith, the inventor of matchbox cars ...

He will be cremated and his ashes placed in 1000 tiny urns.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 08 June 2005 09:09 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, here's to Anne Bancroft.

I always try not to say "too soon," especially when someone has had a great life, but the news of her death took me aback a bit. She was going strong on a visit here only a couple of years ago. I expected her to carry on in the tradition of great broads like Katherine Hepburn.

She sounded a little exasperated that people always remembered Mrs Robinson instead of, eg, her Annie Sullivan in The Miracle Worker. When I hear her name, for some reason I always think first of her laughing her way through the remake of To Be or Not To Be, with Brooks as co-star and a terrific cast of funny friends.

Who can forget the opening number, where she and Brooks sing [???] in Polish? (Well: obviously I just forgot name of song. But their performance is such a hoot.) Or there is a wonderful scene in which Charles Durning, playing a leering fat Gestapo officer, walks around to the front of his desk and attempts to sit casually on one corner, the better to impress the beautiful Mrs Bronski (Bancroft) he is interrogating. He doesn't quite aim right, though, and slips off just as he sits down -- I really think that was unintended because Bancroft breaks up in a way that breaks through her character -- for a moment she looks like a real person snorting with delight at a friend. If that's what happened, I'm glad that Brooks left it in. It's a very affecting moment.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Voltaire
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posted 08 June 2005 09:39 AM      Profile for Voltaire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Who can forget the opening number, where she and Brooks sing [???] in Polish? (Well: obviously I just forgot name of song. But their performance is such a hoot.)
Puttin' on the Ritz.

BTW, in the photo above, Hoffman was about 30 and Bancroft about 36.


From: quelques arpents à Montréal | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Voltaire
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posted 08 June 2005 09:46 AM      Profile for Voltaire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oups.

It was Sweet Georgia Brown. Puttin' on the Ritz was in Young Dr. Frankenstein.


From: quelques arpents à Montréal | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 08 June 2005 09:46 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Is that what is was, Voltaire? Thank you. So funny: I can see them dancing across the stage, and almost hear the Polish, and yet the tune was not coming back to me.

My brothers and sisters and I took our mum to see that one Christmas. From that opening on, she was choking with laughter, all the way through. Great memory.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 08 June 2005 09:48 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Aha! That's it! I do hear "Sweet Georgia Brown"!

In Young Frankenstein there is also the wonderful moment when Madeleine Kahn starts to scream and then her scream turns into "Sweet Mystery of Love, at last I've found you."


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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Babbler # 6477

posted 08 June 2005 01:55 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Andy Russell: conservationist, author, mountain man, on June 2, I think. Link here.
quote:
...He lived most of his life in a log cabin on his Hawk's Nest ranch, near Waterton National Park. He wrote a number of books about wildlife, specializing in the grizzly...

...A rancher, mountain guide, photographer and author, Russell spent most of his time and energy trying to protect the wilderness he loved. He also fought an unsuccessful battle against the Oldman River dam.

"I came as close to I've ever done to just breaking down," he once said about describing the backcountry to a group of students. "Because I knew that none of them, not a single one of them, would ever see what I've seen."...



From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
remind
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Babbler # 6289

posted 13 June 2005 10:56 PM      Profile for remind     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Scott Young, Canadian journalist and father to Neil Young died today in Kingston at 87.
From: "watching the tide roll away" | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 14 June 2005 10:04 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
More on journalist and author Scott Young:Scott Young

At one time, Scott Young was banned from Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto by Harold Ballard. Young was critical of some of Ballard's decisions. I guess the press is free for them that owns one.


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
miles
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posted 14 June 2005 05:27 PM      Profile for miles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Scott Young dead. That is so sad. He was a legend and one of the best hockey guys out there. I also want to pay respects to that esteemed member of the Hockey Hall of Fame and father of a great singer songwriter
From: vaughan | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Stephen Gordon
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posted 14 June 2005 05:31 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Not to mention the author of 'Scrubs on Skates', 'Boy on Defence' and 'Boy at Leafs' Camp.' I read those books over and over again when I was a kid.
From: . | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged
Coyote
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posted 14 June 2005 05:32 PM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Scott Young?

Scrubs on Skates

Boy on Defence

Boy at Leaf's Camp


I'm crushed. I'm literally crushed, here. I'm sitting in my office working on a report and there are tears in my eyes.

Thanx so much, Mr. Young.


From: O’ for a good life, we just might have to weaken. | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
James
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posted 14 June 2005 08:01 PM      Profile for James        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Nice that CBC Radio 1 just did a tribute piece to him. Wow, some of the very first "real books" I ever read.
From: Windsor; ON | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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Babbler # 3674

posted 15 June 2005 11:16 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
vera komarkova, a pioneer of mountain climbing.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6718

posted 15 June 2005 03:34 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Percy Arrowsmith, who with his wife set a record two weeks ago for the world's longest marriage, died today at age 105. His wife of 80 years was by his side.

Arrowsmith died at his home in Hereford, northwest of London, his bishop said.

Arrowsmith and his 100-year-old wife Florence celebrated their 80th wedding anniversary and a place in the Guinness Book of Records on June 1.


http://tinyurl.com/7mrmm


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged

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