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Author Topic: Paul Mcartney: Super Bowl Safe
maestro
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posted 09 February 2005 08:57 PM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Am I the only person who wonders why the NFL had so much trouble finding an American artist for the Super Hype halftime show that they had to settle for an aging rock icon with precious little to show for creative output for the last 30 or so years?

I imagine the NFL lawyer and accountant types sitting around a table and saying something like

"...there's no way we can use any female artist with tits 'cause that will excite the religious right, and of course they weren't too happy about having black and white on the stage together either, and if we choose a white artist the black community will give us hell, and if we choose a black artist we'll be accused of tokenism, and our audience is not ready for Marilyn Manson...

...wait a minute, how about Paul Mcartney?


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
thorin_bane
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posted 09 February 2005 09:29 PM      Profile for thorin_bane     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
LOL you forgot to stereotype country...always need to get the rednecks on board. Remember you are always safe woth Motown!!
From: Looking at the despair of Detroit from across the river! | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 09 February 2005 11:19 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Alright guys, we have to do something that exemplifies America. The thirteen colonies. Philidelphia. New England. The Revolution and freedom of democracy..."

"LET'S GET THE BRITISH TO SING!"


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
maestro
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posted 10 February 2005 04:02 AM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
LOL you forgot to stereotype country...always need to get the rednecks on board. Remember you are always safe woth Motown!!

I thought the problem with country music was more or less self-evident...the Dixie Chicks. Besides country is covered under the black/white part of the discussion in that black country stars are thick like hens teeth on the ground.

My own decision would have to go with Marilyn Manson.

I think a blood soaked, cross dresser, running around the stage in womans underwear, biting the heads off of rats and spitting them out at the audience would have been a real reflection of US culture, to say nothing of the game itself.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 10 February 2005 10:11 AM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
they had to settle for an aging rock icon with precious little to show for creative output for the last 30 or so years?

I think that Mark Chapman got the wrong Beatle.


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Polunatic
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posted 10 February 2005 10:54 AM      Profile for Polunatic   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought the Status of Liberty images were a great addition to McCartney's show. It would have been hard to tell the Superbowl was an USian event without it.

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

[ 10 February 2005: Message edited by: Non-partisan partisan ]


From: middle of nowhere | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Sal Paradise
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posted 10 February 2005 12:00 PM      Profile for Sal Paradise        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Although it was in no way intentional I thought it was interesting that when singing "Live and Let Die" you had McCartney telling baby-boomer Americans, "When you were young...you used to say 'live and let live'... you know you did, you know you did, you know you did."

In the context of Americentric chest-thumping it was a little message that went completely over the heads of most everyone watching.


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
FabFabian
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posted 11 February 2005 12:36 AM      Profile for FabFabian        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hehehe. The FCC got two complaints regarding McCartney's half-time show. They complained he was boring.
From: Toronto | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
maestro
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posted 11 February 2005 12:43 AM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Hehehe. The FCC got two complaints regarding McCartney's half-time show. They complained he was boring.

To say nothing of the thousands who fell asleep during the halftime show and missed the rest of the game.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 11 February 2005 11:22 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy Shanks:
I think that Mark Chapman got the wrong Beatle.

Bad taste, Tommy.

I don't think it's acceptable to advocate the murder of musicians you may not like.


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 11 February 2005 03:37 PM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not advocating anything of the kind. I'm merely suggesting that, considering the treacley pabulum that's been McCartney’s output post-Beatles, I would think it’s a pretty safe bet that John Lennon would have produced more vital music.

Simply entertaining that thought is the same as calling for someone's murder?


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 11 February 2005 03:53 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've actually lived that timeline - he pretty much just re-treaded Beautiful Boy and Woman on two increasingly maudlin records and then died of a heroin overdose in '87.

There was a gorgeous song buried on Macca's crappy recent album Flaming Pie called Calico Sky that is a minor masterpiece, IMO. So piffle.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 11 February 2005 04:49 PM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, obviously settled then. That’s me telt.

quote:
There was a gorgeous song buried on Macca's crappy recent album

Even a blind squirrel turns up an acorn now and again.


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 11 February 2005 05:03 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh. I didn't realise it was that simple. Well I'll just go write Let It Be and let the money roll in then.
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maestro
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posted 11 February 2005 05:26 PM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Paul Mcartney is a brilliant writer of melodies. It shows in every thing he's ever written.

That is not to be sneezed at, 'cause there are a zillion musicians out there who would love to be able to do the same.

Having said that, it is also true that without John Lennon to rein him in, and provide some element of...thought to his songs, he cranked out a never ending bunch of 'pabulum'.

In the Beatles, Paul Mcartney was something, post Beatles he was worse than Billy Joel in his lyrics, which is saying something.

But the point really is, how is it that the NFL looked all over the US for half-time entertainment and couldn't find one entertainer good enough for their show?

Tom Petty, Bruce Springsteen, ZZ Top, christ the woods are full of aging rock stars.

Although I will say this...in the last couple of days I've had conversations with younger musicians (twenties) who really like the Beatles. In two separate incidents I had youngsters tell me that today's pop music was really bad. In both cases they mentioned the Beatles as being 'good'.

Now that surprised me a bit. I mean, I don't remember liking my 'parents music' when I was growing up. In fact, I embraced what was then current pop music at a relatively young age.

I guess it is a comment on the current music scene that at least some kids are rejecting it outright, in favour of old songs with melodies. Hmmm...


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 11 February 2005 07:06 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not much of a football fan. In fact, I really hate football, except when they go into the "hurry up" offense, and the game has some flow. But that's rare.

Even worse are the Super Bowl half time shows. The NFL should just stop getting celebrities, and invite the nations best one or two marching bands for the half time shows.

I could use some Sousa once a year.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 11 February 2005 08:27 PM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy Shanks:
I'm not advocating anything of the kind. I'm merely suggesting that, considering the treacley pabulum that's been McCartney’s output post-Beatles, I would think it’s a pretty safe bet that John Lennon would have produced more vital music.

Simply entertaining that thought is the same as calling for someone's murder?


Chapman murdered Lennon. You explicitly indicated that you thought he should have murdered McCartney instead. If you wanted to criticize his music, you could have done that without that remark.


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 12 February 2005 12:17 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Although it was in no way intentional I thought it was interesting that when singing "Live and Let Die" you had McCartney telling baby-boomer Americans, "When you were young...you used to say 'live and let live'... you know you did, you know you did, you know you did."

In the context of Americentric chest-thumping it was a little message that went completely over the heads of most everyone watching.


I wonder if perhaps this choice of song was deliberate, but the choice wasn't McCartney's. It wouldn't be out of the question for some yanqui propagandist to imply that "we used to be the planet's helpful compassionate Boy Scout, and look where that got us, so now we're going to face a hostile world with violence and agression."

Maybe the song went over McCartney's head.

By the way Sal, I dig your handle. What's your road, man?

[ 12 February 2005: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 12 February 2005 01:05 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The music died for me when Lennon was killed. Really, I was stunned. At the time I was in Thunder Bay, and since that time I've hardly brought any new music at all - mmost of what I have are older LP's, cassettes, and CD collections of music of the 1960's and 1970's. My impression of McCartney is that he's become fluff, a lightweight. Lennon's music had an edge. I'll give both credit, though, they were an awesome songwriting team. I liked McCartney's first two LP's with his new band, but never much listened to them after those first two albums. The only artists I've found worth following since the death of Lennon are Bob Dylan (although I'm not fanatic about him) and some of the folk singers still performing since the 1960's.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 12 February 2005 01:32 PM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
John Lennon was killed on my mum's fortieth birthday. She wasn't listening to the news, so when a friend of hers called and said, "It sure makes you feel old, doesn't it?" she assumed he was referring to turning forty.
From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 12 February 2005 01:44 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"sure makes you feel old" could have been the feeling I also had when Lennon was killed - that the innocence of a generation had finally been shattered (although the death of JFK and MLK has the same impact). I felt I had to grow up and get on with it most intensely after the death of Lennon. No one spoke for my generation anymore (except Bob Dylan, who had or was about to lose his way when he converted to Christianity - and was making music that didn't matter anymore). No heroes left. It was finally time to move on.

Lennon died December 8, 1980 at age 40. I had just turned 31 a few months earlier. As for Paul, I think he wanted a lighter, happy life, and I think his first two albums showed that. That's not to take away from his talent as a musician - he remains a very good singer/songwriter. Harrison's death hit me but not remotely as hard as Lennon's.

I think I'll put on some Beatle's music tonight!

[ 12 February 2005: Message edited by: Boom Boom ]


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sal Paradise
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posted 12 February 2005 02:39 PM      Profile for Sal Paradise        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I wonder if perhaps this choice of song was deliberate, but the choice wasn't McCartney's. It wouldn't be out of the question for some yanqui propagandist to imply that "we used to be the planet's helpful compassionate Boy Scout, and look where that got us, so now we're going to face a hostile world with violence and agression."

Interesting take. I was looking at the lyrics from the point of view that they could be seen to scorn American society that turned its back on compassion (though really - was it ever?). But I see your point too...and it goes more in hand with the whole "rah!rah! USA!USA!" teary-eyed patriotism bullshit that the Super Bowl represents.

I doubt that any message was intentional by McCartney in either case. Who knows though? He was the guy who penned the insipid "Freedom" as a tribute to American patriotism in the aftermath of 9/11.

My guess was that the song was chosen for its maximum-possible-use-of-fireworks potential.

quote:
Maybe the song went over McCartney's head.

Perhaps....but that's one pretty big head to go over.

I love the Beatles and respect McCartney for his gift as a song craftsman....but geez...I couldn't help but watch McCartney that night and think "Paulie's finally gotten his wish...*HE* is now the Beatles."


quote:
By the way Sal, I dig your handle. What's your road, man?


Thanks. A fan of your handle as well.


And my road?

Too much time spent in the ditch I think...but I try to focus on the stars.


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
chimpanzee
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posted 17 February 2005 01:34 PM      Profile for chimpanzee     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's another clue for you all. The walrus was Paul.
From: toronto | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged

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