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Author Topic: Musical snobbery
Michelle
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posted 05 February 2005 07:57 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It comes in all sorts of forms. People who hate the popular music from the next generation. People who put down older music from the generation (or two or three!) before them as fogey music. People who cluck their tongues or make snide comments about music their acquaintences like, because it's just SO not cool/commercial/whatever.

I used to hate country music in high school. It was cool then to hate country music - not sure if it still is, since I don't exactly have my finger on the pulse of teen culture these days. Truth be told, it's still not my favorite type of music, but unlike back in high school, I can appreciate it as a musical form, and I don't automatically dismiss songs that are country anymore.

I lived with a boyfriend who was about a decade older than me who CONSTANTLY put down my taste in music. Everything from the 80's "sucked" (and this was the music I grew up with, of course). He would praise me as not like other women my age because I actually liked "real" music (in other words, popular music from the 70's as well as many other types of music not from the 80's), but if I ever played any popular music from my teen years, or played any current music he didn't like, the cutting comments about how much the music I liked SUCKED would fly. As an easygoing person who likes pretty much everything musically (not out of lack of discernment but out of a love of music and an open mind to almost all forms of music), I really got into the music he listened to, and I didn't care that he didn't get into my music - but he would constantly take jabs at it.

It was always "joking" and "teasing". I would laugh and brush it off. But when I left him, I was amazed at how much of my music I'd stopped listening to, once I started hearing it again and could listen to it without the mockery.

So now, I'm a bit sensitive when I see people putting down other people's taste in music. There's a big difference between saying, "I don't like -------" or even criticizing a particular musician over some feature of their music that makes you dislike their singing/playing, and saying, "You like so-and-so? God, they totally SUCK!" or worse, "Your taste in music sucks!"

Just my pet peeve. Of course, I'm not completely innocent either. I know I have done this on occasion, particularly when Neil Young comes up in conversation. But I try to be conscious of not putting people down for liking him, and I can appreciate that my dislike of his voice doesn't invalidate him as a likeable musical choice for other people, or make him unmusical.

[ 05 February 2005: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 05 February 2005 08:06 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As far as genres go, I can appreciate almost anything (with opera, my limit is Gilbert and Sullivan, though). But no matter ***HOW*** polite I'm trying to be, I will always say "I *hate* that!" if I hear Celine Dion.

[puking smiley]


From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Stephen Gordon
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posted 05 February 2005 08:16 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thing is, when I hear her singing in French, it seems okay to me - there are a couple of songs that I really like: I've been known to turn up the sound on the car radio when 'Pour que tu m'aimes encore' comes on.

'Course, it could just mean that I'm still in the 'ignorance-is-bliss' stage of my French comprehension.

[ 05 February 2005: Message edited by: Oliver Cromwell ]


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Jared
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posted 05 February 2005 09:59 PM      Profile for Jared     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think some of my friends are afraid to talk about music around me because I listen to a lot of stuff that clears rooms and am a nerdy wonk that way, but I don't believe in putting down the tastes of others. What the fuck do I care what someone else listens to in their spare time? Sure I may put down Nickelback themselves - after all, Chad Kroeger was obviously concieved during an absinthe-fuelled Airport Ramada orgy attended by Lucifer, three members of Styx, and an excessively permed woman, and I'm also deeply suspicious of any man who wears cowboy boots yet doesn't own a cow - but if that's what floats your boat, whatevs.

Vancouver is faux-hipster ground zero, so the cliquey environs that emerge from that shit probably contribute too. I won't go into a rant, but sometimes it's difficult to hear the music over the quote-unquote 'scenesters' chatting at the bar. I think that the Van live-music scene is kind of a microcosm for the city as a whole, which is to say very image-conscious. It breeds exclusion, and my revulsion at one group viewing others as somehow 'unworthy' probably informs my opinion in judging the music taste of others.

Besides, I'm the dude who has listened to Motley Crue's 'Shout At The Devil' three times today. Rawk.

[ 05 February 2005: Message edited by: Jared ]


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
chimo
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posted 05 February 2005 11:45 PM      Profile for chimo        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i find that usually when other people tell me to check out some band, etc they aren't any good. i think the opposite is true also. i can usually tell that others aren't into the same music i am.
From: sobolev spaces :-) | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
maestro
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posted 06 February 2005 01:57 AM      Profile for maestro     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have had bar patrons come to me when I'm playing and say, "Just play country music, don't play anything else."

Obviously they're not interested in music, they're interested in lifestyle.

Music is common to all humanity, and probably predates spoken language. It is also totally without purpose, except to uplift the spirit.

Unfortunately, nowadays music is an industry, with totatlly predictable results. A small handful of folks produce the product, and the rest of us are supposed to consume it.

So the industry spends loads of money calculating demographics to the nth degree, and separates music into this genre and that.

When the industry dies, music will once again become something that everyone participates in, and genre will disappear.

I look forward to that day.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 06 February 2005 02:55 AM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Man! that 80's music sucked. Just kidding.

No, I've always been respectful of other people's tastes in everything from music to movies to dining. I still turn up the radio volume for songs that the other person had a liking for. But you know when things aren't going well when nothing you like suits them. At that point, you're better off drifting some yourself. Two can be as bad as one.

[ 06 February 2005: Message edited by: Fidel ]


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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posted 06 February 2005 02:57 AM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Music is about Correctness.
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 06 February 2005 03:13 AM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sittin' on the dock of the bay watching the tide roll awaaaaay (Otis whistling)

My favourite 80's tune ...

Well I was walking down the street just a-having a think
When a snake of a guy gave me an evil wink.
He shook-a me up, he took me by surprise.
He had a pickup truck, and the devil's eyes.
He stared at me and I felt a change.
Time meant nothing, never would again.
All:
Let's do the time-warp again.
Let's do the time-warp again.
Narrator:
It's just a jump to the left.


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
kuri
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posted 06 February 2005 07:38 AM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'd say I was guilty of this during my metalhead high school years. In fact I remember my best friend as I talking about how we had to get my hardcore CD's into our collection lest we be "lightweight" by listening to too much punk and grunge. If I showed my current musical tastes (silly j-pop, alt. country and world pop) to my teenaged self, I think she would have rolled her eyes. On the plus side, with the exception of the j-pop, I can share more music with my family than I ever could before.

It's also a marker of tribe though. Where I was growing up, being a country fan was being "mainstream" while hating country was being "anti-mainstream" regardless of what you rejected the country music in favour of. I suspect in the cities, it's much the same with radio pop as being a marker of "mainstream" or "anti".

[ 06 February 2005: Message edited by: dokidoki ]


From: an employer more progressive than rabble.ca | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 06 February 2005 07:55 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I gotta ask (thereby displaying my UN-coolness?)

What's j-pop?


From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
kuri
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posted 06 February 2005 07:57 AM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Actually, Heph, by not knowing, you're probably cooler than myself.

J-pop = Japanese pop.


From: an employer more progressive than rabble.ca | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 06 February 2005 08:16 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is the only J-pop I know:

Yatta, by Green Leaves

It's pretty funny. It'll open your media player as soon as you click it.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
James
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posted 06 February 2005 11:19 AM      Profile for James        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It has amazed me how exposure to, and some involvement with, even an "utterly despised" genre can broaden ones musical appreciation and serve as a bridge between generations, cultures, etc.

As a dead-centre boomer, I entered adulthood absolutely detesting anything "metal", thinking it certainly not "music", and (admittedly) transferring a very poor opinion to anyone who would even listen to such "noise".

As my son reached his mid-teens he developed an interest in guitar and with my encouragement formed a garage band. Well guess what ? To my horror, I soon learned that they were bona fide "metallica wannabees". My poor ears !

Notwithstanding, I did the "good dad" thing, hauling equipment around, etc. I soon learned that they were doing almost striclyly original material, and that it was considered "good", as they started winning festival "battles" and other awards. And I started taking a real interest in the comparative musical merits of their performances, in the lyrics they developed and so forth. And, ruefully, I developed a sense of appreciation.

By the time we had finished the ordeal of getting the first album, Overcome By Suggestion produced, I had to occasionally remind myself "I. am. not. a. metalhead."

Btw, the second album, "pieces held sane" was much better. Sorry, I can't locate it on the web.

Returning to my point, looking into my son's musical tastes and compositions gave me an insight into not just him, but his entire generation and the thought processes that I otherwise would not have had.

As he and his sister matured further, their musical tastes broadened to include all the stuff that I have always loved, and they often call on me to provide historical contxt and insight to, say, the Vietnam era, desegregation, what have you.

In short, much of the wonderful dialogue and relationship that I continue to enjoy with my children can be traced to our mutual broad-based musical appreciation. That's a good thing.

Apologies for the length of this post.

[ 06 February 2005: Message edited by: James ]


From: Windsor; ON | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 06 February 2005 11:39 AM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've noticed that liking something always leaves you open to abuse.

There's always something wrong with everything.

Generally though, I think that sincere music is good. Pre-fabricated, focus-group tested music is bad. Also, foreign imitations of Western music can be bad if they don't really know what it is about Western music that they like.

I'm not implying that, say, Japanese pop music, or Euro-pop is inherently bad. Just that when it's a bunch of people trying to copy something that is popular, while having no idea what makes it tick.


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thorin_bane
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posted 06 February 2005 03:27 PM      Profile for thorin_bane     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have been a metal head through and through and still am, But it was vital to me appreciation of classical music. I have a thread that ties all my music together in some fasion. A lot of metal uses classical composition at the beginning or as the general construction of the song. From there I began to like Opera to a lesser degree but it is there. I think we are all a little snobbish at stuff we don't like until an artist we do like does something that opens the door to that genre. I still am trying to figure how come I love celtic music(i'm not irish or scottish that close only about 5 gen back mostly french) and I still can't grasp jazz, old jazz that my meme listens to is fine or big band but not beatnik or the music where(and this is just my opinion)it sound like 5 people who are deaf and don't hear anything that the other musicians are playing. Sax has never been that great to me since my sis picked up that accursed honking device!! But I digress. Soemthings you enjoy because of a moment in time(Why I like grease!) and others because it has something, however small, in common with something you alreadylisten to.
From: Looking at the despair of Detroit from across the river! | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
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posted 06 February 2005 10:47 PM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is my worst area and I'll freely admit it. I am a musical elitist (at least to some people's standards). I love all music, but I admit to a huge bias against mainsteam pop, and especially the slinky bimbo-type music. I also don't have a whole lot of like for country yet I really like Kid Rock's country music, as well as Fred Drake. I love old school disco and motown and just about anything but my special and true love is psychedlica.

Oh and on Feb 23rd I go see Motely Crue!

Rawk \m/


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Left Turn
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posted 07 February 2005 12:49 AM      Profile for Left Turn        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
to me, the term "musical snobbery" applies most to people who think that classical music is the only "genuine" form of music, and that all other music is grabage. I made the mistake of actually taking two years of the bachlor of music program at a community college, and ran into this attitude quite a bit.
From: BC | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Polly Brandybuck
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posted 07 February 2005 12:58 AM      Profile for Polly Brandybuck     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If rap is considered a music form, then I am genuinely and unrepentantly a music snob. My kids have brought home all manner of music, from metal to hard rock to hilary duff, and while at worst I pretend to have an errand and best I tap along..when the rap cds come out I find a reason, any reason, to be elsewhere.

That is AFTER I check the case for parental warnings. Some of this crap is just pure...crap. Sorry redundancy there.

[ 07 February 2005: Message edited by: housemouse ]


From: To Infinity...and beyond! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 07 February 2005 01:42 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by housemouse:
If rap is considered a music form, then I am genuinely and unrepentantly a music snob.

Check out a progressive, socially-aware Vancouver band called Sweatshop Union. They might challenge your preconceptions.

Like any other "grouping", there are exceptions to every rule. It's not all "gangsta" trash; there's some extraordinarily good hip-hop out there, too.


From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Polly Brandybuck
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posted 07 February 2005 01:52 AM      Profile for Polly Brandybuck     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You are probably right, I tend to tune out at the very mention of the word rap, though I have found some reggae/rap that I can get into.

I think my prejudice comes from the source, unfortunately I got my intro to rap from the 11 to 16 year old set, and they only really really like what everyone else is listening to. Which is gangsta stuff, as apparently there is a real glut of "bad muthas" and "homeboys" in the winter coat and toque junior high set in North Alberta.


From: To Infinity...and beyond! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Polly Brandybuck
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posted 07 February 2005 02:00 AM      Profile for Polly Brandybuck     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Hephaestion:
[QB]

Check out a progressive, socially-aware Vancouver band called Sweatshop Union. They might challenge your preconceptions.


Okay. Checked them out. And while their message is considerably more progressive and socially aware than say...eminem..I still don't care for the genre. I did give it a listen though, so my preconceptions have been duly challenged.


From: To Infinity...and beyond! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
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posted 07 February 2005 02:04 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
*snerk* Nothing makes me smirk quicker than seeing white farm kids trying to ape black inner city youth. How pathetic!

Another good progressive hip-hop band you might like (now broken up, but still good stuff) is Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy. I recommend their CD, "Hiphoprisy is the Greatest Luxury" from the late '80s. You might be lucky and get your kids to like it — maybe even start a new trend in Northern Alberta — socially aware, progressive non-conformity!


From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 07 February 2005 02:49 AM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I am a genre NAZI.

If you call something rock and roll, I'll have about a thousand different names for it.

I am also a musical genre supremist.

"You like salsa? Well, I bet I could name a thousand "blah, blah, blah,blah, blah, blah, blah".

I can't help it though. I love music


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
The Hegemo
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posted 07 February 2005 03:32 PM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Jared:
... after all, Chad Kroeger was obviously concieved during an absinthe-fuelled Airport Ramada orgy attended by Lucifer, three members of Styx, and an excessively permed woman ...

This description is so brilliant it brought tears to my eyes. Bravo, brother!


From: The Persistent Vegetative States of America | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 07 February 2005 03:45 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
My favourite 80's tune ...

... came out in 1973.

How's that for snobbery?


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Polly Brandybuck
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posted 07 February 2005 06:03 PM      Profile for Polly Brandybuck     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Hephaestion:
[QB]*snerk* Nothing makes me smirk quicker than seeing white farm kids trying to ape black inner city youth. How pathetic!

Sure you can smirk...he isn't yours!! Me, I pretend to be looking around for his parents so that they can come take him home.


From: To Infinity...and beyond! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 07 February 2005 06:11 PM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Hephaestion:
*snerk* Nothing makes me smirk quicker than seeing white farm kids trying to ape black inner city youth. How pathetic!


Unless they're aware of their smirk-making tendencies, like the now defunct Brandon rap group, Farm Fresh. I have to respect those guys, just for choosing that name.

quote:

Another good progressive hip-hop band you might like (now broken up, but still good stuff) is Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy. I recommend their CD, "Hiphoprisy is the Greatest Luxury" from the late '80s. You might be lucky and get your kids to like it — maybe even start a new trend in Northern Alberta — socially aware, progressive non-conformity!

If you can find it. I've been looking for that CD for a while, but it seems to be out of print. Too bad; I guess it was ignored owing to its lack of naughty words.

[ 07 February 2005: Message edited by: Mike Keenan ]


From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Scout
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posted 07 February 2005 06:18 PM      Profile for Scout     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy

Limewire.

Tupac is one of my favorite rap artists. He's a legend for a reason, but he might not be blingy enough for today's kids, he was a little disenfranchised. K-Os, he's a rapper but he's above and beyond his peers. It tickles me that his music is finally making the cut, in part due to Oukast's massive sucess I would guess.


From: Toronto, ON Canada | Registered: Oct 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jared
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posted 07 February 2005 08:12 PM      Profile for Jared     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
If you can find it. I've been looking for that CD for a while, but it seems to be out of print. Too bad; I guess it was ignored owing to its lack of naughty words. [/QB]

Agreed on the indispensiblity of TDHOH. I've had the opportunity to meet a number of musicians in person, and Michael Franti is easily the most gracious, humble, and talkative of the lot. The album is widely available here in Vancouver, and at a very reasonable price. If you can't find it anywhere, PM me and I'd be happy to burn you a copy.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Bill Haydon
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posted 07 February 2005 10:58 PM      Profile for Bill Haydon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw the forerunners to TDHOH, The Beatnigs, open up for Billy Bragg, before he began to suck, in Regina in 1988.

Except for the Regina part, this would be a statement worthy of the label "musical snobbery"


From: Redchina | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 08 February 2005 12:11 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
My favourite 80's tune ...
---------
... came out in 1973.

How's that for snobbery?


Ehh, that ain't so bad. My favourite 80s tune came out in 1929:

"You talk of sweeties, bashful sweeties,
I got one of those,
Oh, he's handsome as can be,
But he worries me;
He goes to college and gathers knowledge,
Hooh! What that boy knows!
He's up in his Latin and Greek,
But in his sheikin', he's weak!

'Cause when I want some lovin',
And I gotta have some lovin',
He says, "Please! Stop it, please!"
He's so unusual! "


boop boop be doop


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 08 February 2005 08:06 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Hephaestion:
*snerk* Nothing makes me smirk quicker than seeing white farm kids trying to ape black inner city youth. How pathetic!

Hee! Reminds me of that milk commercial where all those white farmers are rapping.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
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posted 08 February 2005 10:33 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't have a lot of time for "gangsta rap", but then again I don't call women bitches and I don't want to kill cops, so I suppose I can't really relate.

quote:
Nothing makes me smirk quicker than seeing white farm kids trying to ape black inner city youth.

Also, white kids from Oshawa and Ajax and Peterborough. They don't seem to realize that they look as foolish and forced as if they were parroting Pirate Talk. Substitute "Shiver me timbers" for "shizzle my wizzle" and see if it's not laughable.


From: ĝ¤°`°¤ĝ,¸_¸,ĝ¤°`°¤ĝ,¸_¸,ĝ¤°°¤ĝ,¸_¸,ĝ¤°°¤ĝ, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Melsky
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posted 08 February 2005 10:49 AM      Profile for Melsky   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wish they would go around saying "shiver me timbers" that would be cool.

My favorite rap band is the Marginal Prophets

http://www.marginalprophets.com/

Not at all "gangsta"


From: Toronto | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 08 February 2005 11:14 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not as ecclectic as some, but in my van right now you'll find some Tea Party, some Beethoven, some B52's, some Steve Earl and some Johny Cash, and Little Richard, as well as a compilation CD that features some stock favourites from Teenage Head to Black Sabbath. A while ago I left a hip hop station on at work as a respite from the "classic rock" drek favoured by the majority of my co-workers. I liked it.

But I'll maintain that there is a difference between Beethoven and Joey Ramone, between the musical documentation of culture that Earl and Cash do, and the thumpa thumpa of Black Sabbath.

So, yes. Enjoy it all but there's always room for more than just snobbery, but a recognition that some music is art and some is just for dancing on your problems for two minutes and fifty seconds at a time.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 08 February 2005 11:38 AM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Ehh, that ain't so bad. My favourite 80s tune came out in 1929:

Cyndi Lauper is cool.

I was pretty partial to Captain Sensible way back when:

"Youve got to have a dream, if you don't have a dreamm..."


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Al Creed
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8145

posted 08 February 2005 06:34 PM      Profile for Al Creed   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My favourite music as a youngster (and we're talking 8 years old, here) was Grunge. Nirvana was the first band I knew of. Was I angry? No, not really. The music just sounded good on my ears (Gimmie a break, I was 8 )

Nowadays, I've expanded my taste to encorporate more 90's Music (up until 1998). Nirvana, White Zombie, Foo Fighters, RATM, a little Manson, it's all good.

I rock out.


From: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
thorin_bane
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6194

posted 09 February 2005 09:27 PM      Profile for thorin_bane     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
don't forget DIO \m/ \m/ ROOOOCK
From: Looking at the despair of Detroit from across the river! | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged

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