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Author Topic: Music For Tots
audra trower williams
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Babbler # 2

posted 16 April 2001 03:15 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What is/isn't appropriate music for kids (school aged to pre-teens?) to be listening to? It really bothers me that those Much Mega Hits-type compilations are pretty agressively marketed to non-adults, but often contain songs by Eminem, Limp Bizkit, Sisquo and the like. I think a lot of parents probably see them on birthday/holiday lists and buy them for kids without thinking, unaware of the sort of sexual/violent lyrics contained on them.
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Bec
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posted 16 April 2001 03:45 PM      Profile for Bec     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think a good policy is to let your kid listen to whatever they want, but make sure you listen with them and discuss what you're hearing. Hopefully, that will results in a discussion like the following: Parent: So what is Eminem saying? Kid: He's saying he wants to kill his wife. Parent: Hmmm, and what do you think of that? Kid: I think that's horrible! What a horrible song! Parent: Yes I agree. Let's turn it off. Kid: Yes, and let's never buy another Eminem album. Parent: Good idea.

Well, HOPEfully.


Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
chrisw
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posted 16 April 2001 03:51 PM      Profile for chrisw   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I know that the "My parents let me listen to that stuff and I'm OK" argument is all passe and whatnot, but I think there is something to it. If parents make sure that their kids do things other than "Ho bitch I shot tha muthafucka crew" records then kids are going to be able to deal with that stuff. IE: My parents were fanatical about reading and basically forced me to do it when I was pre-teen and ornery.

The key is parental involvement. At the end of the day, that is where kids learn their core values.


From: Halifax, NS | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Nic
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posted 16 April 2001 06:43 PM      Profile for Nic     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't think it's really possible for parents to keep their children away from voilent and sexist music and I'm not really sure that it's even in a child's best interest to try and isolate them from it. The only way somone can become truly critical of the messages they recieve through pop culture is by exposing them to something for them to be critical of.

I agree with chris, parental involvement is really important.

[ April 16, 2001: Message edited by: Nic ]


From: Incheon, Korea | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
penelope
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posted 16 April 2001 07:17 PM      Profile for penelope   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I agree with the more holistic, non-censoring type of involved parenting-- that it's important to give your kids the tools to deconstruct and decide for themselves.

Still, there are eight, nine-year-olds listening to these horrific things-- and regardless of whether or not they're going to mimic the violence (no, I don't believe they necessarily will), they're still being exposed to pretty vile imagery. They're still children. I get very squeamish when parents buy their 11-year-olds Eminem-- just as squeamish as when they take them to see The Exorcist.

Once they're 14, 15, sure-- listen with them, and discuss the content. But it's not fair to stand back and let children soak up such violent/sexist/sexually charged/racist messages before they're equipped to deal with it.


From: With audra! I'm the luckiest! | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Rutiger
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posted 16 April 2001 10:57 PM      Profile for Rutiger     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What we really need is more parental advisory labels. We love you, Tipper Gore!
From: Halifax | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
idlewild
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posted 17 April 2001 02:11 AM      Profile for idlewild   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm guessing that you're joking, Rutiger.

I agree with Nic that there's really very little good in parents trying to control what their kids listen to. And I don't necessarily agree with chrisw that kids learn their core values from their parents. I think their peer group is ultimately more important than whatever their parents say.

This is not to say that parents should take a completely hands-off approach, just that one can't expect one's kids to always be accepting of a more involved role in their pop cultural lives.

That said, I think there's lots of traditionally "adult" music that is great for kids -- Woody Guthrie, They Might Be Giants, Emmylou Harris, et al.


From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Chabs
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posted 17 April 2001 08:11 AM      Profile for Chabs   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is very difficult to sensor what your kids listen too. My two children own many CD's that range from Pooh Bear songs to Raffi and Disney Soundtracks, but my seven year old is in the public school system and comes home singing lyrics from songs I'd rather she had not been exposed to yet. But how do I stop that? I don't. So...talking is the key. Although I still won't buy her Britney Spears because I don't think she needs to be "not that innocent".
From: MA, USA | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
chrisw
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posted 17 April 2001 07:17 AM      Profile for chrisw   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Don't forget The Rheostatics' Story Of Harmelodia.

OK, I'll qualify. A high degree of parental involvement will usually result in the transfer of the parents' core values to the children. This can work either way. Take for example the ten year old a freind of mine knows who, mimicking his father, belives that homosexuals should be executed en masse. In many families, children still idolize their parents.


From: Halifax, NS | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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Babbler # 560

posted 26 May 2001 01:14 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A few years ago when the Spice Girls were all the rage, a friend of mine had a 4 year old daughter. She wouldn't buy her Spice Girls, but she heard them at her friends' places and on the radio, and...well, you get the idea.

My friend resigned herself to the inevitable (without caving in about buying the album for her) but she said it creeped her out listening to her 4 or 5 year old little girl singing "If you wanna be my lover..."


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
audra trower williams
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posted 26 May 2001 02:17 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I know I belted out "like a virgin" as a 7 year old. And lookit me now!
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged

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