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Author Topic: Kultur
Arch Stanton
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posted 08 November 2002 11:22 AM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There was some discussion elsewhere about where this topic would fit. For want of a better venue, I'll plop it down here.

We can ease into the subject.

What are babblers' favourite uses of classical music in film?

Kubrick always gets good reviews for the music in his films. "2001" and "Clockwork Orange" get all the ink, but I liked "Barry Lyndon" better. The Massenet, and Schubert's Piano Trio were great - even if anachronistic.

Woody Allen always has something special. While the Prokofiev in "Love and Death" may have been expected (then again, he could have used something else) it fit the mood of the film. His having the murder scene in "Crimes and Misdemeanors" accented with Schubert's String Quartet in G Major was chilling.

The most striking use of a classical piece in film that I have found is the 4th Movement of Brahms' Piano Quartet in G minor that Patrice LeConte features in "Monsieur Hire." Perfect.


From: Borrioboola-Gha | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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posted 08 November 2002 11:39 AM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Godfather III's use of an opera was pretty good. The movie may not have been as good as its predecessors, but the opera-and-murder scene was effective.
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Trespasser
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posted 08 November 2002 01:37 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought there was too much Strauss in 2001. An der schönen blauen Donau while there's a long shot of the space ship floating in the open universe, OK. But anything beyond that -- one can take only as much Strauss at once. (Even if it's nice to be reminded of the Vienna Philharmonic New Year's Day concerts and all that went with them while I was a single-digit aged person.)

Come to think of it, classical music is seldom used well in the movies. It often comes across as a pompous directorial choice, and rightly so. When the music plays large part in the movie, though, it's a whole different story.

For that reason, I still like Forman's Amadeus -- which gave so much incorrect bad rep to Salieri. Mike Leigh's Topsy-Turvy has got its music perfectly right, if we accept Gilbert and Sullivan as 'classics'. Classics of musical, for sure.

There's a great use of bel canto music in Bertolucci's movie The Moon, in which the Mother character is a brilliant opera singer. Istvan Szabo's 1991 Meeting Venus with Glenn Close -- ditto (the synopsis: "An unknown is to conduct Wagner's 'Tannhauser' at the Opera Europa in Paris, where petty jealousies and trivial arguments begin to reduce the production to shambles...).

There's a lot of good music in the 1984 version of Unfaithfully Yours with Nastassja Kinski and Dudley Moore, and probably in the original Preston Sturges movie as well ("Rex Harrison as a symphony conductor seeking revenge against wife Linda Darnell's infidelity" - from MoviesUnlimited.com).

There's a moment in the excellent movie Citizen Ruth where the sudden 'Alleluia' from Handel's Messiah gives you a belly laugh.

Chuck Jones' cartoons with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, and Elmer Fudd did wild things with classical music classics.


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Arch Stanton
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posted 08 November 2002 01:59 PM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Kill da wabitt"
From: Borrioboola-Gha | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Arch Stanton
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posted 08 November 2002 02:07 PM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Another one! Not sombre like those others I mentioned either.

The bicycle scenes in La Lectrice had Beethoven's "Razumovsky" (String Quartet No. 1 in F major Op. 59) playing in the background. Light and delightful.

The "Ride of the Valkyries" in Apocalypse Now was a nice touch.


From: Borrioboola-Gha | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged
Trespasser
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posted 08 November 2002 02:28 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
HAHA, yes, Kill the Wabbit! Wagner's Walküre has been used in so many funny contexts that I can't listen to it with a straight face anymore! Tam-ta-ta-ta-ta, tam-ta-ta-ta-ta, tam-ta-ta-ta-ta, tam-ta-ta-ta.
From: maritimes | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trespasser
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posted 08 November 2002 02:30 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
PS: And the best (the only good?) thing about Philadelphia with Tom Hanks is the Maria Callas aria near the end.
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skdadl
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posted 08 November 2002 02:45 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In My Favourite Year, a drunken Peter O'Toole resuscitates a few phrases of the 1812 Overture as he is bumped up stairs, strapped to a pile of luggage ...

Arch, I have the soundtrack from Barry Lyndon, and I agree, it is drenchingly wonderful, especially if you have either a C18 or a Celtic twitch.

Apart from the Irish music, my favourite cut on that LP is Giovanni Paisiello, the Cavatina from Il Barbiere de siviglia. I had never heard -- or, at least, paid attention -- to it before I got the LP. It is so beautiful all on its own that I'm afraid to play it often, because it sends me into crying jags. I have no memory of how it's used in the movie.


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jeff house
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posted 08 November 2002 03:19 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Omg! It seems that Trespasser is prejudiced against Valkyries! Who would have thought it?

More on topic, I think the v.e.r.y s.l.o.w rendition of Pachelbel's Canon in the film "The Man Who Fell to Earth" was ethereally beautiful.

The movie "Babette's Feast" makes wonderful use of several Mozartian arias. It also tells you what you need to know about Denmark.


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clockwork
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posted 08 November 2002 03:23 PM      Profile for clockwork     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought Star Wars was great. I even had the sound track.

That's my two cents. Keep the change.


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Arch Stanton
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posted 08 November 2002 06:04 PM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
skdadl, could you please tell me what the Massenet piece from Barry Lyndon is called?

My Grade II piano lesson book called it "Sarabande" from what I remember. I don't know its real title.


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Trespasser
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posted 10 November 2002 09:18 PM      Profile for Trespasser   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I cannot wait for this movie: The Hours. Not only because of the music of Philip Glass, though that's a factor too. (And you can hear a bit of that music on the website.) The screenplay was written by David Hare, who wrote it on the basis of Michael Cunningham's book The Hours, which he wrote as a footnote to/recreation of V Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway.

I simply cannot wait.


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Arch Stanton
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posted 14 November 2002 01:08 PM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Barber's Adagio for Strings fit well with Oliver Stone's Platoon, I thought. What is it with war movies and classical music?

I have to be in a particular mood to like Prokofiev's music for Alexandr Nevsky.

One of the best works used in A Room With a View was Puccini's O Mio Bobbino Caro, although I'm not sure what it did to move the plot. It is a great piece of music nonetheless.

[ November 14, 2002: Message edited by: Arch Stanton ]


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skdadl
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posted 14 November 2002 01:41 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
could you please tell me what the Massenet piece from Barry Lyndon is called?

Sarabande it is, but not Massenet. It's Handel, and there are several versions -- just drums, full orchestra, Sarabande-Duel, etc.

There are so many fun historical pieces on this album. A curiosity, eg, is the Hohenfriedberger March by Frederick the Great -- not bad for an amateur.

And there are a number of trad Irish melodies done by great Irish groups, among them the Chieftains.

I had read about Lilliburlero in Tristram Shandy, where it shares a running subplot with My Uncle Toby, but I'd never heard it until I saw this movie -- or I thought I hadn't, and then I realized that it's the theme that BBC morning radio news uses, or used at one time.

But the Paisiello is sublime. Play it for me, any time.


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skdadl
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posted 14 November 2002 01:43 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Tres: I am now afraid of The Hours.
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Michael Hardner
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posted 14 November 2002 01:44 PM      Profile for Michael Hardner   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In "The Fifth Element", an alien woman sings an entire passage from the Gaetano Donizetti opera "Lucia Di Lammermoor".

It makes the film.


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Arch Stanton
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posted 14 November 2002 02:21 PM      Profile for Arch Stanton     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Sarabande it is, but not Massenet. It's Handel...

Egad, you're right. I've just finished a Kazaa search, much rummaging through 25 year-old piano books, followed by tortured plunking upon the kids' keyboard to discover that my memory is shot.


From: Borrioboola-Gha | Registered: Mar 2002  |  IP: Logged

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