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Author Topic: Pigs 'R Us
Boom Boom
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posted 16 January 2005 10:59 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Year In Following Your Enlarged Heart
http://www.ocweekly.com/printme.php?&eid=59701

Just a few weeks ago, they (Carl's)introduced something called the Double Pastrami Burger, a piling of pastrami atop two hamburger patties that one can imagine was once only a gleam in the eye of the guy who invented hardening of the arteries.

Last week, the company said wider profit margins, helped by the success of their premium products (i.e., big-ass piles of cholesterol),
led to higher-than-expected quarterly earnings. The company's stock rose more than 14 percent the following day.

=================================================
Personally, I stopped eating smoked meat or pastrami sandwiches about 20 years ago when I really became concerned about heart disease. Nevertheless, I have been on Lipitor for two years now. Fresh veggies and fruits, while available here, are nothing in variety compared to the mainland. I do my best, but possibly part of high cholesterol may be hereditary? I try to get a daily speedwalk of at least a mile, depending on the weather. But, how in the world, in 2005, with everything we know about heart disease and cholesterol, can people eat something like a Double Pastrami Hamburger??? Almost makes me despair of the human race.

Sorry for the rant, but it feels good to get this out.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 16 January 2005 12:04 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You've forgotten notre apport national à la culture néfaste-food, poutine. I must be among the few people here who've never eaten it - I do like fries, though I rarely eat them any more, but could never stomach the idea of drowning them in bad gravy. La Banquise Poutine 994 Rachel E., 525-2415 is one fast-food joint notorious for serving 15 kinds of Poutine. The most caloric and heart-attack friendly is, not surprisingly, the "Elvis Poutine". I fear to even contemplate what it contains.

As for your question about cholesterol, yes, it is hereditary to a large degree. I worked with a guy at a tenants' association here who ate things like poutine, greasy disgusting pizzas (you know the kind) and double cheeseburgers every day, and drank oceans of Coca-Cola, plus a fair bit of beer in the evening. He was thin as a rail, and I don't believe he had any heart problems either.

[ 16 January 2005: Message edited by: lagatta ]


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 16 January 2005 01:08 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by lagatta:
[QB]You've forgotten notre apport national à la culture néfaste-food, poutine.

Yes, I've had poutine a couple of times in the distant past, never again. The only fries I ever go near now are McCain's new no-trans-fat and only from the oven, never cooked in oil or grease, and never with gravy, only light ketchup.

Gosh, I miss the days of the old Royal Burger in Ottawa, before Harvey's (yum!) and MacDonald's and others came in - the competition just killed Royal Burger. I like Harvey's whenever I can get there, but I'm a long way away from fast food joints of any kind. Thank goodness!

Actually, my favourite fast food - and I'm 55 now, so I don't eat junk food much - are submarines, but not the heated kind, only light on the cold meats with lots of lettuce and tomatoes.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 16 January 2005 02:38 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Has anyone ever looked into historical links between cheese-and-potato foods such as Swiss raclette, Savoyard tartiflette and Québec poutine?
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
candle
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posted 16 January 2005 02:57 PM      Profile for candle     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't think there is a link between the European cheese and potato foods and Quebec poutine.

My understanding of the history of poutine was this: A truck driver stopped at a diner in the 50's and ordered some curd and french fries and told the owner of the diner to just put in one bag. The owner said it would make a big mess (poutine) but the driver said go ahead anyway. This gave the restaurant owner an idea and he began selling it in the restaurants (the curd and fries in paper bags). Customers would rip the bag open in the restaurant and add ketchup and vinegar. Gravy didn't come onto the scene until sometime after when the owner realized it would melt the cheese faster.


From: Ontario | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 16 January 2005 03:26 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's a news story that confirms your history of it.

http://tinyurl.com/4mlwq

Poutine is not a traditional Quebec food, it's a quite modern one that happened to have been invented there. Cheese curds as a snack food are a Quebec tradition though, so it's unlikely poutine could have been invented just anywhere.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
kingblake
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posted 16 January 2005 03:32 PM      Profile for kingblake     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I like poutine, I like smoked meat (especially from Schwartz), burgers are OK, but I don't think any of these things should be consumed together - or even within a week of each other.

One thing I would never try: Deep-fried Mars bar.


From: In Regina, the land of Exotica | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 16 January 2005 03:41 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by kingblake:
I like poutine, I like smoked meat (especially from Schwartz), burgers are OK, but I don't think any of these things should be consumed together - or even within a week of each other.
======================
Oh, gosh, I agree 100%.
======================
One thing I would never try: Deep-fried Mars bar.

Me, neither. I've heard reference to this, and can't imagine what the attraction to this is.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 16 January 2005 04:24 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The deep-fried Mars bar is an invention of Scots chippers (fish and chip shops) where basically they deep-fry everything. I think the working-class diet in Glasgow etc is amongst the worst in the world, no?

Boom-boom, I'm only a few years younger than you are so I can't eat much junk food either. I do remember the period when poutine was more or less a speciality of the Drummondville - Victoriaville area on the South Shore between Montréal and Québec - it was unknown in Montréal back then.

Few Québécois come from the southeast of France or la Suisse romande, so I doubt there is a direct relation to the egg and cheese dishes you mention. One I did make at the holidays, and which disappeared immediately, was a strata, or savoury bread pudding. Vegetarian, but not a good idea for someone with a cholesterol problem, because of all the eggs (and cream, in some versions, but I used goat's milk)...


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 16 January 2005 04:29 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can enjoy eggs once in a while, but I haven't purchased cream or butter in at least the past twenty years.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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posted 16 January 2005 04:30 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My father swears by massive consumption of eggs for everything that ails you and pooh-pooh claims about the badness of egg cholesterol, which he says is minor compared to the wonderfulness of the benefits that he believes they have. Raw is best. He is probably somewhat older than lagatta, and he goes through massive quantities of eggs every week.

Unlike me, he is quite lean and fit for a man his age. He looks, in fact, 15 to 20 years younger than what he actually is. There must be something to his food ideas, or else I didn't quite get all the good genes from his side of the family.


From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 16 January 2005 05:03 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mandos:
[QB]My father swears by massive consumption of eggs for everything that ails you and pooh-pooh claims about the badness of egg cholesterol, which he says is minor compared to the wonderfulness of the benefits that he believes they have.

Good for him. However, I've got problems with cholesterol to the extent that my physician has had me on Lipitor for two years now, and an annual stress test. I had a stroke three years ago. Heart disease killed my father. I have a noisy heart valve. I'm 55. In my case, better safe than sorry, eh?


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 16 January 2005 05:34 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mandos:
My father swears by massive consumption of eggs for everything that ails you and pooh-pooh claims about the badness of egg cholesterol, which he says is minor compared to the wonderfulness of the benefits that he believes they have. Raw is best. He is probably somewhat older than lagatta, and he goes through massive quantities of eggs every week.

Well lagatta's hardly what I'd call old, so I don't see being "probably somewhat older" than her to be all that much of an accomplishment.

Diet is only one factor in cholesterol, as it's manufactured in the body.

Some people, such as your dad, can eat massive quantities of eggs with little or no effect. Someone like Boom boom, even with a restricted diet and medication, have a problem.

However, the fact that massive quantities of eggs haven't adversely affected your dad's health is not proof that it's helped his health either.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 16 January 2005 05:39 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
[QUOTE]Originally posted by RealityBites:
Someone like Boom boom, even with a restricted diet and medication, have a problem.QUOTE]

Exactly. I absolutely LOVE pizza but only eat a small one maybe every six weeks or so, hold the:
pepperoni, salami, ham, ground beef.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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posted 16 January 2005 05:40 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, it's anecdotal, but he claims to have science on his side in that eggs are a Complete Food. If it's good enough to grow a chick, it's good enough for him.
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 16 January 2005 05:51 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's just plain silly. The nutritional requirements of an adult male are quite different from even a male infant human, let alone another species.

Maybe they should make a movie with your dad where he eats nothing but eggs for a month. We could call it "Egging him on."


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Rufus Polson
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posted 16 January 2005 06:07 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You know, it might be worth making a re-evaluation in light of some of the latest solid dietary research. Not of smoked meat (although in my case, you can have my smoked meat sandwiches when you pry them from my cold, dead hands even if they do hasten that event), but of some other things such as those eggs, f'rinstance, which it seems may be healthier than was thought.
And, of course, it's looking like the unsaturated fats may be actually good for you. Although I dunno about the McCain's. They use canola oil, which is mostly unsaturated. What they don't mention is that it's also usually genetically modified. I've switched from canola oil to sunflower, safflower, peanut and whatnot because of this.

There are only a few crops which are frequently GM at the moment; unfortunately they're fairly pervasive in processed foods: Canola, corn and soy, mostly. And while it's generally thought that the dangers of GM crops are mainly environmental or that we haven't tested them enough to know whether they're a health problem, that isn't strictly true. I read a recent book called Seeds of Deception, which made a strong case that GM food actually is quite bad for people. And gives reasons why this should not be that surprising. The core one is that genetic modifications are based on the idea of one gene, one protein, letting them just insert a gene that expresses a protein, check that the protein's being produced, and bing! they have what they want. The problem is that in fact, genes encode an average of three proteins each, varying depending what helper molecules are being expressed nearby. So the engineers may have tested to make sure they're getting what they want from a gene they insert--but they have no idea what *else* they're getting as well. Although the author says it was quite unexpected to him--he was planning to talk about the environmental issues and so forth, but postponed that to a forthcoming second book when his research turned up various cases of considerable impacts on health. Bottom line, after reading that book I concluded that it was both more worth avoiding them than I'd thought and more workable, at least to a degree, since it's mainly just those three GM crops that have become really widespread.

Which, incidentally, means that all the arguments about the precautionary principle are already a propaganda victory for the Monsantos; precautionary principle my ass, the evidence for health effects is already there, if well covered up.


From: Caithnard College | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
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posted 16 January 2005 06:41 PM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I usually try not to be moralistic vegetarian, but some of those "sandwiches" from Carl's Jr. can only be described as sinful.
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lagatta
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posted 16 January 2005 07:10 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, they can also be described as rather disgusting.

I didn't think Mandos was saying I was old. I certainly thought I was somewhat older than Mandos - like old enough to be his mum - but then I looked at his profile!


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Doug
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posted 16 January 2005 07:22 PM      Profile for Doug   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I could, if I were feeling hungry and suicidal order the Dangerous Dan's Quadruple C, which is a burger with 24 ounces of meat, a 1/4 pound of bacon, a 1/4 pound of cheese, two fried eggs and comes with poutine and a milkshake. Oooogh...
From: Toronto, Canada | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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posted 16 January 2005 08:16 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That birth date isn't really correct. I was trying to figure out the beginning of the universe, but I gave up and declared by fiat that the universe began in 1900. However, this particular body is in its mid-20s. I wonder what he'd have been like if I hadn't occupied his body at birth.
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 16 January 2005 11:40 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Few Québécois come from the southeast of France or la Suisse romande, so I doubt there is a direct relation to the egg and cheese dishes you mention.

Potato and cheese.

I didn't really think there was a link, as I knew the story of the invention of poutine, and that most Québecois are descended from Normands and Bretons.

I was just trolling food snobs who might claim to love raclette or tartiflette but who show distain for poutine.

It was a Finkleman moment. Did anyone ever hear Danny's comment (I heard it on his Saturday morning show in the seventies) that Fetuccine Alfredo is nothing more than Kraft Dinner with a fancy name?

I'll miss the old crank.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 09 February 2005 12:37 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It just occurred to me today that I had poutine on Friday at le Relais, then raclette on Saturday at home.

Last night we had hachis parmentier (basically a shepherd's pie, but we use TVP instead of meat) that had lots of cheddar to go with the smashed potatoes.

Is this the potato-and-cheese season?


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 09 February 2005 01:10 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yesterday was traditionally the day of pancakes.
(Shrove Tuesday aka Fat Tuesday)

From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
mayakovsky
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posted 09 February 2005 01:16 AM      Profile for mayakovsky     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Cheese and potatoes. Then we cannot forget perogies. I have to admit I fry 'em up after boiling them. I enjoy a good smoked meat but my last few poutines just haven't sat well. My thirty plus stomach has been rejecting things lately. When looking at health issues I believe it is important to take heredity/family history into consideration. I have a relative who has never smoked, drinks little and doesn't eat 'junk' food. Yet he has had three blocked arteries that had to be reopened. As a stepson I have to remember that my birth father had his first heart attack at 40.

There is a new diet book out called 'French women don't get fat' or somesuch. Anyone looked at it?


From: New Bedford | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Kevin_Laddle
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posted 09 February 2005 01:59 AM      Profile for Kevin_Laddle   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Perogies.... Ooooo baby...

About the person who's dad eats a lot of eggs; they are bad for you in the longterm, because they will clog your arteries. But in terms of wieght gain they aren't so bad, the yolk has a lot of nutrients and they have a good protien to fat ratio. I recomend buying a carton of egg whites and having one actual egg with a half cup of white.

The diet i am on at the moment is very high in fat, but almost all flax, omega, and olive oils. The body typically does not store them as fat. A good rule of thumb is to only consume fats that are LIQUID at room temperature.


From: ISRAEL IS A TERRORIST STATE. ASK THE FAMILIES OF THE QANA MASSACRE VICTIMS. | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
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posted 09 February 2005 03:05 AM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My dad is now quite nonyoung, and has been consuming huge amounts of eggs for decades, and does not have clogged arteries. Just the opposite, he has been growing younger...
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 09 February 2005 11:35 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking of raclette, we use Esrom, a Danish cheese, instead of the more expensive Raclette (some folks use Oka, but it's expensive too). It has purty good melting properties, and is quite smelly to boot!
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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posted 09 February 2005 11:47 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think Poutine is disgusting. I'm not wild about french fries to begin with and soggy french fries....well a bit like soggy bread. Yecch.
From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Stephen Gordon
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posted 09 February 2005 11:59 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
From RB's link above:

quote:
There are variations like "Italian poutine" served with meat sauce and cheese curds, and "Chinese poutine" which is topped with both meat and barbecue sauces.

When I was first confronted with 'Italian poutine', I was certain that it was a prank - who would want to eat french fries covered with spaghetti sauce? The answer turned out to be: the person in line ahead of me. And he even put it in his mouth and swallowed! Aieee!


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 10 February 2005 12:40 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by clersal:
I think Poutine is disgusting. I'm not wild about french fries to begin with and soggy french fries....well a bit like soggy bread. Yecch.


Mmmm, take a thick slice of bread (or old toast), cover it with onions, melt some cheese over it in the microwave, then pour gravy on it.

[ed.] That reminds me, I saw people eating french fry sandwiches in France. I kid you not. They take half a baguette, slice it lengthwise, then stuff it with frites. I don't know what condiments they use inside.

[ 10 February 2005: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Amy
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posted 10 February 2005 02:40 AM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey! thanks to whoever it was that said something about raclette! I remember eating some when I was in Switzerland as a child and getting very very ill as a result, and I could never remember the name. Weirdly enough, a lot of previously hazy memories are much clearer now.

Speaking of gross versions of 'poutine', you can get this stuff called 'War' from the Belgian Fries Shop on Commercial Drive in East Vancouver. It's a pile of chopped onion, mayo, and peanut satay sauce ontop of double-fried chips.


From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 10 February 2005 07:00 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Al Q, perhaps the frites sandwich was the veg version of the standard Maghrebian-Parisian "Merguez-frites" - that includes what you say - frites and a Merguez (a small, spicy sausage made from lamb or beef) as well as harissa and/or mayonnaise stuffed into a piece of baguette. - Revellers eat them late at night the same way their Brit counterparts nip into kebabs and such.

Hard for anyone over 35 or so to digest. I prefer the "Tunisian sandwiches" with tuna, hard-cooked egg, olives, various vegetables.

The best falafels in Paris are on rue des Rosiers in the old Jewish quarter - they are filled with various types of fresh and pickled veg as well as the falafels themselves.

Wouldn't a poutine made in a restaurant be non-veg? Not the fries (unless they are cooked in lard or suet) or the cheese curds, but the brown gravy...


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 10 February 2005 07:53 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Amy:
Speaking of gross versions of 'poutine', you can get this stuff called 'War' from the Belgian Fries Shop on Commercial Drive in East Vancouver. It's a pile of chopped onion, mayo, and peanut satay sauce ontop of double-fried chips.

Actually, that sounds pretty yummy to me.

I also never eat poutine anymore (I used to have it occasionally in my early 20's). Not because I dislike it, but it's just too heavy to contemplate. Although, every once in a while for a treat I'll have New York Fries with a small dipping side of sour cream. Not very often, though, despite the fact that they're transfat-free. They're still deep-fried, and I like them with salt, and, well, not a great idea.

When it comes to unhealthy favorite things, every once in a while I get a craving for fried potatoes (hash browns) and fried eggs over easy (or medium - whatever you call it when the whites are hard and the yolks are soft). Cut the fried eggs up into the potatoes, salt and pepper, and there you go. Heart-attack-on-a-plate. Another thing I don't have very often.

What I'd like to know is, why is stuff like that "comfort food"? Why couldn't some delicious vegetable dish be comfort food instead? But for some reason, the food that is worst for you seems to be the easiest to cook and the most comforting. It's just not right.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 10 February 2005 08:17 AM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There must be some gravy mixes that are veggie, no? Chances are a restaurant selling poutine wouldn't have them, but it's a theoretical possibility.

Comfort foods generally contain large amounts of carbs and fats, as does the original comfort food, mother's milk. I don't know if there's a connection, or if it's more a chemical thing.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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posted 10 February 2005 01:14 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Mmmm, take a thick slice of bread (or old toast), cover it with onions, melt some cheese over it in the microwave, then pour gravy on it.

I don't have a microwave but I do have a stove....so..if you hold the gravy it sounds very good.


From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 10 February 2005 11:46 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Wouldn't a poutine made in a restaurant be non-veg? Not the fries (unless they are cooked in lard or suet) or the cheese curds, but the brown gravy...

I used to think so, and thus never tried poutine, but then I checked the ingredients on various dehydrated poutine sauces and found that they were all based on soy and yeast, without any animal parts whatsoever.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Amy
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posted 11 February 2005 12:13 AM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Michelle:

Actually, that sounds pretty yummy to me.

I also never eat poutine anymore (I used to have it occasionally in my early 20's). Not because I dislike it, but it's just too heavy to contemplate.


Yeah, I have to admit that they taste pretty good... but after the first few bites... well that's when the gross hits. The oil from the mayo and the peanut sauce coats one's tongue. It's more a gross idea than a gross taste.


From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Américain Égalitaire
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posted 11 February 2005 10:13 AM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If you really like pierogies, and you're ever near Cleveland, stop by at any of the Parma Pierogi places or anyplace really that looks old and Polish - lot of those in Cleveland. If you ever saw the Drew Carey Show you know what I mean.

Fried in real butter, smothered in sour cream and chives.

I have added trying authentic Quebecois poutine to my list of things to do before I leave the planet.


From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 11 February 2005 10:35 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was in Cleveland in 2003 - didn't see any Parma's. I was there to visit the University, and the Anglican Cathedral, and the Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame, all near downtown Cleveland, then on to friends in Medina, and then Ohio Mart in Akron. Medina is a nice small city (22,000 I think) and would love to move there except for the summer heat. No Parma's but some nice restaurants.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
chester the prairie shark
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posted 11 February 2005 11:19 AM      Profile for chester the prairie shark     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey EA

what is Parma? you see it in relation to clevland (one of drew carries theme songs was "moon over Parma") is it a neighbourhood?


From: Saskatoon | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 11 February 2005 01:11 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Parma is a neighborhood or suburb of Cleveland I think.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged

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