babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » right brain babble   » culture   » Attitudes to children throughout Canada

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: Attitudes to children throughout Canada
brebis noire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7136

posted 14 April 2005 11:17 AM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've been in Quebec for a long time now, and after frequent visits elsewhere in Canada, I've come to notice that attitudes to children are different here.

For example, people here adopt a particular language when talking to kids - it's not patronizing at all, it's a way of communicating with them that is very tender and effective. Nurses, hygienists, daycare workers, dentists, for example, can explain things to my kids in ways that I'd never considered, and get them to do things simply by being patient and speaking to them in a special language and tone of voice. It's hard to describe, for this anglo anyways.

Also, in public, people appear to genuinely like kids (i.e. other peoples' kids) and appreciate their presence.

I haven't had the same positive experiences elsewhere in Canada (mostly, it's just neutral and sometimes even negative experiences) However, I've also noticed that people from the ROC love their own kids - but appear to consider other people's kids as...nuisances?

Maybe I've just been completely seduced myself, that's why I'd like to know what others' experiences have been. I should add that I've read an essay by Barbara Kingsolver that essentially described the same experiences I've had - hers were comparing U.S. perceptions of OPK (other people's kids) to ones she'd had in Spain.


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 14 April 2005 11:28 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I know what you mean about the "child voice" - it is more a question of speaking very slowly and enunciating. But I'm wondering how much the attitude towards children might also be an urban-rural divide. Have you ever lived in Montréal? In general, I find people here far more "tolerant" of other people's lives than is the case in Toronto, say. (That does not mean they are necessarily welcoming). It is hard to find child-friendly spaces, friends who are parents say. And indeed a lot of us non-parents do tend to gravitate to cafés, libraries, cinemas etc where children are pretty much absent.
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 14 April 2005 11:35 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Kids are pretty absent from libraries, huh?

That's kind of sad. My little one loves it when we go to the library together. We don't do it enough, alas.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7136

posted 14 April 2005 11:39 AM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've found that the child voice incorporates more than just speaking slowly and enunciating - it involves a different vocabulary and even a different way of perceiving the world. For example, yesterday with the dental hygienists, she was able to clean my three-year-old's teeth very thoroughly by first showing him what the instruments were used for, asking him questions, and making it into a little game. I was fascinated.

I've wondered if it's an urban-rural divide, but I've had lots of positive experiences in Montreal as well - including in restaurants with babies and little children. Negative glances and comments are almost unknown to me when I'm out with the kids, even in the city, and it's not because my kids are quiet and particularly well-behaved.
It's as if for anglos, "children should be seen and not heard", but for most francophones it's "we want to see and hear children!"


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7136

posted 14 April 2005 11:41 AM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
lagatta, Michelle, I'm happy to report that the Sherbrooke library is usually full of kids, at least on Saturdays.
From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 14 April 2005 11:42 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Don't worry, Michelle! There are plenty of children in the children's libraries here. Alas there is a serious underfunding problem affecting all our libraries. But many libraries in Montréal are also "Maisons de la culture" where there are a lot of free shows and exhibits. Many of those target children.

I tend to use university libraries and highly specialised research libraries (at labour unions, for example) so obviously there aren't many children there.

Do parents acquire an ability to concentrate with children's background noise? I really need either quiet or background music over which I exert some control. But there are a lot of parents in continuing ed courses, so it must be an ability people can develop if need be.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 14 April 2005 11:47 AM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't know that attitudes towards kids are a whole lot different in Montreal than the rest of Canada, and other than Montreal, I haven't spent much time in Quebec.

Toronto, though. When I'm there without the kids, people are friendly. Even with the kids, usually fairly friendly. However, Toronto is the only place on three continents where I have had people be openly hostile about having my [actually quite well-mannered] kids with me in a restaurant. I was once told to go breastfeed my baby in the bathroom, for instance. I was discreet, and at an out of the way table where others really couldn't see anything unless they stood next to me and ogled. And I've had fellow restaurant patrons make loud and very rude comments about having my 2 year old in a restaurant with me -- she wasn't being loud, either, just quietly eating her meal.

I don't understand the hostility. Kids are people, too, and they need to eat just like the rest of us.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Ginger
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8443

posted 14 April 2005 11:49 AM      Profile for Ginger   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is wonderful to know B N that adults are out there speaking to children with 'respect' - this is an issue I have been writing about.... how important the words we use are when dealing with kids (and adults). Empowering the children with positive images of adults and the world we live in - a beautiful thing!
I wish I could help those adults who struggle with talking to children - they are the future, we are responsible for how they end up - happy/confident/full of inner spirit....

From: London Ontario | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 14 April 2005 11:55 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, the restos where I tend to gravitate (as they are cheapish and the food is good) are:

Le Petit Alep, a café run by two sisters of Syrian descent, whose dad owns the fancy Restaurant Alep next door;

La Carreta, a little Central-American place just round the corner from me - it closed due to a fire last summer but has reopened;

and the Greek byow Terrasse Lafayette (strange name, I know, but I suppose the owners never changed a previous name). All of those places are extremely child-friendly. But I don't know how representative those places are ...


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
periyar
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7061

posted 14 April 2005 12:08 PM      Profile for periyar   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Zoot:
I was once told to go breastfeed my baby in the bathroom, for instance. I was discreet, and at an out of the way table where others really couldn't see anything unless they stood next to me and ogled.

That's a very backward reaction to breastfeeding. Sorry you had that experience.

I live in Toronto and I've been fortunate to have never experienced that kind of censure to breastfeeding- especially since I've been breastfeeding for the last four years (2 kids) in just about evey public space- including the subway in toronto. I have had the odd occasion where a staff person tries to direct me to a washroom- but why would i serve my child food in a washroom- I usually just reply -no thanks, I'm fine here.


From: toronto | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3276

posted 14 April 2005 12:10 PM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anytime we all take our granddaughter (aged 2 1/2 ) to a restaurant around here, we find other toddlers there too. We admire theirs, they admire ours. If you don't like children, stay out of Northumberland County, please.
From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 14 April 2005 12:33 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I hope you told whomever it was who told you to breastfeed your baby in the bathroom to suck eggs, Zoot.

I have seen lots of people breastfeed in public in Toronto without being harassed about it. But since I've never breastfed on a regular basis in public in Toronto myself, I may just not have seen the hostility that is out there. I do remember hearing a story a few years back about a woman who was told at the ROM to stop breastfeeding in an open area of the museum. If I remember correctly, she stood her ground and rightfully told the guard to get stuffed.

You'd think that by now, people would be used to it and not see it as such a big deal.

I don't go to restaurants a lot, but the places I go to are either child-friendly (and those are the places I take my son), or they're pubs where kids tend not to go, and where I generally go with adults. I have never noticed anyone giving my son the hairy eyeball when we go to the type of restaurants I go to (but then, they tend to be more informal places in any case). Generally my son doesn't act up in restaurants, but every once in a while, he starts up. The only time I've seen patrons glaring at children in restaurants is when they're tearing around the tables and being generally obnoxious, and then, only if the parents seem oblivious or overly indulgent. But again, maybe I just don't notice people glaring at my kid when he's well-behaved, because I'm generally focused on my own meal and companionship rather than noticing people at other tables. I would be pretty peeved, though, if people were audibly making rude comments about my son within my ear shot if he were doing nothing to provoke it. In fact, I think I would be peeved enough to audibly complain about it to the server, and ask them to ensure that the people at the next table do not continue to harass me and my child while I'm dining there.

I have been in restaurants when my son decided to act up. But when other people saw that I was trying to reign in the poor behaviour, they generally gave me sympathetic smiles or glances rather than glares. It's what I generally do too when I see some poor mom or dad dealing with a temper tantrum or sudden sugar rush.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 14 April 2005 12:54 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
hope you told whomever it was who told you to breastfeed your baby in the bathroom to suck eggs, Zoot.

He was the restaurant manager, or possibly owner. I just politely, but firmly declined. He thought better of pushing the point, but I could see the internal struggle going on.

The thing is, when we travel, we sometimes like to go to fancy restaurants. Especially in larger centres, like Toronto, because they have a wider variety of restaurants than we have here -- and if it's business travel, we get per diems and can afford a nicer meal than we could on our own dime. (Less eating out in Montreal, as we stay with my SIL) Sometimes we find ourselves in places where kids are less usual, but I don't think I should have to forgo eating in certain types of restaurants for 10 years because I have kids.

I did tell the nasty fellow-patrons in the other place I mentioned that my two year old had better manners than they did, when I was on the way out. The loudest looked pretty embarrassed -- I think he figured I'd just sit there and take it.

And for the most part, I haven't had any other problem when I was in Toronto -- it was just those two experiences have never occurred anywhere else I've been with a kid or two. And I've traveled a lot, especially when Ms B was wee -- 6 countries over 3 continents. It's a shame that a small, small minority of people can colour your experience of a place, but they can.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7136

posted 14 April 2005 12:54 PM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, Michelle, in my experience (even from observation of other kids) is that when they act up it's from an excess of vitality (we should all be so lucky) or if they're cranky, it's because they're hungry, tired or a lethal combination of both. I've never seen a child just act up for the sole purpose of annoying people - to me, that's a media-created fallacy - like that episode of Sex and the City where Samantha gets a hunk of pesto on her suit, thrown by a little kid in a fancy restaurant. I thought it was either very disingenuous, or else a reflection of what goes on in the States, where people consider their own children to be gods, whereas OPK are considered to be toxic waste.

Zoot, I've never had anything near that kind of experience with breastfeeding in Quebec, but the several times I was visiting out west and was nursing, I used to feel nervous - I knew that some people were feeling squeamish about it.

And to imagine feeding in the bathroom - that's disgusting!

[ 14 April 2005: Message edited by: brebis noire ]


From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 14 April 2005 01:08 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Zoot, I've never had anything near that kind of experience with breastfeeding in Quebec, but the several times I was visiting out west and was nursing, I used to feel nervous - I knew that some people were feeling squeamish about it.

And to imagine feeding in the bathroom - that's disgusting!


Innit, though?

Honestly, I'd heard stories about women being asked to feed their babies in washrooms, but figured, hey, that must've been ages ago, that sort of thing doesn't happen now, blah, blah, blah...

Apparently Mr Restauranteer didn't get the memo.

I know some people, especially older men, get squeamish and uncomfortable, but I can ignore that. It's the direct comment that bothers me. I got very few of those.

Here's another thing -- What's up with people who touch babies without asking? It happens all over!


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Amy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2210

posted 14 April 2005 01:52 PM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Touch babies without asking? EEk! Occasionally when I'm on the bus I wave at babies if they look bored, and then if the parent/supervisor looks OK with it and the baby responds maybe peek-a-boo, but I'd never ever touch one. That's just weird.

On a slightly related topic- I used to work at a kids' clothing store and it always suprised me how many parents handed their kids over to me. I can sort of understand it, I do know how hard it is to shop with little (sometimes) beasts, but still. "Hey clerk! Here's my baby, take her while I find clothes for her."

One thing that I always find awkardly hilarious is travelling or shopping with my little brother, age 4, and my mum. Any time that we interact with people we don't know, the people focus immediately on him - asking questions and stuff- rather than either one of us. This is different than when it's one of us alone, when usually they'll talk to me or her, and I think that it's because they can't tell who is the mum. My little bro likes the attention lots though.


From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 14 April 2005 02:14 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, this reminds me of something that happened at a toy store in Kingston. I forget the name of it, but it's a higher-end toy store, downtown on Princess Street for anyone who might live there now and know where I'm talking about.

I had bought the occasional toy there in the past. My son was three or four at the time when this happened. We were in the store - I think I had just bought something for him and we were about to leave and he told me he had to pee. And believe it or not, they WOULDN'T let him use the washroom. At a TOY STORE. A FOUR year-old.

I've never been back since. I probably should have written a letter to their manager - or better, to the editor of the local daily - but I never did. I can understand them not letting the general public use their washroom. But I don't think I've ever been to a store that didn't bend that rule to allow a pre-schooler to use the washroom. Especially a toy store!

[ 14 April 2005: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 14 April 2005 02:21 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You should have invented a new game called "How Much Pee Can Teddy Bears Absorb".
From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
Amy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2210

posted 14 April 2005 02:23 PM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, we weren't really *supposed* to let people use the washroom, but really, children need to pee when they need to pee. Any time that it was too messy (or under construction) in the back, we'd go back there with them (not into the bathroom). We'd always insist on a parent going into the bathroom with them if they were young because we had cleaning chemicals in the open... But we knew that bathrooms for kids aren't an option.
From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
kuri
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4202

posted 14 April 2005 05:13 PM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Zoot:
I was once told to go breastfeed my baby in the bathroom, for instance. I was discreet, and at an out of the way table where others really couldn't see anything unless they stood next to me and ogled.

I wonder if

this sort of law needs to be imported? I would have thought that it wouldn't, but if businesses insist on trying to shoo some moms away when they're feeding their infants maybe a fine would deter that behaviour.


From: an employer more progressive than rabble.ca | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 14 April 2005 06:04 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think they already have such laws here, dokidoki. Although I'm sure it won't deter some people from hoping they can embarrass you out of plain view anyway.

Michelle -- I can't believe the toy store wouldn't let you use their toilet. I'd have started loudly asking anyone nearby if they knew where the nearest public rest room was, in the hopes that they'd let me in just to shut me up.

Last year we were out garage saling and Ms T (3 at the time) announced she had to go RIGHT NOW. The nice older lady whose garage we were in let us use her bathroom without even asking. Nice lady.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
kuri
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4202

posted 14 April 2005 06:11 PM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Zoot:
I think they already have such laws here, dokidoki. Although I'm sure it won't deter some people from hoping they can embarrass you out of plain view anyway.

Then the amount of the fine is the first thing I'm looking up when I decide to have kids. Well maybe not, but if that ever happens to me, I'll want to make credible threats.


From: an employer more progressive than rabble.ca | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 14 April 2005 06:23 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You don't need to make threats. Just speak in an audible, clear tone, one that most people in the vicinity can hear when you refuse to comply -- but don't sound angry. That makes it clear that you aren't going to be easily moved, and that the ensuing fuss (which will make them look much worse than you, especially if you're cheerful about it) isn't going to be worth it.
From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Américain Égalitaire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7911

posted 14 April 2005 06:25 PM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Zoot - wow I can't believe that happened to you in Toronto! What a knob that guy was/is! Down here in Iowa a group of women damn near burned down a restaurant in Herbert Hoover's hometown when a nursing mom was asked by management to take it to the restroom. I may have mentioned before here that breastfeeding moms from all over Iowa converged on the restarant for a "mass feeding," humilitaing the ownership! The restaurant closed up a few months ago, never recovering from the shame. Sometimes I'm really proud of Iowans.

As for restaurants and kids, well, if you've ever taken an autistic son or daughter out to eat, no doubt there have been times you've had to remove said child. I used to take Karl out pretty regularly when he was younger and couldn't sit still or not hand flap or any of the other usual behaviors. He's a model citizen now in restaurants and I am so proud of him, especially when I see some parents let their kids run between tables and literally bump into people's chairs and be loud and obnoxious. One time a kid almost plowed a waiter with a hot tray of food! What I like to do is make sure I compliment parents who have kids who behave well at dinner. If they look approachable, on my way out I'll say, "your son/daughter is so well behaved you must be very proud." For a lot of parents, that kind word can be a real day-maker. And I do it because I've been there when it gets rough.


From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4650

posted 14 April 2005 08:48 PM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Zoot:
I'd have started loudly asking anyone nearby if they knew where the nearest public rest room was, in the hopes that they'd let me in just to shut me up.

Be careful about that, Zoot. I have a friend whose worst childhood trauma was her mother doing that in a store.


From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 14 April 2005 10:41 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My kids are both exhibitionists and would likely take the advantage to talk to strangers as an adventure. I'm not tremendously worried about traumatizing them that way.

[ 14 April 2005: Message edited by: Zoot ]


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 14 April 2005 10:44 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
As for restaurants and kids, well, if you've ever taken an autistic son or daughter out to eat, no doubt there have been times you've had to remove said child. I used to take Karl out pretty regularly when he was younger and couldn't sit still or not hand flap or any of the other usual behaviors.

It must have been a real challenge to deal with people who aren't tolerant of disturbances. We've had to take a kid out of the room on a couple of occasions, and it's funny -- you're dealing with the problem and making an effort not to disturb other diners, yet you still get a slew of dirty looks. I've always hated that.

Or when the kid has a meltdown in a department store and you get the "tsk tsk" treatment from people on your way out of the store. Like it isn't stressful enough to be dealing with a small human siren on overload...


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Américain Égalitaire
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7911

posted 14 April 2005 10:51 PM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Zoot - a big part of it was that people don't understand why autistic kids do what they do. One of the funniest things that happened pretty regularly for awhile is my son used to think that some public fountains were glorified swimming pools! So he'd start taking his clothes off! We thought it was pretty funny and were eventually able to get him to tell the difference but a lot of people give you that "what the hell is wrong with THAT kid" look. The Autism Society of America tells parents those are good times to educate the public on autism but sometimes you just want to pull a DeNiro on these people: "whaddya lookin' at?"
From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Hailey
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6438

posted 15 April 2005 12:54 AM      Profile for Hailey     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I nurse one of the boys. I am not sure what I'd do if I could nurse both of them. I guess I had always imagined that I'd be the person least likely to nurse in public but life has unfolded so that's different than I expected. Despite this change I am modest. Mathy needed to nurse last week and we were in a coffee shop. We moved, went to the back, I chose the wing chair facing the back wall, and I used a small quilt. Nothing was exposed and only your own discernment would let you know what was happening. This little one sees babies and leaves their parents table at the front of the cafe and rushes back to say hi. Although I don't think that parents should leave their children that poorly attended I'd never be rude to a child. I smiled, greeted the little one, and said "the baby was busy" when he asked to see him. I let him see my other son but that was less entertaining because he was sleeping. At no point did the inobservant parents do much of anything. Anyway when the little babe got back to the table he chattered to his father who went to the manager. The manager walks back, looks, and you can see he's poised to say something so my husband asked if he could help him. He said "Do you not know there are children present?". My husband responded poorly to that and the manager left.

I was just so very surprised anyone took issue with it.


From: candyland | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7050

posted 15 April 2005 01:03 AM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I love kids. Whenever I see a baby in the stroller kind of lolling around looking bored, I always make a silly face. Since I have long hair, I generally look female to them...I guess that is generally easier on babies to accept? I just love seeing little youngings smile. It makes me feel good when those babies just starting laughing and smacking their podgy hands together. It makes me feel like I've finally done something worthwhile. That's why I loved babysitting. I could just sit there and make sillyfaces all day and having the kids laugh without having people bud in and drop in lame jokes. I've noticed most parents find it nice that there is someone entertains their kid and still keeps distance. There are a few that become extremely protective, which is more than justified.

But I've not seen that behavious exhibited by many other people.


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1448

posted 15 April 2005 05:10 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The Autism Society of America tells parents those are good times to educate the public on autism but sometimes you just want to pull a DeNiro on these people: "whaddya lookin' at?"

I'm not sure I could withstand the temptation to pull a De Niro.

Last June, at Ms B's first cello recital, I noticed Ms T had gotten out of the house without her underwear on. When did I notice? When we all went outside to take group photos of the cellists and she was twirling around so her skirt went up. In front of about 40 other parents.

Sometimes I think I should just tattoo "Bad Mother" on my forehead and save people the trouble of making the judgement on their own.

quote:
The manager walks back, looks, and you can see he's poised to say something so my husband asked if he could help him. He said "Do you not know there are children present?". My husband responded poorly to that and the manager left.

And so he should, Hailey -- the blond guy wouldn't tolerate that nonsense, either.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca