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Author Topic: Traumatic children's movies
Michelle
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posted 01 December 2007 02:06 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was just watching an Animaniacs videotape with my son (who will be 9 in a week). The three Animaniacs siblings take over directing from a movie director who challenges them to "do it better" and then they cast the director in the role of "Old Screamer" in a yellow dog costume, at which point the director knows what's coming, etc.

I explained the gag a couple of years ago to him, telling him about Old Yeller and how it was a really sad movie where, at the end, they have to put a family dog to sleep because he's very sick and suffering.

Anyhow, so we're watching it now and my little one asks me if I've ever seen Old Yeller. I haven't - there's no way my parents would've voluntarily sat me in front of that movie, as I likely would've had nightmares for months. And so, I did a quick search on "Old Yeller" and found all sorts of people talking about how they were traumatized by Old Yeller.

Movies that I DID see that traumatized me? Bambi, of course. If I remember the story correctly from my parents (and I have vague recollections of it myself), I apparently saw it at a movie theatre and started sobbing loudly when Bambi's mother gets shot.

Then there's the Ugly Duckling. I saw that during a school assembly when I was in grade 2 or 3. I wept through it - and when I think about it now, it's easy to understand why. A little gosling being taken away from his family and then stuck into a new family where everyone hated him and thought he was ugly. The horror!

The more recent Disney films have traumatic stuff in them too, of course. The characters' parents are always dying, often violently (Nemo's mom, Simba's dad, etc.).

Which movies traumatized you as a kid?

P.S. Time Magazine lists Bambi as #20 on its top 25 horror movies. Not horrifying KIDS' movies. ALL horror movies.

[ 01 December 2007: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
M. Spector
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posted 01 December 2007 02:34 PM      Profile for M. Spector   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought this topic sounded familiar!
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The Wizard of Socialism
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posted 01 December 2007 02:36 PM      Profile for The Wizard of Socialism   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We're showing re-runs because of the writer's strike.
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bliter
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posted 01 December 2007 03:04 PM      Profile for bliter   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Which movies traumatized you as a kid?

Snow White


From: delta | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 01 December 2007 03:55 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Old Yeller.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
The Wizard of Socialism
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posted 01 December 2007 04:17 PM      Profile for The Wizard of Socialism   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A Red Cross Health film I saw in Kindergarten. It had anthropomorphic drops of blood walking down the hallways of veins and arteries, pushing wheelbarrows full of more blood. It gave me nightmares and eventually I blocked it out. I recovered the memory during a long night of drinking at an SYND function when I was 20. And the fear was gone.

I must not fear.
Fear is the mind-killer.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
Where the fear has gone there will be nothing.
Only I will remain.

Frank Herbert, DUNE, 1965.


From: A Proud Canadian! | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michael Nenonen
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posted 01 December 2007 04:33 PM      Profile for Michael Nenonen   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
When I was about 5 years old I saw the English-dubbed Japanese monster movie Rodan the Flying Monster on TV. (Rodan, for those philistines who are unaware of such things, is a pteranadon with a several-hundred foot wingspan and a habit of destroying Japanese cities. There were two of them in the movie.) At the movie's climax a volcano erupts for no good reason just below the monsters, and one of the Rodans is overwhelmed by the fire and the fumes and sinks into the lava. The second Rodan has a chance to escape, but chooses instead to perish alongside its mate. The hero of the film wonders aloud, as he hears the monsters' agonized death cries, if he, a modern man of the twentieth century, could hope to die so well.

I was bawling my eyes out before the closing credits began rolling. Until I saw Grave of the Fireflies thirty years later, this was the only movie that ever brought me to tears.

[ 01 December 2007: Message edited by: Michael Nenonen ]


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Fidel
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posted 01 December 2007 04:52 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I went to see Jaws with a friend at the movie theatre when it debut'd. I thought that was pretty extreme at the time. I did jump out of my seat at that moment the head popped out of the hole in the boat underwater. I was uneasy about swimming in fresh water lakes and rivers for the longest time after that. My first time in the ocean was with a mask and fins off one of the ABC islands. We did a breath-held dive to about 50 feet in clear water, and I came nose to nose, literally, with about a five foot long barracuda. I had no idea what kind of fish it was at the time. It came right up to within inches of my mask.

[ 01 December 2007: Message edited by: Fidel ]


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bliter
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posted 01 December 2007 04:58 PM      Profile for bliter   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Back to Snow White. It wasn't her, but those seven height-challenged, foul-mouthed, Hi Ho-ing guys hanging onto the hem of her skirt.

I now feel quite safe with my own children since digital technology has allowed me to doctor my own version. That song lyric has now become:

Hi Ha, Hi Ha,
It's off to work we are
....


From: delta | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged
Nanuq
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posted 01 December 2007 04:59 PM      Profile for Nanuq   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As an average member of the first television generation, I believe that I've seen thousands of people die on television over the years. Whatever trauma I faced in the movie theatres rarely matched what I got in my living room.
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The Wizard of Socialism
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posted 01 December 2007 05:02 PM      Profile for The Wizard of Socialism   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I still don't say the words "I don't know" without looking up to make sure there's not a bucket of green slime coming my way.
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Jabberwock
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posted 05 December 2007 09:56 AM      Profile for Jabberwock     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My son, at four, used to weep at the words to "you are my sunshine"

The other night dear
When I was sleeping
I dreamt that you were by my side
But then I woke dear,
And you were gone dear,
So I held my head and cried.

I used to have to amend it to add that the loved one promptly skipped up the garden path and everyone lived happily ever after.


From: Vancouver | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 05 December 2007 10:20 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, that happened to me too! I sang the chorus first and my son loved it. Then I started singing the verse, forgetting how it ended, hoping against hope that he wouldn't notice the words.

They ALWAYS notice the words.

Anyhow, it made him sad, so then I had to sing a few other songs to banish the memory of it!


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
500_Apples
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posted 05 December 2007 10:26 AM      Profile for 500_Apples   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Transformers, when Optimus Prime died, made a lot of kids sad. Also the Lion King, when they kill Moufassa.

A Little Princess is really sad when the girl's father dies at war. There was this movie of a boxer whose kid encouraged his father to go back, and his father won, and then died from the fight. That was terrible.

But I don't think I've ever cried during a movie.


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Michelle
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posted 05 December 2007 10:32 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh! The Champ! I remember seeing that!

Oh, that was a terrible one! All through the film, the father and son bond and then the father dies at the end. And that was for kids? Jebus.

I think I saw that movie. It came out in 1979 (the second one) and it had Ricky Schroeder in it as the kid. (Incidentally, I, like many other women my age, was in love with Ricky Schroeder when he was a child actor on Silver Spoons. )


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
bigcitygal
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posted 05 December 2007 10:37 AM      Profile for bigcitygal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Charlotte's web, the animated version that came out in the 70s. I cried so much when Charlotte died.

The Wizard of Oz. I saw it on t.v. as a teen. It was too weirdo and creepy for me, esp. they way they talked, all fake-y falsetto. Never mind the flying monkeys! Eeek! And the melting witches realllly creeped me out.


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Tommy_Paine
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posted 05 December 2007 03:40 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Easy.

"Beaches". Wait, I was an adult by then.


"How Green Was my Valley"....maybe that counts as a trauma, of sorts... I think I was eight or so when I sat watching it with my mom and dad, and was mortified when I cried in front of my dad over something like a movie. And, I haven't flat out cried since childhood.

They say it takes a big man to cry. But I think it takes and even bigger man to make that big man cry.

But I don't think I was traumatized or anything.


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Stargazer
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posted 05 December 2007 03:46 PM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Love Story! That was a sad one. And the Boy In the Plastic Bubble along with Born Innocent with Linda Blair.

What really traumatized me was that bed time prayer my mom used to make us say when we were kids:

"Now I lay me down to sleep.
I pray the lord my soul to keep
and if I die before I wake
I pray the lord my soul to take."

Those are just plain rotten words to make kids say before sleeping!! Thanks mom!!


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Doug
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posted 05 December 2007 04:23 PM      Profile for Doug   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I hate that prayer too.

I'll second Charlotte's Web as traumatizing. How I cried when Charlotte died...it was embarrassing too, since they showed it at school.


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jrose
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posted 24 December 2007 06:25 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
P.S. Time Magazine lists Bambi as #20 on its top 25 horror movies. Not horrifying KIDS' movies. ALL horror movies.

That's amazing, and incredibly accurate. We used to drive up to Michigan as a child and my sister and I would count the dozens of deer we would see on the way up. In my mind I could never seperate those deer from the cartoonish Disney versions.

I'm not sure if E.T would be considered a children's movie, but I do remember watching it as a child. My grandparents had an E.T sleeping bag. I vividly remember my sister bawling when they tried to tuck her into it at night.


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N.Beltov
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posted 24 December 2007 07:27 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Judging by the number of crying children who left the theatre with a guardian during the movie's premier in Winnipeg, I would venture a guess that there's a whole generation of kids traumatized by Jurassic Park. Besides the obvious product placement in the film, aimed at children, I was particularly disturbed by the aggressiveness with which the film was marketed to kids in general.
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Tommy_Paine
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posted 24 December 2007 07:51 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Kids and dinosaurs though, what can you do?

When that came out I took my two oldest daughters. The younger of the two sat enraptured, while my eldest hid her face away from the screen at times.

But then, she thought "Blair Witch" was scary, too.

Our youngest, Snarfy the Wonder Girl, was pronouncing the correct multisylabic names for dinosaurs at a very early age-- at about the same time she started talking.

But then, she was exposed to the "Land Before Time " series, where the writers dumbed things down, so terms like "sharp tooth" and "spike tail" crept into her vocabulary.

From a certain perspective, "Land Before Time" has traumatized me.


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oldgoat
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posted 24 December 2007 08:03 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad 1958, a not half badly done B movie when I was a little guy. Scared the crap out of me and I couldn't sleep tht night.

One film that really creeped me out for some reason though, was The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T


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N.Beltov
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posted 24 December 2007 08:08 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The film just wasn't "age appropriate" for those really young kids in my view ... and yet they were part of the marketing "demographic" with dino lunch buckets, backpack stickers, and what have you. I felt bad for the kids who may have been lured into something too graphic for them.

The depiction of tragedy is a different matter. I haven't really thought about what age or level of development it should be introduced. Sorrow is just as much a part of life as joy, its sibling as it were, and it can't be anything but helpful to kids to observe adult responses to it and begin to understand it.


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Tommy_Paine
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posted 24 December 2007 08:28 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I remember have some trepidation about taking my girls to see "Jurassic Park". I forget their ages at the time. I do know there was no doubt in my mind that my third daughter was too young for it at the time.

Reminds me of being in grade 7, and entirely pissed off and feeling unjustifiably excluded when "A Clockwork Orange" got an "R" rating. I can't recall it ever being marketed at kids my age, but we all wanted to see it.

Probably a good thing we didn't.


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jrose
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posted 24 December 2007 08:38 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One thing I never understood as a child was that the drive-in near my house would do a double feature. I remember going to see a double bill: 1st: Lassie 2nd: The Fugitive. We went again 1st: Dennis The Menace 2nd: Clear and Present Danger.

I remember trying to sneak a peak of the "adult" movies, but in retrospect it seems like quite the strange thing to do.


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minty
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posted 24 December 2007 10:54 AM      Profile for minty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I remember as a young child my mother would sing "Leaving on a Jet Plane" to me whenever she was leaving home for a few days on business. I loved it until I was old enough to understand the potential implication of the lyrics:

'Cause I'm leaving on a jet plane
I don't know when I'll be back again
Oh, babe, I hate to go'

After one memorable meltdown she stopped singing this to me. I still love the song, but to this day it brings back some uncomfortable feelings when I hear it.


From: London | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged

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