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Author Topic: The Trouble with Tracy
Mycroft_
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posted 30 March 2003 07:51 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Comedy Network is bringing back one of the worst sitcoms ever produced, the Trouble with Tracy, which some of us may remember as a Cancon CTV daytime staple in the 1970s.

quote:
Toronto, Ontario (March 18, 2003) – The Comedy Network announced today the completion of filming of The Trouble With Tracy, a new, primetime comedy pilot starring award-winning comedian Laurie Elliott. Based on the 1970s’ CTV series of the same name, The Trouble With Tracy is The Comedy Network’s first original sitcom. The half-hour pilot premieres Tuesday, April 1 at 10:30 p.m. ET/PT. A special “look back” presentation of an original episode premieres Tuesday, March 25 at 10:30 p.m. ET/PT. The Trouble With Tracy will be considered for a future 13-part series in association with CTV

http://www.thecomedynetwork.ca/pres_view.asp?id=1149
on the original...
quote:
Although this series has made it into more than one list of the worst Canadian television shows ever, 20-20 hindsight may have done it some injustice. When CTV was under fire for doing no Canadian drama production at all, suddenly in 1970 there in the schedule was not just a weekly program, but a five half-hours a week strip. It starred an all-Canadian cast, though with a New York setting in the hope of helping U.S. sales. Originally piloted under the title The Married Youngs, the show was renamed when it went to series by producer Seymour Berns, who named it after his daughter Tracy.

The scripts were originally written by Goodman Ace under the title Easy Aces, a US radio comedy soap of two decades earlier, and were adapted to make them more topical, though unfortunately no funnier. The Trouble with Tracy starred Steve Weston as a young advertising exec, and Diane Nyland as his scatterbrained wife. Others in the cast included Sylvia and Ben Lennick, Franz Russell, Bonnie Brooks, Arch McDonnell and Sandra Scott.

Tracy ran in the afternoons on CTV, Monday to Friday at 3:30pm, starting in the fall of 1970. It lasted only one season in this slot, but the Network gave it another daytime airing in repeats in the 1972-73 season at 9:30 – 10:00am. A co-production with a U.S. company, Tracy was produced in the studios of CFTO-TV Toronto.



From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Sisyphus
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posted 31 March 2003 11:50 AM      Profile for Sisyphus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I remeber this show from afternoons at home from school when I was sick.

Oh, the Horror...the Horror .


From: Never Never Land | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 01 April 2003 09:50 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Only a few hours before the new Trouble with Tracy (10:30 Eastern)
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 01 April 2003 11:40 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
They got me. It was an April Fool's Joke (and I'm usually pretty good at spotting them a mile away).

After a really bad intro complete with laugh track "Tracy" turned to the camera and said it's an April Fool's Joke, there really isn't a "Trouble with Tracy" remake and introduced another show altogether.

You know. I'm kind of disappointed. I was kind of curious what it would be like


From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Briguy
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posted 02 April 2003 01:09 PM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
At least their April Fool's prank was somewhat thoughtful, and maybe even believable. ATV (our CTV affiliate) had some poor intern adorn a bunch of leafless shrubs with marshmallows, and did a piece saying that the mallow crop had come in well because of our unusually snowy winter. I watched it and considered that I'd have to personally lobotomise anyone who admitted being fooled. Needless to say, my opinion of the intelligence of the average ATV newsperson has not changed because of this bit (it can't physically get any lower).
From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 02 April 2003 02:05 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hm, that sounds like an unoriginal take off of a brilliant BBC prank from the 1950s:

The Swiss Spaghetti Harvest

quote:
On April 1, 1957 the British news show, Panorama, broadcast a segment about a bumper spaghetti harvest in southern Switzerland. The success of the crop was attributed to an unusually mild winter. The audience heard Richard Dimbleby, the show's anchor, discussing the details of the spaghetti crop as they watched a rural Swiss family pulling pasta off spaghetti trees and placing it into baskets.

"The spaghetti harvest here in Switzerland is not, of course, carried out on anything like the tremendous scale of the Italian industry," Dimbleby informed the audience. "Many of you, I'm sure," he continued, "will have seen pictures of the vast spaghetti plantations in the Po valley. For the Swiss, however, it tends to be more of a family affair."

The narration then continued in a tone of absolute seriousness:

"Another reason why this may be a bumper year lies in the virtual disappearance of the spaghetti weevil, the tiny creature whose depradations have caused much concern in the past."

The narrator anticipated some questions viewers might have. For instance, why, if spaghetti grows on trees, does it always come in uniform lengths? The answer was that "this is the result of many years of patient endeavor by past breeders who succeeded in producing the perfect spaghetti."

And apparently the life of a spaghetti farmer was not free of worries: "The last two weeks of March are an anxious time for the spaghetti farmer. There's always the chance of a late frost which, while not entirely ruining the crop, generally impairs the flavor and makes it difficult for him to obtain top prices in world markets."

But finally, the narrator assured the audience, "For those who love this dish, there's nothing like real, home-grown spaghetti."

Of course, the broadcast was just an April Fool's Day joke. But soon after the broadcast ended, the BBC began to receive hundreds of calls from puzzled viewers. Did spaghetti really grow on trees, they wanted to know. Others were eager to learn how they could grow their own spaghetti tree. To this the BBC reportedly replied that they should "place a sprig of spaghetti in a tin of tomato sauce and hope for the best."

To be fair to the viewers, spaghetti was not a widely eaten food in Britain during the 1950s and was considered by many to be very exotic. Its origin must have been a real mystery to most people. Even Sir Ian Jacob, the BBC's director general, later admitted that he had to run to a reference book to check on where spaghetti came from after watching the show.
The prestige of the Panorama show itself, and the general trust that was still placed in the medium of television, also lent the claim credibility. The idea for the segment was dreamed up by one of the Panorama cameramen, Charles de Jaeger. He later said that the idea occurred to him when he remembered one of his grade-school teachers chiding him for being "so stupid he would believe spaghetti grew on trees."



I saw the "documentary" when it was rebroadcast a few years ago and it really was brilliant.

[ 02 April 2003: Message edited by: Mycroft ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 02 April 2003 02:12 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Click here to see the Spaghetti Harvest on real video.
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michael Hardner
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posted 02 April 2003 02:32 PM      Profile for Michael Hardner   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Since when is April Fools on March 18th ? Or March 30th if that date is wrong ?
From: Toronto | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mycroft_
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posted 02 April 2003 02:43 PM      Profile for Mycroft_     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The press release came out a few weeks ago but the show was to air yesterday, April 1st, so it's an April Fool's joke with a lead in of several weeks
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged

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