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Author Topic: Pink Floyd co-founder Syd Barrett dies
Jimmy Brogan
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posted 11 July 2006 08:32 AM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Pink Floyd co -founder Syd Barrett dies

quote:

Jul. 11, 2006. 10:29 AM
JILL LAWLESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON Syd Barrett, the troubled genius who co-founded Pink Floyd but spent his last years in reclusive anonymity, has died, a spokeswoman for the band said Tuesday. He was 60.

The spokeswoman who declined to give her name until the band made an official announcement confirmed media reports that he had died. She said Barrett died several days ago, but she did not disclose the cause of death. Barrett had suffered from diabetes for many years.

Barrett co-founded Pink Floyd in 1965 with Roger Waters and Nick Mason, and wrote many of the band?s early songs. The group?s jazz-infused rock made them darlings of the London psychedelic scene, and the 1967 album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn largely written by Barrett, who also played guitar was a commercial and critical hit.

However, Barrett suffered from mental instability, exacerbated by his use of LSD. His behavior grew increasingly erratic, and he left the group in 1968 five years before the release of Pink Floyd's most popular album, Dark Side of the Moon. He was replaced by David Gilmour.


[ 11 July 2006: Message edited by: Jimmy Brogan ]


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
blake 3:17
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posted 11 July 2006 11:08 AM      Profile for blake 3:17     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Poor sweetheart. I hope the last octopus ride was not too awful.
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Fidel
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posted 11 July 2006 12:53 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

Floydian slip


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Boom Boom
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posted 11 July 2006 06:15 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm 56 and many of the rockers I listened to are probably going to start dying off in droves now. I'd chalk it up partly to bad eating and exercise habits when we were all younger and more stupid. I don't think the drugs helped, either, although Keith Richards is still kickin'. I really miss Dennis Wilson (Beach Boys), Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison (Doors), Jerry Garcia (The Dead), George Harrison, and some who should be around today if they had treated themselves better. And, John Lennon. Cripes, why did he have to be shot?

ETA: I miss a lot of the classic rockers, bluesmen, and folkies of the '50s and 60s, too - far too many to mention, but most of all I miss folkie Tim Hardin.

[ 11 July 2006: Message edited by: Boom Boom ]


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
$1000 Wedding
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posted 11 July 2006 08:07 PM      Profile for $1000 Wedding        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, Boom Boom, it's sad to lose our old heroes. Some of those you mentioned like Hendrix and Joplin died in their youth from the youthful exuberance of drug and alcohol abuse.

Keith Richard and Mick Jagger show that if you really take care of yourself in your later years medical technology can preserve you. I'm sure Keith doesn't party like the old days. Syd Barrett was in bad shape for a long time. Garcia had an ongoing coke problem which led to him dieing while in rehab. John Entwistle died while railing lines before a gig in Vegas. And Lennon, there's no innoculation against a load of bullets. There's a fat Elvis in all of us.


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Boom Boom
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posted 11 July 2006 08:13 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Keith Richards for some reason makes me think of Dorian Gray.
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erroneousrebelrouser
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posted 16 July 2006 06:45 PM      Profile for erroneousrebelrouser   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This one is from the BBC; I will provide the link.

-----------------

Obituary: Syd Barrett

Syd Barrett was a huge influence on rock music
As a founder member of Pink Floyd, Syd Barrett wrote songs at once wistful, surreal and quintessentially English. Barrett's increasingly erratic mental state led to him leaving the band in 1968.
Syd Barrett's continuing importance, both to his former band-mates and the musical world at large, was made explicit at the 2005 Live 8 concert in London's Hyde Park.

Introducing their classic song, Wish You Were Here, Pink Floyd's Roger Waters said: "This is for the people who can't be here - especially Syd." But it was another Floyd song, the epic Shine On You Crazy Diamond, written as a tribute to Syd Barrett, which will stand as his epitaph.

As a member of Floyd during its formative years, Syd Barrett was a troubled genius whose drug abuse and poetic lyrics personified the psychedelic 60s.

Improvisational

Roger Keith Barrett was born in Cambridge in January 1946. The son of a well-known pathologist, he acquired the nickname "Syd" during his teens, a reference to Sid Barrett, a local jazz drummer.

It was as a student at London's Camberwell School of Art that he became guitarist and vocalist with a band called Tea Set, whose other members were Roger Waters and Bob Klose on guitars, Rick Wright on wind instruments and drummer Nick Mason.

It was Syd Barrett who christened the new group The Pink Floyd Sound, in homage to two of his own musical heroes, the bluesmen Pink Anderson and Floyd Council.

After Klose left the line-up to pursue a career as a photographer, Pink Floyd - as it soon became - played standards like Louie, Louie, often embellishing them with free-form interludes, improvisations in the jazz style, yet also influenced by heavy rock.


Syd Barrett founded Pink Floyd in 1965
By 1966, Floyd was the most influential act in swinging London's burgeoning underground music scene, filling venues like UFO and The Roundhouse with audiences keen to witness their radical sound and its accompanying light-show.

The following year saw Pink Floyd enter the charts with the Barrett-penned single Arnold Layne which, although banned by the BBC, reached an impressive number 21.

The follow-up single, the drug-inspired See Emily Play - also written by Barrett - fared even better, going to number 6 in the charts.

Signing up to the EMI label, the band recorded its first album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, in 1967.

With Barrett as its driving force, the album included a number of classic tracks, most notably Astronomy Domine and Interstellar Overdrive, and more whimsical offerings like Bike and The Gnome.

Cult following

But Syd Barrett soon found himself grappling with his new-found fame and facing a serious drug problem, especially with the psychedelic drug LSD.

His live appearances became shambolic, often silent or confused and, by the end of 1967, the band had been forced to bring in Barrett's friend, one David Gilmour, as a substitute guitarist. In early 1968, Syd Barrett and Pink Floyd went their separate ways.

Syd Barrett's solo career was short. His first album, the inconsistent The Madcap Laughs, appeared in January 1970, and its altogether more polished follow-up, Barratt, hit the record shops that November.

Songs like Gigolo Aunt, Vegetable Man and Dominoes, showcased on his albums and in live sessions recorded for BBC radio, brought Syd Barrett a cult following.


Barrett ended up a recluse in Cambridge
An Effervescing Elephant, a children's song written by him at the age of 16, has drawn comparisons with Ogden Nash, Hillaire Belloc and Roald Dahl.

But a lack of popular recognition, combined with the increasing fragility of his health, led Syd Barrett to abandon the music industry altogether and, despite a couple of abortive attempts to re-ignite his career, Barrett remained, for more than 30 years, British rock music's greatest recluse.

But he did attend Pink Floyd's recording sessions in 1975, ironically sitting in the studio while the band recorded Shine On You Crazy Diamond.

In recent years, Barrett preferred to be known by his original Christian name, Roger. But, despite continuing mental problems and diabetes, those who met him spoke of a content man who had left his illustrious past behind him. A devoted gardener, regular royalty payments made his later years more comfortable.

Barrett's influence was rich indeed. Artists from David Bowie to REM have acknowledged their debt to him, as have newer acts like Phish and Pearl Jam.


I found this story from the BBC; the link:


web page


From: home sweet home | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
Ken Burch
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posted 16 July 2006 08:53 PM      Profile for Ken Burch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:
Keith Richards for some reason makes me think of Dorian Gray.

But wouldn't Keith be a REVERSE Dorian Gray?
Shouldn't he have a picture at home that keeps getting younger and healthier-looking?


From: A seedy truckstop on the Information Superhighway | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ken Burch
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posted 18 July 2006 02:13 AM      Profile for Ken Burch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
More seriously though, farewell Syd. I hope you were able to put your fears and demons to rest in your later years. If not, at least you're free of them now.

Be at peace.


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Cueball
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posted 18 July 2006 02:17 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sad.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
paxamillion
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posted 18 July 2006 06:47 AM      Profile for paxamillion   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sad indeed.
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blake 3:17
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posted 18 July 2006 08:31 AM      Profile for blake 3:17     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I used to listen to the Opel compilation and a bootleg of Syd on tape, and to the the LPs on vinyl. I remember finding them on Queen West in Toronto, saving up the money, and just losing myself in the songs. What a brilliant brilliant song writer.
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Heavy Sharper
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posted 18 July 2006 02:30 PM      Profile for Heavy Sharper        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Supposedly he dropped acid 4 times a day in addition to spiking just about everything he ate and drank with it, consequently making his friends scared to eat or drink with him.

That's the equivalent to consuming LSD the way that a nicotine addict consumes cigarettes (an odd thing to do with a substance that does not trigger dependence)...And while LSD is physically even less toxic than cannabis, the effects on the psyche would be beyond devastating,


From: Calgary | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged

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