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Author Topic: Festive Xmas Meal For Vegetarians??
idontandwontevergolf
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posted 06 December 2004 08:47 PM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My brother and his young son who live on an island in BC will be visiting us for the holidays. He is a vegetarian, though he eats seafood and dairy. While everyone else is stuffing themselves with the bird, what will he be eating? What can we make for him that is tastey and festive?

Any ideas/recipes would be greatly appreciated.


From: Between two highways | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
writer
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posted 06 December 2004 09:01 PM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
though he eats seafood

Then he's not a vegetarian, though I'm sure he's a great guy nonetheless.

I'll get back to you with some suggestions for vegetarian dishes.


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 06 December 2004 09:19 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
No, strictly speaking he is not a vegetarian, but I know many semi-vegetarians who also eat some fish. How about the vegetarian recipes then?
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
nonsuch
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posted 06 December 2004 09:25 PM      Profile for nonsuch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mushrooms work for me.
Stuffed with chopped onion, pepper, tomato, croutons and grated cheddar, then baked. Or nice big shiitakes, marinated and broiled - with maybe a slice of goat-cheese between two mushroom caps. Or breaded and deep-fried, with a creamy sauce.

The same things can be done with eggplant.

Any of those main dishes go fine with the usual vegetables and potatoes that you serve with turkey.

Make extra: the carnivores will scarf up the vegatrian food if you don't watch them.


From: coming and going | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
idontandwontevergolf
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posted 06 December 2004 09:31 PM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I love nonesuch's ideas.

Okay. I know he's not a vegetarian. (Though he is when compared to my husband.) I should not have called him that..... I know he eats salmon, a lot! Primarily because of his location, it's local, he gets wild salmon and helps the local economy. I know that's what he's thinking.

He actually is not a vegetarian for political? reasons but because of some life-threatening colon problems.


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lagatta
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posted 06 December 2004 09:34 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, any time I've made a "vegetarian" and "non-vegetarian" dish, the omnivores zoom in on the veggie one. Only exception, paella and such - that has tempted some lukewarm vegetarians I know... (including one who claims to be a vegan).

A traditional year's end British vegetarian dish is a nut roast - no, the idea is not to make "fake meat" but to have a nice set piece. BBC recipes are well-tested - but this IS a complex one, and very rich. You want a bit of this and a lot of veg and nice salads: remember winter ones like grated carrot, celeriac, red cabbage etc. http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/bettyrundlesnutroast_71061.shtml

Here in Québec, for New Years' the traditional dish was a tourtière, traditionally a meat-based savoury pie. There are many vegetarian recipes for tourtière, made from seitan, millet, mushrooms, etc. and you can cheat and use some of that Yves fake meat "ground round" or their fake sausage meat - with a lot of vegetables such as onions and mushrooms to make it less stodgy.

Anna Thomas of The Vegetarian Epicure always has nice ideas. Her site is: www.vegetarianepicure.com In her old books if you can find them, she does up a lot of traditionally meatless Polish dishes, as she is of that ethnic background.

Italian Christmas eve food is traditionally "meatless" as well in the Catholic sense, but that can include fish. Still, there are a lot of vegetarian offerings including fancy ravioli.

By the way, if this fellow has colon problems you had better to find out what his dietary restrictions are - I'm sure the nut roast I posted might NOT be a good idea.

[ 06 December 2004: Message edited by: lagatta ]


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 06 December 2004 10:30 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We usually have something like a seitan roast or tofu bourbignon around Christmas. Pommes Dauphines is another seasonal favourite.

I was at a potluck last weekend, eating what I thought was a carrot/cheese salad. I bit into something of an unusual texture, then examined my plate and saw a SHRIMP!

The horror. It was the first dead animal flesh I've eaten (I'd say "tasted", but the unfortunate little critter had none) in 15 years.

What kind of screwball puts meat into salad?


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rasmus
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posted 06 December 2004 10:31 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This doesn't work as a main dish (in fact it's usually an appetizer in Chinese vegetarian restaurants), but I prefer it to the "real" thing. It would be a nice side dish for the vegetarians.

Mock Roast Duck

3 Tbs soy sauce
1 tsp sugar
1 Tbs Shao-sing wine, dry sherry, or sake
1/2 c. mushroom water (soak 6 dried shiitakes in 2/3 c hot water 1 hour)
5 Tbs oil
10 dried bean curd sheets, about 8"x14"
1 Tbs sesame oil

Combine soy sauce, sugar, wine, mushroom water, and sesame oil in
a small saucepan, simmer for 5 minutes, and let cool.

Soak b.c. sheets in warm water for 2 minutes and pat dry with towels.
Spread one sheet on a flat surface and brush the soy sauce mixture
generously over the entire sheet. Spread another sheet over the
first and brush soy sauce mixture on it. Repeat until all the sheets
are coated with the soy sauce mixture and stacked in a pile. Save
the leftover liquid. Fold the stack 3 times across the shorter side
and cut the folded bean curd strip crosswise in half. Wrap both
pieces securely in cheesecloth.

Put wrapped bean curd strips in a steamer and steam for 15 minutes,
then remove from steamer and take off gauze.

Heat oil in a skillet over moderate heat and fry both sides of the
strips until golden brown. Drain off excess oil from pan and add
leftover soy sauce mixture (add extra stock if needed). Cover pan,
simmer for 5 minutes, then cool.

Cut each strip crosswise into 1/2" pieces, arrange neatly on a
platter, and serve. Goes well with many vegetable dishes (broccoli,
cabbage, bok choy, etc).

These are the "bean curd sheets" they are talking about:


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
f1 dad
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posted 06 December 2004 10:46 PM      Profile for f1 dad     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If he eats salmon, then you can whip together a pasta dish with a sauce consisting of:

*about a pint of table cream
*about 100-150 grams of smoked salmon torn into small bits
*4 or 5 chopped up caramalized shallots
*2 or 3 cloves of garlic (perhaps throw 'em in to the shallots when they're almost done)
*a pinch of nutmeg

Just stir all this stuff together, warm it up in a pan, and throw the pasta in when it's done. (We use fettucine.) Simple yet yummy.


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UWSofty
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posted 06 December 2004 11:05 PM      Profile for UWSofty   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm a vegetarian, but eating meat at Christmas has never been a problem, even with my non-vegetarian extended family, because we eat a traditional Ukrainian Christmas eve meal. The traditional Ukrainian Christmas Eve dinner (Sviata Vechera) consists of 12 meatless dishes:
  • Kutya - wheat and popppy seed soup (although nothing like most soups)
  • Borshch - beat soup
  • Fried Fish - often pickerel at our house
  • Pickled Fish - usually herring
  • Holubtsi - cabbage rolls
  • Perogies
  • Varenyky - perogy variant
  • Baked beans
  • Mushroom sauce
  • Pampushky - dumpling-like
  • Kolach - Christmas bread
  • Compote - stewed, dried fruit

The actualy dishes might vary from family to family. I think fish should only be on there once, but I don't remember what to replace it with. Might be a salad of some sort. Here are some recipes.

It's interesting to note, that I consider myself a vegetarian even though I do eat some seafood. And the traditional Ukrainian Christmas eve dishes are meatless, yet they have always contained fish.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
shaolin
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posted 06 December 2004 11:56 PM      Profile for shaolin     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The horror. It was the first dead animal flesh I've eaten (I'd say "tasted", but the unfortunate little critter had none) in 15 years.

Oh dear! I'm sorry to hear that. I almost did that at a buffet with my mother a couple of weeks ago. I can't remember what I put on my plate, it clearly wasn't labelled as meat, but apparently I should have known by the name (again, despite the fact it said nothing about meat) what it contained.

Can someone please explain to me how a person can be a vegetarian if they eat fish? Is this not animal flesh? Am I missing out on something? At best, maybe you could use a 'lazy' vegetarian title or something to that effect. Fish are living creatures too!


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shaolin
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posted 06 December 2004 11:57 PM      Profile for shaolin     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Does anyone have any good vegan recipes for the holidays?
From: Edinburgh | Registered: Jul 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 07 December 2004 12:40 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Can someone please explain to me how a person can be a vegetarian if they eat fish? Is this not animal flesh?

I've met too many people who think that fish and chicken are vegetables, and who consider themselves vegetarian because they don't eat something they call "red" meat.

I make my cabbage rolls during the holidays sometimes. (I mentioned my recipe somewhere else on babble a few days ago).

I use sour cabbage, which is like a big head of sauerkraut. I made cabbage rolls last night, and if lagatta's listening in, I can assure her that the "sweetness" of the tomato soup was hard to discern.


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peppermint
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posted 07 December 2004 04:45 AM      Profile for peppermint     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't have the recipe handy. but what I used to do for holidays when I had an oven( they're pretty rare here) was saute some veggies (red and green peppers, mushrooms and?) and then roll it into filo pastry like a jelly roll. Bake it in the oven for a little bit ( while someone carves the turkey) and then other people can have it as a vegetable side dish. Everyone who tried it really enjoyed it- even my ex boyfriend's mother!
From: Korea | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Gir Draxon
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posted 07 December 2004 04:57 AM      Profile for Gir Draxon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm with Softy- go Ukrainian!

With the pyrohy, holobsti, pyrizhky, and nachynka on your plate, you'll probably not have enough room on your plate for turkey!


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Hailey
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posted 07 December 2004 09:56 AM      Profile for Hailey     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For medical reasons I've had to give up meat which is absolutely one of the hardest things I've done. I'm insatiably hungry all the time!

We are having butternut soup, chocolate fondue and fruits, yam casserole, potato and egg casserole, cheese dish, ...that's all I have so far. I've been hunting myself. If you want any of those pm me.

I'm amazed how accommodating you are being. Most families - at least ones I know! - would have non-meat dishes at the table but they wouldn't go out of their way to accommodate a preference or desire not to eat meat.

[ 07 December 2004: Message edited by: Hailey ]


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lagatta
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posted 07 December 2004 10:46 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A dish that sounds like nothing but which everyone digs into is a strata, or savoury bread pudding. It is rich though. You don't have to put all the stuff they suggest into it - they are just some possible ideas. If you have grown your own sage that is lovely here. I have another one by Lucy Waverman that is very good - must find it, it is not online but on a scrap of clipping... Waverman's is simpler.

SAVOURY VEGETARIAN BREAD PUDDING
A variation of the layered bread Strata, you can serve this hot or at room temperature. For a change, vary the vegetables and cheese.
2 T. butter (or olive oil)
2 cups chopped onion
1 t. minced garlic (or more...)
2 cups sliced mushrooms
4 cups milk (or soya milk)
8 large eggs
parsley to taste
1 t. salt
1/2 t. ground black pepper
1/8 t. cayenne pepper
2 cups grated gruyère or other hard cheese
12 cups baguette cubes or croûtes
1 red bell pepper, chopped
6 oil-packed sundried tomatoes, chopped
1 package (10 oz.) frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained well (or fresh spinach processed in the same way, lightly steamed and drained - you can save the spinach water for soup stock).
1 cup fresh grated Parmesan cheese
Lightly oil baking dish. Set aside.
Melt butter in large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. (I use olive oil) Add the onions and garlic and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms give up their liquid and the liquid evaporates, about 15 minutes (the mixture must be dry). Remove from heat and cool.
Whisk milk and eggs in large bowl until smooth. Whisk in the parsley, salt, pepper and cayenne pepper. Add the vegetables and gruyère and stir to combine.
Arrange half the bread cubes or croûtes in the prepared baking dish. Pour the egg/vegetable mixture over the cubes. Arrange the remaining cubes over the mixture. Press the bread cubes gently to submerge them. Cover with plastic wrap and chill for several hours, up to overnight.
Preheat oven to 350F Sprinkle the Parmesan cheese over the bread pudding. Place the baking dish on a baking sheet (to catch drips) and bake, uncovered, for 60-80 minutes, until hot and puffy.
Serve hot or at room temperature (the pudding will deflate as it cools). Makes 12-16 servings.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
UWSofty
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posted 07 December 2004 12:43 PM      Profile for UWSofty   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Can someone please explain to me how a person can be a vegetarian if they eat fish? Is this not animal flesh? Am I missing out on something? At best, maybe you could use a 'lazy' vegetarian title or something to that effect. Fish are living creatures too!

I guess it depends on why someone is vegetarian. If it is for ethical reasons, then you would be right - eating fish would be no different than other meats. However, many people are vegetarian for religous or health reasons. Religous traditions that forbid meat might still allow fish. I'm not positive, but I think Fish is automatically considered Kosher and Halal.

And many people who adopt vegetarian diets for health reasons will still eat fish because nutritionally fish is different(and probably healthier) than red meat. If it wasn't for all the toxins from chemicals like mercury I'd be more confident stating that it is a healthier form of protein, but even with the toxins I think it's healthier than most cuts of meat (because of lower cholesterol and fat levels). Granted lean meat may be just as good.

Even then, I don't eat much fish (less than once a week). I've gone through periods where I give it up completely for ethical reasons, but I still think it part of a healthy diet. I use it as another source of protein to complement vegetable sources and to get some necessary amino acids.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 07 December 2004 06:12 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Guardian has several good vegetarian ideas, including a timbale - nice to have a fancy set piece for a special meal, along with all the salads etc: http://www.guardian.co.uk/christmas2004/story/0,15386,1364898,00.html
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Rufus Polson
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posted 07 December 2004 08:18 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by lagatta:
Yes, any time I've made a "vegetarian" and "non-vegetarian" dish, the omnivores zoom in on the veggie one.

So what you're saying is, you're not good at non-vegetarian cooking?
(Though doubtless not as bad as I am at vegetarian)

quote:
Only exception, paella and such - that has tempted some lukewarm vegetarians I know... (including one who claims to be a vegan).

And that would confirm it. So your most successful non-vegetarian dish was dominated by . . . rice.
Where are the hot wings? The ribs? The meatballs spiced with satay and/or black bean + a bit of chili sauce? The, in short, grotesque, unhealthy, steaming chunks of flesh, well spiced?
Not to mention the (pretty much the same as whatever snazzy vegetarian thing you're doing, only wrapped with a slice of baaacoooonnnnn). That'll make fairly sure the vegetarians get to keep the vegetarian version.

Just razzing ya.

[ 07 December 2004: Message edited by: Rufus Polson ]


From: Caithnard College | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 07 December 2004 09:51 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I do NOT cook ribs or whatever that other awful greasy thing was. No, the non-veg things are usually fish. Or Moroccan chicken with olives, that sort of thing.

And proper paella contains at least as much seafood as rice...


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
swirrlygrrl
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posted 07 December 2004 10:40 PM      Profile for swirrlygrrl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
What kind of screwball puts meat into salad?

The French. I never saw more ham in salad than during my month in France.

shaolin, check out John Robbin's "May all be fed" - everything is totally vegan, and the things I've made from it have been completely excellent (the soups especially - mmmmm, "chicken" noodle!) Its half cookbook, half another version of "Diet for a New America."

My Christmas meal is always lasagna, even when I was vegan. My mom is the best lasagna maker in the world, tonnes of veggies, and if you eat dairy, stir cottage cheese into the sauce, and sprinkle a bit of cheese on top of the suace layers before the noodles.

However, if you want traditionally "Christmassy" food, I'm not sure turkey actually needs to be replaced. I've had many a meal of veggies, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, mushroom gravy, rolls, stuffing cooked outside the bird, pumpkin pie, have still managed to stuff myself with too much food, and felt no loss for having no turkey. But that's me. I would warn to avoid "tofurkey" at all costs. First of all, it costs a small fortune. And secondly, its just yucky. The drumettes are the most terrible part. Worst. Thanksgiving. Ever.


From: the bushes outside your house | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
idontandwontevergolf
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posted 07 December 2004 10:42 PM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh my goodnes gravy! I can't believe how generous everyone is with their ideas. So nice! I haven't had a chance to read everything today but will check back in tomorrow (not working, yeah!).

Once again, thank you thank you thank you


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alisea
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posted 07 December 2004 11:21 PM      Profile for alisea     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If he eats seafood and dairy you don't really have a problem :-)

How about a roasted salmon with a bunch of fresh herbs inside, drizzled with olive oil? Or a cheese souffle? Or a big fat smoked salmon omelette? Or grilled halibut steak with pesto? Any of those should mesh with the rest of the meal.

On the veggie only side, there's always ratatouille, grilled portobello mushrooms with a savory stuffing, roasted roots and leeks ...

I think something unusual is what's needed -- festive doesn't have to mean a Large Bird.


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 08 December 2004 02:25 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, one could always have fried ice cream with hot sauce o-roony and some avocado seed soup.
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lagatta
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posted 11 December 2004 04:25 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The bbc food website has a lot of interesting ideas - many of them would please anybody.
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Reverend Blair
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posted 11 December 2004 07:59 PM      Profile for Reverend Blair   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As long as fish is still on the menu I'd suggest the traditional 13 course Ukrainian Christmas Eve supper. That's some dandy eating. There's no meat other than the fish and the meat eaters at your table won't even notice.

The vegetarians can skip the fish and the vegans can take a miss on the mushrooms (cream sauce). If you let everybody know what's what beforehand you won;t even get those weird looks from the old carnivorous uncle.

The best part for the cooks is drinking rye whiskey out of juice glasses during the preparation, but that might just be a family tradition.


From: Winnipeg | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 11 December 2004 08:51 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That sounds lovely; Italian Christmas Eve meals are also "meatless" in the Catholic sense (ie fish is allowed) and there are plenty of non-fish dishes for real vegetarians. Idem Polish and no doubt several other Catholic traditions.

One of the fancy ravioli types would be appropriate for vegans: it is stuffed with chopped or ground nuts and sometimes greens.

It is too bad for both vegans and the lactose-intolerant that "soya cuisine" is not sold in North America: it is a soya-based (and non transfat) substitute for cooking cream, packed in mall tetrapaks. I always bring some home when I'm across the pond.


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
CanadianCrone
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posted 13 December 2004 04:05 AM      Profile for CanadianCrone        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One daughter has been a vegetarian for about 25 years and she always got along on the wide variety of vegetables that we have accompanying the turkey... plus a seperate cake pan of meatless stuffing. This year one son has a new S.O. who is also vegetarian, so I may just buy one of those frozen meatless dishes for those two women. Everyone spends the day stuffing themselves with things like veggies and dips and there's always so much that I really have never had to go out of my way worrying about my daughter. I do make sure I have some tofu, lentils, rice, etc. around in case she stays over and wants to make herself something the next day.
From: Toronto | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 13 December 2004 08:07 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
CC, that is all fine, and vegetarian food certainly needn't mimic meat - as if there was something "missing" without it, but sometimes it is nice to have a bit of a centrepiece - something vegetarian that meat-eaters will like as well. There are many on that bbc site link I posted, or try a vegetarian tourtière. I'm trying to find a good recipe - I usually just make it up as I go along, but I've made many. Seitan, millet, or that soya based Yves "meat" are possible ingredients, as are "meaty" (chewy) vegetables such as mushrooms and eggplants. Onions are essential.

Here is a recipe base on the Yves one (they allow use of it by non-profits, with credit) with notes:

Vegetarian Tourtière

1 pkg. Yves Veggie Cuisine Veggie Ground Round Original

Pastry for a 9"/23 cm double crust pie

1 large baking potato

2 Tbs. (30 ml) vegetable oil (canola, olive or sunflower)

1 large onion, diced ( I use at twice that)

4 garlic cloves, minced

3/4 (175 ml)Cup potato cooking water

1/4 tsp. (1 ml) cloves

1/2 tsp. (3 ml) dried thyme

1/4 tsp. (1 ml) dry mustard

1/2 tsp. (3 ml) salt

1/2 tsp. (3 ml) coarse black pepper

Preheat oven to 425° F.(220° C). Line a 9"/23 cm pie plate with pastry. Roll out remaining pastry to a flat round for the top of the pie. Heat oil in a large skillet until hot. Add onion and garlic and sauté, stirring occasionally, until tender. Meanwhile, cook potato in a small amount of salted water until tender. Reserve 3/4 c. (175 mL) water. Mash potato (no butter or milk). When onion and garlic are cooked, turn off heat. Add the potato water (Note from web designer: you may not need all the water - we use approx. half for a firmer texture), crumbled Yves Veggie Cuisine Veggie Ground Round Original and all seasonings to the skillet. Mix well allow to cool slightly. Spread evenly in prepared pie shell. Place pastry top on pie. Seal edges with a little water, turning the crust under and fluting decoratively. Place pie on baking tray and bake about 20 minutes or until browned. Let stand 5 minutes before cutting into wedges.

This could be a bit stodgy and dull as is. If you have some left-over red wine (ah, if only the strike were over...) substitute that for the potato water, but put it in with just the onions and garlic, and let simmer to draw off the alcohol and let it cook down a bit. I'd strongly suggest including some more vegetables - especially mushrooms.

Tourtière is traditionally served with homemade fruit or chunky tomato ketchup - mild salsa would also do - It can be a bit dry otherwise, especially if made vegetarian or with lean meat (such as deer or bison).

[ 13 December 2004: Message edited by: lagatta ]


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged

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