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Webgear
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posted 23 May 2007 02:24 PM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We started to discuss early Black settlements in Ontario in the following link.

The myth of the country ideal and race thread

I thought it would be interesting in starting a thread of Black history in Ontario.


From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
zak4amnesty
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posted 28 May 2007 11:51 AM      Profile for zak4amnesty   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
well, I am in SW Ontario. NOt far from Dresden and Uncle TOm's Cabin and all that. My little city has very few black people, and as a result, I know very little about black history. I recently saw the NFB doc about the Train Porter's Union and every bit of it was new to me. My last apt. was a large house with a quarters for the black servants, who lived above the horses. I've seen the gravestone of the first black person buried in a Sarnia cemetary. His stone predominately labeled his as coloured. I'm sure if I knew more black people, I'd be more enlightened.
From: Chemical Valley | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
Webgear
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posted 29 May 2007 07:29 AM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here are some links that I have discovered.

Ontario Archives

City Of Toronto

Black History Society

Our Roots

[ 29 May 2007: Message edited by: Webgear ]


From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
siren
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posted 29 May 2007 03:03 PM      Profile for siren     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Webgear, have you read, Fall on Your Knees
by Ann-Marie MacDonald?

It's set in Nova Scotia (and NY) but you might like it.


From: Of course we could have world peace! But where would be the profit in that? | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Farmpunk
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posted 29 May 2007 04:19 PM      Profile for Farmpunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's a good read, Siren.

I'll repost my link from the other thread:
http://www.buxtonmuseum.com/. A sadly neglected aspect of Ontario history.

Sorry to sidetrack into black lit, but anyone read Iceberg Slim? Robert Deane Pharr? Good reading.


From: SW Ontario | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged
Webgear
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posted 29 May 2007 05:22 PM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Siren

Thank you for the link. I will add this novel to my reading list.

I am currently researching my family history which involves villages and towns mentioned in most black history websites in southern Ontario.

Looks like I will end up doing some other history research.


From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
-=+=-
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posted 29 May 2007 08:05 PM      Profile for -=+=-   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I grew up in Chatham, Ontario, near Buxton -- and we actually knew alot about black history in the area (my friends and I were white). I don't know if it was just part of the local folklore, or if we learned it from our highschool history teacher -- but it was probably a bit of both.

John Brown, the man who started the Civil War, actually planned his raid on Harper's Ferry at a black church in Chatham (There's a plaque and I think the same church is still there). A black man from Chatham died in raid I believe. I think the first black newspaper in North America was also printed in Chatham. My history teacher used to also tell a famous story about a Chatham mob surrounding a slave catcher who came up from the States for someone, and put him on a train back south.

The Uncle Tom's cabin referred to was actually that of Rev. Josiah Henson who started the Dawn Settlement in the area. This was a settlement of free black slaves who learned self-help, farming, trades and other skills. The Uncle Tom Cabin's author (Tubbman?) visited Henson, and he was the inspiration for the character.

Buxton still is a rural black community; I don't know much about it, but I assume it dates from the civil war era.

Most people in the Chatham area would holiday in nearby Lake Erie. Black citizens had their own holiday village there (whose name I can't remember). This may have been defacto segregation, as the white community had Rondeau Park and Erieau.


From: Turtle Island | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
jrootham
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posted 29 May 2007 09:32 PM      Profile for jrootham     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Harriet Tubman was a conductor on the Underground Railway, Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote "Uncle Tom's Cabin". She was an abolitionist and feminist.

Another of her books, "Lady Byron Vindicated", got turned into a stage play in Toronto many years ago.


From: Toronto | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
Webgear
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posted 30 May 2007 11:35 AM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is my understanding that the Queen’s Bush (Grey, Wellington and Bruce) once held upwards of 20,000 Blacks settlers however sometime before World War One. The Black population in at least Grey County was reduced to a few thousands, and then mainly located in Owen Sound or other large cities and towns.

I am going to try and visit Buxton this summer. It sounds like an interesting place to discover.


From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Makwa
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posted 30 May 2007 12:46 PM      Profile for Makwa   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Africville (Halifax) was bulldozed in 67' or so. The history of African Canadians in this country has been ground down into dust, and it is a fucking shame.
From: Here at the glass - all the usual problems, the habitual farce | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Steppenwolf Allende
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posted 30 May 2007 02:12 PM      Profile for Steppenwolf Allende     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Interesting reading here.

Nova Scotia was a real landing ground for blacks getting away from slavery in the US--although it didn't necessarily mean getting away from similar conditions.

Africville was a real black spot in this country's history--another conveniently forgotten atrocity that puts a big hole in this mantra that Canada supposedly walks with the angels when it comes to equal rights, cultural diversity and mutual respect.

A bit more history on this


From: goes far, flies near, to the stars away from here | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
-=+=-
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posted 30 May 2007 03:35 PM      Profile for -=+=-   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Makwa:
Africville (Halifax) was bulldozed in 67' or so. The history of African Canadians in this country has been ground down into dust, and it is a fucking shame.

The same thing happened in Windsor, Ontario as well, on a smaller scale -- though I'm not sure of the exact date. The city was widening a road and had a black church torn down (African Methodist I think) -- then they ended up not widening the road. The congregation rebuilt their church in a different location (I knew someone who did work for them, so that's where I heard the story) -- but that's really a lack of civil rights.

There's also alot of 19th century black history in BC as well (where I know live). There was a free black community on Vancouver Island and some of the gulf islands. They formed the first volunteer military unit in B.C. (First Victoria Rifles I think).

The leader of the community was Mifflin Gibbs from Salt Spring Island, who represented his district at the Yale Conference in 1868 where delegates discussed and passed resolutions regarding Confederation. The anti-Confederates used the fact that the pro-Confederation faction had a black member to attack them (which shows you that throughout history the Canada-haters have always been the reactionaries in this country). Gibbs eventually went back to the States where he became a judge.

[ 30 May 2007: Message edited by: -=+=- ]


From: Turtle Island | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Webgear
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posted 15 June 2007 03:21 PM      Profile for Webgear     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here is a link for Black History in Wellington County.

Black History In Wellington County


From: Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
zak4amnesty
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posted 18 June 2007 01:45 PM      Profile for zak4amnesty   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Maybe I'm repeating this.

The NFB doc suggested that during the time of the civil rights movement in the US, the black people there actually had more 'rights' than the black people of Canada. Altho the US was 'seperate but equal', it was more than Canada, that had NO provisions for how black people could be treated, or ignored, or exploited, etc.....It was the Union of Porters that started lobbying for the rights of black Canadians.

Oh yeah, the movie "Seperate but Equal" was interesting..... I'd never seen it before.


From: Chemical Valley | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged

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