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Author Topic: Frightening books
pookie
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11357

posted 01 August 2006 08:29 AM      Profile for pookie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Nice discussion about scary movies over here so I figured I may as well switch to books.

I was addicted to horror novels when growing up, mostly King (this was in the 80s) but I tried a few others too.

Stand-outs for me were:

The Exorcist - if you've never read it, it's pretty impressive. I found it scarier than the movie. It's also got some interesting theological discussions.

Salem's Lot - to me this is one of King's best - just a great story and very effectively done. Apart from the novelist protagonist, there's less grandstanding than in alot of his stuff (you know, where he just HAS to show off his arcane knowledge of pop culture or the wondrous research he did) and more straight narration.

The Monkey's Paw - only a short story but one of the best

The Turn of the Screw - a bit dense as James is wont to be, but pretty neat


From: there's no "there" there | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 01 August 2006 10:08 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not generally really frightened by books. I was once rather freaked out by Patricia Cornwell's first book, in which the killer stalks the ME and she narrowly escapes a gruesome death. But I think that had more to do with my state of mind when reading it - I was going through a weird thing where I was terrified of death. You know, the whole realizing-in-a-big-way-that-you're-mortal thing - existential crisis. Never read horrible books full of killing when you're going through an early 20's existential crisis.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
pookie
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11357

posted 01 August 2006 11:28 AM      Profile for pookie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Fear is a hard emotion to generate through writing, I agree. My affinity with these books may be precisely because I read them in adolescence, and they DID scare me. Nowadays, it would probably have to be a dead-of-night, darkened room with one small lamp before I could get really freaked out.

Actually, one more title: "In the Cut". Forget the movie - the novel's ending is kickass.


From: there's no "there" there | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
EmmaG
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Babbler # 12605

posted 01 August 2006 01:15 PM      Profile for EmmaG        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sphere by Michael Crichton gave me the shivers in certain sections.

Interesting premise too...involves black hole time travel, and ET life...lots of juicy sci-fi that's not over the top.


From: nova scotia | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged
500_Apples
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posted 01 August 2006 01:23 PM      Profile for 500_Apples   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
When I was small, goosebumps :-)
From: Montreal, Quebec | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 01 August 2006 10:32 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I read the Amityville Horror while laid in bed sick with the flu for two days. I think being a bit delirious from the fever added something to the sinister mood of the book.
From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged

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