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Author Topic: Children of Men
jrose
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posted 08 January 2007 05:37 PM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anyone seen Children of Men yet?
From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Legless-Marine
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posted 08 January 2007 07:34 PM      Profile for Legless-Marine        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jrose:
Anyone seen Children of Men yet?

I saw it about two weeks ago. Had considered reviewing it here, but didn't think anyone would be interested.


From: Calgary | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Nanuq
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posted 08 January 2007 08:47 PM      Profile for Nanuq   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It has it's own entry in Wikipedia but don't read that if you haven't seen the movie since it gives away the ending. The movie is based on the book by P.D. James.
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 08 January 2007 10:15 PM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I enjoyed it.

It was the first movie I've seen in a really long time that I left feeling completely deflated, with the wheels in my head really turning, thinking "what if?" I've come across a lot of blogs and reviews calling it little more than left-wing propaganda.


From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Legless-Marine
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posted 08 January 2007 10:56 PM      Profile for Legless-Marine        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by jrose:
I enjoyed it.

[/URL]


I quite liked it to. I was pleasantly surprised to find that it a fairly typical british apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic film, similar to Last Train, 28 days later, No blade of grass, Survivors, etc. The "Flight across the british countryside to salvation" is familiar themetic territory, but a style I never tire of.

The last third of the film had some of the most satisfying shootouts I've seen - Although the Gaza-strip type aesthetic was a bit disturbing.

Children of men didn't really break new ground, but was a worthy addition to a small, but recognizable genre.


From: Calgary | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
oreobw
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posted 02 February 2007 09:55 PM      Profile for oreobw     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I posted a comment or two in another forum so this is partly a repeat.

Re Children of Men, I got the DVD yesterday and watched most of it in the afternoon. It is quite the movie. Fast moving and with an almost depressing view of the future. This director is very very good (but new to me). I must look and see what else he/she has done. Also, I agree with the Gaza-strip comment.

(I just got a new large screen TV a week ago and have watched parts of several movies from my collection).

Now I must sit down and watch the movie from start to finish.

[ 02 February 2007: Message edited by: oreobw ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
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posted 03 February 2007 09:01 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There was a piece in Maclean's I think, panning it because it wasn't sufficiently faithful to the book. I can't speak to that having not read the book but I thought it was an extreemly well done movie. Sort of depressing yet ultimately hopeful at the same time.
From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
laine lowe
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posted 03 February 2007 10:04 PM      Profile for laine lowe     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
oldgoat, the piece was written by ultra-conservative, Muslim-hating Mark Steyn. The fact that he pounced on writing a film review is suspect in itself but I think he took issue with the director's handling of the film and it's attack on the current trend of immigrant bashing.

And it was that focus, perhaps a departure from the novel (I haven't read it yet) that made the film so powerful in my opinion. Those detention centres and neighbourhood cages didn't seem that far off from what is going on now or might definitely happen in the near future.


From: north of 50 | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
Sineed
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posted 03 February 2007 10:35 PM      Profile for Sineed     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just saw Children of Men tonight. It's the best post-apocalyptic movie I've ever seen and I will recommend it to everybody I meet. And yes, sometimes it wears its politics on its sleeve (like the cages containing refugees emblazoned with "Homeland Security). But Alfonso Cuaron is a visionary filmmaker. Go see it!!
From: # 668 - neighbour of the beast | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
JayPotts
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posted 14 February 2007 12:06 PM      Profile for JayPotts   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just saw Children of Men and I thought it was very good. It had a lot of scary elements about where humanity might be heading. But the story was still far fetched enough that I can sleep at night.
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged
writer
editor emeritus
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posted 28 February 2007 06:26 AM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Media content created for the movie: Wow.

[ 28 February 2007: Message edited by: writer ]


From: tentative | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 28 February 2007 10:56 AM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I haven't seen Children of Men, but does anyione remember the Peter Watkins, the War Game? I just rented it the other night, and it still seems pretty clever.

Supressed by the BBC for years it was finally aired 20 years after it was produced.
The War Game

quote:
The War Game is a 1965 television film on nuclear war. Written, directed, and produced by Peter Watkins for the BBC's The Wednesday Play strand, its depiction of the impact of Soviet nuclear attack on Britain caused dismay within the BBC and in government. It was scheduled for transmission on August 6, 1966 (the anniversary of the Hiroshima attack) but was not transmitted until 1985, the corporation publicly stating that "the effect of the film has been judged by the BBC to be too horrifying for the medium of broadcasting". It was widely viewed before its BBC debut on video and in art-house cinemas, often using prints provided by Watkins. The film won the Academy Award for Documentary Feature in 1966.



It can usually be found on DVD were it is twinned with "Culloden" a fictionalized recreation of the ethnic cleansing of the Scotish Highlands by the English in the 18th century.

Culloden

quote:
Culloden is a documentary film written and directed by Peter Watkins and originally broadcast by the BBC on December 15, 1964. It portrays the Jacobite uprising and the 1746 Battle of Culloden that "tore apart forever the clan system of the Scottish Highlands". Described in its opening credit as "an account of one of the most mishandled and brutal battles ever fought in Britain", Culloden was hailed as a breakthrough for its cinematography as well as use of amateur actors. It was based on John Prebble's study of the battle.

The latter holds up to time better than the first.


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Catchfire
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posted 12 May 2008 05:19 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Slovenian cultural critic Slavoj Žižek on Children of Men:
quote:
In a typical Hollywood sci-fi, the future world may be full of unheard-of objects and inventions, but even the cyborgs interact exactly the way we do – or, rather, did in old Hollywood melodramas and action movies. In The Children of Men, there are no new gadgets, London is exactly the same as it is now, only more so – Cuaron merely brought out its latent poetic and social potentials: the greyness and decay of the littered suburbs, the omni-presence of video-surveillance… The film reminds us that, of all strange things we can imagine, the weirdest is reality itself. Hegel remarked long ago that a portrait of a person resembles it more than this person itself. The Children of Men is a science-fiction of our present itself.

It is 2027, with the human race rendered infertile - the earth’s youngest inhabitant, born 18 years ago, was just killed in Buenos Aires. The UK lives in a permanent state of emergency, anti-terrorist quads chasing illegal immigrants, the state power administering the dwindling population which vegetates in sterile hedonism. Are these two features – hedonist permissiveness plus new forms of social apartheid and control based on fear – not what our societies are about? Here comes Cuaron’s stroke of a genius – as he put it in one of his interviews: “Many of the stories of the future involve something like ‘Big Brother,’ but I think that’s a 20th-century view of tyranny. The tyranny happening now is taking new disguises — the tyranny of the 21st century is called ‘democracy’.” This is why the rulers of his world are not grey and uniformed Orwellian “totalitarian” bureaucrats, but enlightened democratic administrators, cultured, each with his or her own “life style.” When the hero visits an ex-friend, now a top government official, to gain a special permit for a refugee, we enter something like a Manhattan upper-class gay couple loft, the informally dressed official with his crippled partner at the table.



From: On the heather | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged

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