babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » right brain babble   » culture   » I Hate "classic rock" stations!!!

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: I Hate "classic rock" stations!!!
thwap
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5062

posted 23 February 2006 10:27 AM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And Hamilton has to have one of the worst anyway but they all suck!

YESTERDAY I'm at the gym and "Y-108" has some stupid contest: "Man-Cave II" [supposedly last time you could win a "cave" full of "guy-stuff" but now man has "evolved" and there's ... ah, it's too stupid to go into, there's some character doing a lame-ass Brooklyn accent living in the cave and they play the same bits over and fucking over again, and it drives me nuts. So THEN, they follow that with Boston's "More Than A Feeling."

Now here's the thing: I don't mind this music. I even like some of these songs. I don't even mind "Boston" for chrissakes, but not when some overthehill failed comedians play it over and over and over for forty goddamn years and act like these tunes are the last word in music.

Unless they dig up some band that imitates "classic rock" then they'll play it: "Just enough of the new stuff" or a clip of Dana Carvey's "Garth" character shouting "live in the now!"

It's so fucking obvious and predictable and boring and they act like it's so fucking coooool.

And I rant about this today because at the gym, exact same time, the fucking "Man-Cave II" commercial is played and they fucking played "More Than A Feeling" again!!

AAARRRRRGGGHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

[ 23 February 2006: Message edited by: thwap ]


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4795

posted 23 February 2006 11:07 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
LOL. You need a cd player and headphones, or a walkman, or radio or whatever. I gave up on most commercial radio ages ago -- it's all shite.
From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
thwap
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5062

posted 23 February 2006 11:15 AM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yesterday the battery's died, so i had no choice.

Today, I stupidly went back for a couple of exercises and didn't bring the discman, stupidly thinking to myself: "What's the worst that can happen?"

The station is owned by "yes I'm a fascist thank-you" Adolph Coors.

bleargh!!!


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
kimmy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11914

posted 23 February 2006 11:33 AM      Profile for kimmy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm feeling you. There was a point a few years ago when I said to myself, "I never want to hear another Aerosmith song. Ever." I was so sick of having to sit through hour after hour of Nickelback and similar crap just to hear the occasional song I wanted to hear that I just gave up on radio.

Just within the past year or so Edmonton *finally* got a "modern rock" station and an "urban" station, and once again I'm in radio heaven.

But not that long ago, Edmonton's last "top 40" station changed formats and went country (we've got ... 4 or so country stations?!) and the "urban" station has diluted its format to pick up the slack... because Avril Lavigne had been left homeless. But at least the "modern rock" station is still doing what it set out to do.

My special guy has a theory that mens' preferences get "locked in" at around the time they enter puberty. The car they idolize will become their all-time dream car... the music they're digging will be their favorites. Maybe it's a good theory, maybe not so much. But if he's right, it would explain why the North American automakers are all producing new cars styled after the Mustang, Camaro, and Challenger of 1969... the kids who were entering puberty in 1969 are now at their peak earning years, the kids have moved out, and they can go buy the car they dreamed about when they were 13. I think the same theory would explain the classic rock format... it's a big demographic with lots of money that advertisers want to reach, and they seem to want to hear the music they liked when they were teenagers.


From: Awesometon, Alberta! | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4795

posted 23 February 2006 11:58 AM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think you're right, kimmy. Thank goodness that your guy's theory about "guy music" doesn't seem to hold for all of us. Despite my encroaching Middle Fartdom (I am not an "old" fart yet!) I am still finding different musical styles I like, from jazz to hip hop -- basically everything except opera and that shlock they call "new country".

...Of course, then there's all the "niche" stuff, like Johnnie McGovern and Pansy Division... (but I doubt your guy listens to them )

From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
thwap
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5062

posted 23 February 2006 01:05 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
kimmy!

Shit, you got me pegged on cars. (Though i can't drive so i'll never buy one. then again, i like jags too. just the look of them.)

There's some big doofus at the gym, likes the "classic rock." Once it was playing som r & b station but switched to y-108 and he said "That's better. That's 'big boys' music!"

i can't imagine going to my cd collection every night for THREE DECADES and going: "hmmm. Aerosmith, Boston, or Led Zeppelin? Maybe Foreigner!!"

again, i've got this stuff, i listen to it from time to time, but it kills me to hear it on those stations knowing that they played it 3 times yesterday.

and now i'm listening to techno, rap, jazz, classical, "stoner-rock", and on and on, as well.

i also weep for the oldies stations that think there were only 100 songs recorded between 1955 and 1970.


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7050

posted 23 February 2006 02:07 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It kills me...I just can't listen to radio because of my weird musical tastes.
From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Accidental Altruist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11219

posted 23 February 2006 04:09 PM      Profile for Accidental Altruist   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The problem I have with most commercial radio stations is the disk jockeys. I suppose they're just regular people so I shouldn't expect them to be too enlightened or progressive. Most of the population isn't so why should radio announcers be different?.

But geez. If there's a woman's voice on a morning radio show odds are she's just there to laugh at the guys' jokes. There was one urban radio station I liked. The morning show was gender balanced and the announcers would actually engage in witty banter and debate on the air. But the formula changed. They hired "Mauler and Rush" who's schtick was honed on a "classic rock" station. So I tuned out.


From: i'm directly under the sun ... ... right .. . . . ... now! | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 23 February 2006 04:19 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
But geez. If there's a woman's voice on a morning radio show odds are she's just there to laugh at the guys' jokes.

I hate Klassik Rawk too, but still tune in once in a while. And of course you're right, for the most part. But one of the local blarecasters has a woman on one of their afternoon shows -- or did, anyway -- who can/could more than hold her own among her colleagues, the usual clutch of ageing frat boys. She could outshock the jocks. The time that springs to mind, one of her remarks reduced the rest of them to stunned silence for a millisecond, followed by cries of "Whoa!" "We are so fired!" "Uh, time to go to a commercial," and so forth.

But apart from such moments, which probably come along about every two years or so, neither that station nor any of the other commercial ones in town are worth listening to.

[ 23 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 23 February 2006 04:23 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ok. This is a test. What was on the flip side of "Itsy Bitsy Teeny-Weeny Yellow Polka-Dot Bikini"?

[ 23 February 2006: Message edited by: skdadl ]


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 23 February 2006 04:23 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
My special guy has a theory that mens' preferences get "locked in" at around the time they enter puberty.

My theory has always been similar, only change "enter puberty" to "first got laid".

God gives you an Almighty "flick" to the forehead and you're stuck that way perpetually.


From: ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°`°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø,¸_¸,ø¤°°¤ø, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 23 February 2006 04:26 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Ok. This is a test. What was on the flip side of "Itsy Bitsy Teeny-Weeny Yellow Polka-Dot Bikini"?

I'll answer that if you can tell us what was on the B-side of "Temptation," by New Order.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Crippled_Newsie
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7024

posted 23 February 2006 04:27 PM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Magoo:
God gives you an Almighty "flick" to the forehead and you're stuck that way perpetually.

Forehead?


From: It's all about the thumpa thumpa. | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 23 February 2006 04:27 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
psst, 'lance: is "flip side" a little too oldies for this thread?
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
thwap
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5062

posted 23 February 2006 04:28 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The gym also used to play Toronto's "The Mix" 99.something and the morning host was one Carla Collins - "Carla and Company" [a guy and a gal or two?]

Anyway, while they were "bantering" one morning, the topic turned to these stupid pizza commercials where a guy with a Phil Collins accent says the phone number's "3636" isn't "free sex, free sex."

The guy co-host said 1-800-"free-sex" was Carla's phone number. There was some laughter from "company" but Carla wasn't too happy you could tell. They went right to a commercial and when they came back the guy had obviously been spoken to. Ha-ha-ha!

I hate morning "shock jocks." I hate everything. I'm going to stop bantering right now.


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 23 February 2006 04:30 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
psst, 'lance: is "flip side" a little too oldies for this thread?

Not so much. Klassik Rawk and its fans and salespeople are still in the vinyl era, emotionally if not literally.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Crippled_Newsie
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7024

posted 23 February 2006 04:34 PM      Profile for Crippled_Newsie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking of classic rock, I just want to share the horror I felt when music from my high-school years began appearing on those late-night offers of 'compilation CDs' from K-Tel.

All the best hits of the 80s!

I remember as a lad I saw those bloody things for music from my parents' era and wondering, 'who would listen to that crap?'


From: It's all about the thumpa thumpa. | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Mush
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3934

posted 23 February 2006 04:34 PM      Profile for Mush     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh my gawd...I was so happy to see this thread.
The $#@#! London "International" Airport plays a classic rock (or one of those terrible '70's, 80's, and whatever' stations) as background over its PA. It has a nice new terminal building, but to be there listening to the music makes you feel like you've just flown into...I dunno...

...well, London, I guess...anyway, you know what I mean. You sure know ya ain't in Barcelona.


From: Mrs. Fabro's Tiny Town | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 23 February 2006 04:36 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ok, got it. Flip side was "Hurt."

Am I right?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
BleedingHeart
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3292

posted 23 February 2006 04:37 PM      Profile for BleedingHeart   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What makes radio stations that advertise that they play a certain type of music, think that people tune in to here about their jocks' personal lifes or attempts to be funny.

My son (14 years old) loves classic rock but when I drive him to school you can go thru the entire 15 minute drive without hearing a song.

Several years ago during my then 30 minute commute to work I got so bored with listening to the morning crew's personal lives that I switched to CBC stereo which I listened to for years (even it has too much talk).


From: Kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 23 February 2006 04:37 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Ok, got it. Flip side was "Hurt."

Am I right?


You are, and to "Itsy Bitsy..." etc, it was "Why Have You Changed Your Mind."

But of course I had to use Google. You?

[ 23 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 23 February 2006 04:40 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Are you kidding? I've never heard of those guys before, whaddr they called, New something ... Well, c'mon. That's eighties. I was using an ear trumpet by then.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mush
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3934

posted 23 February 2006 04:42 PM      Profile for Mush     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What I find amusing is how songs that were totally over the top in their time now sound like elevator music, and have somehow become appropriate for play everywhere. I was in a (sigh) Red Lobster (double bleccho) some years ago, and they were playing Clapton's "Cocaine". Dinner music? I heard Voodoo Chile in the Valu-Mart the other week. Cripes!
From: Mrs. Fabro's Tiny Town | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 23 February 2006 04:44 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Are you kidding? I've never heard of those guys before, whaddr they called, New something ... Well, c'mon. That's eighties. I was using an ear trumpet by then.

Meanwhile, thanks to you, I'll have that bloody stupid song in my head the rest of the day.

Damn Sixties generation, ruckusfruckussourbiscuitbatter...

quote:
What I find amusing is how songs that were totally over the top in their time now sound like elevator music, and have somehow become appropriate for play everywhere. I was in a (sigh) Red Lobster (double bleccho) some years ago, and they were playing Clapton's "Cocaine". Dinner music?

On the contrary, I think most of Clapton's music was perfectly appropriate for elevators, or chain restaurants, on its first release.

[ 23 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 23 February 2006 04:46 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've noticed that our Loblaw's has lately been playing the blandest parts of the British invasion - like, not even Beatles, but Peter and Gordon, and then groups whose names I can't even remember, although their insipid, coattails jingles come back to me all too clearly. (By coattails, I mean they were riding on the Beatles' and the Stones' coattails.)
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mush
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3934

posted 23 February 2006 04:46 PM      Profile for Mush     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Quote:
On the contrary, I think most of Clapton's music was perfectly appropriate for elevators, or chain restaurants, on its first release.



From: Mrs. Fabro's Tiny Town | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 23 February 2006 04:48 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mush:

Phew. For a second there, I wondered if I'd just thrown down a gauntlet in front of a partisan of the "Clapton is God" variety.

quote:
I've noticed that our Loblaw's has lately been playing the blandest parts of the British invasion - like, not even Beatles, but Peter and Gordon, and then groups whose names I can't even remember, although their insipid, coattails jingles come back to me all too clearly. (By coattails, I mean they were riding on the Beatles' and the Stones' coattails.)

I've always thought that, however good (if maudlin) "Ferry Cross the Mersey" was as a song, there turned out to be a cruel irony in the lyrics:

"...and here I'll stay."

Well, yes, Gerry. Just so. Sorry about that.

[ 23 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Hephaestion
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4795

posted 23 February 2006 04:49 PM      Profile for Hephaestion   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I was in a (sigh) Red Lobster (double bleccho) some years ago, and they were playing Clapton's "Cocaine". Dinner music?


... yet they'd probably get shirty if I went in there with a blaster pounding "Keep Yer Jesus Off My Penis", or something. Sheeeeesh!

From: goodbye... :-( | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Mush
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3934

posted 23 February 2006 04:50 PM      Profile for Mush     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I did used to like Cream, but am feeling much better now, thanks.
From: Mrs. Fabro's Tiny Town | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 23 February 2006 04:50 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The one group I missed out on in their own time but really came to like later is Queen. Watching/listening to Brian May playing God Save the Queen from the roof of Buck House a few years ago just left me rigid. That was so good.
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8238

posted 23 February 2006 04:54 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I probably wouldn't think twice about hearing "Cocaine" in a restaurant, but I did enjoy it the one time I was eating at the local lunch place and they put on a CD shuffle that included VU's "Heroin."

"And all the dead bodies piled up in mounds...."


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
arborman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4372

posted 23 February 2006 04:54 PM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There are radio stations other than the CBC?

'flick to the forehead'

Thank god that didn't work for me - I'd be stuck with Bon Jovi. The humiliation of saying that is profound.


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 23 February 2006 04:55 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I did used to like Cream, but am feeling much better now, thanks.

Likewise. Well, there was a lot of stuff I used to like which later... but this line of thought gets old.

One other example, though: The Eagles. I'd bracket them with Clapton as prima facie evidence that technical impeccability can be boring beyond belief.

quote:
I probably wouldn't think twice about hearing "Cocaine" in a restaurant, but I did enjoy it the one time I was eating at the local lunch place and they put on a CD shuffle that included VU's "Heroin."

"And all the dead bodies piled up in mounds...."


Yeesh. VU is one band whose stuff mostly hasn't been rehabilitated (in the Soviet sense) -- which is odd when you consider the pop-music gems of the third and fourth albums, and even some from the first. I can't think why I've yet to hear "I'll Be Your Mirror" on a TV commercial.

[ 23 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sleeping Sun
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10470

posted 23 February 2006 05:13 PM      Profile for Sleeping Sun     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by arborman:
Thank god that didn't work for me - I'd be stuck with Bon Jovi. The humiliation of saying that is profound.

Heyyyyy. I resemble that remark.

Of course, I'll admit that I only listen to Bon Jovi using headphones, so no one else will know what I'm listening too.

And once or twice I've covered up my ipod display so Mr. Sun doesn't know what I'm up to.


From: when I find out, I'll let you know | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged
The Evil Twin
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11561

posted 23 February 2006 05:32 PM      Profile for The Evil Twin     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
My theory has always been similar, only change "enter puberty" to "first got laid".

IOW, you're saying that virgin-boy CPC MP Jason Kenney's tastes in cars or music haven't been locked in yet?


From: Toronto | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
Makwa
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 10724

posted 23 February 2006 05:40 PM      Profile for Makwa   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by kimmy:
My special guy has a theory that mens' preferences get "locked in" at around the time they enter puberty. The car they idolize will become their all-time dream car... the music they're digging will be their favorites.
So true. I'm still listening to Van Der Graf Generator and Joy Division and dreaming of owning another 1969 Mustang coupe. The problem is that most 'classic rock' was crap then and is now dated cliche crap now.

From: Here at the glass - all the usual problems, the habitual farce | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Accidental Altruist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11219

posted 23 February 2006 05:51 PM      Profile for Accidental Altruist   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mush:
What I find amusing is how songs that were totally over the top in their time now sound like elevator music, and have somehow become appropriate for play everywhere. I was in a (sigh) Red Lobster (double bleccho) some years ago, and they were playing Clapton's "Cocaine". Dinner music? I heard Voodoo Chile in the Valu-Mart the other week. Cripes!

Honest to goodness I've heard the elevator music version of "I wanna be sedated".


From: i'm directly under the sun ... ... right .. . . . ... now! | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 23 February 2006 06:11 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I hate everything.

Killjoy.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Black Dog
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2776

posted 23 February 2006 06:18 PM      Profile for Black Dog   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
But not that long ago, Edmonton's last "top 40" station changed formats and went country (we've got ... 4 or so country stations?!) and the "urban" station has diluted its format to pick up the slack... because Avril Lavigne had been left homeless. But at least the "modern rock" station is still doing what it set out to do.

Which is apparently play endless amounts of Nirvana, RageAgainsttheAudioSoundgardenSlave, Foo Fighters, Red Hot Chili Peppers and other '90s casualties.

.

quote:
My special guy has a theory that mens' preferences get "locked in" at around the time they enter puberty. The car they idolize will become their all-time dream car... the music they're digging will be their favorites....I think the same theory would explain the classic rock format... it's a big demographic with lots of money that advertisers want to reach, and they seem to want to hear the music they liked when they were teenagers.

My main quibble with the theory is I don't think music tastes tend to get locked down until the end of puberty. But otherwise, it does a nice job explaining why '90s grunge is the new classic rock. All the dudes who were wearing torn jeans, Docs and flannel during their formative years 15 years ago are now the one's buying cars and houses.


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8238

posted 23 February 2006 06:36 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Phew. For a second there, I wondered if I'd just thrown down a gauntlet in front of a partisan of the "Clapton is God" variety.

Well, I for one am not one of those. But Knopfler is the Messiah. And Marr is the Prophet.


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
radiorahim
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2777

posted 23 February 2006 07:44 PM      Profile for radiorahim     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
You need a cd player and headphones, or a walkman, or radio or whatever. I gave up on most commercial radio ages ago -- it's all shite.

I'm a radio junkie...with a handle like mine is it hard to guess?

But yes I'll agree that commercial radio is largely shit. There are maybe a dozen "formats" that are used all across Canada and the U.S. so no matter where you go its all the same.

But nowadays I mostly listen to informational programming on radio and if I want music, I just dip into my own rather massive collection.

I used to listen to alot of international shortwave radio but now most of that has moved to the net. Net radio kind of sucked in the beginning because of bandwidth limitations but now with highspeed connections pretty much everywhere it's become pretty reliable and the audio quality...while not great is okay.

The trick though is to be able to detach yourself from the computer so that you're not "glued" to the computer while listening to net radio.

A year or so ago I found a simple and cheap solution to that problem. I bought myself one of those cheap FM radio transmitters. I can plug it into the sound output jack of my computer sound card (or any other audio source for that matter), put the transmitter on an "empty" FM channel and around the house I have "Radiorahim" in FM stereo!

My little micro-transmitter can be heard for about half a block. So can sit out in the backyard with an ice cold brew in the summer and listen to whatever is coming out of my micro-transmitter on a portable radio.

Sometimes I'm streaming stuff off the net, and at other times playing stuff from my mp3 collection.

One of my faves is the music feed from RFI (Radio France International) out of Paris. They've got a great playlist of "world" music...you never know what they're going to play...reggae, African music, Cuban, Brazilian, Euro and North American pop.

It isn't going to help you much at the gym ...when you have someone else's commercial crap inflicted on you...but at least you can control the stuff around the house.


From: a Micro$oft-free computer | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 23 February 2006 09:47 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In a previous thread on Classic Rock, some wag dubbed it "Stairway to Hotel Freebird."

And one night on London's local Classic Rock station, they actually played Stairway to Heaven, Hotel California and Freebird inside of a couple of hours.

The guys at work blast Classic Rock all through the night, so I'm familiar with the format, and overly familiar with songs I lost all interest in decades ago.

Not that I don't like "Classic Rock." Heck, for the most part I'm stuck in the late sixties to late seventies in my rock taste.

But the playlist is so limited. Layla over and over again. Dust in the wind over and over again.

Classic Rock format is done by people who must really really hate music, or people, or both.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5594

posted 23 February 2006 10:25 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
But the playlist is so limited. Layla over and over again. Dust in the wind over and over again.

Classic Rock format is done by people who must really really hate music, or people, or both.


I'm pretty sure it was me who made "Panama" the most played song on Bornie's restaurant jukebox one summer. Sounded to me like he was singing "padded bra"


From: Viva La Revolución | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 23 February 2006 10:26 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
In a previous thread on Classic Rock, some wag dubbed it "Stairway to Hotel Freebird."

A googlesearch tells me that was the much-missed sherpafish.

Come back, sherpafish! You're much missed.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boarsbreath
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9831

posted 24 February 2006 12:27 AM      Profile for Boarsbreath   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
GEEK WARNING
Just on the reputations here: Clapton most certainly is God, and entirely unsuitable to elevators, up to the point where he goes off heroin. 1972? After that he's lite.

And Gerry did not in fact ever cross the Mersey...he really did live in Liverpool all his life. Bless the dear.

Classic Rock is abuse, of the old and of the new. But so is all radio except some state networks & most college stations.


From: South Seas, ex Montreal | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 24 February 2006 12:31 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
In a previous thread on Classic Rock, some wag dubbed it "Stairway to Hotel Freebird."

And one night on London's local Classic Rock station, they actually played Stairway to Heaven, Hotel California and Freebird inside of a couple of hours.


I played a tune called "Stairway to Freebird" when I hosted a morning show on community radio ten years ago. (gotta go google now...)

It musta been by this fella, The Reverend Billy C. Wirtz, because his name is familiar

quote:
My special guy has a theory that mens' preferences get "locked in" at around the time they enter puberty.

I don't listen to the same music that I listened to in 1974. I keep changing my main musical interests, although I've stuck with classical, jazz and retro (no, not 80s rock...you think that's retro? Bah, you don't know from retro. I'm talking about Eddie Cantor and Al Jolson; Frank Crumit and Jerry Colonna; The Original Dixieland Jass Band and Lu Watters' Yerba Buena Jazz Band; I guess ya get the picture. Anyway...) over the last 10-15 years.

I even like stuff I used to hate at puberty: 60s hurtin' country music by folks like Ray Price and Jim Ed Brown.

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 12:52 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think there might be something to this puberty business, though. Around then I was listening to the Beatles a lot. I don't listen to them that much these days, but it gave me a taste for both melody and harmony in pop. So I found myself liking punk rock better in theory than in practice -- the Clash and Iggy and a few others always excepted, of course. Never had any time for hardcore, for example; preferred witty bands and singers (Squeeze, say, or Elvis Costello) to angry ones; and like that.

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pogo
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2999

posted 24 February 2006 01:07 AM      Profile for Pogo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Radio stations are moving to 'train wrecks

quote:
The rules guiding a Jack-formatted station are simple: Unlike a typical radio station, which regularly plays 300 or 400 hits of a particular genre, programmers on Jack stations select 700 to 1,000 songs of completely different genres. Then, they sequence them to create what radio programmers call "train wrecks" -- Billy Idol will follow Bob Marley, Elvis after Guns N' Roses, and so on. And Jack stations often (but not always) use a smart-alecky recorded voice, rather than a live DJ, to make short quips between songs

From: Richmond BC | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
kimmy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11914

posted 24 February 2006 01:50 AM      Profile for kimmy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by radiorahim:
I'm a radio junkie...with a handle like mine is it hard to guess?

oh? For some reason, I assumed your handle was an homage to Rahim Jaffer's Milli-Vanilli act on talk radio a few years ago.


From: Awesometon, Alberta! | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
kimmy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11914

posted 24 February 2006 02:18 AM      Profile for kimmy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Black Dog:
Which is apparently play endless amounts of Nirvana, RageAgainsttheAudioSoundgardenSlave, Foo Fighters, Red Hot Chili Peppers and other '90s casualties.

You're one cynical cranky-puss, you know that?

If they have a shortcoming, it's heavy rotation. Most of Sonic's programming is new music from fairly new acts. They're playing lots of Foo and NIN right now because Foo and NIN have solid new records out right now, but for the most part. If they dust off their Nirvana records, or their Soundgarden and Ramones and Sex Pistols records from time to time, it's because these are bands that helped shape what they consider "modern rock" to be.

And "modern rock" doesn't mean "new acts only" or "nothing older than last week" or "indie" or "no commercial appeal allowed". Anybody who wants that on their radio will just have to move to a home within range of CJSR's mighty 30-Watt transmitter.

I had never heard "People Who Died" by Jim Carroll before I heard it on Sonic. That song is older than I am, but it's still fresher than anything I've ever heard on a "classic rock" station. I think "modern rock" is meant to describe the attitude of the music, not the age of it.


From: Awesometon, Alberta! | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3076

posted 24 February 2006 10:04 AM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
But yes I'll agree that commercial radio is largely shit. There are maybe a dozen "formats" that are used all across Canada and the U.S. so no matter where you go its all the same.

Yeah, every city in Canada now has a 1**.5 FM (The Bear), Ruuurgh.

Never anything good like a 98.7, The Weasel, or 89.5, The Cockatoo.

quote:
Just on the reputations here: Clapton most certainly is God, and entirely unsuitable to elevators, up to the point where he goes off heroin. 1972? After that he's lite.

Sigh. Eric Clapton is and always has been a pretentious piece of Middle Britian crap. God, the man sucks and blows and the same time. I'm glad I finally got that off my chest.

And about your musical taste being fixed at puberty? I think its more specific then that. It's what you are listening to the day you have your first orgasm. That's why a few words into "jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way..." i'm rarin' to go.


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 10:41 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Yeah, every city in Canada now has a 1**.5 FM (The Bear), Ruuurgh.

Never anything good like a 98.7, The Weasel, or 89.5, The Cockatoo.


I don't know, Kelowna has something called The Lizard, which is at least... weird, I guess.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
chester the prairie shark
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6993

posted 24 February 2006 11:13 AM      Profile for chester the prairie shark     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
well Saskatoon doesn't have a "bear", "wolf" or "lizard" but we do have "magic" 98 which is as stupid as any of them. the rock station 102 is just as you describe a mix of classic and "modern" rawk.

what we do have is CFCR commuity radio 90.5 (i'm surprised alQ wasn't pimpin this) which was originally the campus radio station. 20 years ago when the uofs quit supporting the students union in running the station the community pitched in, moved it downtown and its going pretty well. in true community radio style it's pretty eclectic with the weekends given over to ethic music and programmimng and the evenings working specific shows given over to genre's or styles that are programmed by the show hosts. week day mornings showcase two programs, "so many roads" and "green eggs and ham" which play roots, r&b, soul, etc; definately a tonic for those oppressed by "format".

people like Papal Bull could pitch a show and run an hour or two a week of his take on what music should be. I suspect this is very similar to Kimmies' CJSR in the "BIG E" (as we always use to refer to edmonton) but in Saskatoon, because were small and CFCR raised money to upgrade their wattage, you can listen to it anywhere


From: Saskatoon | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
thwap
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5062

posted 24 February 2006 11:38 AM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Don't nobody be no musical snobs.

What do you like? Oh yeah?!?!? Omigod, they're AWFUL!!! How can you listen to that crap???

It's really easy to say. About anyone's taste in music.

As long as it's sincere, it's got something. Although some people actually like committee-produced corporate pop (some kind of amusing irony or something) and i can't abide by that.

It's the unoriginality and repetitiveness of "classic rock" stations that kills me. And a lot of the announcers on y-108 were there when it was an easy-listening station and you can tell that 10+ years later they're still not used to anything.


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6061

posted 24 February 2006 01:45 PM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Come on thwap, admit that you are EMO
From: Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
thwap
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5062

posted 24 February 2006 02:16 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
who is this EMO you speak of??
From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
RP.
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7424

posted 24 February 2006 02:25 PM      Profile for RP.     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
To quote Maddox, loosely, emo is the new goth, except the goths are still around, and so it's getting to be almost unbearable.
From: I seem to be having tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hawkins
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3306

posted 24 February 2006 02:34 PM      Profile for Hawkins     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Its 106.9 The Bear in Ottawa. I had it set for my alarm clock. Ugh. It atleast gets me up to turn it off. And in the past 2 years I have not been woken up by something other than: U2, Tragically Hip, annoying bear commercial, or the crow (or are they ravens?) outside my window!

My roommate always messes with my radio downstares to turn it to the bear, pisses me off to no end 'cause i have it set to CKCU or CBCradio1. I would rather put up with their blathering voices than the annoying commercials. Plus CKCU is usually a good listen, eclectic mix of country, cont. indy, jazz, beats, indian, persian, chinese, latin, etc. etc. etc. Plus helps with my spanish, if I am lucky enough to listen at the right time (learning scheduals is for geeks!).


From: Burlington Ont | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
thwap
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5062

posted 24 February 2006 02:37 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Me n' my (also androgynous) friends at last year's "April Wine" reunion concert in Hamilton, Ontario:

(the original picture didn't load!)

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: thwap ]


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
Hawkins
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3306

posted 24 February 2006 02:43 PM      Profile for Hawkins     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by ronb:

Killjoy.


It was actually today I hate everyone by the Killjoys .


From: Burlington Ont | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
kimmy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11914

posted 24 February 2006 02:50 PM      Profile for kimmy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
When I lived in Ottawa, I liked "X fm". I just discovered that they went down in 2004.

This article about its demise adds a nugget of wisdom to the discussion of the "classic rock" format:

quote:
Most radio advertising is aimed at 25 to 54-year-olds not at Xfm’s younger demographic, says Scott Parsons, Rogers’ vice-president and Ottawa market manager.

“Not many advertisers are after the 18 to 24 male,” says Parsons. “Breweries, yes, but there aren’t that many of those.”



From: Awesometon, Alberta! | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 24 February 2006 02:56 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I think there might be something to this puberty business, though. Around then I was listening to the Beatles a lot. I don't listen to them that much these days, but it gave me a taste for both melody and harmony in pop.

'lance, are you sure you're not me? It's a bit disconcerting sometimes.

quote:
It was actually today I hate everyone by the Killjoys

Everyone. Everything. What's the difference?


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 02:59 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by ronb:
'lance, are you sure you're not me? It's a bit disconcerting sometimes.

Pretty sure. I mean, I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together...


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 24 February 2006 02:59 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Eric Clapton is and always has been a pretentious piece of Middle Britian crap.

This is roughly as accurate as "Clapton is God". I think the truth is some where in the middle. Yardbirds, good. Forever Man, bad. Blind Faith, mostly awful. Concert For George, mostly very good.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Stargazer
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6061

posted 24 February 2006 03:28 PM      Profile for Stargazer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Emo isn't really the new Goth though. Emo is more like an watered down whiny Goth without the death sutext. Instead it's all about whining, big back packs, horn-rimmed glasses and Blink182 still Emocore.

Emo Sucks


From: Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist. | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 03:39 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Yardbirds, good. Forever Man, bad. Blind Faith, mostly awful. Concert For George, mostly very good.

Cream, over-rated. Though I'll cop to still having a soft spot for "White Room" and a couple of others.

But then, I'll cop to some pretty questionable taste. I still have something of a soft spot for "Under Pressure," by Bowie and Queen.

What can I say? I was seventeen. Available radio was a wasteland, and not even a vast one. Local TV had never heard of videos. I doubt I could have bought even Rolling Stone in that town, and downloading music was unimaginable in an era of scattered BBS's and costly 300-baud modems, neither of which I'd even heard of.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 04:01 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, I loved Cream, especially the 'Disraeli Gears' (sp?) LP. Anyone remember "Mississippi Queen" by Mountain? That was awesome back then. There were a couple of good 'Blind Faith' songs. I never did listen to 'Ginger Baker's Army', whatever the hell that was.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 24 February 2006 04:01 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I never really understood all the fuss about Cream. Especially live, I thought they were about the least swingingest band ever - which I mostly blamed on Jack Bruce, a terribly busy player with my least favourite tone ever. But I gained a lot of respect for Ginger Baker for his playing on the second Masters of Reality record.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 04:27 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Cream were victims of an enormous amount of 'hype'. They were labelled a 'supergroup' which of course they never were - Clapton, Baker, and Bruce were just three very talented musicians who sometimes gelled as a group, and sometimes did not. Their solos were done to excess, although actually they were quite good. I think "Sunshine of your love" is my favourite Cream recording. Who ever came up with that naked teenage girl on their LP cover?
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 04:38 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Cream were victims of an enormous amount of 'hype'.

But since I was around 4 when they formed, and discovered them only around ten or more years after they broke up, I missed out on the hype, and so was more or less able to judge the music on its merits or lack of same.

(It's not quite true that I was spared the hype. The 1960s veterans who staffed what passed for an Ottawa rock station at that time ballyhooed Cream and other bands of their youth -- not unnaturally, I have to concede. In fact several of them seemed to think nothing decent had been recorded past around 1972, and seemed to play stuff like Foreigner and Van Halen and recent Zeppelin with some reluctance, as if it had been foisted on them. Which it hadn't, necessarily -- at this time I think the Playlist Juggernaut hadn't quite trampled everything in its path, and DJs still had some freedom in their choice of records. But I digress, as usual).

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 24 February 2006 04:42 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Blind Faith album cover story.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 04:43 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was about 18 or 19 and doing acid when the second Cream LP came out. My adventures with acid didn't last long - a couple of months - as I was in college and just didn't have time for it. I saw Walt Dizzy's "Fantasia" while zonked out, though, and also "2001". California Sunshine for the first, purple microdots for the second. How do I remember this shit 35+ years later???
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 24 February 2006 04:44 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And I'm guessing that was CHEZ FM.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 04:47 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by ronb:
And I'm guessing that was CHEZ FM.

Give that man two tickets to "Share CHEZ," their local "talent" festival, as it then was.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 04:47 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by ronb:
The Blind Faith album cover story.

Quote: "The space ship would be the fruit of the tree of knowledge and the girl, the fruit of the tree of life."

He's kidding, right?


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 04:48 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sadly, I don't think he is.
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 24 February 2006 04:50 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You're the one on California Sunshine, you tell us whether he's for real or not.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 04:51 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
^

From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 04:55 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Purple microdots" were acid, laced with something, either speed or PCP, or whatever, but it really set my teeth on edge. Scary as hell for the first hour, but eventually you get a mellow trip. I did just one of those. Never again. I did blotter acid probably a half dozen times, never knew what variety it was. "California Sunshine" were big green tabs I think. Very strong, very mellow trips. Blissful, in fact. You really had to be careful where to trip out on California Sunshine, because that was strong acid - pure, in fact - not cut with anything.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 24 February 2006 04:58 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My Dad was involved in some of the original LSD trials in Berkley back in the 50's. He says that nothing ever approached the depth of experience of that batch for him ever again. Owlsey, none of it.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 05:04 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My druggie days began and ended in 1969 I think. It was an experience, but never again.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 05:05 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Are you experienced? Well, I am".
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 05:06 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Drat. Now I gotta go lissen to Jimi Hendrix. Foxey Lady, here I come.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 24 February 2006 05:07 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Not necessarily stoned, But beautiful.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 24 February 2006 05:09 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Which brings us to the day when Clapton first caught Hendrix at a little club in London and decided then and there to quit Cream and try and join the Band.

Hendrix was the Art Tatum of the electric guitar.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 05:13 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by ronb:
Which brings us to the day when Clapton first caught Hendrix at a little club in London and decided then and there to quit Cream and try and join the Band.

Now that's a truly surreal thought. Robertson and Clapton, jamming. Oy.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 05:17 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Robbie Robertson and Eric Clapton

So he came to Woodstock and we're hanging out and one day he says, "Well, maybe, should we go somewhere, we can get some instruments and we could all like, maybe we could jam.” And I said, "We don't jam.”

And he was like, "Oh, okay.” And then years later he said, "I thought if we jammed, I could play some flashy guitar, and then I'd work up enough nerve to say, hey why don't I join the group here?" He said, "But I didn't get to do my thing, so I never worked up the nerve to ask you".

And I said, "Well, were you insinuating that … I'm the guitar player in the group.”


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 05:18 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Didn't Clapton guest in "The Last Waltz"?
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 05:21 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:
Didn't Clapton guest in "The Last Waltz"?

Come to think of it, he did. I honestly can't remember his appearance at the moment, though.

Edit:

In all candour, it's not Clapton I have anything against, so much as the Clapton-is-God crowd.

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 05:44 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Quote: In all candour, it's not Clapton I have anything against, so much as the Clapton-is-God crowd.

Same here. I like the guy, but he's no Jimi Hendrix.

I'm a big fan of The Band, I listen to their CD's when I'm in my truck, which ain't often enough.


From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 24 February 2006 07:12 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
'lance said:

quote:
But then, I'll cop to some pretty questionable taste. I still have something of a soft spot for "Under Pressure," by Bowie and Queen.

You. Are. Dead. To. Me.

On the puberty thing, I believe I was listening to CCR, Deep Purple and the Beatles. I remember the first album I ever bought was CCR's "Cosmos Factory", for $4.65. Played the grooves right of that sucker.

Thinking about it more, I used to buy a lot of 45's. That allowed you to be a bit more eclectic. Price of albums, then and today, tends to keep you focused on what you like and to not take risks. Didn't you just hate blowing your allowance on an album that sucked?

Which keeps you easy to market to, which is the real reason the music industry hated Napster. Napster encouraged eclectisism in musical taste.

Am I stuck with what I liked when I was ten or twelve? I don't think so. If I listen to CCR today, I certainly don't visit the popular tunes. Instead, I'll listen to something like "Ramble Tamble". Rough, amatuerish....but somehow visceral and edgy, to me anyway. If I listen to Deep Purple, it isn't the Deep Purple from "Machine Head" which I had at that age, but rather stuff preceeding it.

And, I am really into a "The Beatles Suck" phase of my life right now.

So I can't say that specific stuff stayed with me, but if I hear music from that era-- with the sound defined by the technology of the day-- it always interests me.

The real crime of Classic Rock stations is that it isn't classic rock. They play tunes in the 1967 to 1980 range, when Classic Rock should include about fourty years of music.

"Train Kept a' rollin" was copywrited in what, 1948? On Napster, I used to roll Johnny Burnet's, the Yardbirds and Aerosmith's versions of that song. When you do that, you realize how the technology shapes the sound.

It's criminal, how these radio stations just roll the same tunes over and over, and don't link them to previous artists. No Little Richard? Chuck Berry? Jerry Lee Lewis? Never a mention about what was going on in society at the time, and how it tied in with the music?

What a waste.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
obscurantist
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8238

posted 24 February 2006 07:51 PM      Profile for obscurantist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
The real crime of Classic Rock stations is that it isn't classic rock. They play tunes in the 1967 to 1980 range, when Classic Rock should include about fourty years of music. ...

It's criminal, how these radio stations just roll the same tunes over and over, and don't link them to previous artists. No Little Richard? Chuck Berry? Jerry Lee Lewis? Never a mention about what was going on in society at the time, and how it tied in with the music?

What a waste.


Tommy, have you heard Little Steven's Underground Garage, hosted by former E Street band guitarist Steven Van Zandt?

It's a syndicated program that's on quite a few radio stations, and also available online. I haven't listened to it in a while, but besides playing a range of what he considers to be great "garage" rock (using the term very, very loosely to include basically whatever he thinks is cool), Little Steven gets into the history of it, like who inspired who. His range is more like fifty-five years than 40, as he plays a lot of new stuff too.


From: an unweeded garden | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 24 February 2006 07:56 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
You. Are. Dead. To. Me.

This, from a man who cops to wearing a mullet (or "hockey hair," to give it its proper Canadian name)? I ask you.

quote:
Thinking about it more, I used to buy a lot of 45's. That allowed you to be a bit more eclectic. Price of albums, then and today, tends to keep you focused on what you like and to not take risks. Didn't you just hate blowing your allowance on an album that sucked?

Which keeps you easy to market to, which is the real reason the music industry hated Napster. Napster encouraged eclectisism in musical taste.


True, but so does iTunes and similar services. Not to deny that Apple is in the process of taking its place with the Sonys and such of the "music industry" (god, what a horrible phrase, and I'd not be sorry to see said industry utterly melted down and transformed). But consider that at 99 cents, individual songs are far cheaper, in real dollars, than they ever were on singles. Even if it's $1.98 for the two songs you'd have got on a 7-inch 45.

As for albums that sucked: Lord yes. Who really misses them? One decent hit single, plus an OK B-side (or vice versa); two or three quite listenable cuts; two or three marginally listenable ones; and the rest completely useless filler. Which you'd stoutly defend for a while to your snickering friends, unwilling to admit you'd been hosed, though eventually your common sense would get the better of your pride and you'd resolve to hate that band forever. Except that the next year, they'd put out something else, and the cycle would repeat itself.

Never mind Queen/Bowie. I actually bought not the first, but the second album by Boston. Not just $7.99 gone for ever with nothing to show for it, but $7.99 in 1978 dollars.

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 07:58 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
When I was a teenager, CKOY Ottawa played a lot of rock from the late '50's to the present day 60's. Consequently I heard a lot of Elvis, Chuck Berry, and a lot of other stuff. Me brudder had a r&r dance band that played live music on Saturdays. It was pretty cool for the 1960's. In the 1970's CFRA dial 580 am played mostly old rock, it hadn't become so right wing crazy with certifiable Lowell Green ranting and raving by that time. Once Lowell Green hit the air, CFRA was sunk.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 24 February 2006 11:06 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Instead, I'll listen to something like "Ramble Tamble".

I started babysitting in 1973, when I was 13. One of my clients had Cosmos Factory, and I played "Ramble Tamble" until I wore out the grooves. They also left Coke and chips for me as a snack. I still like to have Coke and chips together. What's that theory again? I bought Cosmos Factory years later when I had money (I probably bought model airplanes with my babysitting money).

quote:
what we do have is CFCR commuity radio 90.5 (i'm surprised alQ wasn't pimpin this) which was originally the campus radio station.

I traded in my pink Cadillac for a Model "A" years ago. You should tune in sometime and hear real retro. If you haven't figured out my time slot, PM me.

quote:
20 years ago when the uofs quit supporting the students union in running the station the community pitched in, moved it downtown and its going pretty well. in true community radio style it's pretty eclectic with the weekends given over to ethic music and programmimng and the evenings working specific shows given over to genre's or styles that are programmed by the show hosts. week day mornings showcase two programs, "so many roads" and "green eggs and ham" which play roots, r&b, soul, etc; definately a tonic for those oppressed by "format".

Can you imagine Shakey Wilson and Shoulder Crow hosting a show anywhere else?

While CFCR has a few hosts who were active with CJUS (the Campus station), the community station has no affiliation with the University. The only connexion is that we inherited their vinyl...but lots of that has been sold off.

We recieved thousands of 78s from CKCK in Regina when the station opened. I used to call our 78 collection (we had the ODJB's "Tiger Rag," as well as stuff from The Crew Cuts and Charlie Chamberlain to the Benny Goodman Quartet and Vic Damone's "Cincinnatti Dancing Pig") the eighth wonder of the world.

Unfortunately, The 78s have all been sold off.

[ 24 February 2006: Message edited by: al-Qa'bong ]


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
radiorahim
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2777

posted 24 February 2006 11:07 PM      Profile for radiorahim     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I remember the first album I ever bought was CCR's "Cosmos Factory", for $4.65. Played the grooves right of that sucker.

Hey...I still have my original copy...complete with scratches! Wasn't the first album I ever bought but among the first dozen.


From: a Micro$oft-free computer | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 24 February 2006 11:10 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I went through about two or three copies each of the first three CCR vinyl LP's. I've got their two greatest hits albums on cassettes, will probably order a cd set. One of the Fogarty boys (John?) is still recording, cripes, is he ever good! Saw him on a PBS special last year - he looks fantastic.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 25 February 2006 11:05 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
This, from a man who cops to wearing a mullet (or "hockey hair," to give it its proper Canadian name)? I ask you.

He he. The mullet is in it's full winter glory right now. The back hasn't been cut since September.

Okay, you'll admit to the Boston thing, I'll admit to buying Styx's...second album? Equinox?

God, I hate Styx now. To me they embody everything that went wrong with rock and roll.

And yes, Yossarian, I have heard Little Stevie's Underground Garrage. It's pretty close to what I think a Classic Rock format should be about. Although, I find Stevie moves a little slower than I'd like when he educates us on Rock history, musical influences etc.

al Qa'bong, you and I are probably less than a year apart in age. And I cleaned up on babysitting when we moved from a house to a high rise apartment building. Kept me in album and pot money.

A different, more trusting time, for sure. I doubt teen boys get much babysitting in anymore.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 25 February 2006 11:11 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Okay, you'll admit to the Boston thing, I'll admit to buying Styx's...second album? Equinox?

God, I hate Styx now. To me they embody everything that went wrong with rock and roll.


I had a Styx album too. Grand Illusion, maybe?

I found myself hating them within a relatively short time of buying the record.

In retrospect, bands like that are more to be pitied than censured, maybe. The real villains of the piece would be the record-company A&R gyus who allow such schlock to be recorded, then promote the hell out of it.

Well, their day is approaching rapidly, or is indeed already upon them. Mwahahaha.

[ 25 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 25 February 2006 01:18 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You know, in a way Styx and bands like them help identify what Rock and Roll is through negative example, perhaps better than what a text book example might.

Styx is pretentious. The moon june rhyme schemes siphon the feel of spontenaity from the music. The crisp, clearly enunciated vocals take it from the realm of the visceral, and make it sound like it's something you'd sit and watch with mom and dad on some generic 70's variety show.

I watched the Ramones documentary, and I thought it sad that Joey Ramone was so set on having a number one hit on radio. Styx had lots of hits.

Joey Ramone should have been very proud not to have a #1 radio hit.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
TeamNeedles
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8126

posted 25 February 2006 03:26 PM      Profile for TeamNeedles     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking as a radio guy (not working at a Classic Rock station, I add), let me make a few things clear.

1. Many people in radio KNOW that repeating the music over and over again is annoying to some, but, there are more listeners that want to hear Kansas everytime they tune in. So, they play to the majority. emember, they're in it for the money.

2. There are many Classic Rock fans that are NOT in that age bracket. I'm 20 and when I'm not listening to the Fan I've got a Classic Rock station on (not one of the 'Male Name' incarnations though, they drive me nuts). I think there's so much great music on there (Springsteen is my all-time favourite artist, and while you hear lots of Zeppelin on these stations, it'd hard to deny the brilliance) that hearing some of the stuff that isn't as great is worth not having to listen to Maroon 5 or whatnot...

3. Man-cave? It's a popular contest directed at the typical listener of the format, based on market research. The radio game is very much about generalizations.

4. Most FM stations don't like their jocks being seen as having any political affiliation, atleast the ones I've been involved with.

5. The Hawk out of London plays Little Steven's Underground Garage and as a hardcore Springsteen follower, when I heard it the first time I instantly became a regular listener.

[ 25 February 2006: Message edited by: TeamNeedles ]


From: Waterloo, Ontario | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
kimmy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11914

posted 26 February 2006 03:29 AM      Profile for kimmy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by TeamNeedles:
2. There are many Classic Rock fans that are NOT in that age bracket. I'm 20 and when I'm not listening to the Fan I've got a Classic Rock station on (not one of the 'Male Name' incarnations though, they drive me nuts). I think there's so much great music on there (Springsteen is my all-time favourite artist, and while you hear lots of Zeppelin on these stations, it'd hard to deny the brilliance) that hearing some of the stuff that isn't as great is worth not having to listen to Maroon 5 or whatnot...

Yes, nobody is doubting that there has been some great music produced over the years.

However, I think that everybody reaches a point in their life where they decide "if I hear Love In An Elevator one more fucking damn time, I'm going to start throwing punches." And it's that point when you realize that you're no longer content with the Classic Rock format.


On Styx: I can't stand Mr Roboto, but I love Suite Madame Blue. It seems to me that there are much, much bigger things in the world of music to be upset about than Styx. Specifically, Aerosmith. God, they suck. And also the fact that the Rotting Stones just won't retire. The Superbowl halftime show was the saddest, most pathetic display I've ever seen. It made Janet Jackson's boob look like high-brow entertainment by comparison. My god that was shitty.


From: Awesometon, Alberta! | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
Ken Burch
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8346

posted 26 February 2006 06:21 AM      Profile for Ken Burch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:
One of the Fogarty boys (John?) is still recording, cripes, is he ever good! Saw him on a PBS special last year - he looks fantastic.

Actually, John Fogerty is the only one of the Fogerty boys who COULD still be recording, given that his brother Tom(who was officially listed as the rhythm guitarist of Creedence, although there were rumors that his guitar wasn't actually plugged in when the band played in concert)died of pneumonia several years ago.

At his death, he and John were estranged, because Tom had joined the other CCR members in aligning themselves with Saul Zaentz, the head of Fantasy Records(CCR's label)against John in a bitter royalties dispute. This dispute was the reason John Fogerty refused to play with the surviving members of CCR when the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.


From: A seedy truckstop on the Information Superhighway | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Ken Burch
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 8346

posted 26 February 2006 06:26 AM      Profile for Ken Burch     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As to the "classic rock" format itself, my biggest gripe with it, aside from the fact that it only plays the same handful of classic tunes over and over again(missing the chance to remind listeners of brilliant Sixties and Seventies tunes that don't get heard anymore)is that the songs are played in a completely random fashion, with no attempt to link them by mood or style. You'll hear a series of songs that have nothing tying them together besides the fact that they were more or less released at the same point in time(and sometimes, not even that). If they are going to keep playing "classic rock", why can't they at least do it in a way that shows the music some genuine respect? Why do they insist on seeing the songs as nothing but filler between advertising and dj banter?

[ 26 February 2006: Message edited by: Ken Burch ]

[ 26 February 2006: Message edited by: Ken Burch ]


From: A seedy truckstop on the Information Superhighway | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7791

posted 26 February 2006 06:27 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, I remember reading in Rolling Stone long, long ago about a royalties dispute with CCR and their label. Didn't know Tom died. I've got a John Fogarty LP someplace.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 26 February 2006 07:12 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think that royalty dispute hit it's zenith when Fogarty was sued for plagerizing himself. It was Fantasy's position that Fogarty's "Old Man Down the Road" was a rip off of "Run Through the Jungle." I think the judge agreed that it was a fantasy position, and ruled in Fogarty's favour.

quote:
1. Many people in radio KNOW that repeating the music over and over again is annoying to some, but, there are more listeners that want to hear Kansas everytime they tune in. So, they play to the majority. emember, they're in it for the money.

I should be wise enough to deffer to your expertise, but I do have to wonder about market research saying the majority WANTS to listen to this music when they tune in.

I think what the market research more likely indicates that these tunes are found largely inoffensive by the majority. So we get music that the majority will put up with, but not necessarily enjoy.

McMusic.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1275

posted 26 February 2006 08:11 AM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
On Styx: I can't stand Mr Roboto, but I love Suite Madame Blue. It seems to me that there are much, much bigger things in the world of music to be upset about than Styx. Specifically, Aerosmith. God, they suck. And also the fact that the Rotting Stones just won't retire. The Superbowl halftime show was the saddest, most pathetic display I've ever seen. It made Janet Jackson's boob look like high-brow entertainment by comparison. My god that was shitty.
I'll take the worst tunes by Aerosmith, the Stones, and Janet Jackson any day, for weeks on end, in "classic rock format" rotation over anything ever done by Styx, thanks anyway.

Styx repulsed me thoroughly - far more than any of the other feeble 'prog rock' ensembles - and there were dozens and dozens of painfully bad examples on the airwaves.

So thoroughly disgusted was I that I was driven to punk back in the day - so I guess I have something to thank them for, after all.


From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 26 February 2006 12:36 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't know, I can see kimmy's point. I think bands like Styx did far less damage -- because they were far more obvious, cartoonish, indeed buffoonish -- than bands like Yes, who admittedly were at least proper musicians. In fact I'd not even bracketed Styx with the "prog-rock" sloths before, though I guess if you had to slot them in somewhere that's as good a pigeonhole as any.

But I'll not go further with that line of argument, lest I get into a comparison between, say, Led Zeppelin and Foreigner, and that way Madness Lies.

And I agree that both the Stones and Aerosmith should have hung it up decades ago. As so often, they ended up believing their own hype.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 26 February 2006 01:37 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The lines of demarcation in music genre's are painted with big broad grey stripes, to be sure.

But if you go back to the 50's "Rock and Roll" was about feeling good. If I wax Townsendian for a moment, it's about putting your troubles on the floor and dancing on them for two minutes and fifty seconds at a time.

Prog rock, or pop rock was a deviation from that. I went along with it though. I bought a Styx album. Heck, I bought an Elton John album.

But what did it for me was Supertramp. In the middle of my teenage angst, I was going to parties and listening to music that made me feel bad.

And that ain't what I call rock and roll.

As a teen, you got a whole world working on making you feel bad. You don't need Supertamp telling you your on a train to nowhere, or whining about logic, or Kansas telling you you're just dust in the wind. You need Little Richard telling his girlfriend that she can keep a knockin' but she can't come in, Chuck Berry insisting it wasn't me, and Pete Townsend windmilling you full of power, and Joey Ramone telling you it's time to ay, oh, let's go.

That's classic Rock and Roll.

I dunno what they play on Classic Rock stations. But why are they trying to make me feel bad in the middle of my middle age angst? I got a whole world working on making me feel bad......


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1275

posted 26 February 2006 03:18 PM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
But I'll not go further with that line of argument, lest I get into a comparison between, say, Led Zeppelin and Foreigner, and that way Madness Lies.
Between Zeppelin and Foreigner? Madness is 'One Step Beyond' either one.

From: ... | Registered: Aug 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 26 February 2006 03:25 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
As a teen, you got a whole world working on making you feel bad. You don't need Supertamp telling you your on a train to nowhere, or whining about logic, or Kansas telling you you're just dust in the wind. You need Little Richard telling his girlfriend that she can keep a knockin' but she can't come in, Chuck Berry insisting it wasn't me, and Pete Townsend windmilling you full of power, and Joey Ramone telling you it's time to ay, oh, let's go.

That's classic Rock and Roll.

I dunno what they play on Classic Rock stations. But why are they trying to make me feel bad in the middle of my middle age angst? I got a whole world working on making me feel bad......



I suggest Tommy Paine be allowed to change his babble handle to something more descriptive, like "The King."

You rule, man.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 1064

posted 26 February 2006 03:46 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Tommy_Paine:
As a teen, you got a whole world working on making you feel bad. You don't need Supertamp telling you your on a train to nowhere, or whining about logic, or Kansas telling you you're just dust in the wind.

Well, at least not if you can't dance to it. Or slam, or mosh, or whatever it happens to be when you're a teenager.

The Sex Pistols, the Clash, the Dead Kennedies, Nirvana et al had their share of pretty despairing lyrics. But they had some ferocious sonic propulsion happening as well, instead of accoustic-guitar arpeggios and lousy Yamaha electric pianos cluttering up the place.

quote:
Originally posted by Lard Tunderin' Jeezus:
Between Zeppelin and Foreigner? Madness is 'One Step Beyond' either one.

Hey, you! Don't watch that! Watch this!

[ 26 February 2006: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 214

posted 09 March 2006 08:51 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Last Se'erday night, I was driving around and got a chance to listen to CBC radio's "Vinyl Tap", hosted by Randy Bachman.

This show was great. He was featuring a box set called "The Secret History of Rock and Roll.", and what he did was play music from the 1920's and 30's that inspired artists like Jimmy Page, Willie Nelson, B.B. King and a whole lot of others.

The best was listening to the covers after the originals, like I used to do in the early days of Napster-- only Bachman is much more musically informed than I am, and has more interesting annecdotes.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3807

posted 13 March 2006 01:26 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Years ago I once did a radio show like that; playing stuff such as Josh White's "In My time of Dying" and Sonny Boy Williamson's "Bring it on Home."

But back to the thread title, I've always hated classic/commercial rock stations, but am now starting to hate my beloved CBC.

The host of "Canada at Five," Marcia Williams, has been doing unnatural, perverted things to the English language while presenting the news. She appears to be unable to use any verb tense other than the Simple Present, as in "The Pope speaks to a gathering in Rome this morning," or "A listener dies after his head explodes yesterday while listening to the 5:00 News."


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca