babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » right brain babble   » culture   » End Of Year Reflection: Does This Decade Have A Name Yet?

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: End Of Year Reflection: Does This Decade Have A Name Yet?
drgoodword
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3214

posted 13 December 2005 08:17 AM      Profile for drgoodword   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We've cleared the midpoint of the decade (or about to clear it, if your count starts from 2001), and yet there doesn't seem to be an agreed upon name for it.

The UK looks to have settled upon "The Noughties," although, as Douglas Coupland points out, that will never fly on this side of the Atlantic.

Back in the 1980's, the New York Times, looking ahead, suggested that the decade be called "The Ohs," which has a certain logic to it, since we tend to call this decade's individual years "oh-two, oh-three, oh-four," etc. I suspect this will eventually be adopted in North America as the default name for our current decade.

However, I'm still rooting for "The Ohties."


From: Toronto | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 13 December 2005 08:30 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's a funny question, isn't it. I used to edit a lot of Canadian history books, and styling figures or spelled-out versions of figures was of course something I was always watching for, but I'm not sure I ever saw anyone refer directly to the first decade of the C20 with a handy short form like "the sixties." Usually people will avoid the problem as I did above, by writing something like "the first decade." "The nineteen hundreds" won't work since that could refer to the whole century.

I have a feeling that we are just going to go on ducking the issue. Individuals will use terms like "the noughties" or "the oughties" as novelty terms, maybe, but I don't see any becoming standard.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Yst
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9749

posted 13 December 2005 08:41 AM      Profile for Yst     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You know, the biggest problem I found with the turn of the 21st century didn't have to do with the turn of the 21st century at all. It had to do with the fact that "turn of the century" was no longer as useful a description for the period around 1900. I have sinced move to "turn of the 20th century" and "turn of 21st century" when circumstances make meaning ambiguous (which is fairly rarely, actually), while retaining "turn of the century" where it is patently obvious I am making reference to the period around 1900.
From: State of Genderfuck | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca