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Author Topic: how important to you is your lawn?
otter
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posted 22 May 2006 05:33 PM      Profile for otter        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
sun article

Once again, property is deemed to be more valuable than human life.


From: agent provocateur inc. | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
skeptikool
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posted 22 May 2006 07:48 PM      Profile for skeptikool        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
otter,

Please don't link me to a story that I have to buy in order to read in its entirety.

In this case, however, there was enough information to tell that to some sick, sick individual, a lawn was more important than a young man's life.

The crappy waste of skin responsible for this death, should be put away for a long time of hard labor. To defray costs to the public, I would like to see him tending the prisons vegetable gardens and lawns using non-chemical/organic methods - 12 hours per day minimum.


From: Delta BC | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
otter
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posted 22 May 2006 09:26 PM      Profile for otter        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Sun link was only for Canadian content. A google will give you lots more info.
From: agent provocateur inc. | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
thorin_bane
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posted 24 May 2006 08:43 PM      Profile for thorin_bane     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Given my neighbours lust for lush green lawn, I am not surprised. We have water bands and my a hole neighbour is our watering his lawn from 8 at night till 7 in the morning. IT ISN'T GOING TO GET GREENER! Course if we actually used the natural species they would grow without watering as they are adapted to the enviroment. But anything that crows well is considered a weed anyway.
From: Looking at the despair of Detroit from across the river! | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
Slumberjack
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posted 24 May 2006 11:48 PM      Profile for Slumberjack     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
All my neighbors lawns, with the exception of just one, have perfect green grass lawns. Mine is an assortment of broadleaf weeds with very little actual grass. I'm feeling a little self conscious about it, to the point where I went out the other day and purchased a jug of weed n' feed lawn spray. It's the the kind you hook up to a hose and water the lawn with. It is still sitting in my shed because I can't bring myself to use it. Truth is, I like my "organic" lawn, but the grass definitely is greener on everybody else's property. I'm more worried about my 3 year old who likes to play outside than I am about green lawns. After re-reading the warning labels on the anti-weed product that I purchased, I have to say there is no contest in my mind. I will not be applying it to my lawn, neighbors be damned.
From: An Intensive De-Indoctrination, But I'm Fine Now | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
otter
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posted 25 May 2006 12:56 PM      Profile for otter        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There is a primary techer here whose lawn is a jungle of native and wild grasses amidst a landscape of manicured lawns on a popular suburban street. He and his family have been chastized, insulted and even threatened by some of the more arrogant neighbours but he has faced each and every one of them down.

And, since most of it is native grasses, albeit un-mowed, he asserts it is also an ongoing science project for the kids.

In fact, to many of the students at his school he exemplifies the virtues of taking a stand against the mindless hoards [my words].


From: agent provocateur inc. | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 25 May 2006 01:58 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Slumberjack:
All my neighbors lawns, with the exception of just one, have perfect green grass lawns. Mine is an assortment of broadleaf weeds with very little actual grass. I'm feeling a little self conscious about it, to the point where I went out the other day and purchased a jug of weed n' feed lawn spray. It's the the kind you hook up to a hose and water the lawn with. It is still sitting in my shed because I can't bring myself to use it. Truth is, I like my "organic" lawn, but the grass definitely is greener on everybody else's property. I'm more worried about my 3 year old who likes to play outside than I am about green lawns. After re-reading the warning labels on the anti-weed product that I purchased, I have to say there is no contest in my mind. I will not be applying it to my lawn, neighbors be damned.

We turned our scrappy lawn over and planted clover instead of grass 2 years ago. Low maintenance, low water use, greener than everybody else's. We mow maybe twice a year, pull the odd dandelion. No chemicals, either.

Our new neighbors put weed 'n feed on their lawn last week. It had been so long since I smelled the stuff it just about knocked me over when I went outside. I hate people who use lawn chemicals. It's so unnecessary, and so dangerous.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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posted 25 May 2006 02:02 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mine is green. Most of it not grass and I have lots of Dandelions. They make great salads.
From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
jester
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posted 25 May 2006 05:30 PM      Profile for jester        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Its only important to be above the grass,not below it
From: Against stupidity, the Gods themselves contend in vain | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
skeptikool
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posted 25 May 2006 05:52 PM      Profile for skeptikool        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yesterday, caught a bluish bird with some sort of spikey hair-do. It was digging holes in the lawn. Then, this morning, fattest robin I've ever seen doing the same thing. Got 'em both - right in the chest. Darned critters!

They're my damn worms! They should leave 'em alone!


From: Delta BC | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Américain Égalitaire
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posted 25 May 2006 07:39 PM      Profile for Américain Égalitaire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
About a decade ago when I lived in Ohio, a senior shot a father in the neck with a .22 when his kids strayed into his yard and inadvertantly picked his flowers.

The shooter, who was about 67 and showed up to court in a wheelchair, got all of the sympathy. People wrote letters to the editor of the local paper saying how hard they kept their flower gardens tended and they could understand why this guy would get so angry.

I used to think only in America could someone get shot for this.

The guy got a slap on the wrist sentence because the father didn't die. The whole episode sickened me.

My grass dies every July. I cut it, but do not pamper it. I could care less what the neighbors think.


From: Chardon, Ohio USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
clersal
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posted 25 May 2006 08:21 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In the early spring there was part of my grass filled with holes. I'm wondering now if it wasn't the bluish bird with the spikey hair-do. I thought maybe it was moles but spikey hair sounds very delinquent.

That was probably what the cat threw up one morning. The spikes gave her indigestion. No more holes.


From: Canton Marchand, Québec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
siren
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posted 25 May 2006 08:55 PM      Profile for siren     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Pretty tough round these parts on blue birds with spikey hair. (Sometimes known as bluejays.) But if you need the worms for fishing and stuff, stands to reason I guess.

We're supposed to feel a tad guilty when our lawns aren't perfect; it helps the 35 billion a year (US) "gardening" industry.

There's an interesting article over at Counterpunch:

quote:

Eat Your Lawn
The Lawn Racket
By STAN COX


In a 2003 look at the lawn industry, Paul Robbins and Julie Sharp of Ohio State University cited studies showing that to homeowners, "property values are clearly associated with high-input green-lawn maintenance and use," so many Americans have "associated moral character and social responsibility with the condition of the lawn."

How can a patch of ground that delivers fertilizer-laden pollution into streams, greenhouse gases and a terrible racket into the atmosphere, and pesticide residues into the neighbor's dog -- and probably the neighbor -- come to embody "moral character and social responsibility"?


I just bought one of the "old is new again" all manual push mowers. Little noise, no fumes, it doesn't spew grass violently backwards so I can cut the lawn barefoot in sandals. Doesn't do a perfect job but lots of people use them on this street and getting used to it.

Frankly my snobbery is reverse; I look at a perfectly manicured monoculture crop lawn and think; "Well, I guess they know nothing of the manner in which chemicals developed for trench warfare in WWI became a multibillion dollar agricultural industry. Idiots."


From: Of course we could have world peace! But where would be the profit in that? | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Bubbles
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posted 25 May 2006 09:04 PM      Profile for Bubbles        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We have a fair amount of lawn around the house here that I like to keep fairly short. By mowing it once in awhile you prevent a lot of the grass from going into seed and subsequently from dying down. Since I live on a farm it is also necesary to keep it trimmed to prevent a grass fire from getting to the house and out-buildings. I never spray or fertilize.

In spring, when the ground is heavy with moisture there tend to be a lot of worms that attrackt the birds. But here it tend to be the skunks that dig the holes. I planted a bunch of white pines this spring, had to replant most of them a few times because some skunk kept pulling them out, looking for worms and grubs in the soil.


From: somewhere | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
skeptikool
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posted 26 May 2006 08:29 AM      Profile for skeptikool        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
siren,

Thanks muchly for the link, Eat Your Lawn
Not only an excellent article, but much other good stuff. Have forwarded to others and added to "favorites".


From: Delta BC | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Polly Brandybuck
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posted 26 May 2006 08:51 AM      Profile for Polly Brandybuck     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have about an acre and a half of lawn...well what used to be lawn but now is less grass and more weeds than the original owner would have let happen. I keep it mowed by a combination of giving free rein to an ancient miniature pony with bad teeth...(it takes her forever and she fertilizes all in one go) - and moving the guinea pig cage whenever she runs out of clover.

It's not a lush green lawn, but it works for us and I like my little guys bringing me in the beautiful dandelions for my table.


From: To Infinity...and beyond! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 26 May 2006 09:31 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The place I'm moving to has nice grass, but no trees, so I'm going to get help from the local contractor and see if we can get trees transplanted from the road construction. He's been digging up trees to make room for widening of the road that was built last year, maybe these can be transplanted into my new yard. Also hope to transplant some wildflowers. The new property has interesting potential - it's not a large property, but still nice, with an excellent view of the Gulf. I'll probably build a driftwood fence around it.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
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posted 26 May 2006 09:45 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There's lots of attractive alternatives to your traditional lawn if you want. It's also possible to have a nice lawn without chemicals. I noticed last summer my front lawn was far from the greenest patch on the block. Nutrients get leached by surrounding large trees and shrubs. This spring I reseeded and topped it off with triple mix. In the late fall I'll give it another light seeding and spread some composted cattle or sheep manure. In the spring I'll airate. Should be all it needs. Lawn grass, when you give it a good natural environment is actually very aggressive. A naturally healthy lawn will force out most weeds, leaving only an amount that can be picked out by hand if they bother you.

I should say a kind word though for dandilions. They are a really useful and healthy plant. You can use every part and they are attractive. I've always thought that if they weren,t so prolific on their own, nurseries would charge $14.99 a pot for them. Certain other broad leaf weeds can be used in salads too.

quote:
I just bought one of the "old is new again" all manual push mowers. Little noise, no fumes, it doesn't spew grass violently backwards so I can cut the lawn barefoot in sandals. Doesn't do a perfect job but lots of people use them on this street and getting used to it.


I too am enjoying the moral superiority of a push mower. Actually, I think they do a better job because they cut with a scissor action rather than a chopping blade. Main trouble is that you can't let your lawn get too far ahead of you, especially in the spring. Also, it's a bugger to cut the grass when it's wet. Good workout though.

[ 26 May 2006: Message edited by: oldgoat ]


From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skeptikool
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posted 26 May 2006 09:53 AM      Profile for skeptikool        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm reposting this from Pesticide debate in the House (Environmental Justice) because of lack of response and because it fits better here:

Weed 'n Feed. How innocuous. Should be: Kill 'n Feed.

I'm really stupid to do it and probably play Russian roulette every time I do, but I constantly pick up neighborhood grass clippings to add to my compost heap. I don't know what crap, if any, might have been applied to the lawns that yielded these cuttings.

I'm starting to have serious doubts since, after having dug in much of that composted material, many of my vegetable seeds seem to be going nowhere. It's noted, however, that when the city picks up yard waste it composts it and makes it available to residents. I recall no warnings regarding its uses.


From: Delta BC | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
arborman
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posted 26 May 2006 10:13 AM      Profile for arborman     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's usually possible to walk through a neighbourhood and pick out the rental households by the dandelion ratio.

When we were renting, our lawn was about 80% dandelion, to the chagrin of the retired old drunk next door with his absolutely immaculate lawn.

Now we live in an apartment, so it's all moot. We indulge our outdoor slob by leaving half dead plants on the balcony instead.


From: I'm a solipsist - isn't everyone? | Registered: Aug 2003  |  IP: Logged
Bubbles
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posted 26 May 2006 10:20 AM      Profile for Bubbles        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is difficult to know why your plants are doing so poorly. Compost is a bit tricky anyway, since it tends to be so variable in its nutrient content. It is a good help to retain water. Also make sure it is well composted, otherwise it will compost on in your garden and rob your plants of available nitrogen now. Mind you later on when the composting organisms die it will become available again.
From: somewhere | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
BleedingHeart
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posted 26 May 2006 12:14 PM      Profile for BleedingHeart   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Timebandit:

We turned our scrappy lawn over and planted clover instead of grass 2 years ago.


I did that too once after noticing that clover thrived while grass was usually brown where I lived.

The city of St. Albert has banned clover on your lawn.

We have only the small grass boulevard the city insists we have (perenial garden in front, patio in back).

The main benefit, no mosquitos in our yard.


From: Kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
skeptikool
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posted 26 May 2006 05:10 PM      Profile for skeptikool        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
BleedingHeart:

quote:
The city of St. Albert has banned clover on your lawn.

Are you having us on? What possible reason could there be for such a bylaw?

I almost wish I lived there so that I could defy it and challenge it.


From: Delta BC | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged

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