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Author Topic: Bob Dylan discussion
meades
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 625

posted 06 September 2001 07:16 PM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Okay, the title says it all.

Right now I'm listening to Bob Dylan. I have a question, though. When did he write "I shall be released"?

I don't really understand the lyrics, either. Could someone tell me? here they are:

They say every man must need protection,
They say every man must fall.
Yet I swear I see my reflection,
Some place, so high above the wall.

I see my light come shinein' in,
From the west down to the east.
Any day now, Any day now, I shall be released.

Down here next to me, in this lonely crowd,
Is a man who swears he's not to blame.
All day long I hear him cry so lound,
Callin out that he's been framed.

I see my light come shinein' in,
From the west down to the east.
Any day now, Any day now, I shall be released.

----------------------------------

I really like the tune, and the guitar work in that one.

For a while now I've thought that "Shelter from the storm" would be a good campaign song for the NDP, or whoever, or whatever comes out of the convention next november. Though they should cut the music before it comes to the line "...back to when god and her were born..." just to avoid any comparison between a political party and g-d that some people might be offended by.

[ September 07, 2001: Message edited by: meades ]


From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 06 September 2001 07:39 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Love this thread already. Hate to be pedantic, though, but it's "I see my light come shinin'..."

This song is from the "Basement Tapes" I believe. First recorded 1967 (in Woodstock NY with The Band), circulated as bootlegs, then released officially 1975.

As for what he meant... My friend Maggie Helwig, a writer in Toronto, has a great essay on Dylan in her book "Apocalypse Jazz." It's not available on-line, but if you're interested, I'll get it to you somehow.

Anyway the word "light" is important, according to Maggie, which is the only reason I added the correction.

If you want to see a good performance of this song (and many others), rent "The Last Waltz," a documentary about The Band's last live appearance, in 1976.

Oh yeah, I was meant to be working. Well, I did some work this afternoon.

[ September 06, 2001: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
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posted 07 September 2001 12:07 AM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
thanks 'lance! I'm not always good at decyphering lyrics. Damn the English and all its similar sounding words!
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'lance
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posted 07 September 2001 11:28 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hell, as misheard lyrics go, this is nothing compared to the Radiohead pratfall of, ah, a certain babbler. See the "misheard lyrics" thread... This one would at least make a kind of sense, by Dylan's lights anyway.
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 07 September 2001 11:39 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I hate to be the party-pooper, and I'm not sure where I quite stand on all he raises, but the sharp-tongued critic John Leonard wrote a scathing article about Dylan several months back here, in the New York Review of Books.

(What a coincidence, meades -- I'm so far behind in my reading, and was just admiring Leonard's talent for invective in this piece last night. Have you ever seen anyone figure out so many fresh ways to say he thought a guy was a total jerk?)


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 07 September 2001 11:50 AM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've only just had time to skim Leonard's piece, but it does look like quite a good broadside, as these things go. And he's right, post-docs in Dylanology are ridiculous. More thoughts later.

For now, I can only say what I usually say: a person can be a total jerk and still produce great music, or painting, or whatever. The news that Dylan can be, and frequently has been, a total jerk is not exactly a fast-breaking story.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 07 September 2001 12:12 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Indubitably. Couldn't agree more, on all points. And Leonard is known for this sort of thing. Wish I could do it, sometimes ...
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rasmus
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posted 07 September 2001 01:17 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Skdadl, as a poeticist, I'd like to hear your thoughts on Dylan's poetic talents. People wax effusive about them, but frankly, if you just recite his songs as poems or read them on the page, they tend to be disjointed, random, lacking structure, like a parody of "Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot".


Some lines are memorable though. You know, "my love, she's like some raven, at my window, with a broken wing" sticks in my mind for various reasons, its patronizing, almost frightening subtext of misogyny perhaps being one of them. I'm not sure it really works as a poetic figure, but I'll give it a shot -- it suggests her danger, her obscurity, yet that she still inspires love and care in him. But look at almos the whole of "Desolation Row" and sorry it does not hang together as a poem. It works as a song, which is what it is.

More comments later.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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posted 07 September 2001 01:50 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I read John Leonard a while ago and agree it may presage a reconsideration of Dylan's reputation among the avant garde. I do think he has written some pretty fair poetic images, though. FOr example, I always liked:

"The motorcycle black madonna two-wheel gypsie queen,

And her silver-studded phantom make the grey-flannel dwarf to scream."


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 07 September 2001 02:28 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
But look at almos the whole of "Desolation Row" and sorry it does not hang together as a poem. It works as a song, which is what it is.

Agreed, I haven't patience for those who describe Dylan as a great poet, or abstract the words from the music.

Greil Marcus says somewhere that 1960s audiences found songs like "Desolation Row" funny. I'd like to hear more about that.

Favourite line at the moment: "the beauty parlour is full of sailors," which I which I'd remembered yesterday, over on another thread.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
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posted 07 September 2001 09:49 PM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
While I was reading "Imagine Democracy", one subject Judy Rebick touched on was the pure saddness of IBM (or was it Microsoft?) using Dylan's song "the times they are a changin'" to sell computers (or was it software?)

I couldn't help but laugh out lound. Of course, a lot of people thought I was crazy for it (what would you think if you saw someone quietly read and suddenly burst out laughing? Crazy, right?).

I think it's sick that these corporations are using protest songs to make it seem as though their products are "revolutionary", or to try and appeal to people from that generation. It's only a matter of time before "state farm" starts using "all along the Watchtower" I guess. To me, this kind of marketing is just a pure spit in the face of the meaning of the music, and its meaning to the people who listen to it.

Sad, sad world we live in.

Okay, here's an opinion question-

"Lay, Lady, Lay" - musical backstabbing, or an interesting slow song, with a genuinely nice tune? Of course their are plenty of in-betweens, but anyway, I'm interested in babbler's take on this.


From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 07 September 2001 10:21 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
meadus, you should check out Thomas Frank's latest book, One Market Under God. It is basically one long rant against that sort of appropriation of revolution by big capital to serve as an advertising topos.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 07 September 2001 10:30 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, I can recall "The Times They Are A'Changing" being used on a Bank of Montreal commercial a few years ago.

Then again, I do believe Dylan owns the rights to that song. So the one who sold him out was... him.

From fairly early days he was a canny businessman, with an eye to the main chance, and like everyone else who wanted to be a star, regarded music as a commodity. (Not only a commodity, of course). Remember, when he started producing records it was on Columbia Records, which was the big time, rather than on, say, Folkways.

And I think much of the "sadness" is a generational thing. Many younger people don't take the same attitude either to Dylan, or to music in general. Moby, for example, had leased the rights to everything on Play even before it was released, and still has legions of fans.

Rasmus posted while I was composing this -- I'd also recommend Frank's book, The Conquest of Cool. To oversimplify a bit, he'd say that the familiar "appropriation" thesis is, well, a bit oversimplified.

But certainly the use of such music is a calculated, rather cynical decision on the part of marketers.

quote:
"Lay, Lady, Lay" - musical backstabbing, or an interesting slow song, with a genuinely nice tune?

Can't it be both at once?


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 07 September 2001 10:57 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You and skdadl keep correcting me on that appropriation thing. I'll get it right one day....
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
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Babbler # 625

posted 07 September 2001 10:58 PM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Can't it be both at once?

Sure!


From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 08 September 2001 01:05 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Y'know, the thing about Bob Dylan being full of himself -- have you listened to "Don't think twice"? Like, who needed to do research? What a petulant twit. Still, good song, again.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 08 September 2001 07:23 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One metaphor I've always thought was brilliant was (I hope I heard it right)

Yonder stands your orphan with his gun
Crying like a fire in the sun

That "crying like a fire in the sun" is poetry.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
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posted 09 September 2001 02:03 AM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Bob Dylan's biography was on the Biography Channel today.

I kind of got the understand from that, that he was writing his music along with the times (actually, he was always a little bit ahead of everyone else), and that he was more loyal to music than he was to a perticular style of music, so I think that is something that makes him such a...well...I guess legend...or something.

Well anyway, they acknoledged that he was a jack ass, but after his motorcycle accident, he changed a lot, and wasn't a jack ass anymore, or something to that degree.


From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 09 September 2001 02:44 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Was that when he'd "been saved"? "I been saved" or whatever must rank as one of the worst Dylan songs of all times. But his Christian period DOES have some good stuff... gee it's been so long I forget the names now.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trisha
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posted 09 September 2001 02:58 AM      Profile for Trisha     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I remember reading somewhere that "Lay, Lady, Lay" was about his dog. Anyone else heard this?
From: Thunder Bay, Ontario | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 09 September 2001 10:42 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Y'know, the thing about Bob Dylan being full of himself -- have you listened to "Don't think twice"? Like, who needed to do research? What a petulant twit. Still, good song, again.

Wow, the only one I ever heard sing that song is Gord Lightfoot! I didn't know Bob Dylan wrote that song.

Do you really think that song is petulant? I just looked up the words here, and I didn't think it was petulant at all. Haven't you ever had a relationship that went lukewarm after a while? One that had just become a habit and you just wanted out of it even though you knew it might hurt the other person? Or been with someone in a complete rut and wanted to leave because the other person was satisfied with that rut and you weren't? I've been in that situation, and I always think about that when I hear this song.

Sure the "You could have done better, but I don't mind...you just sort of wasted my precious time...but don't think twice, it's all right" sounds a bit egotistical, but perhaps he was describing a dead-end relationship. When he says "You could have done better, but I don't mind," I think he's trying to say that, sure, it could have been better, but that he doesn't really blame her for how it was.

Saying she wasted his precious time - well, again, it sounds bad, but hasn't anyone ever felt like that? Time IS precious. I felt like that after a relationship I was in from age 17-23. It was pretty dead end, and he could have been more interesting, but I don't resent him for that ("you could have done better, but I don't mind). But gee, that time WAS precious, and it was kind of wasted. I could have had a pretty exciting time in my late teens and early twenties. That's the thing I really regret about it - he just sort of wasted my precious time. Except, I would change that to say that *I* wasted my precious time. That's the only thing I would change about those lyrics. You can't blame someone for wasting your time if you stick around and allow it to be wasted.

Wow. I know. It's just a song. But I really like this one and can relate to it, so it has some special meaning for me.

Before that relationship, though, I thought those lyrics were pretty bitter too.

And from the first post in this thread:

quote:
Right now I'm listening to Bob Dylan. I have a question, though. When did he write "I shall be released"?

I don't really understand the lyrics, either. Could someone tell me? here they are:


This is just a guess. I don't know when he wrote it, but just from reading the words, I wonder if it's about someone in jail, or even on death row? After all, Dylan was a peacenik/activist, perhaps it was a protest song against the death penalty? Particularly these lyrics: "All day long I hear him cry so loud, Callin out that he's been framed" - someone on death row who doesn't want to die? And his reiteration of "I will be released" - you could take that to either mean that he is hoping to be let out of jail eventually, or that he will be finally released by death if he is on death row.

But like I said, that's just a guess.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 06 July 2007 08:12 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Great Dylan show in Ottawa last night. I must admit, I was pleasantly surprised. I've been a Dylan listener, well, since the womb, and for all the talk I've heard lately that his live shows are just a parody of what he once was, I'd have to argue that he was quite on the ball last night.
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Banjo
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posted 06 July 2007 11:20 AM      Profile for Banjo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For people I know who lived through the sixties, to hear that Dylan is about to appear in Casino Rama, we think, 'God, that's about like using Phil Ochs in a car commercial."

I looked up his tour at see that at the age of about 65 he's still touring this hectic schedule. Does a person's quest for millions of dollars never cease, or is he trying to have more impact with his cryptic lyrics?


From: progress not perfection in Toronto | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
unionist
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posted 06 July 2007 11:37 AM      Profile for unionist     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Banjo:
Does a person's quest for millions of dollars never cease, or is he trying to have more impact with his cryptic lyrics?

The former.

[ 06 July 2007: Message edited by: unionist ]


From: Vote QS! | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Paul Gross
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posted 06 July 2007 12:19 PM      Profile for Paul Gross   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was there also, jrose. I splurged on the "gold circle" and had an up close spot. I managed to capture some decent (considering the poor lighting, too loud sound and that i had to avoid security) video with my little pocket camera.

Here are some snippets:

[ 06 July 2007: Message edited by: Paul Gross ]


From: central Centretown in central Canada | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 11 July 2007 10:13 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Oh, you're videos are better than mine! I should post some of mine too. I definitely didn't splurge on the Gold tickets, but I still managed my way up fairly close. Have you seen any other Bluesfest shows this week?

Thanks for the videos!


From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 11 July 2007 10:17 AM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
For people I know who lived through the sixties, to hear that Dylan is about to appear in Casino Rama, we think, 'God, that's about like using Phil Ochs in a car commercial."
I looked up his tour at see that at the age of about 65 he's still touring this hectic schedule. Does a person's quest for millions of dollars never cease, or is he trying to have more impact with his cryptic lyrics?

Good points, for sure. But honestly, why not? Think of how many people are out there working dead-end office jobs, or an array of other things. If you were as successful as Dylan, and had the chance to spend the rest of your life, making millions of dollars, always selling out concert halls and stadiums, why wouldn't you? Sure, it's disapointing, I agree, but fans were going nuts, and I'm glad he's still doing it, just so I could finally have the chance to check him out.

We need a Phil Ochs thread on Babble!


From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Frustrated Mess
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posted 11 July 2007 11:18 AM      Profile for Frustrated Mess   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Back in my youth when I began discovering sixties protest music, I became a huge Dylan fan. And then when I discovered his links to The Band, my respect for him just grew. No more. I don't care that he continues to tour. That is his business and if he can get the crowds, good for him. But he is no longer a rebel and the fire is out, the urgency is gone. He may as well be Deep Purple.
From: doom without the gloom | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 11 July 2007 11:40 AM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have almost every Dylan album to Infidels (which I don't like much). Has he recorded anything wortwhile, since?
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Frustrated Mess
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posted 11 July 2007 11:47 AM      Profile for Frustrated Mess   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Worthwhile? No.

I really don't begrudge the guy. He is just no longer the Bob Dylan who inspired so many when he first began recording. He is now the hospital food version. Bland and uninspiring.


From: doom without the gloom | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
jrose
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posted 11 July 2007 12:53 PM      Profile for jrose     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
True enough, well said.

I was similar in my discovery I guess. Came across many of my dad's old albums from the sixties. And while there were many that I loved, I really took to older Dylan and very much to Phil Ochs. I was lucky in later years to get to know Phil Ochs' sister a little bit, through emails, and a lengthy telephone interview for an article I wrote, which was a lovely experience.


From: Ottawa | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged
Boom Boom
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posted 11 July 2007 03:15 PM      Profile for Boom Boom     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I first heard a Dylan album in 1964 - I had just turned 15; my older brother had been buying his albums since 1962, and I sat down and listened to Dylan's first LP. Not long after, I started to buy Dylan LPs myself, and I still have the orignal albums from back then. The only Dylan I really enjoy listening to nowadays are Blonde on Blonde, Nashville Skyline, John Wesley Harding, and Live at Bukodan. May have been a reflection of how young I was at the time, but I discovered the Beatles and the Beach Boys before I listened to Dylan.
From: Make the rich pay! | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Sal Paradise
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posted 16 July 2007 10:18 AM      Profile for Sal Paradise        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Banjo:
Does a person's quest for millions of dollars never cease, or is he trying to have more impact with his cryptic lyrics?

At the risk of sounding naive...or...without resorting to knee-jerk cynicism (take your pick)...

Why assume Dylan's in it, at this point in his life/career, for the money?

Considering some of the backwater venues he's willing to venture to...I think Dylan continues to tour and make music because he still has a love for making music, and for performing it in front of an audience.

Considering it's what he has done for most of his life is it really a stretch to think that giving up that life would be hard to do? Particularly if the demand and appreciation for his music still exists?


quote:
Originally posted by Boom Boom:
I have almost every Dylan album to Infidels (which I don't like much). Has he recorded anything wortwhile, since?

I couldn't disagree with Frustrated Mess more. Dylan went through an artistic drought through the 80's and early 90's. And actually Infidels (1983) isn't as good as it should have been...when, for unknown reasons, Dylan chose to remove some of that album's strongest track ("Blind Willie McTell", "Foot of Pride") in favour of weaker material.

Since the late 90's Dylan has been in something of a late-career artistic renaissance. Sure he's not the same Dylan he was in '64...but neither was Dylan in 74/75 when he made 'Blood on the Tracks' and 'Desire'...and artist evolves, grows, and matures and if someone wants to get hung up on one particular period of a performer's artistic growth, then I guess that's where their train goes off the track...for anyone else who can continue to appreciate change and growth...look into "Time Out of Mind", "Love and Theft"...and last year's "Modern Times"....it is in these albums that Dylan has found comfort later in life and has produced music befitting an old bluesman sage.

But....these are just my humble thoughts....


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Banjo
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posted 16 July 2007 10:41 AM      Profile for Banjo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sal Paradise:
[QB]quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Banjo:
Does a person's quest for millions of dollars never cease, or is he trying to have more impact with his cryptic lyrics?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

At the risk of sounding naive...or...without resorting to knee-jerk cynicism (take your pick)...

Why assume Dylan's in it, at this point in his life/career, for the money?

Considering some of the backwater venues he's willing to venture to...I think Dylan continues to tour and make music because he still has a love for making music, and for performing it in front of an audience.

Considering it's what he has done for most of his life is it really a stretch to think that giving up that life would be hard to do? Particularly if the demand and appreciation for his music still exists?
QB]


Sure you could be right, Sal. No one can look into anyone's mind, and judge what they're up to. I'm about the same age as Dylan, I can't imagine going on frantic world tours. I also couldn't imagine appearing at such places as Casino Rama, which here in Toronto doesn't have a great reputation. It seems like the Canadian equivalent of Branson, Missouri.

There could be all kinds of reasons, eg: a favour to his agent, an ego trip to surround yourself with as many adoring fans as you are still able to draw, the creative urge.

Casino Rama just seems a bit desperate.


From: progress not perfection in Toronto | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Steppenwolf Allende
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posted 16 July 2007 01:56 PM      Profile for Steppenwolf Allende     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As someone who grew up in part listening to, and later playing, Dylan music, I think both Banjo and Sal Paradise make valid points about the neo-Dylan era.

I set up his concert here in Vancouver last year, and the question arose there as well as to why Dylan, now 64, would still be doing the live tour circuit.

The various tour reps I talked to said it isn't about the money, as he could easily retire in comfort. Rather, it's the fact that live performances have always been a very important part of Dylan's folk rock legacy, and it's simply his tradition to continue doing it, as well as the fact he enjoys it.

I would guess this explanation is fairly valid, since after watching part of the show, I could tell he was very into what he was doing and fairly interactive with the audience. People generally seemed to really be having a good time--and there were clearly more younger folks there, many of whom clearly weren't even born yet when Dylan was at his peak, than old die hards (although there was no shortage of those either).

I also pretty much lost interest in Dylan's music after Slow Train Coming and his "born-again Christian" phase. But it re-emerged a bit with the arrival of the Traveling Wilburies and again later with his 1991 [Political World[/I] album, with the tune Everything is Broken that my kids caught onto and kept playing.

quote:
Casino Rama just seems a bit desperate.

He played the Coliseum here. But apparently, the dives are also appealing to him, as they are more intimate and working class-like (although the big venues are as filled with working class folks as the smaller ones).

We really will know Dylan’s done for when he appears at the River Rock Casino—a place known for reviving fossil bands and featuring them as entertainment acts (apparently to full house crowds).

Then we can really reminisce about the once great musical social change icon of the 1960s, when he kicked off his career with this anthem in 1963:

Come gather 'round people
Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters
Around you have grown
And accept it that soon
You'll be drenched to the bone.
If your time to you
Is worth savin'
Then you better start swimmin'
Or you'll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin'.

Come writers and critics
Who prophesize with your pen
And keep your eyes wide
The chance won't come again
And don't speak too soon
For the wheel's still in spin
And there's no tellin' who
That it's namin'.
For the loser now
Will be later to win
For the times they are a-changin'.

Come senators, congressmen
Please heed the call
Don't stand in the doorway
Don't block up the hall
For he that gets hurt
Will be he who has stalled
There's a battle outside
And it is ragin'.
It'll soon shake your windows
And rattle your walls
For the times they are a-changin'.

Come mothers and fathers
Throughout the land
And don't criticize
What you can't understand
Your sons and your daughters
Are beyond your command
Your old road is
Rapidly agin'.
Please get out of the new one
If you can't lend your hand
For the times they are a-changin'.

The line it is drawn
The curse it is cast
The slow one now
Will later be fast
As the present now
Will later be past
The order is
Rapidly fadin'.
And the first one now
Will later be last
For the times they are a-changin'.


From: goes far, flies near, to the stars away from here | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Banjo
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7007

posted 16 July 2007 09:41 PM      Profile for Banjo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Steppenwolf Allende:
:
We really will know Dylan’s done for when he appears at the River Rock Casino—a place known for reviving fossil bands and featuring them as entertainment acts (apparently to full house crowds)...

I don't want to belabour the point, but that sounds like Casino Rama here. This is a list of their upcoming acts. A few of them may be OK to a fossil such as myself, but I though half of these guys were already passed on.

KENNY G
KENNY G
TOTO
TOTO
HOLD 'EM POKER TOURN ENT
JOE NICHOLS
MARY J. BLIGE
BACHMAN & CUMMINGS - LIVE IN CONCERT
BACHMAN & CUMMINGS - LIVE IN CONCERT
PAT BENATAR WITH NEIL GIRALDO
THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND
THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND
WAYNE BRADY
WAYNE BRADY
TRACE ADKINS
THE GIPSY KINGS
RANDY TRAVIS
JOE WALSH
BILLY OCEAN
BILLY OCEAN
MEAT LOAF
BILL ENGVALL
KENNY ROGERS
KENNY ROGERS
KENNY ROGERS
MICKEY GILLEY
MICKEY GILLEY
SHIRLEY KWAN
THE BEACH BOYS
THE BEACH BOYS
BARENAKED LADIES
BARENAKED LADIES
TOM COCHRANE WITH RED RIDER
MACY GRAY & THE BRAND NEW HEAVIES
AL BANO
CHARLEY PRIDE
CHARLEY PRIDE
THE OAK RIDGE BOYS
THE OAK RIDGE BOYS
TWINS IN CONCERT
AIR SUPPLY
AIR SUPPLY


From: progress not perfection in Toronto | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged

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