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Author Topic: Quebec slang
libertarian
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posted 14 March 2006 06:47 PM      Profile for libertarian        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I remember fondly when I worked in Lachine at Dominion Engineering (changed to Les Ateliers d’Ingénierie Dominion in the 80's) some colourful expressions and verbal mannerisms among my colleagues. I wonder if there is a compilation for us Anglos anywhere.

Some examples: if I dropped a dish someone would say "Taberrrr" (not finish the word). Or colinnn or colissss.

Another: some colleagues would finish every sentence with the sound: "le" . This is similar to an Ontarian saying "eh"

Unless my ears decieved me I also think I heard "Bais oui" instead of "Mais oui." Am I correct?


From: Chicago | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
deBeauxOs
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Babbler # 10099

posted 14 March 2006 07:19 PM      Profile for deBeauxOs     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
posted by libertarian:Unless my ears decieved me I also think I heard "Bais oui" instead of "Mais oui." Am I correct?
Bè oui!


From: missing in action | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged
head
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Babbler # 10717

posted 16 March 2006 06:32 AM      Profile for head        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's some definitely worth remembering. Wonderfully colourful, if a little crass in the wrong company.

les doudounes
baise-toi
criss
con
ostie
plotte
ben criss
boute de queue

Can I say all this here??

Hope this brings you good memories


From: canada | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 16 March 2006 07:05 AM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Roch Carrier's novel La Guerre, Yes Sir! has some rather colourful language (I read it in English, but the profanity is left in the original French). One example is, "Vieille pipe de p'tit Jesu!" (Is it true that "pipe" means "blowjob", or is my brother pulling my leg on that one?)

And then there's the story of the Buick LaCrosse.

[ 16 March 2006: Message edited by: Agent 204 ]


From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 16 March 2006 07:43 AM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
At last I understand why lacrosse, not hockey, is Canada's national sport.

And spurt.


From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Marc
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posted 16 March 2006 07:17 PM      Profile for Marc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I lived in Quebec for a year and a bit...I am an anglo Albertan but shortly after taking some French immersion in Chicoutimi I worked in a bilingual call centre in Montreal. I quickly had to learn a lot of the slang which was a challenge because there is a lot of it. I developed a fascination with all things Quebecois and truly enjoyed my experience there. Not to say that I didn't encounter some "trucs de cul" there but I was open-minded and earnest...I think a lot of Quebecois were somewhat amused by an anglo who would moved from Alberta to butcher (although earnestly butcher) their language. .

I moved back to Calgary a couple of months ago and now drive a car with the first 3 letters being "CUL"...I don't think I could drive that car in Quebec without getting a good ribbing.

Some of my knowledge about Quebecois...

Instead of saying "mais oui"...many Quebecois say "ben ouais"...ben being a contracted version of bien. Also they end a lot of sentences with "là" or "là-là". It depends a lot on who you talk to though and what region of the province. I noticed that people in Montreal generally speak a more "neutral" French. Also, many Quebecois that I have encountered don't like the joual and fear that it sounds uneducated and 'stupid'. I have always been partial to the so-called "working class" French.


From: Calgary, AB | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Marc
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posted 16 March 2006 07:25 PM      Profile for Marc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Niaiseux(se) - a fool
Niaiser - to fool around...being foolish
Niaiserie - stupidity

Capoter - to freak out

Minou - Kitty
Pitou - Puppy

[ 16 March 2006: Message edited by: Marc ]


From: Calgary, AB | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
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posted 16 March 2006 07:40 PM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
on va se coucher moins niaiseux à soir (ce soir).
From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 16 March 2006 11:54 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Faut pas se faire niaiser! plutôt déniaiser.

Déniaiser is a popular expression in France (and Belgium - alas I have little familiarity sur le terrain with Swiss French and the Swiss French editor I know is NOT a "populaire" sort, on the contrary, il est une sainte-nitouche (sur le plan linguistique). But niaiser in the sens of "fuck around" seems specifically Québécois (and other franco-Canadian). Déniaiser means to make someone wise up, but also to make either a lad or a lass lose his or her sexual innocence.

Niaiseux, euse seems specifically this side of the pond. "eux" as a familiar or slightly pejorative (but sometimes affectionate) suffix is certainly French, but very common here. Un violoneux (a fiddler - he (traditionally) can be just as talented a musician as a violiniste, but lacks formal training.

Here is the site of a local cat, named Leon who speaks Québécois - not necessarily slang. He says, "ce qui est bon pour pitou est bon pour minou". Notice that in English, you use two genders (goose/gander) - this example uses two species instead.

I've heard quite a few terms in common use here in Northwestern France and not elsewhere, though many other were developed in contact with English and Aboriginal languages - or simply invented to fit the new circimstances.

[ 17 March 2006: Message edited by: lagatta ]


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
simonvallee
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posted 17 March 2006 12:16 AM      Profile for simonvallee   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
"Vieille pipe de p'tit Jesu!" (Is it true that "pipe" means "blowjob", or is my brother pulling my leg on that one?)

Yes a "pipe" can mean a fellation, but it also means a pipe as in the smoking apparel. In the case you mention, since the qualificative "vieille" (old) is attached to "pipe", I'd say it's meaning is in the first definition of the word, not the vulgar one (plus such an expression sounds horribly old and the people who'd say it wouldn't want to imply that Jesus had fellatio since they'd have lived in a time of rather strict Catholic upbringing).

quote:
Not to say that I didn't encounter some "trucs de cul"

It's "trou-de-cul", not "trucs de cul".


From: Boucherville, Québec | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Marc
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posted 17 March 2006 11:01 AM      Profile for Marc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I know...I realized it a little bit afterwards...


From: Calgary, AB | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
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posted 17 March 2006 07:16 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought "gouine", an insulting term for a lesbian, was Québécois but see it recorded on European sites. Je suis en beau maudit en ce moment - because I just took a lovely walk down St-Laurent ("the Main") and some masculiniste (I presume) had stuck little homemade stickers on all the Manon Massé Québec solidaire posters for the Ste-Marie St-Jacques by-election. These included gouine, but also "parasite suceuse de pensions alimentaires", "Québec solidaire - féministes toxiques" "ennemies du peuple" (note the feminine) and other sentiments along those lines. I was able to remove a lot of them - wonder if the masculinistes (Fathers for Justice types?) will be pulling any more serious dirty tricks. Crissssssse!!!!
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
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posted 17 March 2006 07:26 PM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
wow, lagatta, that's awful.
I've never heard nor seen that term before.

From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
deBeauxOs
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posted 17 March 2006 10:16 PM      Profile for deBeauxOs     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by lagatta: ... I've heard quite a few terms in common use here in Northwestern France and not elsewhere ...
That would seem right, since the majority of French colonists were drawn from Normandie. I've heard many stories of young Canadian francophones travelling in Northwest France and being moved to tears when they spotted their family name on a store front or street sign. There was a significant wave of French-speaking European immigrants who settled in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta at the end of the 19th, beginning of the 20th century. Some of their vocabulary and turn of phrases is quite distinctive from the rest of French-speaking Canada.

[ 17 March 2006: Message edited by: deBeauxOs ]


From: missing in action | Registered: Aug 2005  |  IP: Logged

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