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Author Topic: technoplexy
judym
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Babbler # 29

posted 03 July 2001 05:33 PM      Profile for judym   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What do you love to hate about computers? What do you love to love? Hate to hate?

Is it all a great conspiracy to keep us distracted by corrupt files and Ha ha ha?

Check out rabble.ca's news section on July 4 for one guy's opinion.


From: earth | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Jared
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 803

posted 03 July 2001 06:29 PM      Profile for Jared     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What I dislike most about my (OK, my twin bro's ) particular machine is the non-existant sympatico between my printer and computer. The two seem to communicate about as well as a Frenchman and a German person trying to have a conversation about "War And Peace" in Yiddish. It wouldn't be so bad if it was just a loose wire or something external, but heaven knows that's far too fixable. Nope, it has to be some pissy little hiccup of a problem in the deepest, darkest section of circuit board. Upon death I will be judged harshly for all the unfortunate tech-help people who I've managed to go all Doctor Hyde on.

[ July 03, 2001: Message edited by: Jared ]


From: Vancouver | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
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Babbler # 490

posted 03 July 2001 07:48 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My pet peeve is how Windows 98SE just *sometimes* bluescreens on me when I go to the DOS prompt. No rhyme nor reason either.
From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
Babbler # 621

posted 03 July 2001 08:50 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
*superior Linux boasting mode*

Well DrC my computer has crashed exactly once in a year, that too because I misconfigured something. When it crashes in Linux you get a black screen of death. I have to admit it was kind of charming after such a long time without that experience. I've never lost data in Linux at any rate.

One of the reasons I switched was that MS-Word corrupted a 60-page paper I was writing. It was clearly a bug in the software -- vast chunks of text simply would not appear on screen or in print, though (if you looked at the document with the binary editor) they were there. Finally I had to convert it into Word 4.0 for Macintosh format and print it on an old Macintosh. I had some other bad experiences with file corruption too.

Then the endless crashing, the software treating you like an idiot -- nope, I deleted it. Bye. The only argument *for* Windows, Linux geeks joke, is that General Protection Fault is of a higher rank than Colonel Panic.
Sorry folks maybe you have to have the soul of a geek to like that. (Windows motto: where do you think you're going today?)

I like Outlook's interface but what really cheesed me off about it is when I found out that the bloated .pst file that Outlook stores everything in is weakly encrypted, not for your protection, but to make it a pain in the arse for you to switch to another mail client of your choosing. That ticked me right off. It's my data, not Bill Gates's.

Speaking of bloat every proprietary format MS uses, especially .doc, is just so filled with bloat. Save your .doc as an .rtf and you can shrink it by 80% sometimes. What is all that junk? The document looks the same, so it clearly wasn't necessary.

And another thing... Windows 9x uses memory so poorly that it is constantly swapping, which makes an annoying noise. Ever since I switched to Linux my hard drive is basically silent. There's no swapping and I only have 64MB RAM.

I'm having to use Windows nowadays because I can't play Quicktime on Linux, owing to the proprietary Sorenson codec. If it's not one thing it's another crashing this Windows machine about once a day. Of course part of the problem is that I run an application-layer firewall, and this seems to interact poorly with the networking layer of the OS.

Speaking of security, that's another thing. So many things are enabled by default with Windows that it's a real security hazard. I had personal experience of that too.

Macintosh is my preferred OS and I'm really excited by OS-X. When I have a lot of money I might buy a Mac. OTOH I'm doing alright with Linux/BSD and I like the open source community. So maybe I'll stick with it.

[ July 03, 2001: Message edited by: rasmus_raven ]


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pimji
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Babbler # 228

posted 03 July 2001 09:02 PM      Profile for Pimji   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I love to tinker with computers. What I dislike most is the hype. The consumer has to really do their homework when shopping for a machine or parts for their machine. We all just went through the mega high tech media hype. I read an article by that asshole dianne francis from the national post a year ago saying that students should stay away from liberal arts programs in university, which is just plain stupid, to put it bluntly. What we will end up with is fast computers (tools) and not have the the slightest clue what to do with them.
The processors available now are so fast that a skilled person can do things at home that where just not possible even 2 years ago. What I really lack is the expertise in art and music to be able to actually use the tool to anywhere near its potential. We have high speed networks,faster 3D graphics cards, photo realistic colour printers, etc, but if or society can't produce the people who can create the art music and literature to send on this technology we might as well go back to just watching tv.

From: South of Ottawa | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 03 July 2001 09:33 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thank you Pimji for those sage remarks.

And now it's time for a rant.

I can't stand all that high-tech WIRED-crowd optimism about how the computer is going to unleash human creativity. What? Where? Have you seen all that graphics work done in photoshop by people on crack? Gimme a leash, quick! Essential to succesful creation is restraint, which the culture of technological unleashment does not encourage.

A friend is a really good typographer. He trained by drawing the letters by hand. Also, when composing, he used hot lead popping out of a giant machine. You didn't get to do it over and over again so you had to be clear in your head about what you were doing. And there was a certain respect for the medium that arose out of this care.

Similarly for music, writing.

[I snipped a long rant from here because it was incoherent]

I agree with you, Pimji. As technology becomes better we should be concentrating more on humanistic training, less on technical training. This is a pet concern of mine, and as you can see, I've gone into overdrive rant mode.

Maybe when I have time to do it coherently I'll follow up on this rant.


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Slick Willy
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Babbler # 184

posted 03 July 2001 09:57 PM      Profile for Slick Willy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Talk about a love hate relationship!

I love the idea that people from all over can just say what's on their mind to a large audience. So I guess I love the communication that the computer and Internet can be.

I hate that due to the nature of the beast that most people have no idea how this stuff works or what to do when it doesn't. So they must rely on tech support that often is not very good at all. So people end up hateing those who provide tech support and tech support begins to dispise those who need it.

Maybe it would be nice if we all remembered that the person on the other end of the phone might be new to the job and that users don't need to know how to build a car just to drive it.


From: Hog Heaven | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
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Babbler # 625

posted 03 July 2001 10:23 PM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've had complaints in the past, and I'll definitely have them in the future, right now though I forget them. But when I remember them, I won't be able to log on and complain about them!

Yes, that was supposed to be and ironic hidden complaint, I don't know why I'm writing this footnote, because I'm sure you all caught on.


From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
meades
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Babbler # 625

posted 03 July 2001 10:25 PM      Profile for meades     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
ironically, when I tried to post the above message, the computer popped up with it's oh, so clever, yet not funny in the least reply: The server is not responding, you...
From: Sault Ste. Marie | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 490

posted 03 July 2001 10:29 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
A friend is a really good typographer. He trained by drawing the letters by hand. Also, when composing, he used hot lead popping out of a giant machine. You didn't get to do it over and over again so you had to be clear in your head about what you were doing. And there was a certain respect for the medium that arose out of this care.

You know, I think (going OT for a sec) that this really captures the differences between people who did work and lived in the 1950s and 1960s vs today - I've seen films of workers from that time period as well, and I was astonished at the care and precision that was taken back then.

I just could not imagine anyone, today, doing the same thing. Makes me wonder what would happen if someone trained only on the newest equipment had to go back and do all the work by hand - would he/she learn how to do it with care, or would he/she just be happy with bashing out any old thing?

There's something to be said, I think, for learning the way your friend did. Before you can use the machine, your hands must know how it all worked.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Pimji
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Babbler # 228

posted 03 July 2001 11:42 PM      Profile for Pimji   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
To get the skinney on the tech help goto Net Slaves The people on the other end of the tech help phone line are the fry cooks of the new economy.
Read the articles
    Dotcom Workers: Chumps of the New Economy
    Anatomy of a Recruitment Scam
    Confessions of a Fallen Web Designer

Better yet read the book Net Slaves: Tales of Working the Web My Mom gave this book to me for Christmas . It had me ROTFL!

Rasmus Raven Bring it on! I'm a listinin.

Here is another thing that galls me. The high tech industry likes to portray themselves as the pioneers and cowboys of the "new economy" (a word which has been banished from the headlines and lips of politicians). The free wheelers who don't like government interferance, however the federal government has promised to get "highspeed internet access into every household in Canada". The internet software security firm Entrust has just been handed the their largest contract ever by, you guessed it, the Federal government! This story made the World at Eight this morning but couldn't be found on the CBC.ca websiteinstead they gave us the sad tale of the soon to be dust 360 Networks.
I'm not complaining about government spending. It's the fact that the high tech sector can't seem to tell it's ass from a hole in the ground.


From: South of Ottawa | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trisha
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Babbler # 387

posted 04 July 2001 12:40 AM      Profile for Trisha     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What I hate is going to appear quite small. I hate how bubble jet printers print the top half of a line on one page and the bottom on another. I also hate that pictures often get cut in half because of all the junk that goes above them. And I really hate all the popup ads that jump on the screen lately.
From: Thunder Bay, Ontario | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 04 July 2001 12:47 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Trisha, I have the cure for you. Go to http://www.webwasher.com and download webwasher. Play with it, you will see that you can filter out all popup scripts. It's great. If you are unlucky and your machine becomes less stable just uninstall it. Every new piece of software on Windows is a crapshoot as far as how it will affect your system's stability. But I had extremely good experience with Webwasher when I was using Windows (that was last year).
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Trisha
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posted 04 July 2001 12:50 AM      Profile for Trisha     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks, rasmus_raven. I'm still so new to computers that I need help quite often to make things easier. I appreciate any help I can get.
From: Thunder Bay, Ontario | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 04 July 2001 03:30 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Trisha, don't be shy to ask for help if you need it.

Here's the article JudyM mentioned:

Aaaaarghware

quote:
Computers could be designed more simply. Software companies could stop "improving" their merchandise and bundling the newer product with just-bought hardware. But it won't happen, of course. Computers aren't like cars - they can't kill you, so the stress they cause remains unactionable. Computers also aren't like TV - at least not yet. We can't just change the channel.
But one day there will be something of a revolt. One day, one too many cyber-peons will get fed up with a piece of machinery that can perform miracles on those occasions when it's not eliciting curses, and the screams of complexity-loathing passion will be heard across the land.

Well not to burst Mr. Harvor's bubble, but where has he been for the last few years? The movement he's talking about is the open source movement, and the best-known example of it is Linux. You can find a Linux distribution that will fit on a floppy, or you can make it as complex as you like. Like I say, my computer has crashed once this year and it was my fault. Linux runs on any old hunk of junk, you get off the upgrade treadmill, it treats your hardware better so you can keep it longer, you're in control and it does what you want it to. A little self-education is required, however.

[ July 04, 2001: Message edited by: rasmus_raven ]


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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Babbler # 554

posted 04 July 2001 10:20 AM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What I hate about computers is that a Pentium 1 is really a good enough computer for the vast majority of people, but companies don't make them any more. If all you're doing is word processing and spreadsheet stuff, you don't need much more than a 100mhz computer.

It's like if every car company stopped making compact cars and only made SUVs and sports cars, because those are flashier.

I also hate how they stop supporting older computers. I've got a 5 year old PowerMac 6500, and it is all I need. I edit video and music on it. It's really a rather powerful computer, all things considered, and I think I get more out of it than the average person gets out of their Pentium III. But it doesn't have USB, so I'm fucked when it comes time to buy peripherals. I guess I could get a USB card for it, but I only run System 7.6.1, and I don't think it supports USB. I'd love to upgrade to System 8.6, but it's not manufactured any more, and it's damned expensive even if you buy it on eBay.

I like computers. I hate the computer industry. Linux is a nice step in the right direction, but it doesn't really solve any hardware woes.


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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Babbler # 478

posted 04 July 2001 10:34 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
skdadl further reveals just what a techno-peasant she is: I always wanted to know: what is a spread-sheet?
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 554

posted 04 July 2001 10:40 AM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Go here to learn about spreadsheets: http://libwww.stfx.ca/courses/CSCI130-13/lectures/spreadsheets/intro.html


I do have a problem with the whiny article that spawned this thread. There ARE other, less complex software packages out there, and many of them are free or shareware. If you don't want to be suckered by Microsoft or Corel you can use software by smaller companies. Personally, I like the word processor and spreadsheet programs produced by a company called Mariner. I got the programs for free with one of my Macintosh magazines. My e-mail program (Claris E-Mailer Lite) is nice and simple as well. You don't HAVE to shell out $500+ for all the whistles and bells of MS Office.

[ July 04, 2001: Message edited by: mediaboy ]


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
jrootham
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posted 04 July 2001 01:34 PM      Profile for jrootham     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
All might not be lost in the future (I have, however, given up on the present).

The Humane Interface by Jef Raskin and The Inmates Are Running the Asylum by Alan Cooper are books dedicated to the proposition that there are better ways to do things and attempt to break trail in that direction. Raskin created the Macintosh project at Apple and spends a lot of time thinking about better designs. Cooper wrote a prototype which Microsoft shipped as Visual Basic and spends a lot of time thinking about better organizations.

I have attempted to implement some of Raskins ideas (see Zoom Scheduler) but mostly I proved that Java performance is inadequate.

As far as Linux/GNU/Open Source goes right at the moment it is winning on stability and not winning on user interface. You need to be a patient geek to cope so far.

Given my experience with computers (I wrote my first programme in 1968) I will say that things will change and they might even get better.


From: Toronto | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
grrr
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Babbler # 275

posted 04 July 2001 02:35 PM      Profile for grrr     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I suspect the author is a windows user. You get what you deserve. One important feature of windows, that everyone ought to know, is that every application you install thinks it is the most important of all. So, down in your right hand corner, in the System Tray, you have all these little icons representing active applications and tasks. Each one sucking up some of your dwindling resources.
Here is a hint: Go Start > Run and type in 'msconfig'and then choose Startup. There you can select what programs you want running when your computer starts. The rest you can open as you require them. Also, if in that right hand corner you have an icon of a small computer display, turn it off by double clicking the icon, selecting settings, and then advanced. There you will see a check box "Show settings icon on task bar." Trust me, seems trivial but will reduce crashing.
Finally, when you can, free yourself of the chains of microsoft. Go to Linux (Mandrake for beginners) or Macintosh. You will cure yourself of the deblitating effects of technoplexy.

From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 554

posted 04 July 2001 03:30 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, even though I'm a MacAddict, I wouldn't call Macintosh a cure for technoplexy. Steve Jobs is as much, or more, of a nut-case than Bill Gates. The syndrome of having to "keep up with the Joneses" is way more prevalent in the Mac world, especially since the iMac came around. The marketing pressure to have the latest and greated Mac box is pretty strong. They try to make you feel that you're living in the town of Bedrock if you're using an "ancient" G3, and not some whiz-bang G4. Also, the vast majority of office applications software for Macintosh comes from M$! I don't think Corel makes Wordperfect for Mac anymore, and when they did, it was pretty lousy (it's still what I use, because I got it cheap). OS-X seems to be yet another example of Apple sticking its middle finger up at the users who like their older systems. I don't want to have to buy a G4 just to run the operating system, thanks.

I love Macintosh, but Apple Inc really sticks in my craw.

[ July 04, 2001: Message edited by: mediaboy ]


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 04 July 2001 04:19 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I agree, mediaboy, Apple really is a manipulative corporation. Where MS leverages its control of the OS to force you to use its software, Apple leverages the OS to get you to buy a new machine, and vice versa... and their customer support has really deteriorated. They have tremendous contempt for their customers.

BTW as late as last year Steve Jobs's desktop was a NeXT and his laptops were Toshibas...


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 04 July 2001 04:44 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I read an article by that asshole dianne francis from the national post a year ago saying that students should stay away from liberal arts programs in university, which is just plain stupid, to put it bluntly.

Uh oh. I guess I really goofed with Philosophy, huh?

You know, I usually enjoy reading Dianne Francis - not because I agree with her, but because it's always interesting to hear another point of view, especially a well-written one. She wrote an interesting book called "Contrepreneurs" (I think that's the name), and it's about the boiler room, white-collar-crime industry.

As much as annoys me when I hear people trash liberal arts, sometimes I wish some of the professors that teach liberal arts courses would become at least slightly savvy with technology (I mean, to the point of being able to use power point - or turn on an overhead projector - or find the light switches - okay, that was a bit of an exaggeration). My dream job is to be a professor (I have a long way to go!) but when and if I get there, those kids are going to get dynamite presentations and visuals with MY lectures. And I won't be asking the guys in the back of the room if they know how to work the VCR either.

(That reminds me - on the second day of women's studies last year the professor was trying to use the audio-visual system. She couldn't get it to work, so she asked if anyone knew how to use it. None of us knew because we weren't familiar with the AV set up in that room - we had never had a class there before being dumb frosh and all. So finally the professor calls the AV person, and he came in to get it going. And a few of us women in the room giggled about how ironic it was that all of us women in our women's studies course had to get a MAN to come and start the VCR!)


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
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posted 04 July 2001 05:47 PM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hehe. The way universities are funded, no liberal arts professor can give a really stunning, high-tech presentation to the students. The students will always be several steps ahead of the teacher when it comes to being savvy with high-tech stuff. Methinks the glitz-factor of the students' presentations will nearly always kick the teacher's presentations' ass.

One thing I found frustrating about liberal arts (I was a communications major) was how many professors REFUSED to teach ANY practical skills. I heard way too many profs say, "if you want to learn practical skills you should be in college, not university." I think that's terribly short-sighted. One of the reasons I chose my school (U of Windsor) was because the communications program offered several practical media production courses, as well as theory. If it was pure theory, I never would have gone there. There was always tonnes of in-fighting between the "theory" profs and the "practical" profs. The "theory" profs could never get it through their thick skulls that the school's strategy of combining the two was really the most effective strategy. I wouldn't want to go to a college and miss out on all the great theory courses, and I wouldn't want to go to a "ivory tower" that teaches nothing BUT theory.

Whoa. That was a bit of a rant, wasn't it?


From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
grrr
rabble-rouser
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posted 04 July 2001 06:16 PM      Profile for grrr     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I would definitely agree, Mediaboy, that Apple clearly likes to put the screws to its users. For the latest software you need the latest hardware and for the latest hardware you need the latest software. And never the twain should meet.

However, Macs crash far less than Win PC's and are much easier to maintain. For example, you can reconfigure your network without rebooting. You can ditch Internet Explorer and MS Office by dragging to the trash. You can solve problems by deleting preferences.
Try any of that with a PC.

In fact, even the most novice PC user eventualy becomes intimately acquainted with the re-install within a short time.


From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 04 July 2001 06:28 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
grrr...

Yes, a reinstall on a PC does wonders for your performance. All those stray bits of uninstalled programs, all the gumming up that various things do when they're installed, those annoying things in Systray that you can never be sure of. Zap 'em and reinstall. Ahhh... so satisfying. There are lots of neat shareware utilities for Windows that let you peek and poke but they're certainly not advertised.

I forgot one more gripe about Windows: the FAT filesystem is horribly fragmented. In no time at all your drive becomes a hideous mess of stray bits and bytes... and the Windows defrag program isn't that good. Another reason for frequent reinstalls with Windows. Unix-type file systems don't even *need* a defrag program because they don't fragment. They're written to use space efficiently.

Ease of reinstalling the Mac OS is pretty impressive. However, I wouldn't go so far as to call pre-Mac OS-X systems "stable". Mac has no multithreading or multitasking to speak of, no protected memory. One wrong mouse click and even the Vulcan nerve pinch won't help you. And my friends are frequently having to reinstall on their Macs to fix things. Have you ever had a library go missing on a Mac? Do you think they tell you, here, get the lib from this spot on the CD and copy it to such and such a folder? No. Reinstall. That's the answer. I don't even think lib files are visible to users on Mac.

[ July 04, 2001: Message edited by: rasmus_raven ]


From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
rabble-rouser
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posted 04 July 2001 06:54 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Windows has taught an entire generation of computer users how to solve any problem with Windows using the equivalent of swatting a fly with a Buick - to condense this into a slogan:

"When it breaks, reinstall!"

I've actually had to do that a few times


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
Moderator
Babbler # 560

posted 04 July 2001 11:34 PM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The way universities are funded, no liberal arts professor can give a really stunning, high-tech presentation to the students.

Every lecture hall and classroom for all of my classes had excellent AV equipment available. The AV department will train anyone who wants to learn how to use it. I learned in less than 10 minutes how to use the AV equipment in the most well-equipped classroom I was in. I did it because the school will pay one student per class (at the professor's request) to run the AV stuff. It was more than easy.

However, our sociology class was awesome since the professor had just taken a powerpoint course that summer and it enhanced her lectures like you wouldn't believe.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Gayle
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posted 05 July 2001 10:23 AM      Profile for Gayle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I love so much that I can take my computer and my digital tablet and some software, and create art out of nothing. Out of NOTHING! It's magic, it truly is.

I love that it enables me to talk to all you fine people, and to so many others. It's broadened my world view and given me access to unlimited information, infinitely easier than the library.

I love that computers have created a bazillion new types of jobs and that I have two of them!

I hate when they crash. I hate that I sometimes sit in the basement looking at a cathode ray tube instead of the sun. I hate the frickin' network in this building which stops me from actually getting a scanned file from the scanner to my computer. I hate that they cost so much.

But oh, I can't imagine my life without them!


From: Cape Breton, Nova Scotia | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Victor Von Mediaboy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 554

posted 05 July 2001 10:23 AM      Profile for Victor Von Mediaboy   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've had to reinstall my Mac OS on several occasions. But it's probably because I use OS 7.6.1, and I've got software on there that are designed to work with a newer OS. I have conflicts up the wazoo. For example, if I have the Palm Desktop installed it means I can't use my video editing software. Figure that out!
From: A thread has merit only if I post to it. So sayeth VVMB! | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 490

posted 29 July 2003 12:14 AM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Operating systems. Whee!

Since that post I made about 98SE I went up to Windows 2000, and I have to say that, bar none, it is the stablest and most well-behaved Windows OS Microsoft has made.

It lacks the excess eye candy of XP but retains the ease of use that Windows 95 and 98 brought. I know 2000 is definitely more intuitive in many ways than NT4


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
radiorahim
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2777

posted 29 July 2003 01:41 AM      Profile for radiorahim     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Since that post I made about 98SE I went up to Windows 2000, and I have to say that, bar none, it is the stablest and most well-behaved Windows OS Microsoft has made.

Once heard someone refer to Windows 95 (and suppose the same could be said of 98) as "a virus with tech support".

Windows ME (Millenium Edition) was absolute garbage!

Win2000 Pro is not bad...quite stable and XP is also pretty stable...just that it really is an incredibly bloated operating system and you need at least a Pentium III or more to run it.

Suppose with Linux its more the "idea" of Linux and open source that's intriguing...it is still quite complicated to learn to use...that is if you're doing more than simple tasks like e-mail, web browsing and office tasks.

Installing software is still complicated on Linux if something isn't in an RPM format. Its going to have to get more user friendly before it gets into widespread desktop use.

(Yes I am using my Linux box today).

Can't speak about Mac's...could never afford one!


From: a Micro$oft-free computer | Registered: Jun 2002  |  IP: Logged
DrConway
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 490

posted 29 July 2003 02:28 AM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by radiorahim:
Win2000 Pro is not bad...quite stable and XP is also pretty stable...just that it really is an incredibly bloated operating system and you need at least a Pentium III or more to run it.

Yeah. I'm using Windows XP on a Celeron 1 GHz right now, but frankly I'd probably get somewhat better performance out of Windows 2000.

I use Windows 2000 on a Pentium-233 laptop, and it's actually quite well-behaved.


From: You shall not side with the great against the powerless. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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