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Author Topic: Top 10 British Films
runner
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posted 04 October 2004 03:56 PM      Profile for runner     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What no "Carry On........" I'm shocked!!
BBC Site

From: left behind by the folks | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 04 October 2004 04:02 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
'Trainspotting' really isn't that great. Of course, I think 'Withnail and I' should be #1 (or at least McKellen's Richard III', so what do I know?
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 04 October 2004 05:54 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"However, surprising absences include Oscar winners The English Patient, Chariots of Fire and Gandhi."

Yeah, you'd think those three would top the list of Dullest British Films Ever.


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Contrarian
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posted 04 October 2004 06:12 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have not seen many of those; I did like "Brassed Off".
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Lard Tunderin' Jeezus
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posted 04 October 2004 06:20 PM      Profile for Lard Tunderin' Jeezus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Long Good Friday is my favorite Britflick of all time.
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Anchoress
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posted 04 October 2004 06:28 PM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm surprised that none of the Pink Panther movies (or other Peter Sellers flicks) are on the list. Not high-brow, but some of the best comedy ever.

Also Georgie Girl. It mirrored and interpreted British youth culture the same way The Graduate did in America.


From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Surferosad
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posted 04 October 2004 09:29 PM      Profile for Surferosad   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wonder if there's something by Peter Brook (Marat/Sade comes to mind), Peter Greenaway or Ken Loach in that list?
From: Montreal | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Fidel
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posted 04 October 2004 10:33 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Contrarian:
I have not seen many of those; I did like "Brassed Off".

"Truth is a thought that matta'd, a though that music matta'd, or does it bollocks, not compared ta'row people matter." ha ha

I think Chumbawamba sung-it betta.

Oh aye, an 'ow bout Alistair Sim in A Christmas Carol. Every year on tele and right on time ?. If only we could rid the world of want and ignorance this year, Charles.

[ 04 October 2004: Message edited by: Fidel ]


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angrymonkey
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posted 07 October 2004 05:08 AM      Profile for angrymonkey     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And there was the British Film Institute's top 100 from 1999.
top 100
BFI
#16 Get Carter
#20 A Matter of Life and Death
#10 Trainspotting
#1 The Third Man
#28 Life of Brian
#96 The Wicker Man
#6 Kind Hearts and Coronets
#3 Lawrence of Arabia
- From Russia With Love
- Naked

From: the cold | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 07 October 2004 05:44 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
my beautiful laundrette?
dirty pretty things?
morvern caller?

From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
mighty brutus
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posted 07 October 2004 04:01 PM      Profile for mighty brutus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
How about "Night and the City"? Not the DeNiro one, but the 1950 original with Gene Tierney and Richard Widmark. A noir classic!
From: Beautiful Burnaby, British Columbia | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Bacchus
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posted 07 October 2004 04:11 PM      Profile for Bacchus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yay!!!!!!!!!!!!

31. Zulu 1964


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skdadl
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posted 07 October 2004 04:19 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
These lists are always infuriating. The Third Man is the greatest movie ever made, and everyone knows that.

I wonder whether the Pink Panthers were considered American films? (Blake Edwards?)

Need more time to get more angry over details.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 07 October 2004 04:21 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The Third Man is the greatest movie ever made, and everyone knows that.

(emphasis added)

You may want to have your keyboard checked there, skdadl. I think you've mispledded The Ladykillers.

[ 07 October 2004: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 07 October 2004 04:25 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, and, I mean! I love Michael Caine as much as the next guy, but they rank him above Sir Alec?

And they rank Get Carter above Ipcress File? Or Alfie?

I ask you.


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Bacchus
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posted 07 October 2004 04:29 PM      Profile for Bacchus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Or Zulu even


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'lance
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posted 07 October 2004 04:29 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm really curious to see what they'll do with the remake of Alfie -- specifically, with the female characters, such as they were.

It's one of those movies that I simply can't imagine being made today in anything approaching its original form.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 07 October 2004 04:31 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Isn't it now set in New York?
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 07 October 2004 04:35 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For all I know it is, but I can't see that being a mark against it, necessarily. The movie version of High Fidelity was moved to Chicago but worked perfectly well.

It's just that in the original, all the female characters but one were pathetic ninnies, and the one exception wasn't a whole lot better.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
BLAKE 3:16
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posted 07 October 2004 11:48 PM      Profile for BLAKE 3:16     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What about Ken Loach's The Flickering Flame?

This might be innaporoporaiet but what about Velvet Goldmine?


From: Babylon, Ontario | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 07 October 2004 11:57 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw the poster for the remake of "Alfie" on the way out of a cinema several weeks ago. I was nonplussed, then I went into rant mode. I can't understand why people don't just make new movies. Hacks!

They just better not ever do a remake of "Breakfast at Tiffany's".


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
angrymonkey
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posted 08 October 2004 03:45 AM      Profile for angrymonkey     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There has been a little talk over the years of redoing Breakfast but no-one dares yet.(Harrison Ford and Callista Flockart were last mentioned I think- yipes) They're redoing Wicker Man with Nicholas Cage and setting it in america of course.
It seems anything over 20 years old is ancient history . I read one comment on the Italian Job remake that mentioned it was a remake of an "obscure" British film. Obscure? Give me a break.
Here's some bits from an article I found-
Producer Sid Ganis agrees. "Columbia Pictures has a library of films, intellectual properties if you will," he says. "I'm always thinking about what's in that library that might make a good movie today."
Ganis is not the only producer combing the vaults. "There's a vast amount of material," says Arthur Sarkissian, who's remaking the Charlton Heston-Sophia Loren 1961 epic El Cid and the Alain Delon 1970 thriller Le Cercle Rouge. For El Cid, he has approached Oscar winner Jennifer Connelly about playing the Loren role and thinks that Tom Cruise "would be great" in the Heston part.
Filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen are remaking a Peter Sellers comedy, 1955's The Ladykillers, because it isn't too famous, says the remake's producer, Tom Jacobson."It's slightly well known among film purists, but it's not a huge, well-known movie among the public," Jacobson says.
Remakes also happen for hidden commercial reasons. Mark Malinowski, senior vice president and director of Ketchum Entertainment Marketing, linked the Wendy's restaurant chain with Deeds in a big way. The hero forces a private plane to make a pit stop at a Wendy's en route to New York — and even talks about how good the Frosty shake was later in the film.
"Mr. Deeds has a very upbeat message," Malinowski says. "You've got your small-town guy coming to the big city, and the lessons he learns and teaches other people. That's the message of Wendy's brand, too."

full article


From: the cold | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged

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