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Author Topic: Movies I have rented recently.
Tommy_Paine
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posted 21 April 2003 12:55 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
First off, "Campfire Stories". Don't rent this one, wait for it to come on late night T.V., then don't watch it. Not scary-- low budget and entirely stupid. Maybe a good one to watch if you make "horror" movies and want to know what NOT to do.

I have a rule about books and movies. If either have a Roman numeral in the title, or use cheezy cover gimics like holographs, chances are it's not a good movie.

Unfortunately, I skipped over "Ghost Ship" a number of times for the holographic image on the cover. (but, I rented "Campfire Stories" instead.....duh.....) "Ghost Ship" is a pretty good ghost story. Good production values and good special effects. The opening scene was a bit too much for me to watch-- I saw what was coming and looked away. The scene itself didn't need the gore I know I missed. One sees the set up; one knows what's going to happen. More judicious editing would have left the horror of the moment to ruminate in the viewer's mind, where it would blossom into something more unnerving than the graffic portral could approach.

After that, we are left with a fairly decent action/horror movie akin to "Alien", but not quite so suspensful. But then, what movie has been since?

The movie eases us into the rather big hurdle on the "willing suspension of disbelief" by feeding it to us slowly. What is a technical impossibility-- that a large ocean liner in the 1960's could go missing, then somehow traverse the North West Passage to end up in the Bering Strait has a subtle supernatural explanation-- and we find out that our group of hapless salvagers aren't the only souls to have happened upon the old wreck, anyway.

So, if you like horror movies, this one's a good renter.

I rented the quirky "Secretary" that got lots of film festival attention but didn't make it to theatre's in swingin' places like London Ontario.

There's a lot of laughs in this one, along the black humour lines. We meet the heroine as she leaves an asylum where she has been treated for self mutilation. We know quite early that it's connected to her father's alcoholism and abusive nature, and her yearning to know and love the father that lies beneath his demons.

James Spader plays the equally quirky Para legal our heroine applies to work for. The office has a permanent "Secretary Wanted" sign out front, and we see a tearful, terminated or quiting secetary leaving as she arrives to apply for the job.

There's a debate in my mind about Spader's character, and why he pushes our quirky secretary away when she reveals to him her newly discovered self.

Is he pushing her away because he fears emotional attachment? Or, unlike our heroine, does not understand what drives him, and is repulsed by his own nature, and does not understand why she-- or any woman-- would want to be with him.

"Secretary" isn't for everyone, I don't think. But if you are comfortable with laughing when there's no laugh track to tell you it's okay, and if you are interested in how people find ways to come to grips with elements of themselves that will not change, and turn them into positives, then this is a good one for you.

Oh yes. "Road to Perdition". Tom Hanks, gangsters in the 30's. What's not to like?


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 22 April 2003 04:49 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We liked "Spirited Away" so very much when we saw it a few weeks back that we rented "Princess Mononoke" this weekend. It was considerably more violent than Spirited Away, but almost as good. Bizarre, environmental-themed shinto anime. Great. Highly recommended. The wee daughter LOVED Spirited Away, the dragons are breathtaking, she literally gasped when they first appeared. Princess Mononoke was a little too complex for her, she faded in and out of it, thankfully, because we didn't realize how violent it would be when we rented it. No guns though, thankfully. We were at friends this weekend who's little one is now Star Wars obsessed. He put it in the VCR, and I couldn't believe how much gunplay there was... it is just one long very noisy gun battle. It's amazing how different a film can be when you're watching with a little one. She kept asking "Why are they fighting? Why do they keep falling down?"
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Alix
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posted 22 April 2003 05:05 PM      Profile for Alix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We're dying to see Spirited Away - we'd seen Princess Mononoke and Kiki's Delivery Service a while ago, and we just rented Castle in the Sky last week. It was really great.

I'm so glad they're bringing out Hayao Miyazaki's work on DVD! On the other hand, I am really pissed off about how little promotion was done for Spirited Away - my partner and I managed to see Princess Mononoke in the theatre but Spirited Away never made it here.

And we rented Y Tu Mama Tambien, but we never got around to watching it, and it has to go back this evening. Darn it! We have to stop renting three movies at a time, since we never watch more than two.


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Jacob Two-Two
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posted 22 April 2003 05:11 PM      Profile for Jacob Two-Two     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I loooove that Hayao Miyazaki. Spirited Away was a very magical experience for me all three times I've seen it. I already own Princess Mononoke and plan to buy all his other works (at least the ones you can get here) very soon. The man is a genius.

A movie that I rented fairly recently and recommend is "The Dangerous Lives of Alter Boys". A well-crafted tale of the emotionally intense world of the emerging teenager. It touched me.


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ronb
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posted 22 April 2003 05:11 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I think it's still at the Carlton Cinema here in Toronto, if that helps.

Y Tu Mama was a bit of a disappointment for us, but we were probably over-sold on it. Did you see Amores Perros? It was wild as hell...


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Alix
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posted 22 April 2003 05:29 PM      Profile for Alix     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, but I live in Kingston. But still, Princess Mononoke showed up here at the independent film cinema when it came out. Why not Spirited Away? Still annoyed!

I haven't seen Amores Perros yet. I'll have to get that out soon.


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audra trower williams
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posted 22 April 2003 05:42 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm The One That I Want, one of Margaret Cho's stand up movies.
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sisyphus
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posted 22 April 2003 06:14 PM      Profile for Sisyphus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Atomic Cafe (again). 1st time was in about '90. I didn't find it so funny this time. Perhaps because if you substitute "terrorists" for "Russians", "Islam" for "Communism" and "WMD" for the "A(H)-bomb", we're living the same goddamn thing . Still, it's entertaining and scary and very darkly humourous. I'd watch it again. Think Michael Moore without the blatant editorializing (no footage was shot for the film and there's no added commentary).

"Barefoot Gen" an anime based on an autobiographical "graphic novel" by Keiji Nakazawa, who was a six-year-old when "Little Boy" was dropped on his hometown of Hiroshima. The animation is of uneven quality, but it is horrifying, heartbreaking and inspiring.

"The Sweet Hereafter" a brilliant meditation on loss and greed and love and how fragile people and communities can be. It offers no easy answers, no closure and, although a plot summary might read like the blurb on a John Grisham novel, Atom Egoyan's masterpiece shows the lawyer-as-superhero fantasy as the shallow puerile swill that it is. It's brilliantly acted and filmed with many layers of self-reference (the Pied Piper theme is chilling and wonderful). I wouldn't watch it again, though.

Agree about Margaret Cho. I saw Notorious CHO recently. Not quite as good as IATOTIW, but still brilliant. You don't have to fall into any particular demographic to be amazed by her performances either. I saw a recent Robin Williams (2002). He's not in Margaret Cho's league, if he ever was. I was disappointed by him.

The Ring was entertaining horror-trash with impressive images and a nice feeling of dread. Red Dragon is far and away the best screen version of a Thomas Harris book I think, though I must confess death threats couldn't impel me to a movie version of the execrable Hannibal.

[ 22 April 2003: Message edited by: Sisyphus ]


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dale cooper
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posted 22 April 2003 06:51 PM      Profile for dale cooper     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Saw Cube 2:Hypercube last night. Pretty good. Quite similar to the first one, but developed the story a bit more at the end. Can see a Cube3 coming out in the near future.

Also Say Anything. CBC radio played the clip "I don't want to buy, sell or process anything" on the weekend and I had to watch the movie again. Good stuff.


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West Coast Lefty
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posted 23 April 2003 02:41 AM      Profile for West Coast Lefty     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Saw Cube 2:Hypercube last night. Pretty good. Quite similar to the first one, but developed the story a bit more at the end. Can see a Cube3 coming out in the near future.

I didn't know there was a sequel to the original Cube. I saw the first one a few weeks ago and was blown away.

Sexy Beast with Ben Kingsley is one of those great twisted British thrillers. It is supposed to be a heist caper, but it's really a psychological intrigue about love and betrayal. Kingsley is unbelievably good but so is the rest of the cast. The characters are more interesting than the story, which is a little weak and drags a bit at the end.

I finally saw Raging Bull by Scorcese over the long weekend. Very gory and violent but still an incredible film, so meticulously shot, the editing, the sets, costumes, etc. And Robert De Niro IS Jake La Motta, the actor just dissolves into the character. Brilliant stuff


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speechpoet
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posted 23 April 2003 02:42 AM      Profile for speechpoet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Dinner Rush" -- Danny Aiello is great, the ending is lovely, and it's a very tight example of an ensemble cast orbiting one surprisingly simple story line. Loved it.

"Man of the Century" -- Gibson Frazier is the time-warped hero who sees the modern world through the eyes of a roaring-Twenties reporter. Uneven, but at its best, an inventive fantasy. Didn't quite hold it together until the end... but the supporting cast includes Frank Gorshin, and that's gotta be worth something.

"Spy Kids 2" -- Lots of fun. The temptation was to see it in an (ahem) altered state, but that would have meant missing the innocent delight of an imaginative fable. (Quibble raised between bites of popcorn: why can't the mom be the head of the spy agency, instead of the dad?)


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Tommy_Paine
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posted 23 April 2003 11:59 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
The Ring was entertaining horror-trash with impressive images and a nice feeling of dread.

Yes, I found it well done. I have to admit I fell asleep while watching the Japanese version "Ringu".

I used to really enjoy "horror" movies, being raised on those awful offerings on saturday afternoon by "Sir Graves Ghastly" on one of the Detroit stations. It seems to me, as schlocky as those old movies were, each director and screen writer at least attempted to create a situation that would scare you-- even if it ended up making you laugh.

Way back, when vcr's hit the scene, I started to rent these cheezy horror movies, only to find they had changed.

No longer were there set ups and false set ups, creation of characters we care about being put into perilous or horrific situations; they were just a parade of young girls being unartfully ripped asunder by artless maniacs.

Not even a thoughtful "Dr. Phibes" with his taste for irony was offered up.

So, once I got the drift, I stopped watching this stuff, and have only started again because I'm with someone who enjoys a good horror movie-- or making fun of bad ones.

But it strikes this guy that if I know some basic elements of horror, surely movie makers and screen writers do too. And it strikes me that they deliberately present us with unlikable characters (those whiney brats from "Boring Witch Project") we are supposed to enjoy watching being killed, in as gory a way as possible.

The fact that the vast majority of these characters are young women tells me this isn't "horror" in the usual sense, but a genre that should earn the title of "mysogyny."

A review of the new release by Rob Zombie, entitled "House of a Thousand Corpses" or something like that, says as much about that movie, and as much as some films get panned by critics that I, and a lot of other people enjoy, I will take his word for it and skip Zombie's foray into the movie world.


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Rebecca West
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posted 23 April 2003 03:52 PM      Profile for Rebecca West     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Nothing, but nothing beats the Evil Dead trilogy, particularly second installment. By far the best sequel ever. Also, best use of a chainsaw in place of an amputated limb ever.
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majorvictory
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posted 23 April 2003 04:07 PM      Profile for majorvictory     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Speaking of Bruce Campbell, keep an eye out for his latest movie Bubba Ho-Tep. I saw him introduce it at last year's Toronto International Film Festival (Midnight Madness division, natch) and loved it. Check out a good review here. A theatrical run in Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal is not unthinkable, but it will definitely be going to video/DVD, probably soon.
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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 23 April 2003 04:40 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"the mothman prophecies" -- i was curious to see ol' silver hair (richard gere) in a oooky-spooky film (it's about this bat-like manifestation haunting a west virginia town). not too bad.
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Rebecca West
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posted 23 April 2003 05:01 PM      Profile for Rebecca West     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Check out a good review here. A theatrical run in Toronto, Vancouver or Montreal is not unthinkable, but it will definitely be going to video/DVD, probably soon.
It looks like a lot of fun ... I'll definitely rent it when it comes out.

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DrConway
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posted 23 April 2003 05:47 PM      Profile for DrConway     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Don't get the Philadelphia Experiment 2. I once watched it and it was utterly pointless and incomprehensible. As well, don't get Speed 2.

quote:
I have a rule about books and movies. If either have a Roman numeral in the title, or use cheezy cover gimics like holographs, chances are it's not a good movie.

SO true! Aaaaaaaaaah! I rented a lousy movie called "Power.com" which was a renamed import of an American movie called Menno's Mind. It, of course, had the de rigeur holographic cover thingy.

The concept is good; the execution, semi-awful. Cheezy special effects and a low budget make the plot a bit strained at times.

One interesting thing I found out later about this movie, though, is that whoever wrote the script had some historical sense. Here's what I found out. I punched in Menno's Mind into google once to see what reviews there were of the movie, and I ran across odd references to Mennonites. Curious, I clicked.

In the movie, the main character is, of course, Menno. His best friend is named Simon.

Guess who founded the Mennonite Sect? Menno Simon.

What makes it even cooler is this: Menno (in real life) was also at times chased by authorities who were eager to get him for some imagined or real ability to cause them harm, just as in the movie, Menno was chased because he held the key to exposing a Presidential candidate's attempt to manipulate the upcoming election.

Now as for movies I will be seeing, Jacob's suggestion seems good. I also plan to get "Trembling before G-d", which is about a gay Jewish couple.

I will be adding the "Atomic Cafe" movie as well to my wish-list.

Just for fun, one time I rented "Cats & Dogs". Quite amusing, and I hear there's a sequel due out at some point. Tee-hee. Cats taking over the world, woo-hoo.

If you can stand the gay movie genre, I suggest "Edge of Seventeen", "The Living End" and "Get Real". The first is sort of coming-of-age story involving a guy who's just about to graduate from high school and his discovery of his sexuality. The second is about two guys in their twenties who both have found that they are HIV-positive, and decide to just cut loose and live life without obligations. Unfortunately it begins to go wrong and there is a fairly bitter denouement. This is a shot I grabbed from the end of the movie. I cheered out loud when I saw that. The last movie is.. well, amusing in many respects. Although it also does not have a storybook ending, it's more realistic (pardon the pun) in that respect. It's essentially a story of the adventures of a British high-school student who discovers the school jock also likes guys. This is the IMDb listing for the last movie.

[ 23 April 2003: Message edited by: DrConway ]


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Sisyphus
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posted 23 April 2003 05:55 PM      Profile for Sisyphus     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm an unabashed sucker for horror movies. Agree about the Evil Dead trilogy. I watch part 2 at least twice a year.

"We just cut up our girlfriend up with a chainsaw. Does that sound okay to you?"
(great scene, that)

I've been burned enough by second, third and nth rate horror movies to have developed a little selectivity over the years. I passed on Campfire Tales a few times and also read a review of Rob Zombie's new one. I think I'll pass. when I was younger I went in for the exploitation gorefests: Ilsa, Bloodsucking Freaks etc., which seems to be what the 1,00 corpses is going for.

I have always loved werewolf movies, from Lon Chaney Jr. to Oliver Reed. Two recent classics are Ginger Snaps and Dog Soldiers. The latter has a great debate as to whether turning into a werewolf is more like having to take a leak or a dump. If it's like the former, when you gotta go, you gotta go. If it's like the latter, maybe you can hold it for a while...

Thanks for the heads up on Ghost Ship, I'll rent it soon.


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dale cooper
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posted 23 April 2003 05:59 PM      Profile for dale cooper     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ginger Snaps was a great movie. I saw it in the theatre and the two elderly ladies in the aisle with me got up and left because there was too much content focused on "bodily functions". There's supposed to be 2 sequels in the works.

Also, for wolf movies, Wolfen takes the cake. I had a hard time finding it, but was it ever worth it.

[ 23 April 2003: Message edited by: dale cooper ]


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Polunatic
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posted 23 April 2003 06:10 PM      Profile for Polunatic   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've seen these videos over the past few weeks.

Boycott - excellent account of the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott.

Femme Fatale - seductive, sexy thriller worth seeing.

Fear.com - tasteless, slasher crap

About a Boy - definitely worth seeing - about a guy does nothing in life and doesn't care - a young boy comes into his life

The Truth about Charlie - remake of Charade with Tim Robbins, Thandie Newton, Mark Wahlberg. Entertaining thriller, full of twists and turns. Rated PG but with some frontal nudity

Standing in the Shadow of Motown - excellent documentary on the Funk Brothers who wrote almost every big R&B/Soul hit in the sixties and seventies. I saw it in the theatre but see it's out (or coming soon) on video

The Tuxedo - dumb, dumber, dumbest - Jackie Chan at his worst (not an easy feat)


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Jimmy Brogan
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posted 23 April 2003 06:27 PM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sam Raimi is God.


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R. J. Dunnill
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posted 23 April 2003 06:53 PM      Profile for R. J. Dunnill   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
So, if you like horror movies, this one's a good renter.
I was thinking of buying it, but it's a few dollars over my price limit.

I ordered Dogma and Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back instead.

RD


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Sine Ziegler
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posted 23 April 2003 09:47 PM      Profile for Sine Ziegler     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Get "Female Problems" starring Divine. Pure Classic.
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Tommy_Paine
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posted 24 April 2003 11:27 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Divine" of "Pink Flamingo's" fame/infamy? I'm horrible with actor's names and such, and what movies they've been in. I try real hard to lose myself in a movie, so I don't keep track of a lot of stuff.

In fact, if I start noticing details of cinematography, how actors are directed, and how a movie is edited, it means either I'm watching it for the third time, or it's really, really awful.

Like, "13 Ghosts." A few continuity problems in that one. Great visuals though.


I think "Ginger Snaps" was a very layered movie. Even the title has three different meanings. I wouldn't sit back and absorb it just as a typical "horror" movie, there's a poigniant allagory behind the whole film.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
dale cooper
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posted 24 April 2003 11:35 AM      Profile for dale cooper     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
What's the third meaning of Ginger Snaps?? I can get two...

Saw 'The Crime of Father Amarro' last night. Stunning film.


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Tommy_Paine
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posted 24 April 2003 11:39 AM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, there's the photography she does, the "Ginger Snaps", and she "snaps" in terms of having a mental breakdown, or at least a complete change of character, something we call "snapping" in slang for someone who does this, and of course, what do werewolves do but "snap" thier jaws?
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speechpoet
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posted 24 April 2003 01:11 PM      Profile for speechpoet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And the cookies. Don't forget the tasty cookies. In fact, the entire movie was a thinly-veiled metaphor for the way a new generation of bakers rising up to challenge the hegemony of Betty Crocker.
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Psychwarlord
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posted 24 April 2003 01:22 PM      Profile for Psychwarlord        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Waiting for Guffman" (1996) by Christopher Guest and Eugene Levy is a notch below "Best in Show" (which is funny as hell) but still has hilarious absurdities. I'm waiting for "A Mighty Wind." "Spinal Tap" is still the king of "mockumentaries."

A German movie "Mostly Martha" (2001) is about a beautiful female control freak chef who has to take care of her dead sister's child. There are no special effects I(except for the cooking, which is amazing). It is a relief to see a movie where people are the main subject rather than sex/horror/mayhem/technology.


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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 24 April 2003 01:49 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i just saw "a mighty wind" in theatres ... but i haven't seen "guffman" or "best in show" to compare. still, i liked it. eugene levy and catherine o'hara should get some sort of special "best acting by a duo" award.
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Weltschmerz
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posted 24 April 2003 05:36 PM      Profile for Weltschmerz     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey, I just saw "Mostly Martha" recently too! I LOOOVE foodie movies! "Big Night" and "Babbette's Feast" being my two current faves.

Also saw "The Widow of St. Pierre" recently, and quite enjoyed it. Daniel Auteuil and Juliette Binoche in a drama where you know things are going to go wrong, and they do, but not in the way you think. Quite enjoyable.

Personally, I found "Ringu" pretty creepy. But I don't watch a lot of horror movies any more.

Cheers,


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lagatta
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posted 24 April 2003 07:14 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
How I wish there was a foodie film festival!
From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
R. J. Dunnill
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posted 28 April 2003 01:48 AM      Profile for R. J. Dunnill   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It was Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back on Friday. Now there was something different! I also added Dogma to my collection, and I'll have to find some time to spin it up.

I also ordered a copy of the double feature Drive-In Classics disc from Elite, The Screaming Skull/The Giant Leeches, but I haven't received it yet. Since it was shipped USPS media mail, I won't hold my breath.

RD


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grrril
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posted 28 April 2003 02:42 AM      Profile for grrril     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I wuznt gunna watchit but ...

"The Shipping News" held my interest before I picked up the remote. Hellywood releases ususally garner a giant "ppppppppppphhhfffffeeeeeeeewwwwwww"
from moi, but,,, it held my attention.

There's so little about the East Coast in "pop Cul" that I was drawn in by the film.


From: pinkoville | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 28 April 2003 03:00 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
east coast movies: "margaret's museum" is worth a look.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 28 April 2003 03:42 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
How I wish there was a foodie film festival!

Nominations, anyone:

"The Cook, the Thief, his Wife and her Lover"
"Babbette's Feast."
"Eating Raoul"
"Bambi"


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
verbatim
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posted 28 April 2003 03:52 AM      Profile for verbatim   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You missed "Eat Drink Man Woman." I'm missing some, too, I think.
From: The People's Republic of Cook Street | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 28 April 2003 04:38 AM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A fabulous film, one of my all-time faves, verbatim. Ang Lee is a genius.

I watched Iris the other night. Wonderful movie. Poignant love story, beautifully shot.


From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
Polunatic
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posted 28 April 2003 10:14 AM      Profile for Polunatic   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I rented "The Believer" on the weekend. Very powerful movie (supposedly based on a true story) about a young Jewish man who becomes a neo-Nazi in New York City. Full of contradictions and interesting insights into the big question, "What would you have done if you were around in Hitler's day?"
From: middle of nowhere | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
beibhnn
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posted 28 April 2003 04:10 PM      Profile for beibhnn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Back to the food films: Like Water for Chocolate is my favourite drool inducing film.
From: in exile | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Weltschmerz
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posted 28 April 2003 04:47 PM      Profile for Weltschmerz     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Just what I was about to say. Damn fine movie. Poignant, painful, funny, and lots of good food! What more could you ask for?

And as much as I love Greenaway, "The Cook, the Thief.." is not what I would call a foodie movie. My wife and I had that exact conversation less than a week ago. Strange.

Cheers,


From: Trana | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Timebandit
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posted 28 April 2003 05:21 PM      Profile for Timebandit     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
How about Chocolat? I liked that one. I've even figured out how to make hot chocolate with chilis.
From: Urban prairie. | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
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posted 28 April 2003 09:06 PM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I just rented Werner Herzog's "Heart of Glass" Really freaky looking film. Apparently the entire cast except one were hypnotized before each shoot.

very interesting

Also rented Made, the sequal to "Swingers"


From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
grrril
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posted 04 May 2003 03:17 PM      Profile for grrril     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I recently watched Spanking the Monkey, a David O. Russel film. After seeing Flirting With Disaster, one of the funniest films I'd watched in some time, I was expecting another black comedy. Spanking the Monkey starts out as a black comedy but then turns into a dark drama about incest. I think it'll be awhile before I watch it again. Russel also made Three Kings with George Clooney but I didn't think it was all that great.
From: pinkoville | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
spindoctor
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posted 05 May 2003 09:30 AM      Profile for spindoctor   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I recently saw the movie Down By Law by Jim Jarmusch with Tom Waits and Roberto Benigni (long before A Beautiful Life)

The film was simply fantastic. One of the greatest lines I've heard in a long time.
Roberto Benigni plays a friendly lovable Italian guy who's in jail for killing somebody.

Unbelieving, Tom Waits turns to him and says.

"So you killed somebody, hey? What'd you do that for Bob?"

Classic.


From: Kingston, Jamaica.....oh alright....Kingston, Ontario | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 05 May 2003 12:36 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"You trow the ball at me... I trow ball at you..First-a-stroke."

...or the immortal: "In this case Bob, I'd have to say you're looking AT the window."

Try Dead Man, Jarmusch's bizarre anti-Western with Johnny Depp and the magnificent Gary Farmer.

And speaking of Mr Jump Street, I recently rented "Blow", which I quite enjoyed. Ever since I became a Dad, i've become quite a softy, particularly for father-daughter themes, The last scene in Blow quite thouroughly undid me, I must admit, although, in my own defense, it was very late, and my defenses were way down.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
clarabel
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posted 08 May 2003 04:33 PM      Profile for clarabel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Somebody mentioned "Secretary" a while back. I saw that recently too... recommended for a twisted look at love.

Speaking of which, I also rented "Bitter Moon" again recently. It is not the most polished of films, but there are some good laughs and some good dancing. But, there are definitely better Polanski's out there.

...one of which is his under-seen "The Tenant". Great film.


From: Halifax | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
audra trower williams
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posted 08 May 2003 08:10 PM      Profile for audra trower williams   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Gah. I hated Bitter Moon, it made me furious. [dancesnob]And the dancing was only good if by "good" you mean "gawdawful".[/dancesnob]
From: And I'm a look you in the eye for every bar of the chorus | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
clarabel
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posted 08 May 2003 10:13 PM      Profile for clarabel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
[dancesnob]And the dancing was only good if by "good" you mean "gawdawful".[/dancesnob]

Hey, don't knock it... it's where I learned all my smooth moves!

[ 08 May 2003: Message edited by: clarabel ]


From: Halifax | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged

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