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Author Topic: Band Aid 20
FakeDesignerWatch
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posted 16 November 2004 10:46 AM      Profile for FakeDesignerWatch   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio1/news/chartnews/041115_bandaid_lines.shtml

The famous singinging Brits are asking Africans if they know it's Christmas again.

Good, bad, a farce?


From: Milan | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged
runner
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posted 16 November 2004 11:02 AM      Profile for runner     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anything that raises money to help Africa cannot be too bad...providing the money gets well spent. I seem to remember that a good percentage of the money raised by the origianl concert did not make it's way to the needy
From: left behind by the folks | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 16 November 2004 11:32 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
an interesting interview on bbc radio about the re-recording ...
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 16 November 2004 11:34 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ah yes, time to revisit the charming sentiment...

"Well, tonight thank god it's them instead of you..."

But, at least it was better than the American equivalent "We are the World (and you're not)".

To me, the only 80s fundraising/awareness-raising activist starfest still worth listening to is Little Steven's "Sun City". Besides the groove, the lyrics directly challenged the music industry for its own hypocrisy, something that "Tears are not Enough" and "Do They Know It's Christmas" never did.


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josh
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posted 16 November 2004 11:38 AM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:

"Well, tonight thank god it's them instead of you..."

I don't believe the line was meant to be taken literally.


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Briguy
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posted 16 November 2004 11:43 AM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
At the risk of sounding patriotic, I always thought "Tears Are Not Enough" was the best recording of those three. A little hammy in places, but all three of the mega African benefit songs were guilty of excessive ham.
From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 16 November 2004 04:12 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
since no one is taking up the bbc radio link i provided, i'll summarise. an african head of an NGO, tajdine abdul rahim of "justice africa", pointed out that 20 years later, what's changed?

long-term debt, the EU's common agricultural policy, the drop in commodity prices (the US policy on cotton and west africa is a good example of this), there are a number of policies keeping africa down.

so, the BBC interviewer, jim naughtie, said, yet, isn't it a good thing that the western conscience is being re-awakened to this?

to which the NGO head replied, i want africa to be able to help itself.

oh, and does "band aid 20" show the west up as ignorant?

quote:
Millions of devout African Christians celebrate Christmas with a zeal unmatched by its often commercialised version in the rich world. From the slums of Lagos where faith healers attract thousands, to Zimbabwean fields where robed followers of the Zion Church hold open-air services, Africa teems with Christianity. Africans are even exporting missionaries to the West who might ask if Europeans "know it's Christmas?"

The 1984 Band Aid hit raised more than 10 million pounds for famine relief in Ethiopia, where the majority of people were Christian at the time and where Christianity dates back to the fourth century A.D.

Much of the money raised by the new single will go to Sudan's volatile Darfur region, where tens of thousands have died since March alone from disease and malnutrition -- and where most of the victims and needy are Muslim who would not be celebrating Christmas in any case.



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
gopi
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posted 16 November 2004 04:31 PM      Profile for gopi     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
But what we really want to know is this: will Bananarama be involved?
From: transient | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
runner
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posted 16 November 2004 04:35 PM      Profile for runner     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
and have they changed their hairstyles?
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Willowdale Wizard
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posted 16 November 2004 04:53 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
oh, you two are so funny.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Scott Piatkowski
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posted 17 November 2004 01:35 AM      Profile for Scott Piatkowski   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by josh:
I don't believe the line was meant to be taken literally.

OK, I guess I'll just figuratively thank god that other people are starving instead of me. That god... he always makes such good choices about who he's going to let starve.


From: Kitchener-Waterloo | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
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posted 17 November 2004 02:55 AM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Actually, I always thought that line injected a rather surprising bit of honesty into what would otherwise have been a Hallmark treacle-fest. Though few of us would ever say so out loud, I'd bet that most people, faced with images of human suffering, do experience a secret twinge of "thank-God-that-isn't-me".

I suspect it was a deliberate effort on Geldof's part -- he is a cranky bastard, after all -- to shame his intended audience into doing something.


From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 17 November 2004 04:35 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
according to midge ure:

quote:
"When Bono came to sing he was really concerned about the meaning of his line 'Well tonight, thank God it's them instead of you.'

"At the time U2 were a middling successful band, certainly not superstars, but he was not scared to query Bob.

"Why would I want somebody else to go through this?" he said.

"Bob was a real stickler for his words and what they meant and he had a very different angle on what that was.

"He told Bono, 'I'm not saying I want somebody else to suffer, I'm saying I'm glad it's not you.'

"I had sung the guide vocal on the demo so that everyone could hear the melody. Until Bono, the singers had listened to my guide, put on the headphones and sung it in a parrot-fashion.

"I'd sung his line an octave lower but Bono decided to change it.

"He sang 'Thank God' and just leaped an octave and this huge voice erupted out of this little guy. I was standing next to him and I jumped. I felt as if I was standing next to an opera singer. That was it, one take. He just ripped it.

"That's why no one else could ever do that line again. No one would want to -- how could they match him?" he said.



From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Klingon
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posted 17 November 2004 04:51 AM      Profile for Klingon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
K'pla! Interesting to see they're taking a new turn on the Band Aid thing.

I remember when the original Band Aid was organized in 1984. Bob Geldoff, not Bono, was the guy who actually spearheaded the idea. He, of course, went on to work on the Live Aid dual concert the following year.

I was in the US when it came out, and it was interesting to note that while its thrust was mainly charity, many of the musicians wasted no effort putting it in contrast to the oppressive fiasco politics of the Reagan-Thatcher regimes.

Of course, Band Aid inspired US musicians at the MTV Awards just after it (they actually gave Band Aid an award) to put together the USA For Africa album, which featured the single We Are the World (which in turn inspired Canadian musicians to produce Tears Are Not Enough).

Another neat development was that many of the musicians involved in all three projects went on to help Little Steven put together AUAA, Artists United Against Apartheid, which put out the album Sun City in early 1985.

Altogether, these appeared to be good progressive acts of consciousness and charity in the face of the state-sponsored terror across the globe. Seriously, the 1980s were a really boring, unimaginative, reactionary and depressing period overall.


From: Kronos, but in BC Observing Political Tretchery | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
josh
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posted 17 November 2004 07:40 AM      Profile for josh     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Scott Piatkowski:

OK, I guess I'll just figuratively thank god that other people are starving instead of me. That god... he always makes such good choices about who he's going to let starve.


I always took it as a sarcastic comment on the attitude of most people in the west.


From: the twilight zone between the U.S. and Canada | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 17 November 2004 08:02 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by josh:
I don't believe the line was meant to be taken literally.

Exactly. That line was supposed to be a reflection of the attitude of middle-class people in industrialized nations, not an endorsement of it.

Of course, "Do they know it's Christmas" is a pretty stupid sentiment, I agree. But geez, let's not get silly with the political correctness, huh?

Edited to say: Or, I could have read the rest of the thread since josh said in one sentence what took me two paragraphs.

[ 17 November 2004: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged

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