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Author Topic: World Chess Championship in Mexico
N.Beltov
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posted 21 September 2007 10:23 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And the tiger from Madras, Viswanathan Anand, leads the Category XXI event with 3 wins and 4 draws in 7 games. The tournament, being held in Mexico City, is a double round robin affair in which everyone in the event plays each other twice, once on the White side and once on the Black side, for a total of 14 games each.

The winner of the tournament will be the World Champion. However, there is a complicated series of matches, depending on the results, that at least two players are entitled to demand, following the tourney. Both Russian Vladimir Kramnik and Bulgarian Veselin Topalov have such arrangements. There is long history in modern chess of World Champions having "the right to a rematch" following a defeat in a match.

Matches tend to get more mainstream press coverage than round robin tournaments like the current one. In any case, the internet coverage is outstanding, with all sorts of videos, games analysis by GrandMasters (GMs), and so on.

The Internet Chess Club has free game of the day reports, ICC in Mexico, and Daily Summaries by Mig Greengard. There's a flashy little video of Anand on the site right now.

Internet Chess Club

While the host site isn't exactly perfect, an interested person can watch, live and all at once, the games in Mexico City. (Java software is needed but that's about it.)

World Chess Championship - Mexico City - official website

Live Games

I'm hoping for Anand myself as I would like to see India get a World Champion. An Anand-Kramnik match to follow would be interesting as well.

Mig Greengard's "Daily Dirt" website is amusing and worth having a peek for chess gossip if you are interested in that sort of thing. Mig is currently flogging a book by Gary Kasparov.

the Chess Ninja and Mig's Daily Dirt

Whoops. Here's a list of the players.

Anand,Viswanathan 2792
Gelfand,Boris 2733
Kramnik,Vladimir 2769
Grischuk,Alexander 2726
Leko,Peter 2751
Aronian,Levon 2750
Svidler,Peter 2735
Morozevich,Alexander 2758

The ICC website, This Week In Chess, ChessBase, or any good site can give you a crosstable. And if you're a chess nerd, like me, you can download the games and display your own crosstable on chess database software [which every serious player, of course, has].

Vishy Anand, Kasparov's favorite to win.

Alexander Grischuk, a favourite of female chess fans

Vladimir Kramnik, current World Champion

[ 01 October 2007: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Caissa
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posted 21 September 2007 10:36 AM      Profile for Caissa     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It will be interesting to see if Kramnik can make a move in the second half and whether Gelfand can continue his excellent showing.

It's very interesting that the older players are leading the pack.


From: Saint John | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 21 September 2007 10:46 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Here's a nice photo of Boris Gelfand:

All of the photos come from a photo essay by Mark Crowther assessing the prospects of each of the candidates.

A preview by Mark Crowther

[ 21 September 2007: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


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Catchall
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posted 21 September 2007 10:51 AM      Profile for Catchall        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Did you know that there are separate categories and championships for male chess players and female chess players? I find this exceptionally odd. There is no reason in the world why chess should be segregated according to gender. Is this one of those "men and women think differently" things that got the dean of Harvard fired? I understand why females can't compete against males in virtually all activities involving strength or stamina. But chess? What the hell is that all about?

[ 21 September 2007: Message edited by: Catchall ]


From: Nova Scotia | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
oldgoat
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posted 21 September 2007 10:53 AM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I had no idea about that Catchall. Nor had I really given much thought to not being aware of any big name female chess celebrities. It's pretty clear where all the media attention goes.
From: The 10th circle | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 21 September 2007 11:04 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's about encouraging women and girls to play. Those women who have reached the highest level, such as Judit Polgar, can't be bothered to play only against other women. But it should be their choice. Women's chess, like many other sports involving women, needs to be encouraged. This is well served by having some women only events, by encouraging girls to play in separate divisions, and so on. The Chess Olympiad, like the regular Olympics, has separate divisions. But I think Judit and some other women play in the men's side anyway. I don't have any problem giving women chess players a leg up and neither should anyone else. Good grief.

Judit Polgar, the strongest female chess player in history, who has defeated (male) World Champions.

Gary Kasparov, apparently somewhat of a chauvinist pig, once claimed that no woman would ever beat him. Judit pounded him on the Black side of a Najdorf Sicilian (Kasparov's fave opening) a few years ago, just before Kasparov retired. It was a fabulous game.


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Caissa
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posted 21 September 2007 11:05 AM      Profile for Caissa     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I believe there is only 1 woman in the top 100 women: Judit Polgar. She has at times been in the top 10.Her sister Susan is Chairperson of the United States Chess Federation. Susan just served as honourary chairperson for the Canadian Youth Chess Championships this summer in Ottawa. The third sister Sofia had the highest performance rating ever in a chess tournament. From an early age, their father Laslo worked to turn them into chess prodigies.

There has been much debate in the chess community re. men/women and chess playing ability. Nurture vs nature and variations thereof frame the debate.


From: Saint John | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
Catchall
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posted 21 September 2007 11:21 AM      Profile for Catchall        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In cases like this, where certain cerebral or academic pursuits seem to be dominated by one gender or the other, I believe it's often due to inherent causes. I'm not talking about the ability/inability to do it, but rather the inclination to do it. There is no reason whatsoever that the best female chess player in the women couldn't beat the best male player. Unfortunately, females seem to be drawn to the sport in far fewer numbers. Part of this might be due to sexism. But part of it, I believe, is due to differences in what their brains are interested in.

[ 21 September 2007: Message edited by: Catchall ]


From: Nova Scotia | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 21 September 2007 11:43 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Catchall: There is no reason whatsoever that the best female chess player in the women couldn't beat the best male player.

It's already been done and more than once. Why are you expressing mock support for something that's already been accomplished?

I don't see, either, what the expression "what their brains are interested in" is any more useful than "what women are interested in" unless you have some claim about the brains of women. Furthermore, if it's just a matter of your "belief" then it sounds like trolling lite to me. Spare us the speculative mumbo jumbo thanks very much.


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Catchall
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posted 21 September 2007 11:49 AM      Profile for Catchall        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"It's already been done and more than once. Why are you expressing mock support for something that's already been accomplished?"

I meant routinely.

"I don't see, either, what the expression "what their brains are interested in" is any more useful than "what women are interested in" unless you have some claim about the brains of women. Furthermore, if it's just a matter of your "belief" then it sounds like trolling lite to me. Spare us the speculative mumbo jumbo thanks very much."

I will humbly defer to your apparent ability to speak for everyone. However, you should know that today's speculative mumbo jumbo can be tomorrow's scientific fact.


From: Nova Scotia | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 21 September 2007 12:06 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Why not share some of your beliefs about the brains of women in the feminism forum? I'm sure your remarks would be very welcome and greatly appreciated.
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DMcLeod
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posted 21 September 2007 12:47 PM      Profile for DMcLeod     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good luck, Mr. Anand.

I think it was William Burroughs who quit chess with the comment that it was a game for thinking machines.

I myself no longer play, as I would rather play no chess, than bad chess.

Perhaps that's puritanical, or is it egotistical?

I watched Kasparov play online in realtime, and even I knew that he had made a bad move.

Still, outcomes of Man Vs Machine are not inevitable, and will never be, regarding chess.

Cannot super duper massively parallel machines ever err?

Somehow, I'm remembering a James Bond film....

[ 21 September 2007: Message edited by: DMcLeod ]


From: BC | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 21 September 2007 01:35 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by N.Beltov:
Why not share some of your beliefs about the brains of women in the feminism forum? I'm sure your remarks would be very welcome and greatly appreciated.


Actually, what you should have said was something like this: "Gee, you know, we've had this debate off an on for years, over at the feminist forum. It's been a while since the last one. If you started a thread there, I'm sure your fresh take would spark interesting debate."

Stick with me, Beltov, I'll show you how to have fun yet.

Shit disturbing aside, I miss having a chess partner. My last one was Jimmy Brogan, who used to post here. And I suspect still does once in a blue moon under a new nom de plume.

Jimmy and I used to play at work, back in the days when we could. I remember us being fairly matched, once I shook the rust off.

I think my opening game was better than his, and my middle game was, maybe, just a bit better than his. But I'm a hopeless closer, and Jimmy was much better than I there.

But what I liked was, when you are thinking and anticipating moves ahead, it's as if you can feel the other person's mind.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 21 September 2007 01:56 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
In today's results, Anand and Gelfand had a short draw. As well, it looks like Svidler and Kramnik are in the middle of a repetition of moves leading to a draw. So, probably no change at the top.

Live from Mexico City


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Catchall
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posted 21 September 2007 04:16 PM      Profile for Catchall        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
"Gee, you know, we've had this debate off an on for years, over at the feminist forum. It's been a while since the last one. If you started a thread there, I'm sure your fresh take would spark interesting debate."

OK. If you've had such debates it is doubtful that I could offer anything new. And anyway, judging by Mr Beltov's rather defensive stance, I suspect that opinions that deviate from the accepted norm are really not very welcome.

I engage in debate not only to sway others to my way of thinking but also to grow in my understanding. For example, I was impressed with the arguments in favour of Hugo Chavez in the thread I started earlier this week. It really got me thinking.

With respect to the differences between how the brains of men and women work, I do hope that the editorial position of this board is not that there are no differences, because that would be just plain silly.

[ 21 September 2007: Message edited by: Catchall ]


From: Nova Scotia | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 21 September 2007 04:49 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Sorry, I was being obtuse, and you shouldn't take anything I say when it is accompanied by a big smile emoticon too seriously, or personally.

Actually, I don't think that ever has been debated in the feminist forum.

But I'm disrupting Mr. Beltov's chess thread, so I think it's a good time for me to castle.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Catchall
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posted 21 September 2007 05:23 PM      Profile for Catchall        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thank you. I agree.

Personally, I've always, if not infrequently, enjoyed chess. I lose quite often but still congratulate myself at actually having learned how each piece moves. Sometimes I win though, but it's usually when I play against my 7 year old daughter. Oh well, ya gotta take the wins where you can.

[ 21 September 2007: Message edited by: Catchall ]


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Catchfire
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posted 22 September 2007 02:30 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Topalov should never have been the world champion, but a Kramnik-Anand match would be a joy to watch.

Of course, Anand hasn't won yet, but the Tiger has deserved the prize for a long time, and things are looking up for him.

Remember the short-lived babble chess tourney? Good times.


From: On the heather | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 22 September 2007 06:54 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Catchfire: Remember the short-lived babble chess tourney? Good times.

Remember? I organized it. I wound up calling it the Cat Herder Chess Tournament, or something like that, because of the difficulties in getting players to complete their games. It eventually fell apart. grumble. grumble.


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Catchfire
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posted 22 September 2007 07:17 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Poor Cat Herders
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Trevormkidd
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posted 22 September 2007 11:36 AM      Profile for Trevormkidd     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Catchfire:
Topalov should never have been the world champion,

Why not? He completely dominated the tournament to determine the world champion.

quote:
but a Kramnik-Anand match would be a joy to watch.

Well I hope someone enjoys it. I personally couldn't think of a more boring match to watch. I am a big fan of Anand, but he is a 1. e4 player and Kramnik will play the Petroff or Berlin Wall against him everytime. It will be completely lifeless, nothing but draws, unless one of them falls asleep and the other wins on time. zzzzzzzz


From: SL | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
Tommy_Paine
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posted 24 September 2007 12:53 PM      Profile for Tommy_Paine     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by N.Beltov:

Remember? I organized it. I wound up calling it the Cat Herder Chess Tournament, or something like that, because of the difficulties in getting players to complete their games. It eventually fell apart. grumble. grumble.


There was a game I used to play with my high school buddies called "Diplomacy". Fun game, I am sure some of you have played before.

Years ago, I went searching on line to see if I could play via internet. I did find devotees, but I got the impression that they'd send a guy with a broken nose and cauliflower ears to your house if you ever missed a turn.


From: The Alley, Behind Montgomery's Tavern | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 24 September 2007 01:08 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There are, in fact, innumerable sites to play chess on the internet. Most involve downloading an interface appropriate to the particular site. The Internet Chess Club, which charges a fee after one week, the Free Internet Chess Server, which has no fee, PlayChess, associated with ChessBase and Fritz chess products, also involving a fee, Yahoo, and many other sites are available. Any babbler who wishes to play chess online can do so and play organized tournaments as well. Those sites are more willing than I was, with babblers, to forfeit players who are slow to complete their games.

BTW, Anand and Kramnik are playing right now. Kramnik is "up the exchange" in a queen and rook(s) endgame. This is a key game. Shhh...


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 25 September 2007 05:31 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
This Week in Chess: Anand holds Kramnik after an exciting game and will have to have a major catastrophe not to win the event. Boris Gelfand is a point behind but seems to be tiring, then there are a group of three (players) a half point further back.

[ 25 September 2007: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


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Caissa
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posted 25 September 2007 06:00 AM      Profile for Caissa     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Kramnik and Ananad agreed to a draw while there was still much double edged play on the board. Anand is a point ahead of the field after 10 rounds.
From: Saint John | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 25 September 2007 06:19 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I am very impressed with the level of coverage for this event. It really is outstanding. Post game interviews with the players available to world wide audiences, GM analysis left and right, background commentary, live games, downloadable game files, etc.. I am just loving this.

Here is the full post game press conference.

Imagine if poetry or, better yet, social justice issues got this kind of deep and detailed attention. I think our side might just win.

Anand -Kramnik video clip

You can see Alexander Grischuk post-game kibbitzing with Anand and Kramnik.

[ 25 September 2007: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Caissa
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posted 26 September 2007 06:31 AM      Profile for Caissa     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Vishy is a 1.5 points clear with 3 rounds to go.
From: Saint John | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 26 September 2007 10:02 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I am so very happy for the Tiger from Madras, Viswanathan (a.k.a. "Vishy") Anand. My own father was born in that city so I feel a family connection.

The event itself has, as I have mentioned, the most outstanding coverage. And, perhaps due to Anand's example of kind-hearted sportsmanship among other causes, there are some very positive precedents indeed. Here is an example:

What's interesting about this photo? Simple: the player who suffered a bitter defeat is sitting side-by-side with his opponent and going over the game while the loss is still fresh in his mind.

quote:
Frederic Friedel of ChessBase: Anand and Morozevich in their press conference. Note that at this world championship all players have appeared to speak to the press, even after bitter defeats. We hope that Mexico has set an example that will be followed by other super tournaments.

Hear! Hear! This is especially excellent as the recent match between Topalov and Kramnik reached the point where the players did not even shake each other's hand before/after some games. What a contrast.

Freidel's report

[ 26 September 2007: Message edited by: N.Beltov ]


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 29 September 2007 01:14 PM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's official. India's Vishy Anand is the unbelievable, undefeated, and undisputed heavyweight chess champion of the world. Heh. The tiger from Madras has prevailed and the world championship has returned to the land of the birthplace of chess. All is well.
From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Agent 204
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posted 29 September 2007 05:03 PM      Profile for Agent 204   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by N.Beltov:
What's interesting about this photo? Simple: the player who suffered a bitter defeat is sitting side-by-side with his opponent and going over the game while the loss is still fresh in his mind.

No kidding. Can you imagine Korchnoi sitting next to Karpov like that?

From: home of the Guess Who | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
N.Beltov
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posted 01 October 2007 06:30 AM      Profile for N.Beltov   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Wearing his laurels, a mark of honour from ancient times, Indian Super GM Vishy Anand talks about the victory in his fluent Spanish.

Viswanathan Anand, undisputed World Chess Champion


From: Vancouver Island | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged

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