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Author Topic: Classical Music
Vansterdam Kid
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posted 01 January 2005 08:50 PM      Profile for Vansterdam Kid   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I didn't know quite where to put this but I thought maybe the culture forum.

Anyways I was interested in listening to classical music as a sort of background thing while studying i.e.: Bach, Vivaldi, Mozart et al (although it by no means has to be limited to those artists, that specific genre or time period). Since I know almost nothing about it I was interesting in hearing people's opinions on their favourite types of classical music. Or even just instrumental music.

And....Happy New Years.


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Fidel
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posted 01 January 2005 10:45 PM      Profile for Fidel     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Just so long as it's not Wagner, Stravinsky, Puccini, Elgar, Haydn or Brahms. I'd sooner listen to the mating calls of moose.
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Contrarian
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posted 01 January 2005 11:05 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've been partial to Mozart ever since I saw the movie "Amadeus" and bought the magnificent soundtrack. Bach wrote so much... try the Brandenburg Concertos. The thing is, it's a pity to have them for just background.

Your local public library probably has CDs that you could borrow to see what works for you. And the CBC radio show Sound Advice talks about what CD's are available. CBC link Note a couple of other programs are mentioned at this link.


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Vansterdam Kid
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posted 02 January 2005 04:10 AM      Profile for Vansterdam Kid   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well even though my tastes are more contemporary, if I like them then I'd probably start listening to them in a more intensive way (not just as background music). I find it intresting to listen to diffrent instruments within a piece, the beats these sorts of things. Analysing the mood of a particular piece of music can be quite intresting.

Thanks for the advice and the link.

[ 02 January 2005: Message edited by: Vansterdam Kid ]


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RealityStick
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posted 03 January 2005 12:08 PM      Profile for RealityStick   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For studying, I'd mostly suggest smaller works (structurally speaking), such as Handel's Concerti Grossi Opus 3, Mendelssohn's string symphonies, pretty much anything by der Herren Mozart, Bach, und Beethoven.

The Naxos label has a pretty good set of "Discovering the Classics" CD's (last time I looked they were about $8 each) if you want do some generally exploring (you'll find examples of classical music ranging from Gregorian chant all the way through to Richard Strauss).

A small note of warning: If you happen to be studying Nietzche or Kafka, do NOT listen to anything by Mahler (unless you've hidden every sharp object in the house)!

RS


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VanLuke
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posted 03 January 2005 12:29 PM      Profile for VanLuke     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Vansterdam Kid

A composer who hasn't been mentioned here -maybe because he's not really a classical composer- is Carl Orff. Check out Carmina Burana written in 1937 but DEFINITELY not sounding like a 20th century piece.

More like that oxymoron of "modern classical music".

I find it awesome and the same goes for the ballet version with Les Grand Ballets Canadiens (or something like this) I attended decades ago at Place des Arts. (Normally I don't like ballet at all)

The VPL has several version of it. Check out an orchestral version. One is here (I don't know the quality of orchestra and singers though):

http://tinyurl.com/6qe6t

Other versions can be found here:

http://tinyurl.com/4xb3v

The texts are based on manuscripts thought to be from the 11th century and are mainly in Latin. It's hard to describe music without playing it.


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VanLuke
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posted 03 January 2005 12:30 PM      Profile for VanLuke     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Fidel

You surely don't prefer moose calls to the Hungarian Dances by Brahms.

They are based on folk songs and are great to listen to.


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oldgoat
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posted 03 January 2005 02:54 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Fidel:
Just so long as it's not Wagner, Stravinsky, Puccini, Elgar, Haydn or Brahms. I'd sooner listen to the mating calls of moose.

Well! anyway,....

Vansterdam, it is with a raised eyebrow that I view anyone listeng to classical as a mere background activity to something else, but better than not listening at all.

You don't want anything really powerful, so stay away from the 19th century biggies. You may find some Chopin piano stuff does the trick, but it can be pretty diverting. Go for piano etudes and fantasies, and such like minor works.

I would also recommend Bach, specifically the Brandenburg Concertos. Lovely pieces, but won't intrude too much unless you wish to pause and let them. Likewise, many of Bach's contemporaries such as Telemann, Vivaldi, the Couperins, Scarlottis, or other of that era.

May your studies be serene.

[ 03 January 2005: Message edited by: oldgoat ]


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f1 dad
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posted 03 January 2005 03:33 PM      Profile for f1 dad     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I second Contrarian's recommendation to check out CD's from your public library. It's best to know what you like before you sink any money into building a classical CD collection.

My favourites are the keyboard music of Bach. (You can't go wrong with Glenn Gould performing Bach.) Beethoven gets a thumbs up too. In particular the 3rd symphony and his late string quartets are good stuff. Also Chopin's etudes make for high-quality ear candy.

I find the orchestral works of guys like Wagner, Mahler, and Richard Strauss to be a bit bombastic for my tastes, but they do have interesting harmonies and might give you some food for thought if you're a musician.

I'd also recommend using Wikipedia and other sources to get a sense of the history of the music, if you're really wanting to get into it. In the same way that knowing some rock band today was influence by the Stooges can give you a deeper appreciation of their music, knowing that Beethoven was a bridge between the Classical and Romantic eras can help you find stuff in his music you might not have noticed otherwise.


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Contrarian
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posted 03 January 2005 03:42 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Is that the Three Stooges you're talking about? Or some actual band?
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al-Qa'bong
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posted 04 January 2005 01:16 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Some of the more accessible modern stuff that you might like could include Erik Satie's Gnossiennes and Gymnopedies [I ain't sure of my spellin' here], Debussy [if you like moody impressionism], Rachmaninoff's Preludes and the Lt. Kije Suite by Sergei Prokoffiev.

Groovy tunes for newcomers to classical music are Bach's Brandenburg Concertos and also the violin concertos by Tchiakowsky, Mendelssohn, Brahms, Beethoven and Wieniawsky.

Check out chamber music; trios, quartets and quintets by Schubert and Brahms when you're ready.


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Catchfire
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posted 04 January 2005 01:24 AM      Profile for Catchfire   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The best description of Wagner I ever heard came from Rossini:
quote:
Wagner has good moments, but bad quarter hours.

He was also a virulent anti-semite, and believed that there were vegetarian wildcats in northern Canada, citing them as proof of the virtues of vegetarianism. If there ever were any vegetarian wildcats in Canada, they're gone now. I'd lay off him. And Vivaldi is bland pop music. Chopin and Brahms are right on. For some Can con, if you like the piano, be a patriot and pick up some Glenn Gould variations.

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radiorahim
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posted 04 January 2005 01:50 AM      Profile for radiorahim     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've become a fan of Claude Debussy of late...not really classical...more late 19th, early 20th century.
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Vansterdam Kid
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posted 04 January 2005 02:06 AM      Profile for Vansterdam Kid   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks again for the info all -- seriously.

I know it might seem cheesy that I said just background studying music, but I was serious. Although like I said if I like it....

Besides when I say I don't know too much about it, I'm quite serious. I know the major composers -- but some of the other ones that have been mentioned up thread are news to me.

I'm such an un-cultured swine.


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Melsky
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posted 04 January 2005 10:28 AM      Profile for Melsky   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One of my teachers in highschool told me there was a study that proved that studying to music hindered the studying process, with one exception: baroque music, which actually helped people study. I'm curious if this is why you are looking for classical music to study to.
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lagatta
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posted 04 January 2005 10:43 AM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't know how one study can prove anything in general about how people study, or work by themselves. People are so different in that regard. I always listen to Radio-Canada 2 or CBC 2 while working at home. Silence makes me too anxious to concentrate.

Radio-Canada 2 (Espace-Musique) has a really good "flow" now to work to.


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thwap
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posted 04 January 2005 10:51 AM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
For people raised on 2-3 minute pop songs, starting off with classical music as "background" music seems like a sensible way to get into 20-30 minute pieces without a catchy chorus or guitar solo. After a few times, you'll get a hankering to do nothing else but listen, and then you'll have some familiarity with the pieces.

among many other things,
I liked Brahms's "Hungarian Dances"

Tie-choffskee's "Symphony Number 6" (it's over-the-top melodramatic stuff that i ashamedly go for.)

I had a cd with a bunch of Chopin's works by Ivo Pogorelich that really impressed me.

There's lots of good stuff. Check out the library first.


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Melsky
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posted 04 January 2005 11:21 AM      Profile for Melsky   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by lagatta:
I don't know how one study can prove anything in general about how people study, or work by themselves. People are so different in that regard. I always listen to Radio-Canada 2 or CBC 2 while working at home. Silence makes me too anxious to concentrate.

Radio-Canada 2 (Espace-Musique) has a really good "flow" now to work to.


I don't necessarily believe the study, I'm just curious. My husband listens to classical music while he works and it helps him. I listen to punk/indy music when I paint and that helps me keep going. Or silence is good too.


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skdadl
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posted 04 January 2005 12:40 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I had a cd with a bunch of Chopin's works by Ivo Pogorelich that really impressed me.

My step-daughter, who is more qualified than I to judge among performances, used to worship Pogorelich, and indeed may still. I must ask her.

Working to music -- I always used to need total silence to work, and yet now I quite like a murmur in the background. I can even work with interviews as white noise and suddenly pick up on a word that makes me want to listen to the discussion.


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chimo
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posted 05 January 2005 01:38 AM      Profile for chimo        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i just picked up the following:
- paganini's 18 sonatas for violin & guitar, performed by moshe hammer & norbert kraft. (3 vols)
- misc augustin barrios (south american guitar) on 2 vols (discs) performed by antigoni goni & enno voorhorst

^^ all those discs were made in canada & recorded at a church in newmarket ontario. kraft is canadian too. i had fairly low expectations because i always thought that www.naxos.com recordings would suck, being so cheap but they are really good. (not that i'm a connoiseur, but i sure liked them)

i'm more into solo stuff, small groups, etc rather than symphonies or orchestras. symphonies always seem so overdone & whatnot. (beethoven's 9th is the worst) there are exceptions, but as a rule i don't usually listen to that stuff. my 'desert island' recording would be either glenn gould's 1955 recording of the goldberg variations or jean-jacques kantorow playing bach's solo violin stuff


bach is the best composer, then there's beethoven, handel... skip a few, then Mozart is down at the bottom

[ 05 January 2005: Message edited by: chimo ]


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Left Turn
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posted 05 January 2005 01:55 AM      Profile for Left Turn        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well if you're going to study to music, I would recommend something quiet. It depends on what you like. Here's what I would sugguest

"The four Seasons" by Vivaldi
Any Chopin
The slow (2nd) movement to Beethoven's 13th (Pathétique) Sonata

There's lots else to choose from, compilation CD's of slower classical works/movements work well in this regard. Hope this helps.


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fuslim
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posted 05 January 2005 06:52 AM      Profile for fuslim     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I found the sound track to "thirty-two short films about Glenn Gould" to be very satisfiying as a sampler.
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Papal Bull
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posted 05 January 2005 09:43 AM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One time I sat down and listened to the ENTIRE ring cycle all the way through. 15 hours of Teutonic pride. It can get a bit more than a little disturbing...Even if you attempt to ignore his politics.
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gula
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posted 05 January 2005 05:12 PM      Profile for gula     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anna Russell's 15-20 minutes version of the ring cycle is a hoot. Not good for studying though.
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oldgoat
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posted 05 January 2005 05:37 PM      Profile for oldgoat     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The entire Ring Cycle. P_B, this explains much

I loved Anna Russell. My parents had her albums when I was a kid. Some ancient relative of mine knew her through the Royal Conservatory when she was young and trying to take her music more seriously.


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ShyViolet
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posted 05 January 2005 05:44 PM      Profile for ShyViolet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
oh my goodness!!! i sometimes listen to classical music when studying/doing homework!!! i have 5 cds that i rotate....

1) tchaikovsky: romeo & juliet/ songs from the nutcracker

2) holst: the planets (this one also has 2 songs by elgar on it, but i hate his music so i never listen to him) i LOVE "neptune: the mystic"!!!

3) from the incas...to the world: andean symphony vol 1 (got this for a scoial studies project and fell in love with it)

4) romanza-art of the clarinet (assorted artists)

5) the magic of the clarinet (including songs by weber, bruch, mozart, brahms)

i have 4 & 5 because i played the clarinet for 5 years. i actually got them as a suggestion for my teacher so that i could get an idea of what good tone sounds like.

anyhow, when picking music to study to, obviously you should go for the calm, tranquil type of music b/c it will relax your mind (perhaps something with pianos or woodwind instruments). don't go for the loud, racing kind (think wagner's "ride of the valkyries")!!

good luck vk!!! happy studying!!!


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al-Qa'bong
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posted 05 January 2005 07:32 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
5) the magic of the clarinet (including songs by weber, bruch, mozart, brahms)

[snob]
*cough* *cough*
[/snob]

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chimo
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posted 05 January 2005 08:40 PM      Profile for chimo        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by oldgoat:
The entire Ring Cycle.

what's the ring cycle?


From: sobolev spaces :-) | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 05 January 2005 08:47 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It is a late 19th century orchestral piece written by Richard Wagner. Properly called Der Ring it basically is a tale of the Ragnarok and the death of Wotain. But when you get through the basic mythos that Wagner used, it is a very frightening tale of Germany's virulent nationalism and warlike tendencies at the time. On a note, Wagner was an anti-semite. A very big one. He considered that the Northerners (people who shared Teutonic sentiments/blood) to be superior. Mind you, he was more vocal than most, even though such thought was overly common not only in Germany, but in most nations at the time.
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Mandos
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posted 05 January 2005 09:26 PM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I am, sadly, going to miss the Ring Cycle in Toronto when the whole thing is done in one go in 2006. Atom Egoyan is directing, I believe.
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thwap
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posted 05 January 2005 09:42 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I also had a two cd thingy called "Venetian Vespers" that I liked very much.

Any good modern composers? I listened to CBC classical once, and they had some new guy, with "angry" music, but it sounded like soundtrack for The Planet of the Apes.


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Papal Bull
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posted 05 January 2005 09:46 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
thwap, I've noticed that there are many up and coming classical composers from Korea and Japan. I can't name any names right now, I'd have to dig them up. But there was one woman who played the flute, and the sound was absolutely stunning.
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thwap
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posted 05 January 2005 09:50 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks.
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Wellington
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posted 05 January 2005 10:11 PM      Profile for Wellington     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Lots of good suggestions here - CBC FM plays a lot of classical (can't remember if it's Radio 1 or 2) and there's the commercial 96.3FM in the GTA. Also, as someone has pointed out, there's good anthologies and budget labels on CD - Naxos is a good example. As well, a lot of excellent recordings from the vinyl-LP era have been repackaged and re-released at (sometimes)good prices.

Not necessarily for "background" listening, but some twentieth-century composers I enjoy are Prokofiev ("Peter and the Wolf" but try his Symphony No. 5); Aaron Copland ("Clarinet Concerto", which I think was written for Benny Goodman); and Benjamin Britten (the "Sea Interludes", which are a concert piece extracted from the opera "Peter Grimes", are a good place to start). Also, Alban Berg's violin concerto - then you can say you listened to and enjoyed twelve-tone music.

I'd encourage anyone who's discovering classical music to (1) plunge in and listen - don't be afraid to decide for yourself what you do and don't like; (2) try and attend a live concert or recital.

Like Mandos, I'm not going to be able to attend (actually, I'm not able to afford) the whole Ring cycle in 2006 - but definitely looking forward to Siegfried next month. The "Forest Murmurs" is a beautiful concert piece from that opera and might even be considered good background listening!

Edited to add a couple of links [and re-edited to fix a link]. For classical music in Toronto, see the online Wholenote magazine. Performances of "new music" are listed at torontohearandnow

[ 05 January 2005: Message edited by: Wellington ]

[ 05 January 2005: Message edited by: Wellington ]


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2003  |  IP: Logged
ShyViolet
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posted 05 January 2005 11:18 PM      Profile for ShyViolet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:

[snob]
*cough* *cough*
[/snob]

HEY!!!! i am NOT a snob...jsut a band geek!


From: ~Love is like pi: natural, irrational, and very important~ | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 05 January 2005 11:22 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I thought about this thread while listening to Tom Allen on the way to work this morning.

Just listen to CBC Stereo. They have a diverse playlist that isn't limited to Classical, although most of it appeals to those who like Classical music. I heard a quasi-jazz chanteuse singing an Everly Brothers tune this afternoon, right after a violinist played Rimsky-Korsakov's Song of India for example.


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Papal Bull
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posted 05 January 2005 11:30 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'd love to attend the Ring Cycle, or Siegfried...Ah...But I can dream.
From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 05 January 2005 11:36 PM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey, I know; let's rent a bus and drive to Bayreuth!
From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
ShyViolet
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posted 05 January 2005 11:54 PM      Profile for ShyViolet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
k, al-qu'bong..i must confess i figured out what you meant with the snob thing. I KNOW I KNOW....i'm slow.

anyhow, there is NOTHING wrong with the clarinet!!! it is a beautful, soothing, smooth, melodious instrument and i am proud to say that i play it!!!!

you're lucky i don't know where you live...'cause if i did, i'd come and show you the magic of my clarinet!!! and i'd make sure that it was mostly over the second break (you know, the real screechy high notes!). maybe a little "aloha oe"? or "clarinet candy"? perhaps "homage" or abram's "pursuit"? I'VE GOT IT!!!! i'll play "o holy night" (which i can't play worth crap!)for you!!! it's your choice, my man! though i must say that this experience would be especially tortuous as i played it for the 1st time in 6 months yesterday. mom wouldn't let me take it with me to college she said it'd detract from my studies. but, i did suprisingly better than i expected. i remembered all my fingerings but sadly my chops are going soft (which didn't make the second break much fun )....

anyhow, the clarinet is MAGICAL and don't you forget it!!!

*note: no hostility meant in my threats! it's all in fun! *

[ 05 January 2005: Message edited by: ShyViolet417 ]


From: ~Love is like pi: natural, irrational, and very important~ | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
al-Qa'bong
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posted 06 January 2005 12:06 AM      Profile for al-Qa'bong   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A clarinet player! Can you blow where there's a -51º wind chill? If so, come on up here.

Check out Artie Shaw's Gramercy Five if you get the chance. He plays a Fralich-sounding groove on Dr. Livingstone, I Presume that just swings.

I don't know many classical pieces for the licorice stick; I keep to the Artie Shaws, Benny Goodmans, Pee Wee Russells and Sidney Bechets.

Oh, and my snobbery was in reference to calling instrumental works "songs." "Songs" need "singers." If, however, the pieces in question are songs that are played as instrumentals, I apologize.


From: Saskatchistan | Registered: Feb 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 06 January 2005 12:18 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hee. An ex-boyfriend of mine used to call classical pieces "tunes".

"Oh, that one by Chopin - that's a great tune!" Used to alternate between making me chuckle and making me insane.


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
ShyViolet
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6611

posted 06 January 2005 12:20 AM      Profile for ShyViolet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by al-Qa'bong:
A clarinet player! Can you blow where there's a -51º wind chill? If so, come on up here.

Check out Artie Shaw's Gramercy Five if you get the chance. He plays a Fralich-sounding groove on Dr. Livingstone, I Presume that just swings.

I don't know many classical pieces for the licorice stick; I keep to the Artie Shaws, Benny Goodmans, Pee Wee Russells and Sidney Bechets.

Oh, and my snobbery was in reference to calling instrumental works "songs." "Songs" need "singers." If, however, the pieces in question are songs that are played as instrumentals, I apologize.


a -51 degree wind chill? no...my tongue would probably freeze to the reed, the keys would probably lock (happened to me many a time during end of season football games), and the wood would crack from the temp change...

- 51 degrees! geez...well, that's one good thing about living down here... our temps NEVER go that low (not even close!)

then no, they aren't songs! they are pieces by composers.... i'll have to remember the difference, 'cause i always call them songs!


From: ~Love is like pi: natural, irrational, and very important~ | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
chimo
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6472

posted 06 January 2005 12:56 AM      Profile for chimo        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Papal_Bull:
It is a late 19th century orchestral piece written by Richard Wagner. Properly called Der Ring it basically is a tale of the Ragnarok and the death of Wotain. But when you get through the basic mythos that Wagner used, it is a very frightening tale of Germany's virulent nationalism and warlike tendencies at the time. On a note, Wagner was an anti-semite. A very big one. He considered that the Northerners (people who shared Teutonic sentiments/blood) to be superior. Mind you, he was more vocal than most, even though such thought was overly common not only in Germany, but in most nations at the time.

ah... i guess it would be worth a listen then. i remember seeing a doc a year or 2 ago about hitler where he hummed wagner to himself. now i know why


From: sobolev spaces :-) | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Mandos
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 888

posted 06 January 2005 02:38 AM      Profile for Mandos   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hah. Clarinets don't hold a candle to the majesty that is the bassoon.
From: There, there. | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged
ShyViolet
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6611

posted 06 January 2005 02:54 AM      Profile for ShyViolet     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Mandos:
Hah. Clarinets don't hold a candle to the majesty that is the bassoon.

i beg to differ, but the bassoon is awesome too!!! i love most any woodwind, but in my mind any of the different clarinets far surpasses any other instrument.

and any woodwind is a ton better than any brass (imo).


From: ~Love is like pi: natural, irrational, and very important~ | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3276

posted 06 January 2005 03:46 AM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by f1 dad:
Beethoven gets a thumbs up too. In particular the 3rd symphony and his late string quartets are good stuff.

Thanks for reminding me. I am now listening to his 14th String Quartet, Opus 131, which I have on my hard drive but haven't listened to for many months. The first movement, the Adagio fugue, is my choice for the most beautiful piece in the world.

quote:
The Op.131 Quartet in its entirety consists of seven movements which are played through without pause which gives the whole work a sense of fluidity and unity. The first movement, Adagio ma non troppo e molto espressivo, consists of a fugue in the tonic key of C# minor. This part of the piece in my opinion is what evokes raw emotion and sadness.

STRING QUARTET IN C SHARP MINOR Op 131:

quote:
Beethoven appears to have thought this great work his finest quartet. Certainly nothing could surpass its depth, scope, originality or organic perfection. . . The first movement is a wonderful slow fugue. Wagner said it floated over the sorrows of the world, but even that description is too small for it.

From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged

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