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Author Topic: Star Wars: Episode III
Anchoress
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posted 13 May 2005 08:34 AM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
SPOILERS

Review: New Zealand Herald
Short article with promo pics
A few reviews
Heavily biased review from Kevin Smith

[ 13 May 2005: Message edited by: Anchoress ]


From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 13 May 2005 09:20 AM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Tank: "So what do you need? Besides a miracle."
Neo: "Lava. Lots of lava."

Trinity: "Neo ... Lucas hasn't directed a good film in years."
Neo: "I know. That's why it's going to work."

[ 13 May 2005: Message edited by: Willowdale Wizard ]


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Jimmy Brogan
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posted 13 May 2005 09:51 AM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Tomatometer stands at a shockingly high 85% fresh - 33 positive reviews versus 6 negative - so far.
From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 14 May 2005 01:31 AM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I may actually see this one, as opposed to the two that preceded it.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
worker_drone
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posted 16 May 2005 06:45 PM      Profile for worker_drone        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Empire Strikes Bush

quote:
"Revenge of the Sith," it turns out, can also be seen as a cautionary tale for our time -- a blistering critique of the war in Iraq, a reminder of how democracies can give up their freedoms too easily, and an admonition about the seduction of good people by absolute power.

Some film critics suggest it could be the biggest anti-Bush blockbuster since "Fahrenheit 9/11."



From: Canada | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 16 May 2005 07:07 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good article, quoting various reviews. I liked this one:
quote:
"...At one point, Darth Vader, already deep in the thrall of the dark side and echoing the words of George W. Bush, hisses at Obi-Wan, 'If you're not with me, you're my enemy.' Obi-Wan's response is likely to surface as a bumper sticker during the next election campaign: 'Only a Sith thinks in absolutes.' "...

From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 16 May 2005 07:16 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hmmm. After reading that Post story, not only has my respect for Lucas increased several-fold, I... well, I just might go see this thing myself.

I still think that... ah, screw it. Where's that damn "maybe I've been too much of a smartass and too hard on the gyu" smiley?


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Coyote
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posted 16 May 2005 10:42 PM      Profile for Coyote   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
That's not all. Crappy as it was in all but a couple of action sequences (Darth Maul (sp?) + light sabres = cool), Star Wars I was pretty much an anti-globalization screed.
From: O for a good life, we just might have to weaken. | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 16 May 2005 11:04 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
There have been some nice touches such as Nute Gunray (chief of the trade federation in Ep1) having a name suspiciously like Newt Gingrich.
It's still a shite movie though, mind.

From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
ceti
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posted 17 May 2005 12:56 AM      Profile for ceti     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Huey Freeman in the Boondocks had a similar response to Attack of the Clones, when he found new respect for Lucas after the insult of Jar Jar Binks and the Phantom Menace.

The following article contains some of Lucas' comments at Cannes when the question was raised about the similarities between the themes in Revenge of the Sith and real life: AP: Star Wars raises questions about US policy

Interestingly he was thinking about Nixon and the Vietnam war for the first movies, with the Ewoks as the stand ins for the Viet Cong (this could be alternatively insulting or very politically astute as with most of Lucas' work). This works actually, as the battle between the Empire and the Rebels was always characterized as a battle between technocratic power (white and black colour scheme, sharp angular shapes for spacecraft, human supremacy), and anarchic nature (rebels in earth tones, softer, more rounded ships, diversity of species).


From: various musings before the revolution | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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posted 17 May 2005 01:00 AM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
...and of course, all the bad guys are English, and the good guys USians.
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
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posted 17 May 2005 03:41 AM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm not surprised about the message in Episode III: I saw it coming from the moment Yoda decided to use the Clone Army. Despite Episode II's weaknesses, I thought it was quite a bold and thoughtful plotline.
From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
scooter
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posted 17 May 2005 11:05 AM      Profile for scooter     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Lucas makes another couple of billion bucks.
Lucas makes another couple of billion bucks.
Lucas makes another couple of billion bucks.

I can hear him laughing all the way to his bank. Heck, he is a bank!


From: High River | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 17 May 2005 09:25 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Changed my mind about seeing it.

[ 17 May 2005: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
somersol
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posted 17 May 2005 10:04 PM      Profile for somersol   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
i'm not sure what the problem is with the aesthetic decisions in the movies (sterile interiors, grandiose backdrops, etc). spielberg recently said something about the unique freedom of sci-fi. it seems a bit demanding and weird to insist on "reality anchors" in a sci-fi fantasy. who cares if there's no pile of laundry in the room on board the star destroyer; i can see that at home.
there's no doubt that Lucas is authoritarian where his creation is concerned (including its marketing), but really, isn't that what we expect of artists?

[ 17 May 2005: Message edited by: somersol ]


From: ontario | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 17 May 2005 10:20 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One conservative blogger today compare Martin and Stronach to the evil corrupt emperor with the blonde Jedi turned evil standing at his side.
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 17 May 2005 10:22 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Figures. CBC TV had a brief vox-pop in High River or somewhere, one old cat saying "It's like when Judas denied Christ. Just like that."
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
The Hegemo
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posted 17 May 2005 10:29 PM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I disliked the last two and will probably dislike this one, but what the hell, I'll go see it. I was 4, 7, and 10 when the films of the original trilogy came out, so they really hooked me at just the right age.
From: The Persistent Vegetative States of America | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 18 May 2005 03:42 AM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Could You be a Jedi Knight? Speaking as a Jedi master, but not too proud of course...
From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
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posted 19 May 2005 12:03 AM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Is new 'Star Wars' an anti-Bush diatribe?
From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
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posted 19 May 2005 03:39 AM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Glen Schaefer Review (Vancouver): Revenge served Jedi-style
From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
Albireo
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posted 19 May 2005 09:51 AM      Profile for Albireo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The reviewer on CBC radio the morning liked the movie -- by far the best of the "prequel" trilogy -- but really didn't like the actor playing Anakin Skywalker. He had this to say:

It was more like Mannequin Skywalker.

Zing!

[ 19 May 2005: Message edited by: Albireo ]


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jeff house
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posted 19 May 2005 01:14 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Atlantic Monthly has a really funny review in the paper version; I couldn't find it on line.

The reviewer wants to know how Yoda can be so smart, yet never master the fundamentals of English grammar. He quotes Yoda: "Your fears give up you must."


His response is: "Fucking a break give me!"

He also mentions that he suspects Darth Vader is talking into an empty garbage can.


From: toronto | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 19 May 2005 01:25 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Village Voice hates it too. The Globe didn't think too highly of it either.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 19 May 2005 01:39 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't believe Lucas created a character called Grievous. Short for Grievous Angel, no doubt.
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 19 May 2005 01:48 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It sucked.

Here's a spoiler.

Franken Vader goes "NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!"

Although there are more than a couple dozen bad ass scenes...But double that amount of scences with crappy and terrible dialogue.


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Robert James
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posted 19 May 2005 05:35 PM      Profile for Robert James     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I don't know why people seem to have this misconceived notion that a Star Wars movie should have anything BUT cheesy and stilted dialogue. This is a staple of the ENTIRE franchise! Some people need to relax and just enjoy a movie for once.

I came out of a theatre where most people seemed to have been blown away by the film. The whispers in the lobby were almost exclusively saying that the movie was as good or better than some/all of the original films.

Whether it is because people hate Lucas or just want to feel like elitist snobs because they don't go in for this type of thing I don't know, but it never ceases to amaze me that people will grab on to *anything* to criticize Star Wars films. Bad acting, bad dialogue, etc...come on, all of the Star Wars films have elements of this. Seriously, if a person really dislikes the movies that much, just don't bother seeing them - let the rest of us sit back for a couple of hours and enjoy the excitement and adventure.

My recommendation: if you like the original trilogy, I would imagine you will like this film, so go see it. I did and enjoyed it a great deal. As did the other ten people I saw it with - many of whom, I might add, were VERY critical of the first two prequels and sceptical about this one.


From: on hiatus | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Robert James
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posted 19 May 2005 05:38 PM      Profile for Robert James     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 'lance:
Changed my mind about seeing it.

[ 17 May 2005: Message edited by: 'lance ]


You expect a purportedly 'high brow' publication like the New Yorker to sully itself and its well-groomed reputation by positively reviewing a movie like Star Wars?


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'lance
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posted 19 May 2005 05:46 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
You expect a purportedly 'high brow' publication like the New Yorker to sully itself and its well-groomed reputation by positively reviewing a movie like Star Wars?

No, just that I find myself agreeing with Anthony Lane about four times out of five. And he's not so highbrow as all that. He likes James Bond, for example.

For that matter, calling the New Yorker "highbrow" is a bit like calling the UK "socialist." It was, until it was shaken up severely, in this case by Tina Brown. It's less flamboyant under David Remnick, but I think the change was permanent, and maybe overdue.

[ 19 May 2005: Message edited by: 'lance ]


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
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posted 19 May 2005 05:49 PM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
They could always review the subtitled Director's Cut, in the original Swedish. That usually guarantees a boffo rating amongst critics. Or at least amongst the critics who pronounce "film" with two syllables ("Did you see Cronenberg's latest fil-um?")
From: `,_,`,_,,_,, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 19 May 2005 05:50 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You obviously never read any of Pauline Kael's reviews. I wouldn't call her highbrow.

Not that I'm going to rush off to see the new Star Wars movie, but Anthony Lane is mostly a waste of space. He lost me a couple of years ago when he spent a page and a half rhapsodising about the ineffable perfection of Natalie Portman in some piece of shit straight to video with Susan Sarandon a few years back. I think he mentioned Audrey Hepburn and then gushed on from there. It was embarassing. And illuminating.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 19 May 2005 05:52 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Evidently I missed that. And of course he's no Pauline Kael. But then, who is?
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
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posted 19 May 2005 05:53 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I haven't seen the new movie, but doesn't the unmasked Vader in Return of the Jedi look a lot like Dick Cheney?
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 19 May 2005 05:57 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Damme, yer right. Much is explained!
From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 19 May 2005 05:57 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
you were right. you were right about iraq. tell your sister, you were right.
From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Albireo
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posted 19 May 2005 05:59 PM      Profile for Albireo     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

From: --> . <-- | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
rasmus
malcontent
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posted 19 May 2005 06:22 PM      Profile for rasmus   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Mind you, Vader also looks live a shaven-pate Bob Dylan.
From: Fortune favours the bold | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
'lance
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posted 19 May 2005 06:27 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Mind you, Vader also looks live a shaven-pate Bob Dylan.

Heretic! Infidel!! Unbeliever!!! Get thee hence!!!! Never, for as long as the music of the Master (PBUH) is played, shall thy name...

Meh. Who'm I kidding. I got nothing. You're right.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 19 May 2005 06:30 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I liked Darth's earlier records, but then he converted to the dark side and went all wierd.
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'lance
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posted 19 May 2005 06:36 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, it's always the same. Everyone sells out when given a shot at Galactic fame.

On this page, the actor playing the unmasked Vader reminds me a little of Vincent Price.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 19 May 2005 07:16 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Robert James:
I don't know why people seem to have this misconceived notion that a Star Wars movie should have anything BUT cheesy and stilted dialogue. This is a staple of the ENTIRE franchise! Some people need to relax and just enjoy a movie for once.

There is a difference between good one liners, and then Episode III's dialogue.
Spoiler quotes!
"You look beautiful"
"It's only because I'm so in love"
"It's because I'm so in love"
"So, you're blinded by love...?"
Blah, blah, blah.


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Surferosad
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posted 19 May 2005 08:51 PM      Profile for Surferosad   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 

From: Montreal | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 21 May 2005 01:00 AM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is worth a laugh
From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
majorvictory64
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posted 21 May 2005 08:17 AM      Profile for majorvictory64     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
...and of course, Mr. Cranky weighs in!

quote:
Given all the hoopla surrounding "Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sith," is it really too much to ask, after five previous films, nearly 30 years and untold billions of dollars, that George Lucas find someone -- anyone -- to help him write dialogue at more than an eighth-grade level? In this film, "dialogue" often consists of characters simply describing what they're doing, just in case the audience is in the throes of an epileptic seizure caused by the rapid-fire special-effects shots and too disoriented to follow the action. Examples: "Time to abandon ship!" while abandoning ship, "Kill him!" while helping to kill someone, and a "NOOOO!" moment that warps toward Simpsons parody.

Here's proof that Lucas may be one of the most successful bad writers in history. Ask yourself: What was the most memorable line in the entire "Star Wars" series? If you can even think of one, good for you, but if you think hard, the answer is obvious (and it wasn't Jake Lloyd's "Yippee!" from Episode I). It occurs in "The Empire Strikes Back." Han Solo is about to be frozen and shipped to Jabba the Hutt as Princess Leia looks on in horror. "I love you," she tells him. Han looks at her and responds: "I know." Well, that line was improvised by Harrison Ford. Lucas didn't write it. If Lucas had insisted on it being performed as written, it would have been something like: "I love you too, my darling. I'm getting frozen now!"

Lines in "Revenge of the Sith" are more typical of the Lucas oeuvre, such as when Anakin (Hayden Christensen) and Padme (Natalie Portman) play a few rounds of "I love you more; no, I love you more" until the audience is praying for the return of Jar Jar Binks. Their love is central to the arc of the entire series, and is the key pivot point that tips the entire known galaxy to the dark side, yet the chemistry is so tepid that it could have been heightened by a couple of Padme and Anakin finger puppets (undoubtedly coming soon to a Burger King near you).



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Briguy
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posted 24 May 2005 09:43 AM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
until the audience is praying for the return of Jar Jar Binks.

NOOOOOOO!!!!!


From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 24 May 2005 10:08 AM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Took the boy to it. Hated 1 and 2. This one was endurable. With better writing, the whole thing could have been a respectable, if pointless, epic.

The thing was, the first Star Wars (back in '77) was a wonderful, escapist, adventure, using special effects and "sci-fi" concepts that hadn't been seen before. The story worked so successfully because it followed a classic formula from the old adventures from the 1940s. As a 38-yr old, reflecting on what I saw at age 12, I'd also have to say that the editing of the whole attack on the "Death Star" was brilliant.
I remember everyone in the theatre jumping to their feet and applauding at the end. It sounds cheesy, but it happened, and it's a rare thing for a movie to do that.

This third one, again, with better writing it could have been good. As it was, it was kinda entertaining watching to see how the legend from my youth was all supposed to have happened.


From: Hamilton | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged
David Newland
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posted 24 May 2005 12:17 PM      Profile for David Newland   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
About Revenge of the Sith: if there's ever been a more disappointing movie in history, I don't know what it is. Somehow, in spite of everything that's been done since The Empire Strikes Back,, I became convinced that this one might not be too bad. I was really, really wrong.

If someone really wants to get Keanu Reeves an oscar, they should just cast him alongside Hayden Christiansen. He'll look like frickin' Lawrence Olivier by contrast.

Speaking of great British actors... somewhere Alec Guiness is spinning over in his grave. Obi-Wan could not possibly have been more lame, off-rhythm, annoying, or distant from the supposed "brother" he winds up half-murdering. When did Ewan McGregor turn into such a wanker? For that matter, when did Samuel L. Jackson?

But those are asides, really. The meat and potatoes of this movie was a series of pathetic "love" scenes between an actor incapable of feeling emotion and an actress incapable of expressing it. I literally yelled "puke!" in the cinema several times.

Is there a redeeming feature to this movie? Maybe the fact that Frank Oz is such a good voice actor, that they couldn't entirely ruin his now-imaginary puppet.... but other than that, I'd say it's just a relief to know that 28 years of this is over.

You'd think it would be a truism that "one great movie does not a franchise make." I guess this whole Star Wars downward slide proves that one good movie is all you need.

Sigh.


From: Toronto | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Willowdale Wizard
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posted 24 May 2005 12:31 PM      Profile for Willowdale Wizard   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
the thing i keep coming back to (after seeing the film last saturday) is mental illness. i mean, that's the obvious interpretation of what happens to anakin, growing schizoid behaviour, a psychotic break just when he cuts off COUGH COUGH's BLANK when he's winning and about to kill COUGH COUGH.

the lucas message? folks with mental illness are evil, dark, violent, murderous, and nearly irredeemable (at least until he throws the emperor down the reactor shaft).

if only ani had sought counselling earlier ...


From: england (hometown of toronto) | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
brebis noire
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posted 24 May 2005 12:38 PM      Profile for brebis noire     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I watched The Phantom Menace with my 7-yr-old a few weeks ago, and he kept saying 'Mum, this is really boring, can I go play on the computer?' so there's no way I'd take him to see episode III. However - curse the Lucasfilm empire and its marketing minions ! - he keeps bugging me to buy him a light sabre and a Darth Vader voice changer. I don't think I can take it anymore, I'm fixin' to throw the TV out the window...
From: Quebec | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Rufus Polson
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posted 24 May 2005 04:03 PM      Profile for Rufus Polson     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, that's because while Phantom Menace sucked, lightsabres and Darth Vader voice changers are cool.

I mean, the basic concept of the toy sword has timeless appeal. And the concept of the toy laser gun that does sound effects has been providing fun for decades now. In the lightsabre you have basically the whole deal in one package, *plus* the ready-made vision for play of being a kind of martial arts superhero who fights for justice and has neat-o powers.

As to the voice changer, if there's one fantasy lots of kids have, it's being able to sound tough and dangerous instead of wimpy and high-pitched. Presto! It's being marketed relentlessly which is rather a turnoff, but it's fundamentally pretty cool.


From: Caithnard College | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
jeff house
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posted 24 May 2005 04:05 PM      Profile for jeff house     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
he keeps bugging me to buy him a light sabre and a Darth Vader voice changer.

At my home we substitute for the voice-changer. We find that speaking into a smallish garbage can produces the hoped-for effect.


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'lance
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posted 24 May 2005 04:29 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
When did Ewan McGregor turn into such a wanker? For that matter, when did Samuel L. Jackson?

Most critics -- even those who like the latest movie -- are agreed that, whatever his technical skill may be, George Lucas is not good at directing actors.


From: that enchanted place on the top of the Forest | Registered: Jul 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 24 May 2005 04:39 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It's wierd, I mean, American Graffiti was a well directed film, some great perfromances there - Paul LeMat and Mackenzie Philips and Richard Dreyfus to name a few. What the hell happened to George?

I saw it yesterday. My expectations couldn't have been any lower, so it was OK, I kinda enjoyed it. It was better than Matrix part 2.


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'lance
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posted 24 May 2005 04:48 PM      Profile for 'lance     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
It's wierd, I mean, American Graffiti was a well directed film, some great perfromances there - Paul LeMat and Mackenzie Philips and Richard Dreyfus to name a few.

That's true, so I don't know what happened. But if I remember right, around the time that "The Phantom Menace" came out, Lucas was quoted to the effect that technology would soon allow him to make a movie entirely without actors -- a realistic-looking movie, that is.

Maybe he simply got more interested in the technical side, or maybe it's case of "use it or lose it." Did he actually direct any movies himself between 1977 and 1997?


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The Hegemo
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posted 24 May 2005 04:49 PM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I went in with low expectations, but I actually really enjoyed this one. I can't say I disagree with most of the comments from people who didn't like it -- the dialogue stunk in many places, the Anakin/Padme "love" scenes were like nails on a chalkboard, some of the acting was horrible, there was just too much CGI -- but ultimately, I got into the story enough in this one that it overcame its weaknesses for me. Unlike Episodes I&II, where I just couldn't get into the convoluted plots enough to overlook the bad.

It's by no means a great movie, and I don't think it can stand on its own as something that someone would enjoy if they'd never seen any of the other Star Wars movies, but as part of a bigger story, I enjoyed seeing it. I'm glad I went ahead and went to see it.


From: The Persistent Vegetative States of America | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
thwap
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posted 24 May 2005 06:46 PM      Profile for thwap        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've really gotta be fair to Hayden Christensen (who I found appalling in the attack of the clones): Reviewers of the movie "Shattered Glass" have said that he actually can act ...

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0323944/

And obviously, Ewan MacGregor can too. I've heard that Lucas just wanted to play with the CGI.

His directing of the actual acting was probably like that of Ed Wood, as played by Johnny Depp. One take, and that's a print.


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Jacob Two-Two
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posted 24 May 2005 07:23 PM      Profile for Jacob Two-Two     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The original cast of Star Wars used to joke about Lucas' directing. If he liked your performance, he wouldn't say anything. If he didn't, he would always say the same thing: "faster, and more intense". That was the entire extent of him directing his actors, and I doubt he's changed much in that regard. Add in the crappy dialouge and you just have to pity the poor actors who have to make something out of these characters.

But all that aside, I loved the movie. He finally had a story to tell that he cared about. In retrospect, the first two movies just seem like long, tedious, and well-padded exposition pieces to set up the last one. He could have left out all the crap and made one three-hour film that would have been way better, but I guess the payola wouldn't have been up to par.


From: There is but one Gord and Moolah is his profit | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
aka Mycroft
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posted 24 May 2005 07:24 PM      Profile for aka Mycroft     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Anyone see the New Yorker's review?

(paraphrasing) It's been said that episode three is better than its two predecessors. This is true in the way that death by natural causes is better than death by crucifixion.

And on Yoda's dialogue:

"Break me a fucking give."


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Stephen Gordon
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posted 24 May 2005 07:28 PM      Profile for Stephen Gordon        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yeah, well, it blows up real good.
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larva
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posted 24 May 2005 08:23 PM      Profile for larva   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It wasn't thaaat bad... you want bad, watch the Star Wars Holiday Special.

But, if you want to be entertained... watch this:
Store Wars

[ 24 May 2005: Message edited by: larva ]


From: Edmonton | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged
raccunk
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posted 26 May 2005 11:20 PM      Profile for raccunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Am I the only one who liked this movie?? Perhaps it is because I went in with low expectations(I hated 'Attack of The Clones') but I really enjoyed Episode III. I thought it was comparable to the first trilogy.
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raccunk
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posted 26 May 2005 11:28 PM      Profile for raccunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Contrarian:
Could You be a Jedi Knight? Speaking as a Jedi master, but not too proud of course...

I got 8 out of 10: Jedi Master. I am humbly honoured!


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Anchoress
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posted 26 May 2005 11:40 PM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
9/10. You want to go outside.
From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged
verbatim
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posted 27 May 2005 12:02 AM      Profile for verbatim   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A true Jedi Master does not brag about such things.
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Charley Girl
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posted 27 May 2005 02:36 AM      Profile for Charley Girl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can be a Jedi Knight 9 out of 10, however I think I have the secret of the philosophy behind the Jedi and the movie as revealed in the Jedi quiz. Finally it is all clear, the violence should have tipped us all off a long time ago. The answer is:

"A thinly-veiled phallic metaphor"

I cannot in truth be a Jedi Knight as I have no penis envy, and no need for phallic metaphors in my life. Where are the thinly veiled vagina metaphors? Can we find deeper meaning in this movie, can there be redemptiin the face of phallic fantasies? Is the light sword duelling actually a contest of "mine is bigger and stronger than yours?" Is it a space age story of Oedipus? I did think of this before I read this review:

quote:
As in the Oedipus story, the attempted avoidance of a future outcome is what prompts the outcome to occur anyway. You remember Oedipus, after it had been prophesied that he would kill his father and marry his mother, was sent away to die in the wilderness as a baby. Raised by shepherds, he never knows his mother and father, and thus fulfills the prophecy without knowing it.

These movies do not thrill me.


From: BC | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
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posted 27 May 2005 03:49 AM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Since Lucas seems to be very used to people thinking too deep in to his movies, could it have been possible that he intentionally put that line in just to make people think it was a reference to Bush, thus creating MORE media hype beyond film reviews and getting even more people to see it?
From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
drmfoti
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posted 27 May 2005 05:00 AM      Profile for drmfoti        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
And in the meantime, the new Dr Who goes from strength to strength...
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Jimmy Brogan
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posted 27 May 2005 09:58 AM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Am I the only one who liked this movie??

No. Only in the bubble of culture snobs and sour apples known as babble.ca does it seem to be unpopular.

Episode III smashes box office records

quote:
LOS ANGELES—It took just six days for Star Wars: Episode III — Revenge of the Sith to become the highest grossing release of 2005, a feat that reflects the phenomenal box office power of the latest Jedi adventure but also exposes the dearth of other major hits in the marketplace so far this year.

Sith took in an additional $9.9 million (all figures U.S.) on Tuesday for a cumulative North American gross of $182.7 million to surpass the $177.6 million earned over several months by the Will Smith comedy Hitch, according to box office figures released Wednesday.

Sith set yet another record Tuesday by surpassing last summer's Spider-Man 2 to secure the biggest six-day gross. The film already has records for the biggest two-day, three-day, four-day and five-day grosses, biggest opening day and single day gross in history ($50 million), as well as the biggest four-day opening ($158.4 million).

Today, Sith is expected to tie Spider-Man 2 for the record of fastest movie to reach the $200 million mark. The first five films earned a total of $3.4 billion worldwide and Sith is off to a record start in both North America and internationally.


[ 27 May 2005: Message edited by: JimmyBrogan ]

[ 27 May 2005: Message edited by: JimmyBrogan ]


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
Melsky
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posted 27 May 2005 10:04 AM      Profile for Melsky   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Uh, Jimmy the fact that it broke box office records merely means a lot of people saw it, not that they liked it.

For my friends who have seen it the reviews have been pretty mixed. But people who have been into Star Wars their whole life are not going to miss the movie no matter what.


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Robert James
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posted 27 May 2005 11:37 AM      Profile for Robert James     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm with Jimmy. I don't know why, but, to be honest, I find it strange - if not somewhat unsurprising - that almost everyone on here did not like the movie, and, for good measure, that they react to it with such visceral hatred.

Most people I know (that means all but one in my circle of friends/family/acquaintances) enjoyed the movie very much. My andecdotal evidence aside, many people are seeing the movie more than once - this is the only way it can gross at the relatively high levels that we are seeing already. For what it is worth (admittedly not much around here) those who are Star Wars fans rate it right up there with the original trilogy.

Even 'expert' movie critics are relatively split on the film, something that you have to go back to the original trilogy to find similar evidence of. Remember that even then many critics enjoyed bashing the films, especially Empire (generally regarded by most Star Wars fans as the best of ANY of the Star Wars films).

Yes, the movie has some bad moments, but so do all the Star Wars films (including the classics). The fact of the matter is, if you like the originals, chances are very good that you will enjoy this film.

Meanwhile, all the culture snobs out there can continue onward looking down their noses at people that would dare to enjoy a film like ROTS, making their tendentious criticisms of said movies, and frequenting art-house theatres to watch some 'real' cinema.

[ 27 May 2005: Message edited by: Robert James ]


From: on hiatus | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Tommy Shanks
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posted 27 May 2005 11:52 AM      Profile for Tommy Shanks     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ok I saw the damn thing last night.

And I agree, Yoda's speech style was ridiculous, Hayden Christensen spent most of the movie trying to look at top of his eye sockets and longing for his mom, and I expected Obi-wan to spout "Wot, wot, Bobs yer unkle" ever second line.

By why, whenever a scene changed, did we have to see a panorama of the city they were in with a gajillion planes flying back and forth. Like ever frigging time. Why? Why?

And the "NOOOOOOOOOOO"s. The emperor had a series of three short ones early on, like a kid tossing a tantrum, and DV had a long one, complete with hand-shaking later on. I actually broke up twice. They were the only laughs in the movie.

Note: Someone mentioned Paul LeMat above. I think he was supposed to be Han Solo in the first Star Wars, as well as being the "star" of American Graffiti, a movie that is only watch able for the first 30 minutes or so. Maybe Lucas should stick with computerized puppets.


From: Toronto | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 27 May 2005 12:01 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I saw the original Star Wars 36 times in the theatre. I had read the book before the movie came out - it was already my favourite movie based entirely on the trailer. Return of the Jedi I sat through once. Suffice it to say that this is one rabid Star Wars fan who has been deeply disappointed by where Lucas took the story. Maybe I am Anniken, seduced by the dark side of good cinema. I am a cultural Sith.

The inherent weakness of the prequels can be neatly summed up by my 5-year-old's comment about two thirds of the way through this latest one. After she had followled the exploits of Anniken from childhood to young adulthood, now cute little Anni was killing cute little children. She leaned over and whispered to me "Is Anniken going to stay on the dark side?" "Yep, he's Darth Vader now" I answered. "So who is the good guy?" she asked. Good question. Who's the hero, George?

She liked Yoda. She liked the babies. I went because she wanted to see it, I wouldn't have bothered otherwise.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Jimmy Brogan
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posted 27 May 2005 12:21 PM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
and frequenting art-house theatres to watch some 'real' cinema.

AKA 'Dreary Art House Dreck'™ - much beloved here aboots.


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 27 May 2005 12:46 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
David Mamet has a pretty funny article called "Bambi v Godzilla, why Art Loses in Hollywood" in the latest Harpers.

Mamet is a playwright who occasionally makes brilliant movies/ Dreary Art House Dreck - like Homicide - and also writes bigass blow shit up Hollywood product/Real Movies - like the Untouchables.

He calls the franchise movie the modern iteration of the British opium trade.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Robert James
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posted 27 May 2005 01:25 PM      Profile for Robert James     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by ronb:

She liked Yoda. She liked the babies. I went because she wanted to see it, I wouldn't have bothered otherwise.

Exactly. Sounds like you already had your mind made up before you even entered the theatre to watch ROTS - says it all really.

On the point about Anakin's significance, George Lucas has been adamant all along that Anakin is not supposed to be the devil-incarnate or any such relentlessly evil bogeyman. Indeed, Anakin is supposed to be a tragic figure - neither outright hero nor dastardly villain. He is supposed to be a sad, pitiful man [sic] who, in his efforts to control everything around him ends up controlling nothing - he is a slave to the emperor and (as is displayed often in the original trilogy, albeit with dire consequences) many of the Imperial figures mock Darth Vader (Admiral Motti anyone?). This is what the prequels, for all their flaws (especially in the first film) were meant to show: Anakin Skywalker beginning life as a slave and then renouncing his freedom to be a slave again solely to control forces he cannot control (e.g., death and loss). This sets up the original trilogy for what it was supposed to mean all along. The redemption of this tragic figure by his son, who was willing to sacrifice even himself to prove that his father still had good in him (this contrasts with his father as a young man, who was never willing to sacrifice anything, which is why he failed as a Jedi).

Alas...


From: on hiatus | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Papal Bull
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posted 27 May 2005 01:27 PM      Profile for Papal Bull   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Robert James:
On the point about Anakin's significance, George Lucas has been adamant all along that Anakin is not supposed to be the devil-incarnate or any such relentlessly evil bogeyman. Indeed, Anakin is supposed to be a tragic figure - neither outright hero nor dastardly villain. He is supposed to be a sad, pitiful man [sic] who, in his efforts to control everything around him ends up controlling nothing - he is a slave to the emperor and (as is displayed often in the original trilogy, albeit with dire consequences) many of the Imperial figures mock Darth Vader (Admiral Motti anyone?). This is what the prequels, for all their flaws (especially in the first film) were meant to show: Anakin Skywalker beginning life as a slave and then renouncing his freedom to be a slave again solely to control forces he cannot control (e.g., death and loss). This sets up the original trilogy for what it was supposed to mean all along. The redemption of this tragic figure by his son, who was willing to sacrifice even himself to prove that his father still had good in him (this contrasts with his father as a young man, who was never willing to sacrifice anything, which is why he failed as a Jedi).

So, if his armour had a kilt we could call him MacBeth?

Why didn't the Emperor yell "unsex me"? I think that would've been clever.


From: Vatican's best darned ranch | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Reality. Bites.
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posted 27 May 2005 01:35 PM      Profile for Reality. Bites.        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
You scored 9 out of a possible 10
Jedi master. The Force is indeed strong in you, but remember, pride is one of the paths to the Dark Side. Do not become arrogant in your achievement, or believe that anyone is impressed. They're not.

From: Gone for good | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged
raccunk
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posted 27 May 2005 02:00 PM      Profile for raccunk     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Anchoress:
9/10. You want to go outside.

Me, you, and Reality Bites. We'll see who is the best Jedi!!


From: Zobooland | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
ronb
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posted 27 May 2005 02:11 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Sounds like you already had your mind made up before you even entered the theatre to watch ROTS - says it all really.

Well it's not as if I didn't have about 6 hours of dull, plotless meandering in Episodes I & II to help me make up my mind.

But, as I said, Episode 3 was better than the Matrix parts 2 and 3. At least that's something. And there were no Ewoks, no N'Synch and almost no Jar Jar.


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Briguy
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posted 30 May 2005 09:57 AM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I liked the movie overall, what can I say? But the dialogue: Dreadful! The crowd I watched it (and by crowd I mean entire theatre) with actually laughed at most of Padme's lines. I miss you more! My girlfriend - not a Star Wars fan - remarked about Portman's role: "Why is she changing her outfit and hairdo every scene? Why doesn't she say anything useful? She's just serving as a costume prop!"

George Lucas can't write romantic roles, it's as simple as that. But other than the atrocious dialogue between Annikin and Padme, I enjoyed the spectacle and the story.

On a completely different note: Last night I watched the 25th anniversary special mondo delecto triple plus DVDs of the original films. I noticed in the credits for Episode V (called the best film by most) that Lucas was credited as the story writer, but that two other people were credited for writing the screenplay. Lesson not learned?

(Also, in the 25th ASMDTP DVD of Return of the Jedi, the editors have replaced the orginal person playing the ghost of Annikin past with Hayden Christenson! Somewhat cool, no?)


From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
aRoused
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posted 30 May 2005 10:38 AM      Profile for aRoused     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
(Also, in the 25th ASMDTP DVD of Return of the Jedi, the editors have replaced the orginal person playing the ghost of Annikin past with Hayden Christenson! Somewhat cool, no?)

Sucks if your name happens to be Sebastian Shaw, though.


From: The King's Royal Burgh of Eoforwich | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
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posted 30 May 2005 12:18 PM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Dear lord, it already has an acronym....

Now I'm going to constantly confuse ROTS with ROTK.

But I suppose with the latter, I'll have to put LOTR before it.


From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
Briguy
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posted 30 May 2005 12:47 PM      Profile for Briguy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Rob, I'm not sure that Lucasfilm is endorsing the description anniversary special mondo delecto triple plus for the rereleased editions of episodes IV-VI.

[ 30 May 2005: Message edited by: Briguy ]


From: No one is arguing that we should run the space program based on Physics 101. | Registered: Nov 2001  |  IP: Logged
rob.leblanc
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posted 30 May 2005 12:57 PM      Profile for rob.leblanc     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Briguy, I wasn't reffering to that. I knew that it was a joke-name. I was talking about Revenge Of The Sith being called ROTS.
From: Where am I? Where are YOU? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
ceti
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posted 30 May 2005 01:35 PM      Profile for ceti     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I stumbled on this article from the Socialist Worker and I think it was dead on. The political allegories could have been quite powerful if it wasn't for the obvious problems with the film (bad acting, awful dialogue, way too much CGI). The fun of the old films revolved around the obvious screen charisma of the main characters. No one in the new movies come even close.

However, I did find two parts of the movie quite moving -- when the Jedi get slaughtered by order 66 and when Bail Organa steps into the original blockade runner that carries Leia at the beginning of A New Hope. But you have to wonder about the Jedi who kind of brought the whole thing on themselves by blindly following the Chancellor in waging a phony war. Kind of like the spineless Democrats who get clobbered anyways in the US elections.


From: various musings before the revolution | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
ceti
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posted 30 May 2005 01:43 PM      Profile for ceti     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Also, I hated the new ending of Return of the Jedi with the Kenny G solo. Luckily I still have the original Ewok Celebration song on mp3.

I don't know why so many fans hate the Ewoks, but I thought they were fun. And their use of low-tech guerilla tactics against the most technologically powerful force in the universe was awesome.

And also three cheers for the new Doctor Who! I used to have a TARDIS key, but lost it five years ago in Chicago. Aargh.


From: various musings before the revolution | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
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posted 30 May 2005 02:44 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Charley Girl:
...Where are the thinly veiled vagina metaphors? Can we find deeper meaning in this movie, can there be redemptiin the face of phallic fantasies?...

Princess Leia's original double-bun hairdo is obviously a thinly veiled ovarian reference.

I always liked Mel Brooks' take in Spaceballs; where the buns turn out to be hairy earphones.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
wage zombie
rabble-rouser
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posted 30 May 2005 09:21 PM      Profile for wage zombie     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I agree with most here--I wasn't expecting much and didn't really feel, disappointed, but that was about it. It was alright, I guess. I thought the acting was terrible all around and the dialogue was pretty poor too. I didn't think there was too much CGI but I did think the movie was lacking in breathtaking visuals...no crazy fantastic worlds or anything.

Just a lot of plot, really. It felt like watching the news.

Robert James, I like what you're saying about Annakin as a tragic figure but they didn't pull it off. If they had, you wouldn't have to explain it to people.

It would've been nice to see some of the Jedis fighting back rather than just getting shot and killed. I didn't really have any emotional investment in any of them because I didn't see them doing anything.

Also I found the light sabre battles went on way too long. They get boring after a while, especially when you know that nobody (Yoda, Kenobi, Annakin, or Palpatine) was going to get killed.

I don't know why the first three worked so well when these didn't, but Mark Hammill, Carrie Fisher and Harrison Ford were heads and tails better than Portman, Christenson and McGregor. Better acting, better chemistry. Although I didn't think they had much to work with in this movie.

I think a big part of the problem is that we get told what's going on instead of showed.

For those that can't understand why people didn't like it, what did you think were the three coolest scenes?


From: sunshine coast BC | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Jimmy Brogan
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posted 30 May 2005 10:51 PM      Profile for Jimmy Brogan   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
For those that can't understand why people didn't like it, what did you think were the three coolest scenes?


I loved every cheesy/bad acting, bad/cheesy dialogue, retina blistering moment.

But if I had to pick one coolest moment it would be when General Grievous started windmilling his two top light sabres. A lesser Jedi than General Kenobi would have soiled his robes.


From: The right choice - Iggy Thumbscrews for Liberal leader | Registered: Nov 2002  |  IP: Logged
beluga2
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posted 30 May 2005 11:37 PM      Profile for beluga2     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, like most here I went into it with decidedly low expectations, considering how the previous two episodes sucked such copious Wookiee sac. And yeah, yeah, yeah: bad dialogue, wooden acting, excessive CGI (was there a single non-effects shot in the entire movie?). Is anyone surprised? Though I actually thought the "romantic" stuff in Sith was quite tolerable -- if only because they paled in comparison with the "love" scenes in Attack of the Clones, which were, beyond question, the fucking worst in the history of moving pictures. I doubt they'll ever be surpassed in the annals of cinematic awfulness.

But I have to admit the last hour or so of Sith really sucked me in. Anakin's descent into evil was far more extreme than I expected, such that I'll never look at the Vader from the original trilogy quite the same way again. (Slaughtering kids? Darth, how could you?)

Seeing those scenes -- the massacre of the Jedi, the Vader/Obi-Wan duel, Vader getting his fetish suit -- called up a certain visceral thrill for me, because I actually wrote a story based on them back when I was 10 or 11, based on hints and clues about the backstory from various SW-fan sources. My tale, sadly, is long lost, and I have only vague memories of it -- though I'd be willing to bet that the dialogue I wrote as an 11-year-old was at least on a par with George Lucas's. If not better.


From: vancouvergrad, BCSSR | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged
Vigilante
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Babbler # 8104

posted 31 May 2005 01:58 PM      Profile for Vigilante        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It seems that Gary Kurtz was the X-factor of the star wars movies. His fingerprints were all over ESB(regarded by most as the best). He wanted a multy layered story as opposed to Lucas who went for simplicity. ROTJ would have had a complaetely different ending had Kurtz had his way.

Here's an interview
http://filmforce.ign.com/articles/376/376873p4.html


From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Screaming Lord Byron
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Babbler # 4717

posted 04 June 2005 08:47 PM      Profile for Screaming Lord Byron     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was rather underwhelmed.
From: Calgary | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
PitaPlatter
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Babbler # 8256

posted 04 June 2005 09:17 PM      Profile for PitaPlatter     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I enjoyed the original but haven't bothered with any of the sequels however I could not resist the temptation to buy a bootleg version of Sith off the coffee truck last week- $10.00 bucks- I hope it is in english but then again maybe not.
From: Toronto | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged
Left Turn
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Babbler # 8662

posted 09 June 2005 02:06 AM      Profile for Left Turn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Having read Charles Dermers' new article Lucas (Boba) feted too quickly: The Capitalist Strikes Back, I can't resist posting my two bits on Revenge of the Sith

There were a number of scenes that Lucas filmed for RotS, but then cut in order to trim the movie down to his desired length. At least three of these scenes were political in nature. One involved Padme presenting a petition, signed by 2,000 senators (the petition of 2,000) to palpatine, urging him not to abolish the republic in favour of an empire. Another involved a meeting between Padme, Bail Organa, and Mon Mothma in which they decide to start the rebellion. George Lucas claims that he removed these scenes from the movie in order to quicken the pace of the movie. I ssugest that he removed these scenes form the movie for reasons that were politically motivated. I refer to the following passage from Charles Demers' article:

quote:
Like his old colleague, Lucas is unable to escape the realities of his class, no matter his moral opposition to the broad brushstrokes of its current programme.

When Lucas released Star Wars in 1977, he was a struggling filmmaker fighting to remain independent of corporate Hollywood. As such, he supported many of the values epoused by the Rebellion, the good guys who fought the evil empire. However, Lucas has long since become a key part of corporate Hollywood. Thus Lucas no longer identifies with the values of the Republic, and instead identifies with the values of the Empire. As such, Lucas removed from the final version of RotS those political scenes which stood in opposition to the Empire and everything it stands for.

As such, I argue that RotS is not in fact an antiwar film, but rather a pro war film that extolls the virtues of the Empire to the exclusion of alternate viewpoints.

[ 09 June 2005: Message edited by: Left Turn ]


From: Burnaby, BC | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged
Anchoress
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Babbler # 4650

posted 12 June 2005 06:20 AM      Profile for Anchoress     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
George Lucas admits he's no great writer

quote:
"Congratulations George, the first step is admitting it."
"Is that also the last step?"

From: Vancouver babblers' meetup July 9 @ Cafe Deux Soleil! | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged

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